Stories tagged with lytro

Total: 25, showing: 1 – 25
500px now supporting Lytro 'Living Pictures', offering users $250 rebate on Illum

Photo sharing site 500px has announced that it is now supporting images uploaded in Lytro's unique 'Living Pictures' format, and is offering its customers a $250 discount on the purchase of Lytro's Illum camera (MSRP $1599). The Illum is available now for pre-order and is expected to start shipping within the next couple of weeks. Click through for more information.

Lytro Launches Web Viewer; 500px to Host Living Pictures Gallery

As Lytro prepares for the launch of its second generation light field camera, the Lytro Illum, the company faces a challenge: how does one easily display and share the 'living pictures' their cameras produce? Today the company announced plans to open-source its Living Picture Player - a viewer for its light field images. The WebGL-based player can be integrated into any website or social media platform, thereby allowing for easy sharing of Lytro's living pictures. 500px will be the first to host an image gallery based on this player.

Lytro Illum in the hands of five leading photographers

In conjunction with the announcement of what Lytro is calling its 'professional-grade light field camera', the Illum, the company put its new product in the hands of five leading photographers. Lytro has released a promotional video that takes us behind the scenes as five 'creative pioneers' discover what they can do with this innovative new technology. See the video

Light field cameras: Focusing on the future

Lytro’s new Illum camera packs in a few tricks that will appeal to some still photographers, but its aim is really to introduce a new type of imagery. Time will tell if that medium succeeds. Technology writer Liam McCabe spoke with a few players in the light field camera industry to get a sense of where this technology is headed in the next few years and beyond. Learn more

Light Field Cameras - Focusing on the Future
There's a bright future for light field imaging. Even if early cameras like the Lytro Illum don't have a clear purpose, they're helping bring the possibilities into focus. Photographer Liam McCabe breaks down the technology and talks with leaders in light field technology.
Lytro announces Illum light field camera

Lytro has unveiled the Illum light field camera, its first new hardware since the original Lytro launched more than two years ago. Like its predecessor, the Illum captures information about the angle from which light has arrived, allowing it to calculate images with different perspective and focus. The biggest change is the use of a much larger sensor: now a 1" type, rather than 1/3" type usually found in smartphones. Learn more

Q&A with Lytro's CEO and founder on the Illum

Before the launch of Lytro's new Illum camera, we spoke with Lytro CEO Jason Rosenthal and Founder and Executive Chairman Ren Ng about the the new product, to find out what's been added and improved over the original Light Field Camera. Learn more

Google Camera app now on Kitkat and adds Lytro-like effect

So far Google's in-house camera app has only been available on Nexus devices but now a new version of the app is available to anyone in the Google Play Store. The app only works on devices running Android Kitkat 4.4 but Google is planning to make it work on older versions too. It comes with a minimalist design and a brand new feature called Lens Blur to simulate shallow depth-of-field. Learn more

Lytro adds 3D viewing capability to its photos

Lytro, the tiny camera that allows you to choose your focus point after your image has been shot, has announced a software update to its desktop and iOS app that allows photos taken with the device to be displayed in 3D. The update lets users show off Perspective Shift processed images in 3D when connected to a 3D-capable TV over HDMI or Apple AirPlay.

Lytro CEO admits layoffs, promises 'breakthrough' products in 2014

Lytro CEO Jason Rosenthal has acknowledged that the company made a 'small number' of layoffs earlier this year and that there are some 'kinks' to be worked out with its unique 'light field' camera. Meanwhile, according to an article by tech blog SFGate, industry sources report that the Lytro camera 'isn't selling well so far', due to its price and lack of appeal to professional photographers. Rosenthal is, however, bullish on the future of the company, promising 'multiple [...] breakthrough products' in 2014. More details are available after the link.

KaleidoCamera teaches your DSLR new light field tricks

A prototype for a new DSLR add-on is poised to bring plenoptic capabilities to consumer cameras. The KaleidoCamera is designed to sit between a standard DSLR's sensor and lens. A diffuser splits light passing through the lens into nine different beams, each passing through a filter before it reaches the camera's sensor. Click through to read on about this prototype's capabilities and potential applications.

Lytro unlocks Wi-Fi with firmware update, introduces iOS app

Lytro has released a firmware update that enables the Wi-Fi chips inside its 8GB and 16GB light field cameras. The San Fransisco-based company has also announced a new iOS companion app called Lytro Mobile, which allows you to browse images from the camera on an iOS smartphone or iPod Touch. Replicating some of the functionality of Lytro's existing desktop app, the mobile app allows you to refocus and change the perspective of your images and share the 'living pictures' via social media. Click through for more details. 

Nokia investment hints at Lytro-style technology in smartphones

The Finnish smartphone manufacturer Nokia has made a $20 million investment in Pelican Imaging - known for its consumer imaging technology that features a grid of lenses to allow for post-capture focusing. This has spurred rumors about the technology possibly being applied in upcoming Nokia smartphone models. In theory, this could add similar functionality to that offered by Lytro in its innovative light field cameras. Click through to connect.dpreview.com for more details.

Smartphone app offers Lytro-like focusing

A recently released app in the Apple App Store promises the focus-shifting experience of a Lytro camera for a much smaller price tag. FocusTwist takes a series of images with different focal planes and allows users  to choose a focus point after they have taken the photo. We take the app for a quick spin and offer our take at connect.dpreview.com.

Toshiba shows-off Lytro-style Light Field module for mobiles

Toshiba Semiconductors has been demonstrating a sensor module for mobile phones that allows Lytro-style refocusable images. The company promises 2MP images from an 8MP sensor and is already working on a version with higher-resolution output. However, there's reason to believe such cameras would be even more prone to the drawbacks we identified in Lytro's camera. Click through to find out more.

Lytro adds 'perspective shift' and 'living filters' to light field captures

Lytro has announced two extra features for users of its Light Field Cameras - perspective shift and living filters. Perspective shift allows the viewer to re-render the light field as if captured from a slightly different position - moving this viewing position around shows off the depth information captured by the camera. Meanwhile the 'living filters' are depth-aware versions of the processing filter modes that have become near-ubiquitous in cameras in recent years. And, because the Light Field Cameras download all the light field data to your computer, these effects will be available with all existing captures.

Lytro provides more exposure control and additional colors

Lytro has announced an update that provides greater exposure control for its Light Field Camera. It will also be offering the 8GB version of the camera in two addition colors - Moxie Pink and Seaglass that will be availble from Target.com/CityTarget stores and the Lytro website respectively. The update, that will be available to all existing customers, adds a manual mode, that provides control over shutter speed and ISO (aperture always being wide open). If you decide to specify both parameters, it becomes possible to apply exposure compensation and apply the camera's built-in ND filter.

Lytro Light Field Camera now works with Windows

Lytro, the maker of the Lytro Lightfield Camera, has today announced that its 'Lytro Desktop Application' - the software that allows you to 'refocus' light-field images after they have been taken, is now available for Microsoft Windows. You'll need to run the 64bit version of Windows Home, Professional or Ultimate on a computer with an Intel Core 2 Duo or better processor and at least 2GB RAM. At the same time the company announced two new accessories - a USB wall charger and a tripod mount, which are available for around $20 each.

Lytro's Ren Ng steps down as CEO to 'focus on product vision'

Lytro's founder Ren Ng has stepped down as CEO to focus on 'product vision, technology, and strategic direction for the company' in his new role as Executive Chairmen. The innovative California-based company was formed by Ng in 2006, and earlier this year released its first product, the Lytro light field camera. In a blog post on the company's website, Ng makes it clear that he will remain on staff as a full-time employee, '100% focussed on Lytro'. In the meantime, an interim CEO - former Executive Chairman Charles Chi - has been appointed ahead of a full-time replacement for Ng. 

Just Posted: Lytro Light Field Camera review and video

Lytro has shipped its first Light Field Camera to a customer and we've had a chance to spend some time with one, to see what their experience is likely to be like. It's a totally unconventional camera that captures images that can be refocused after they're shot, so we haven't shot our usual, 2D test charts but we've tried to sum-up its technology and what it's like to shoot with. Click here to find out what we thought.

Lytro meeting suggests Apple looking beyond conventional photography

Steve Jobs met Lytro founder Ren Ng to discuss the photographic aspects of Apple products, according to a new book about the company. Details are understandably sparse but, according to Adam Lashinsky's book 'Inside Apple,' Jobs asked Ng to prepare a list of three things he'd like Lytro to do with Apple. If nothing else, the story is interesting as it suggests Jobs was as excited by the Lytro and its effect on photography as the rest of the tech community has been. It also suggests Apple's approach to mobile photography might overlap with Lytro's aim of creating something fun, shareable and engaging, rather than attempting to replace conventional photography. Such an approach would certainly be in keeping with Apple's 'disruptive' approach to technology. (from 9-to-5Mac) [Updated with response from Lytro]

Lytro shooting event shows off possible extra features

CES 2012: Light field camera maker Lytro has been demonstrating early versions of potential features during a shooting event at CES. The event gave journalists the chance to use the cameras and try the 'Advanced Light Field Mode' that the company is experimenting with. We went along and have written this report about what it's like to use a Light Field camera.

Lytro Light Field Camera first look with Ren Ng
Lytro founder and CEO Dr. Ren Ng talks us through the company's Light Field Camera
Lytro's Ren Ng sheds some light on the company's ambitions

Lytro's announcement that it will be launching a plenoptic 'light field' camera that allows images to be re-focused after they've been taken, was met with equal amounts of interest and skepticism. Interested to find out more, we spoke to the company's founder and CEO, Ren Ng, to hear just what he has planned and how far towards a product the company has got.

Photos you can refocus: Lytro promises camera within a year

Startup company Lytro is claiming to be close to launching a camera that allows any point of focus to be specified after the shot is taken. The concept behind the device, called a light-field, or plenoptic camera has surfaced regularly over the past few years, but now Lytro, founded by Stanford PhD Ren Ng, says it will have a product ready within a year. The concept uses a series of microlenses to split the incoming light rays across multiple sensor pixels, depending on the angle from which it arrived. This additional information about the angle of the arriving light makes it possible to recalculate different focus points after the image has been shot, but at the cost of lower image resolution. The company hasn't, as yet, provided details such as its system's output resolution. (From the New York Times)

Total: 25, showing: 1 – 25