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Sony a6000 Review

May 2014 | By Richard Butler, Jeff Keller
Buy on Amazon.com From $548.00


Review based on production Sony a6000

Sony's NEX-6 was a departure from the company's usual lineup of mirrorless cameras when it was introduced in the Fall of 2012. It slotted in between the various NEX-5 models and the NEX-7, and staked out a middle ground between the two, aiming to offer an accessible camera that offered a strong feature set for photographers. So you got a small camera with an electronic viewfinder and a degree of direct control. To this the NEX-6 offered two things that were yet to appear on any Sony mirrorless camera: an exposure mode dial and an ISO-standard hot shoe.

The new a6000 sits in the same place in Sony's mirrorless lineup and offers a broadly similar feature set, but adds a number of significant new features (while also losing the NEX moniker of its predecessor). The resolution and processor have been bumped up, the most notable feature on the a6000 is its updated Hybrid AF system.

Where the NEX-6 had 99 phase-detect points covering approximately 50% of the sensor, the a6000 has 179, with 92% coverage - by far the most comprehensive of any contemporary camera. This, combined with the new Bionz X processor, allows the camera to shoot continuously at 11 fps with subject tracking, according to Sony. The company also claims that the a6000 has the fastest AF performance on the market, though those statements should always be taken with a grain of salt.

The only major losses are that the a6000 utilizes Sony's lower resolution, SVGA viewfinder, rather than its top-end XGA panel. It also loses the NEX-6's level gauge - which seems like an odd thing to remove, just to help it hit a lower price point. However, those cost-cutting measures seem to have worked: the a6000's list price is $100 lower, at $649, than the NEX-6's was at launch.

Sony a6000 key features

  • 24.3 megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor
  • Bionz X image processor
  • Hybrid AF system with 25 contrast-detect and 179 phase-detect points
  • Built-in flash + Multi-Interface Shoe
  • 11 fps continuous shooting with subject-tracking
  • 3-inch tilting LCD with 921,600 dots
  • OLED electronic viewfinder with 1.44M dots
  • Diffraction correction, area-specific noise reduction, and detail reproduction technology
  • Full HD video recording at 1080/60p and 24p; clean HDMI output
  • Wi-Fi with NFC capability and downloadable apps

The major changes here are related to the sensor. The new 24 megapixel 'Exmor APS HD' CMOS sensor has on-chip phase detection like its predecessor, but it covers a much larger area of the frame. Sony promises better AF tracking, especially when shooting continuously. The a6000 uses Sony's latest image processor - Bionz X - which touts improved detail and smarter noise reduction as improvements.

While the specs of the a6000's movie mode aren't a whole lot different from the NEX-6, users now have access to a zebra pattern (a live exposure warning that can be set to indicate a chosen brightness level), and can output 'clean' video over HDMI. The menus have switched to the new 'Alpha' style found on the a7 and a7R (for better or for worse), and the camera can now be controlled via a Mac or PC over a USB connection. The Wi-Fi feature is about the same as on the NEX-6, offering remote control from a smart device, the ability to transfer images from the camera and options for uploading to the cloud, across Wi-Fi networks. The camera can also download and run Sony's feature-enhancing 'Playmemories Apps' of which there are an increasing number.

Hybrid AF System

If there's one area that makes the a6000 stand out from the crowd, it's the camera's improved AF system. While the 25-point contrast detect part of the system remains the same, the number of phase-detect points has increased from 99 to 179 since the NEX-6. All of those extra phase detect points give you a much wider coverage area: roughly 92% of the frame, compared to around 50%. The benefit? A wider area that lets phase detection autofocus do what it does best: track moving subjects.

Bionz X Processor

The company's latest 'Bionz X' processor is considerably more powerful than the previous generation, allowing what the company says will be more sophisticated processing.

Sony is being a little vague on specifics, but is touting the new processor as offering 'Detail Reproduction Technology' which appears to be a more subtle and sophisticated sharpening system. The company promises less apparent emphasis on edges, giving a more convincing representation of fine detail.

Another function promised by the Bionz X processor is 'Diffraction Reduction', in which the camera's processing attempts to correct for the softness caused by diffraction as you stop a lens' aperture down. This processing is presumably aperture-dependent and sounds similar to an element of Fujifilm's Lens Modulation Optimization system (introduced on the X100S), and, as we predicted when we first saw it here, it's subsequently appeared across several brands, including Olympus.

Finally, Sony says the Bionz X chip offers a more advanced version of its context-sensitive, 'area-specific noise reduction', which attempts to identify whether each area of an image represents smooth tone, textured detail or subject edges, and then apply different amounts of noise reduction accordingly.

Compared to a5000 and NEX-6

While most of the changes on the a6000 are for the better, there are a few things that have gone the other way compared to the NEX-6. For the sake of comparison we've also thrown in the a6000's step-down model, the a5000.

 
a5000
NEX-6
a6000
Resolution
20.1MP
16.1MP
24.3MP
Processor
Bionz X
Bionz
Bionz X
AF system (contrast/phase)
25 / 0 point
25 / 99 point
25 / 179 point
ISO range
100-16000
100-25600
100-25600
LCD design (tilt up/down)
Tilting (180° up)
Tilting (90°/45°)
Tilting (90°/45°)
EVF type / resolution
None
OLED / 2.36M dot
OLED / 1.44M dot
EVF magnification (equiv.)
N/A
0.73x
0.70x
On-screen level gauge
No
Yes
No
Max burst rate
4 fps
10 fps
11 fps
Video resolution
1080/60i/24p
1080/60p/24p
1080/60p/24p
Zebra pattern
Yes
No
Yes
Clean HDMI output
No
No
Yes
PC remote
No
No
Yes
Battery life (CIPA)
420 shots
360 shots
360 shots

In most respects, the Alpha 6000 is a big step up from the NEX-6 - the slightly smaller, lower resolution viewfinder is the only major step down in the specification.

As you'd expect, the a6000 is considerably more capable than the lower-cost a5000, unless you want a 180 degree flip-up screen. The trade-off for that feature is the lack of an EVF.

Kit options and pricing

The a6000 is available in silver or black, at a price of $649/£589/€649 for the body and $799/£719/€799 for a kit including the 16-50mm F3.5-5.6 power zoom lens.

The a6000 is available in silver or black

Accessories of note include an 'active sling bag', screen protector, and body case. Some users may also be interested in the BC-VW1 external charger, as Sony only includes a USB charger in the box.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2014 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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312
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Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 789
1234
kapeed1

I love this camera sensor and PDAF. However I know Sony would focus on larger FE lenses than smaller ones optimized for APS-C. One thing I am longing for is the Sigma 18-35 mm f1.8 lens which neither Sigma will port to E-mount, nor Sony will deliver (though they could make it just like Sigma but smaller since flange distance is smaller for mirrorless). No E-mount lens roadmap is preventing me from buying this camera (along with absence of fast standard zooms - f1.8 fast). Instead I am considering Pentax with Sigma 18-35 f1.8 that is soon to have a Pentax port (then that lens will benefit from in body image stabilization as well ).

1 upvote
DPJoe2

Which Pentax is that?

1 upvote
kapeed1

Pentax K-50. I know - sensor is not as good as this, but I want the 18-35 f1.8 lens (that does not have stabilization on it's own) on a stabilized body, so will have to settle for Pentax K-50. Still thinking about it though... thing is Sigma is really innovating in the lens space and has good value for money but they don't really have much of support for the E-mount.

2 upvotes
rYcio

This morning, Sony shop in Lodz (Manufaktura) Poland. I wanted to check handling of this camera but salesman didn't want to disconnect it from alarm system. SONY is it OK?!

2 upvotes
jeremyclarke

This might strike some people as a dumb complaint but IMHO it's very real. I tried the NEX 6 several times in the Sony store while it was attached to the alarm system, and when I finally brought one home I found the handling surprisingly different in ways that would have been valuable to know beforehand.

The alarm system also blocked the SD card port which was a bigger problem for me, since it stopped me from actually taking some pictures to look at later in Aperture, which would have alerted me to the fact that the RAW files have terrible vignetting with the kit lens at 16mm unless you use Lightroom which automatically "corrects" the image.

1 upvote
nicholasC

Just got this camera yesterday and just love it..IQ is fantastic and why people hates the EVF? Its just perfect!

4 upvotes
Sjhizny

Because people don't understand the difference in optics versus resolution and refresh rate

1 upvote
nicholasC

Just doubting people who always talk about this is not how dslr should be, they should have the conventional viewfinder ,conventional mounting capabilities,conventional controls..Its all about innovation..How are we going to move forward without these new innovations..Thats the reason Sony are moving forward now and cant believe there are still people looking backwards, not willing to step up..

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Random Photographer

Because they think MOAR resolution = MOAR better, disregarding any other factor. And yes, they are as annoying as the spelling.

3 upvotes
Andrew Wiggin

I don't recall seeing so much innovation by one company through so little time. They keep churning unexpected goodies at inexhaustible rate, and not even solely professionals oriented.
Makes me really curious about what they come up with next...

10 upvotes
Mike Brooks

Sorry to ask what may be a dumb question, but the reference to IQ ... is it image quality or something else? If the answer is yes that I assume that this is a direct result of the better sensor?
I was given an A5000 just last week and am debating taking it back and "upgrading" to the A6000. From the reviews it appears that this model is improved in several respects and I am inclined to do this. Am I right?
(I am new to this category having used both 35mm SLR models (less and less these days) and the Canon S95 for point and shoot for most photos).
Thanks,

0 upvotes
DPJoe2

Yes, image quality. Personally, I would upgrade given your situation.

2 upvotes
jeremyclarke

a5000 should be almost as good, and you would probably be hard-pressed to even spot a difference between photos taken side by side with both cameras.

The main reason you should consider upgrading is if you want/need an EVF, otherwise enjoy your camera, work on your skills (the real difference!) and wait for the next generation.

Invest in lenses for a much more relevant IQ increase.

0 upvotes
DPJoe2

AF is completely different between the two models. There are 0 phase detection sensors on the a5000 versus 179 on the a6000.

1 upvote
jeremyclarke

Fair enough DPJoe2, though again the OP might be hard pressed to actually notice that AF difference in normal usage. If he finds AF a huge problem then it would make sense to upgrade.

All he mentioned was IQ though and in that department there probably isn't much to gain from the upgrade. Both have plenty of MP and the sensor quality that made Sony, Nikon, Apple and Fuji famous ;)

1 upvote
DPJoe2

Agreed!

1 upvote
dual12

Another gadget from Sony. Gadgety controls, no charger, noisy as all get out, and a poor quality lens. Typical Sony. Sony makes great sensors, but they have no idea what to do with them.

0 upvotes
DPJoe2

Yes, all camera makers ship less than optimal kit lenses, if they include one at all. This one is available without a lens. I agree with you, Sony makes great sensors. No ifs, ands, or buts, this is one of them, in my direct comparison of it to the one in my D800 shot for shot. Odd, mine included a charger. I suggest you return yours, and demand a fresh package. And I love the WHYSIWYG aspects of the EVF. Imagine, seeing what you get before you press the shutter button, and after in the EVF in any light. Unlike my D800 where you can't see squat on the screen even in mild daylight. And I'm delighted Sony included that gadgety 11fps feature found in the likes of the D4S and 1Dx, but not on my D800. I partially agree with you about the controls: Some of the time I hate it, that few lenses have aperture rings on them anymore. You know, like the Schneider f 5.6, 210mm for my Lenhof 4x5, or the 105mm f2.4 for my Pentax 6x7. So thanks dual12 for reminding me of all the things I love.

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
7 upvotes
Sjhizny

Do you actually own this camera? Or is your comment based solely on this review? What does gadgety mean to you? Lack of direct dials? Not like some camera you used before and expect this to be like?

1 upvote
dual12

LOL...why would I own it? It's a gadget, not a camera.

0 upvotes
jeremyclarke

@DPJoe2: To their credit Fuji has a good kit lens, leaps and bounds better than the one that comes with NEX cameras, though also bigger/heavier and of course the Fuji cameras can't compete with Sony in many other aspects (AF and other "gadgety" features, which are extremely important!).

Of course dual12 is a troll so there you go.

3 upvotes
dual12

No troll, but I know a gadget when I see one. The first digital camera I bought was a Sony 707 that dppreview praised. Huge mistake. Piece of junk. Sony hasn't changed much since.

0 upvotes
DPJoe2

@Jeremy, thanks for pointing that out. And actually, I wanted the change my 'Yes, all' to 'Yes, many', but I was timed out and couldn't.

@dual12, I understand your position given your past experience. I have a similar position regarding my Mazda RX3, of 1973. It was Motor Trend's Car of the Year. It was crap. I called it Hiroshima's revenge. And I will never own another Mazda under ANY circumstances. Period. Full stop. And I will never read another word printed by Motor Trend. Ah..., that felt good. dual12, I won't try to change your opinion of the a6000, and if you were right, I would agree with you.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Chanex

Take it from someone who actual owns the camera (like me for example) - It's a great camera, albeit not with the kit lens.

0 upvotes
vadims

> No troll, but I know a gadget when I see one.

Well... I know a troll when I see one.

2 upvotes
Jeff Chastain

I own the camera, not the gadget. It produces great images, even with the kit lens. Just stop down a bit and it sharpens up great. Or you can spring for a sharper lens. In any case, it is a nice camera, the images of which, compete head to head with my Nikon D800.

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
1 upvote
gLOWx

@Sergey Borachev : Nice point.
A lot of ppl forget lens/body balance...and grip.
M43 is the best real alternative to DSLR (to me), until SONY stop making "high end point and shoot" and put some REAL controls and grip...and so create a bulky camera again :D
There is a conflict using a BIG APS-C sensor (i don't even speak about their A7 FF sensor) and trying to make a SMALL camera. It is not related to SONY only. You gain mirror, yes. But it is not enough to reduce bulk...because there is a lens. Same size on any APS-C sensor, DSLR or not.
This conflict create compromises on controls, grip, weight balance and more.
Even if they create a postcard sized FF camera...where do you put your lens ?
No point.
Olympus/Panasonic gone the smaller sensor way, to keep ALL things smaller, and so more balanced.
Sensors becoming better, i already see professionals using M43 instead of DSLR.
Not the best IQ ? May be...but enough to do the job with enough controls ;)

0 upvotes
whoiscathy

I've been shooting Nikon DSLRs until now and have a nice prime lens collection from 20/1.8 to 200/4, all Nikkor, except the 20m which is Sigma. You are SO right with the APS-C size sensor and the lenses it actually requires to bring out the max it can deliver... I got the Sony kit because I'm heading to Iceland by bike so I needed a quality camera with good image AND video quality but at the same time something more portable than my full Nikon system.

And then here I am, happy but a little bit in doubt -- I realized in the first 20 minutes that I hated the kit lens (probably no surprise, after my primes...). So I got the Sigma 19/2.8 with the E-mount (which is already much bulkier than the kit lens!) and that lens is pretty much stuck on the A6000 now, plus I got myself a Nikon AI-S --> Sony E adapter so that I can use the 35/1.4, 50/1.2, 80/1.8 and so on, without having to buy the same lenses now with Sony E-mount. Most of my lenses are manual anyway so it's OK. Cont'd--->

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
whoiscathy

-->

I'll probably leave to Iceland with the Sigma 19/2.8, the Nikon 35 and 85mm lenses, probably also the 200/4, and the adapter. However, the whole setup has become very lens-heavy, no matter which Nikon lens I stick on it. BUT I'm getting amazing, amazing IQ. But that's because I have some serious fast glass. Impressive, the Nikon 35/1.4 AI-S and the A6000 combo.

No regrets, but I think I should have considered the Fuji/Oly/Pana line as well, for real portability.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
DPJoe2

Cathy, I'm jealous, I only get to go to the beach. May I suggest you check out the Metabones adaptor. It's almost magic, your FF lenses will still be their usual focal length no crop factor, Sharpness will increase, and you will gain 1 stop. It was designed by world's best lens designer. LensRentals has a complete write up about it. APS-C sensor, with FF coverage.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 35 seconds after posting
1 upvote
whoiscathy

Very interesting. I try not to use adapters with a glass element, but now I've read up on this thing. I would totally try this if I were in the US (to rent or something, before actually spending $429 for the Nikon version) but I'm not in the US. The price is a bit steep, especially with the - guaranteed - import taxes. Pity :(

But now I don't mind that I kept those primes. When I bought the A6000 kit, and especially before, I thought I'd sell everything and restart. But it would be emotionally hard to part with the 35/1.4 and 50/1.2 so I waited out. I haven't sold anything yet.

1 upvote
whoiscathy

Oh *****. After many, many hours of reading up and watching sample videos, and trying my 20mm Sigma on my old F4 again... I'm afraid I must get my hands on that adapter.

1 upvote
Sergey Borachev

Same problem as the NEX-6, no difference, even though this camera is better featured in many ways. It is really good if you do not need other lenses or if you are happy with ordinary IQ from the kit lens. Once you start getting more than 1 lens for it, and only the expensive Zeiss etc are really good, then many equations change. The value of the system is then questionable when compared to Fuji or M43 cameras. The handling becomes an issue too as those quality lenses available for it, besides far and few between compared to other brands, are big and heavy for the small camera. A Fuji system would be more balanced as the lens and body size and weight are better chosen. So is a M43 system, which would be smaller, better balanced but has a slightly smaller sensor. Sony might as well make this a fixed lens camera and drop the price another $100, as it is mainly good or worth buying for use with only its kit zoom lens. Or, make bigger and higher-end bodies with more controls

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
jeremyclarke

Have to agree. The kit lens on NEX 6 was awful (especially if you don't use Lightroom, in which case the uncorrected vignetting at 16mm is an embarrassment to the Sony name) so if you want to use either of these cameras to their full potential (which is enormous) you need to immediately buy some new glass and oh look, the choices are expensive and not particularly wonderful or diverse. Really affects their starting value compared to a Fuji with its fast, high-quality kit lens even though the starting price is higher. I mean, even if you get other Fuji lenses later, the kit remains a fabulous 18mm f/2.8 that is hard to beat without spending thousands.

If you just want a sharp, fast camera with all the features you can think of and don't care about/can wait for true image quality then these Sony's are a fabulous deal, especially with the reduced pricing on the a6000.

Comparing to MFT is a bit less fruitful since the sensors have such different properties. Good luck replicating bokeh ;)

0 upvotes
Digital Imaging Technician

I would buy this if I could get a 35mm equivalent lens with AF that isn't the size of Alaska (read: SEL24F18Z). It's a clue to me that they still don't have such a lens in their lineup.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
gLOWx

I never bought a SONY for several reasons.
But the main one is : CONTROLS !

SONY mirrorless cameras create amazing IQ...but crappy shooting experience.
Thats' why i bought an XZ-2 instead of an RX-100 v1.
RX-100 IQ was better, but it was not enough to me to justify choice.

I'm not going to buy any SONY camera until they understand how to improve SHOOTING experience.

Because IQ and features are one thing.
A pleasing camera to use without sub menu crawling is another.

3 upvotes
Raist3d

You should check this amera then because that's one of the big improvements Sony did- shooting experience.

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
gLOWx

So i will try thanks ;)
Even if on product photos, i don't see anything ground breaking :D

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Raist3d

Product photos don't tell the story. There's a sea of difference between previous Nex shooting experience and this one. I never cared for the Nex.

1 upvote
Kodachrome200

"Specifying an autofocus point can be cumbersome"

This drives me crazy why are small cameras like this. There are only 3 primary controls on a camera why cant camera designers act like they are the ones that matter. a thousand buttons on camera and it takes multiple button pushes to access something like focus.

ruins a perfectly good camera

3 upvotes
jeremyclarke

It's mesmerizingly wrong that Sony still hasn't added touchscreens to their EVF cameras. They immediately solve so many focus point issues, and Sony even uses them on the lower-end NEX-range cameras.

1 upvote
Kodachrome200

a d pad would be fine too. but i need to be able to work this on the fly

0 upvotes
jeremyclarke

FWIW Fuji fails pretty badly at this too. Any attempts to mix AF point selection with focus-zoom, back-button AF or any button other than shutter result in senseless need to "exit" af point selection before proceeding. You also can't move the focus point while zoomed in for focus-check which is maddening.

Still like the focus-zoom better than DMF on the NEX 6 though, not sure if they improved that system in the a6000 but it was just barely function on NEX 6.

0 upvotes
Kodachrome200

and people wonder why i wont leave my dslr

0 upvotes
DPJoe2

Well, I hadn't been wondering, but now I am, because I am considering leaving my DSLR. Please provide us a detailed answer. Thanks. I have Panasonic G3, that produces great results with the Leica 25mm, but which I don't like using, and now the a6000 which I do.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
1 upvote
DPJoe2

One way to deal with this is to assign the selection function to the center button. This gives you instant access and your thumb is already on the four-way.

1 upvote
Kakariki

Hi, I am split between the a6000 and the fuji x-t1. The IQ of the a6000 seems to be a bit better with a decent lens but the weather-sealed body of the x-t1 is quite tempting. I want to take my camera on longer hiking trips in any weather conditions - below freezing, in heavy rain and sweet sunshine. I would be certainly careful with using any camera in bad weather conditions but even when you are careful you can't keep your gear 100% dry when your hands are wet or heavy fog precipitates (i try to avoid falling into rivers these days).
Has anybody got some experience with the performance and durability of the a6000 in somewhat rougher conditions?
Any comments much appreciated, thanks!

0 upvotes
DtEW

Can't speak to the A6000 (too new, and my usage of this system is different these days*), but I used to use the NEX-5N (an A6000 predecessor) as my primary camera in all conditions except pouring rain (what's to shoot in pouring rain?). This included a canyoneering trip down Tenaya Canyon (dry-bagged the camera when we had to rap into water), lots of shooting in snow/snowing/windblown snow conditions in Tahoe, and lots more urbex (dust, animal fecal matter, industrial waste). The camera survived unscathed, although I was as careful as was reasonable (i.e. wiping down the camera, not rinsing it off).

* - My E-mount system usage has been shifted to casual/social/tourism photography after I invested in a full-frame Canon system. The Canon system is weather-sealed, and it is the primary camera system I use for more adventurous/challenging activities... and those are the photos I might only ever shoot once, so hence maximal IQ.

(continued)

0 upvotes
DtEW

(continued)

Nevertheless, the care with which I use the Canon system remains the same, as "weather-sealed" is not weather-proofing, and there are lots of testimonials of people destroying their "weather-sealed" cameras with seemingly normal "weather". Therefore I regard "weather-sealing" as not something that expands the performance envelope, but rather just a better insurance policy.

Remember, you don't hear about a lot of the cases in which people who dunk their "weather-sealed" camera in a stream to clean it, only to find that it doesn't work right anymore. The nature of testimonials is that people will more likely post about their enviable successes, and not so much their over-ambitous failures.

I think this approach might benefit your consideration: weather sealing is desireable as an added insurance policy. But it is not the be-all, end-all. Neither is the lack of it.

0 upvotes
Kakariki

thanks for your thorough comments, DtEW! the "added insurance policy" resonates with me (and your view on product testimonials in general).
i would probably consider FF myself if i were not looking for a reasonable light and smallish system with a few more photographic options and better IQ than a P&S (my pack is usually already full and heavy without the camera gear :-)
I owned a 1000D for the last 6 years and it survived most of the abuse. if not much lighter i would like something a bit smaller.

0 upvotes
aegis1947

Love my a 6000, but wouldn't take a chance under the conditions you speak of. I never plan on falling in a stream, but I did once.

0 upvotes
Fly Highwire

Today is a Boxing Day in Sydney and many shops offer their special prices including camera shops. I saw an offer of SONY A 6000 from a shop for a price of AUD 850.00 which includes 2 lenses (16-50 mm & 55-210 mm) plus 1 Sandisk Extreme PLUS SD card 32 Gb 80 MBps). Is the price a good deal ? Current exange rate : 1 AUD is approx. USD 0.83.

0 upvotes
BPD7

I just purchased this with some special promotions on Amazon. I really wanted the Fujifilm XT-1 but I know this camera is really amazing too. Such a hard decision. Should I cancel my a6000 and get the XT-1?

1 upvote
Richard Schumer

It depends on what, if any, lenses you might want to add now or later; now, there seem to be more lenses available for the Fuji mount than Sony's. This, however, may change in the future.

If the kit zoom will fit your needs, you're golden. Have fun with your new camera!

0 upvotes
DPJoe2

Stick with your decision. Get the camera, put it through its paces, see how its features meet your needs. Then, if your dissatisfied, send it back. You have 30 days to give it a hands on, rather than looking a specs.

2 upvotes
BPD7

Thanks guys. I got the kit lens, the 50mm and the 55-210 zoom because of all the promotions, total $1056. My only concern is lack of macro capability with these lens. Yarnim I was thinking the same thing, use this for a bit and see how the results work for me. I was hoping to get the X-T1 but this sale came around and it was too tempting!

Thanks again!

0 upvotes
Bueche

No you should not cancel your a6000, because it's a superior camera when it comes to iq (compared to the x-t1).

1 upvote
dual12

If you like noisy images at higher isos, get the Sony. It's horrible.

0 upvotes
BPD7

I canceled the a6000 purchased. In the end I didn't like Sony's lineup of lenses. I like the Fuji's. I wanted a solid camera with good controls, which the X-T1 has. I have the x100s now and I love it. Thanks everyone.

0 upvotes
Bueche

If you like smeared details, horrible rendering of fine foliage/greenery, unrealistic colors and surreal looking images, WAY to dark shadows, cooked raw files, pretty bad DR, get the x-t1.

1 upvote
dual12

If you like gadgets, get the Sony. It's a gadget, not a camera.

0 upvotes
kellydunwoody

I got the a6000 and like it. I'm not a professional; I usually take pictures of my kid and its focus speed on moving subjects and fast burst speed are impressive. I had to buy three cameras and return 2 because truly there's no way to really test without getting your hands on them. I don't know if I can plug a store but my local "best butt" store was great and offered returns w/in 15 days w/no restocking fee. At the time the price was comparable to amazon but no amazing sale.

0 upvotes
DPJoe2

@dual12, Since you admit you never owned this camera, your opinion is meaningless.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
MikeReidDesign

Oh yes this is a great Camera for that price and with all the features that it offers. I see Cameras with less quality costing more.

2 upvotes
Yarnim

Somewhat late to the party I guess, but guys, a question from a relative newbie.

Just ordered A6000 so waiting for it in the mail, but would it make sense at all to get this and the B&H Zeiss 12&32 lens combo?

One of the strongest aspects of the A6000 is its amazing focus speed, but apparently, neither of those lenses even offer PDAF and their focus mechanism kinda sux with a huge, unpleasant focusing motor noise and slow focusing.

I do get that their optics are pretty good, but not much ahead compared to Sony's SEL1018 for the 12mm zeiss, and the 32mm not very much compared to sigma 30mm.

Any thoughts, advises? TIA!

0 upvotes
40daystogo

I only have the SEL1018, so I can't compare. But you can check out test results at www.photozone.de and www.dxomark.com/Lenses/Compare.

http://www.photozone.de/sony_nex/829-sony1018f4oss

You can consider how much the lens stabilisation of the 10-18 helps compensate for its supposed lesser image quality.

The tests from several websites indicate that 5.6 is the optimum aperture, and I use Aperture-Priority to shoot at that aperture. I'm very pleased with the sharpness.

0 upvotes
Thomasthetank

I opted for the sel3518 instead, and i am not disappointed.
performs fantastically... OSS, nice bokeh, uses PDAF.
Win win win.

1 upvote
nofumble

Does lens have anything to do with PDAF?

0 upvotes
Yarnim

Yes nofumble, it does.

0 upvotes
Thomasthetank

Some lenses only support contrast detection... I believe this Zeiss lenses fall into this category.

0 upvotes
FodgeandDurn

Dear Sony

Release a camera like this with better build quality (at least up to the previous standard of the NEX-6 and 7), better (larger) EVF, and a touch-screen, and a level gauge (which I cannot live happily without, sorry) and I'll turn in my NEX-6 and give you $800-1000.

I don't want an A7 (which I know you'd love me to upgrade to - part of the reason the A6000 is now pitching lower in the market) because my 6 APS-C lenses can't make the jump, but I don't want an A6000 because it has a few compromises too many and I'm not here to count pennies.

3 upvotes
DVT80111

Very good camera specs at very good price. I just ordered the Zeiss 2 lens combo for my Fuji X-E1, and at a moment I am thinking to dump the Fuji system and go for A6000.

Just only one thing that hold me back.. the EVF. Sony..why?

1 upvote
Fish Tank

Haven't checked to se if the a6000 has all the same EVF features as my a77, but after using EVF, I can't imagine going back to OVF. With EVF you get what you see, so NO exposure or colour temp surprises, unless you are in a studio scenario - but the preview mode can be turned off in options. I love being able to colour/temp-pick on the fly with the joystick while adjusting exposure and see exactly how the shot will turn out. Coupled with having a digital level, ALL your readings/settings on screen as-needed, and SONY's brilliant focus peaking (always impresses other photographers), it's a perfect choice.

0 upvotes
RichRMA

Certainly do better body-wise for $800.00. Olympus E-M10 is a much better built camera. Handle both, you'll see. Plastic bodies should be relegated to cameras in the sub-$600 range.

2 upvotes
DPJoe2

The a6000 is $599. And it has a much larger sensor.

19 upvotes
RichRMA

Amazon ads are geared to the geographic location of the poster. Prices shown on their ads for Canada range from $799 to over $900.

0 upvotes
Rob Sims

Handled both in the shop, and I felt the A6000 handled much better due to the larger grip, and rangefinder positioning of the EVF. The fact that RAW image quality is better, and that the Sony is cheaper than the Olympus is also pretty compelling.

IMHO 'feel' is just user preference, and should never be stated as fact. (eg. I don't have little hands, so will never be able to get along with the E-M5/E-M10).

8 upvotes
ACosmosis

Lens used in the review is $1000, it's not the cheap kit lens, do the math.

0 upvotes
kellydunwoody

bought both a6000 and e-m10 and returned e-m10 because control dial quit working and would only do manual mode in less than 15 days. Could be a fluke. I also thought build quality "felt" better on the oly vs. the sony until that happened.

0 upvotes
cashewNut

Thinking of buying this camera paired with the Tamron 18-200 mm E-mount lens mainly for travel. I don't make a living out of photography but mainly for recreational/hobby. Is this combination any good? Sony also has their own 18-200 mm E-mount, is the Tamron equal if not superior to it? Kindly shoot me with pro or con feedback. Thanks, eh.

1 upvote
Mike FL

Just a thought for using most of 3nd party lens in hi-speed/lowlight shooting, Sony has no "Built in Image stabilization", so does Tamron 18-200mm.

FWIW: In comparison, Oly OMD EM1 has "Built in Image stabilization" which can give you 5 stops advantage in hi-speed/lowlight shooting. Of course, m4/3 sensor may have 2 stops dis-advantage, but still...

BTW:
Most of Pany (not GM1), Oly, Pentax has "Built in Image stabilization".

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Mike FL

For less confusing, "hi-speed/lowlight shooting" should be read as"slower shutter speed"...

0 upvotes
cashewNut

mike FL, the Tamron 18-200 mm lens has the vibration compensation (VC) image stabilization type. But cheaper than the Sony lens. Thanks.

1 upvote
Mike FL

cashewNut.

That's good.

0 upvotes
DVT80111

with single lens, you are better off with the RX10

0 upvotes
Mike FL

RX10 is truly unique with no competition as a bridge camera. also it is "weather-sealed". The F2.8 lens is 1.5 stop fast in wide angle, and 2 stop fast in tele comparing to other F3.5-5.6 zoom lens.

RX10 is kind of expensive, but this is one camera for all conditions.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
MeaningOfLife

The 18-200 is fairly big. If it is for travel, do consider if size will be an issue.

0 upvotes
jellyhat

I just bought one and it's pretty impressive so far. I had the 5N previously and that too is a great camera but the EVF alone makes it worth buying...

2 upvotes
ACosmosis

The A6000 photos have been taken with a $1000 Zeiss lens. So keep that in mind when you compare the results, $1600 total equipment value, not $800 (with the 18-55mm kit lens)
Don't be naive and think with for $800 you will get the same sharpness and ultimately so sharp ISO800 as with the $1000 lens.

1 upvote
Bobby006

I really don't understand the reason why they didn't use the kit lenses. It would be more useful to compare with other cameras. And it is the option most of the buyer of this camera would have. Not many people would pay $1000 for lens used in these photos.

5 upvotes
ACosmosis

I am not sure if anybody noticed what lens was used in the test since the photos of the camera are showing the very cheap kit lens and there is not photo of the camera with the high-end prime lens in the review.

0 upvotes
Sjhizny

after reviewing with the studio image comparisons, I'm quite glad i opted for the a6000 over the xt-1. i also greatly prefer the side mounted evf to save some proboscis smushing. :-)

2 upvotes
ACosmosis

You will have to pay $1000 for the lens used in the review, it is not the cheap kit lens, but the Sony FE 55mm F1.8 ZA Carl Zeiss Sonnar T*

1 upvote
tecnoworld

I also much prefer the rangefinder form over the SLR/DSLR one. I think it's the perfect shape for mirrorless cameras, saving space and allowing for nice EVF placement.

3 upvotes
DPJoe2

I can't find the lock out option to prevent the camera from taking a shot when there is no memory card in the camera. Yes, I am brain dead and old. Yesterday I took about 5 shots of my sister-in-law. Then, last night I went to import them into LR. Surprise, no card in the camera. How dumb. Help!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
1 upvote
DtEW

I just utilize the policy that I don't close the battery/card bay hatch unless I have a card in there.

The policy has a dual effect:

1) It indicates at-a-glance that you don't have a card in the camera.

2) If leaving the hatch open bothers you (it does for me), it incentivizes you to transfer your stuff quickly, and return the card to the bay quickly so that you can close the hatch.

This policy also addresses the brain fart of running out somewhere with the camera without a bag (which is presumably where you might keep an extra card). The electronic lock-out you are seeking will do nothing for you (aside from thwarting you early) when you don't have a card somewhere on you, right?

3 upvotes
woz

Interesting question, I looked at the manual and can find no reference to this and no obvious answer as to how you would prevent shooting. It does raise the questions:-
1. What would happen if you put a card with a record lockout on in the slot (and I wonder which cameras have a record lockout card sensor)
2.Why there was no warning that the shot(s) would not be saved as no storage was present. (I assume there was not?)
3. What would happen with a full card?
It will be academic for you now, having done that once you'll probably always have a card in.
Good luck with your new camera..

1 upvote
DPJoe2

Hey Guys, Thanks for your responses. And I think I will adopt your door open policy DtEW. Well woz, continuing to be old, I just for the 1st time looked to see if there was anything in the display about the card. Sure enough, bilking in yellow in the top left it says, and I quote "NO CARD". So how hell did I miss it? Yeah, getting old is not for wimps. So having no good alternatives available, I'll just suck it up, and keep putting one foot in front of the other. Old, but not dead...yet. Getting by with a little help from my friends. Thanks again.

4 upvotes
dibs1st

DPJoe2: Old but not dead... use the line everyday and relate!

0 upvotes
lawamainn

Can`t wait to buy this camera!!!

0 upvotes
Robert Garcia NYC

I think Sony has finally caught up with color looks really good.

3 upvotes
Michael Ma

I wonder how much longer are they gonna keep milking full frame at over $1k.

0 upvotes
Robert Garcia NYC

won't be long rumor has it they are going to announce a really cheap FF.

2 upvotes
JEROME NOLAS

So far the best Sony yet, one day when you can buy a decent lens for decent money, I might consider this product...

7 upvotes
quezra

The Sigma primes are super and dirt cheap. The 35 and 50 f1.8 primes are also good and in the affordable range. What are you after?

1 upvote
jojolapin

Could Sony make an alpha 6000 with big photosites like the announced alpha 7s? 12MP, body and features of alpha 6000, high ISO. That would be my perfect pick.

3 upvotes
cgarrard

Even using the same filterless sensor the K5IIs uses would be a great compromise between the A7s sensor and what it currently uses. 14stops DR in raw and excellent high ISO characteristics, with improved detail rendering at 16mp would make plenty of people happy, I'd think.

3 upvotes
MeaningOfLife

12MP at APSC size isn't attractive. The nex6 is already 16MP and dropping to 12MP won't make that much of a difference.

But if you are talking about full frame size sensor, then 12MP may be attractive... But I still doubt many will buy it if it is over $1k for a 12MP camera.

0 upvotes
DPJoe2

The a6000's metering appears to be superior to the metering of a D800. I went down to the beach and shot cranes sitting on the rail of a long pier waiting for hand outs from fishermen. The cranes' colors were dark brown. Shooting about 25 degrees from the Sun and at about 45 degrees up into a perfectly clear blue sky, focusing was instant, and locked onto the bird with three green boxes down the bird vertically. The exposure was absolutely perfect. That even though the bird was only 10% of the frame against a blastingly bright sky. Sky blown out? No, it too was perfectly exposed, a solid blue. The purpose of this outing was to specifically test the auto exposure and in-camera processing capabilities. The result was all exposures in daylight at the beach were perfect. Could I have gotten this result with my D800? Yes, but of course the D800 would have required a small amount of post processing in LR for the sky after I determined the correct exposure for the birds. Sony wins this round.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
mremonen

Sony NEX'es (or Alphas as they are today) tend to underexpose 2/3 EV. Or that has been my expreience with NEX-5N, NEX-6 and now with Alpha 6000. This can be easily verified from RAW-histogram using e.g. RawDigger.

That may be the reason why the exposure was dead-on in your example.

1 upvote
Mike FL

From what I can see, the a6000 has more noise than most, if not all, of Fuji APS-C cameras, I guess that one of the reason is a6000 has too many megapixels.

IMHO: It is always the problem for most of Sony; too many megapixels.

0 upvotes
BarnET

If you look at pixel level there is more noise. if you look at the same magnification as the other Apsc sensors you will see that it has about the same performance as the best.

This of course excludes the SLT's which bounce 1/3 stop of light away at all times.

Still i think your right about too many pixels. It offers some extra sharpness but for me it's not worth the extra time importing and exporting the files.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
brendon1000

Not really. Its a myth that greater pixels must also mean more noise. The A6000 measures better than the earlier Sony 16 MP NEX6 in noise.

http://www.dxomark.com/Reviews/Sony-A6000-sensor-review-Little-wonder/Sony-A6000-versus-Sony-NEX-6-versus-Sony-NEX-7-Incremental-Improvement

The Fuji's have exceptional noise performance but not everyone likes the Fuji colors.

4 upvotes
BarnET

Fujifilm overates their iso values. There for iso 400 isn't really 400. it's more or less 250 when look at the exposures side by side.

Then they use another colour filter that has a larger pattern. This pattern is less efficient in terms of resolution but does kill of moiré and alliassing.

that means you don't need a olpf which increases resolution again.

Still in the end they perform very very well. It's just not as good as it looks in the first glance.

9 upvotes
simpleshot

Sony has done a good job here.
The image output quality very good for such a compact body.

2 upvotes
WillCyn

I got the a6000 (body only) right when it came out to replace my NEX7 and I must say that I am really happy I did. It is way faster at auto-focusing, which was one of my main gripes with the NEX7 since I use it mostly for candid family pics. I absolutely love how much more customizable it is even though it does not have the Tri-Navi system. Even though the EVF has a lower resolution, I prefer it over the NEX7's for it's brightness, clarity and performance. So far my a6000 does really well with my 24mm/1.8 zeiss, 12mm/2.8 touit and 50mm/1.8 OSS Sony E-mount lenses.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
mosc

I want an A-mount version of the A6000 with a proper grip, preferably in a $999 package with that 16-50 f2.8 lens of theirs. Who's with me? SLT be damned, just rip it out and let the chip do the work.

Comment edited 43 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
Petrogel

Make it 15-75mm f2,8 (remember the Sony R1 with the built in 14,3-71,5 f2,8) and count me in.
P.S Environmental proofing would be nice.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
DtEW

I think with a few tweaks to the tracking algorithm, and an even bigger buffer, such a camera can be a serious contender against the Canon 7D and its upcoming successor.

It could conceivably become the killer app for birders.

4 upvotes
tkbslc

They make a lens adapter for that.

0 upvotes
DtEW

@tkbslc: No. Not in a way that preserves the functionality of the A6000 OSPDAF.

The LA-EA3 will only enable CDAF.

The LA-EA4 adds its own PDAF, but that necessitates a pellicle mirror, which takes away 1/3-stop of light. Even that isn't quite as fast as the A6000's OSPDAF w/native lenses.

In addition, when you talk about A-mount, it is the norm to have IBIS, as the vast majority of A-mount lenses do not have OSS. Adapting the A6000 to use with A-mount lenses would leave you with a setup that features no image stabilization for just about all lenses.

This is why adding an A-mount body sans SLT, and instead using the A6000 OSPDAF, makes total sense, assuming it is technically possible. The A-mount has more lenses on the long end. The bigger, dSLR-like body enables the incorporation of IBIS and weather-sealing, and a full grip also helps handling those big lenses.

A common use of crop bodies like this is an addition to an existing FF system in lieu of a tele-extender.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Miwok

DtEW: If you never used a SLT, you will know than 1/3 stop difference doesn't make any difference in the real world.

3 upvotes
DtEW

@Miwok: it probably doesn't matter in most circumstances, but I would rather have it than not, esp. when OSPDAF has progressed to the point where SLT doesn't offer any particular performance advantage anymore.

Yes, I would think long-and-hard between a dSLR and dSLT for the light loss vs. AF/EVF performance advantages. But it is a short consideration when you can have the same advantage as dSLT without light loss with this newest version of OSPDAF.

As an aside, I don't think one needs to fear the decline of A-mount. You will always need a bigger body for IBIS with sensors of this scale (and bigger), and there are definitely handling advantages to full-sized grips/buttons/levers/etc. Plus there is a more-developed lens catalog, plus the Minolta legacy.

MILCs are the most obvious and flashiest implementation for OSPDAF. But its advantages will go everywhere.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Miwok

You're right.
I always been thinking than SLR was a temporary system, and your " dreaming camera" would be the next step.
I bet it will become reality very soon, now. :)

0 upvotes
40daystogo

Apart from the issue of aggravating existing A-mount owners, I can't see any other reason for Sony to keep the A-mount alive. The E and FE mount seems the way of the future. With the Sony A7 family, what is the point of prolonging the A series camera family? Pull the plug and get the A mount users to transition to the A7 series with adapters.

0 upvotes
brendon1000

^^ No, a vast majority of A mount customers like me will transition to a proper system like Canon or Nikon rather than go for a crappy NEX system. Using an expensive LA-EA4 adapter just to use my A mount lenses without any stabilization is hardly an option for any A mount user. An electronic adapter is basically adding 2 additional failure points to your system. Not a good option whatsoever.

Sony will only shoot itself in the foot if it stops the only lens system of theirs that is close to being a complete system.

No doubt the E mount is the future but not everyone wants a tiny body with tiny buttons and the lackluster mirrorless sales (compared to DSLR sales ) tells the story.

0 upvotes
acid592

If I want a camera for low-light and average cost, does it worth to carry an a6000. Or is RX100 good enough with being compact is its advantage?

0 upvotes
Thomasthetank

To me the A6000 is the way to go.
DSLR quality + small size = awesome camera.

8 upvotes
DPJoe2

I 2nd that. Especially since the price is about the same.

2 upvotes
mosc

At least Sony isn't protecting one product line from the other. They compete more directly than Canon or Nikon would like to have in their product lines. I think the RX100 is better because you're more likely to bring it with you but if that's not the case for you, the A6000 is a better camera.

I guess the answer is, would you ever mount a different lens than the kit lens? Yes? A6000. No? RX100

7 upvotes
bluevellet

Unless you intend to buy faster lenses for the A6000, I'd say the RX1000 is actually better. A6000 kit lens is pretty slow, forcing you to shoot at grainy high ISOs while the RX100 has a faster lens mitigating its high ISOs disadvantage while still being a smaller camera.

3 upvotes
acid592

Thanks for all answers. I was not thinking about buying any other lenses. I should consider all those factors now.

0 upvotes
Miwok

"Unless you intend to buy faster lenses for the A6000, I'd say the RX1000 is actually better"
True, but if you did, the IQ and bokeh of the A6000 + Fixed lens will BLAST the RX100.

If you need a camera for random shots, no need of a $800 camera, you can find very good one for a third of this price. but if you want make more serious work, 4/3 sensor is a minimum.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
acid592

Thanks Miwok. Do you have an idea which lens can be best for it? Considering I am not thinking about zooming much.

0 upvotes
acid592

Good ones seems to be very expensive for me I guess. But any idea which lens can make it a better alternative to RX100.

0 upvotes
bluevellet

Primes. Like the 24mm. But it's pricey,

Or legacy primes.

0 upvotes
Miwok

You have the Sigma 19 and 30mm, very good, the Sony 16, 20 and 50mm too (at reasonable price).
It's all depend what you shot. Myself, I mostly shot outside and can live just with my 16mm f2.8 and 50mm f1.8.
And, as said Bluevellet, a lot of legacy lenses who are (for still) fun to use and can be find at cheap price.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
acid592

Thanks for answers! :)

0 upvotes
Thomasthetank

I just purchased the A6000 kit, along with an SEL 35 f1.8

I read online that a lens' firmware must be updated to Version "0.2" in order to take advantage of the dual phase/contrast autofocus.

Is this true if buying new? when i checked my lens firmware, it read "0.1"... which I have read means the lens is only using contrast autofocus. It seems silly to have to update you firmware on a brand new kit lens, as soon as you buy it.

on the other hand, the autofocus seems perfectly fast... just as fast as reviews i have seen online.

Thanks

0 upvotes
DPJoe2

It is common for firmware needing to be updated because a software update can occur anytime. If your lens was shipped to the retailer before the update existed, then it will have the old software on it until you update it.

1 upvote
zackiedawg

Thomas - this should not be a worry with the 35mm F1.8 lens - that lens at Version 1 is already updated to work with the PDAF system, and there is no firmware needed for that lens. You would have to apply the firmware update to an 18-55mm lens, 55-210mm lens, and some others, but not the 35mm F1.8.

3 upvotes
Thomasthetank

Thanks zackiedawg! That's good news.
Should I be worried about the 16-50 kit lens?

0 upvotes
zackiedawg

No - that one is already updated since inception...it debuted with the NEX6 which had the PDAF, so that lens was set to work with PDAF from the outset. Any new (past year or so) and future E and FE lenses will all be PDAF compliant.

0 upvotes
Ross the Fidller

I am looking at this because of someone buying it, but why do you have to be region specific, "when it was introduced in the Fall of 2012.", with the timing of its release? I'm sorry, but as an Australian, I 'fall' about laughing at that term for Autumn. ;) Could you please remember it isn't just North Americans reading this & refer to the time of the year by month or quarters or something else that isn't region specific.

Thanks mate.
Cheers!

3 upvotes
DtEW

Why stop there? Why does it even have to be English for just the English-speaking countries?

I'm sorry, but this site needs to consider all the people that visit from elsewhere and make sure they not only can understand what is being said, but feel *totally* at home so as to not have their fine national sensibilities be bruised like an over-ripe pawpaw.

Therefore, the only correct linguistic choice for this site is Esperanto.

Ĉi tiu estas la plej bona maniero. Manĝi ovo.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
OliverGlass

Why STOP there?

I'm sorry but this site must consider all people. There must be a NAVAJO indian option and the 10 dialects with it. Archeologists must also have a CUNEIFORM and SANSKRIT option. Oh wait.... TODDLERS must understand the site too --- we must have a GERBER option!

"Therefore, the other correct linguistic choice for this site is gibberish"

Dweepeeerebuuu, gugu-gaga dadum. uywyye hkjhnvnb &^&!

dpreview must employ 97% linguists and 3% photographers and writers. Then and only then will we see happy campers posting in the forum.

(give the staff a break) :)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Mac McCreery

what a silly response.

1 upvote
Ross the Fidller

I'm sorry to stir up trouble, but I just thought referring to a time of year in calendar terms rather than seasons (of North America) just makes more sense. "In the Fall" does indicate to me that it is the time of the year as seen in North America, but I guess some people are amused at our description of distances here being often given in travel times rather than km or miles (it's been many years since we used miles here).

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
bluevellet

Sorry mate. Your country elects Tony Abbott, we the world think you don't deserve autumn-free reviews, articles and posts.

So in about 4 months, it's autumn again. I'm looking forward to taking the kids out, letting them play with dead leaves and taking photos of it all.

1 upvote
Ross the Fidller

I like that one bluevellet! :)

0 upvotes
Shamael

autumn, what is that, I live at the equator

0 upvotes
Ross the Fidller

Your seasons would be hot or hot & wet, wouldn't it? ;)

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
MattLangley

Really wish this had a touchscreen... I got a Sony A7 and love it... have a Canon 60D that I'd trade in and put towards an a6000 in a second if this had a touch screen (had been eying the NEX 5T before this). Of course a Full frame with this sort of focus performance and a touch screen would be even better ;)

1 upvote
marc petzold

The Sony SEL-1670Z F4 Zeiss Vario Sonnar T* Zoom Lens would be a ideal match for the A6000 - but then you'd pay almost the same like for the Sony A7 together with the FE 28-70 Kitlens...but the A7 is full frame...and you can use with cheap adapters many very good vintage MF lenses, without cropfactor x1.5
like on a APS-C Alpha/NEX Body.

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
bluevellet

On the flipside, there are just more NEX lenses made for APS-C. No need to fiddle with any old MF lenses not really designed for digital sensors.

0 upvotes
marc petzold

well, i love mf lenses, especially primes, and the contax zeiss for instance are way good ones, could be bought relative cheap, too...and being used onto APS-C NEX/Alphas with a Lens Turbo/Speed Booster either way. :)

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Eleson

There is some kind of serious thruth in that cost ratio.
Electronics gets cheaper quickly, but mechanical(optical) devices just doesn't.

The only way to address this is as it is currently done: Design chepaer lens constructions and handle distorsion and vinjetting in software.

But this unbalanced scenarion will just increase: CPU Power and amd megapixel with both increase, putting higher and higher demands on the lenses, making them more and more expensive.

One reasonable way forward is to make the market accept that sensors should outresolve the lenses. In that scenario the need for AA filter goes away, to start with. Software handling of lens faults will not affect image quality to the same extent.
Pixel peepers just have to accept that images are soft at 100%.

2 upvotes
Lucas_

I bought the A6000 with the kit lens about three weeks ago, as a lighter/smaller option for my A99. It's not a stellar lens, but the camera's ability to correct for most distortion and aberration issues provides for a quite compact and light setup for everyday use with very acceptable IQ. I also bought, after some good searching, a Sony G 18-105 f4 OSS lens, a reasonably small, fast and awesome performer for its price. Additionally, I got from eBay a Sony LA-EA1 adapter for use with my small primes ( Sony 50/1.4, Minolta 135/2.8 and others ). With that set I have most of my intended use covered, anything above 135mm or under 16mm in F.L. is for the A99 to handle! Until now I haven't regretted for one moment having invested in that system, just wonderful!

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
quezra

How fast is LA-EA1 with A6000?

0 upvotes
aiwentimotai

Was the soft skin effect turned off before comparing the jpegs to the ACR processed ones?

0 upvotes
Olgierd

Could someone please educate me:

"The a6000 uses a lower resolution OLED electronic viewfinder (when compared to its predecessor). It's smaller and features 1.44m dots instead of 2.36m. This equates to a 22% drop in linear resoltion, since it now offers an 800 x 600 pixel (SVGA) view, rather than 1024 x 768 (XGA)."

I thought 800x600 = 480,000 dots and 1024x768 = 786,432 dots. So how's that compare to 1.44m dots and 2.36m dots?

Thanks.

0 upvotes
Zdman

They count each red, green and blue sub-pixel as a dot. So 480k x3 becomes 1,440k and 786k x3 becomes 2,359k.

3 upvotes
peevee1

And in Sony White Magic displays, pixels consist of 4 dots (Red, Green, Blue and White). And in Samsung OLEDs, it is even more complex calculation as subpixels (dots) are shared by different pixels...

2 upvotes
Olgierd

That explains. It's interesting then manufacturers tell rather number of dots than the display resolution. Until now I was convinced those small EVFs are HD quality squeezed in such small area.

Thanks.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Dheorl

That's exactly why they state the resolution in dots =)

2 upvotes
Olgierd

Marketing :-)

1 upvote
peevee1

" It's interesting then manufacturers tell rather number of dots than the display resolution. "

They do the same in sensor resolution too - every "pixel" there is actually one-color subpixel, and then color of each pixel at "full resolution" is estimated using the neighbors (and in case of Fuji X-trans, sometimes even not close neighbors). Only Sigma Foveon does it right, but even they have to provide number of single-color photosites as "pixels" to not be hopelessly outdone by the deceptive competitors.

0 upvotes
dcolak

I just got A6000 after using NEX7 for several years.

A6000 EVF is nowhere close to the one in NEX7!

It's so pixelated that it's hard to read the aperture-speed info text that is above and below the image.

Just looking the menus through EVF shows how pixelated and low resolution it is.

I have no idea what the reviewer was on when he said that it's fine EVF.

It's not. NEX7 gives you an ilusion of an optical view finder, A6000 is like looking at the old CRT TV screen, one can see the "space" between pixels.

The other problem I have is the brightness. NEX7 EVF is much brighter than that in A6000.

Maybe the reviewers eyes are not 20/20?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Tonkotsu Ramen

maybe return the camera

3 upvotes
Lucas_

Wow! I've never noticed that "pixelation" on my A6000's EVF, you have quite a "microscope eye"! As for brightness, I simply adjusted it for my liking, is the range too small for you?

8 upvotes
dcolak

Check your eyes then :)

On max brightness it's still not bright as NEX7 evf from three years ago.

It's a far cry from NEX7 evf.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
DtEW

@dcolak, you must've never taken your NEX-7 into any place dark, or cared about seeing anything in the shadows when you compose.

Yes, the old 2.4m-dot EVF has the better resolution in good light. But it falters (in both noise and refresh rate) much earlier than this 1.4m-dot EVF as the light grows dim. Also, the 2.4m-dot EVF is infamous for crushing blacks/shadows. This 1.4m-dot is much better in that regard.

In terms of manual/DMF focusing, if you use focus magnification, both EVFs work as well as each other. It is conceded that the 2.4m-dot EVF works better than the 1.4m-dot EVF if you don't use focus magnification. But neither has enough resolution to allow you to hit critical focus without focus magnification, so I think this "advantage" is extremely limited.

In other words, the 2.4m-dot EVF is better on paper and at-a-glance, but actually use both EVFs in varying conditions and the 1.4m-dot EVF will reveal itself to be more useful.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
dcolak

I use it in the dark all the time. Can't see any improvement. In the bright light it's much worse than nex7 evf :(

I use mostly manual lenses so focus magnification is used all the time.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
JanMatthys

every day there is either a Sony RX100III review or a review for a Sony camera, I guess the marketing dept of Sony is bankrolling DPreview

4 upvotes
peevee1

Or maybe Canon and Nikon do not release anything of note recently (although G1X Mk II was reviewed promptly).

15 upvotes
Tonkotsu Ramen

or because sony cameras are much more interesting than others at the moment?

trolls still out in full force!

18 upvotes
brendon1000

Perhaps Dpreview should review the recent Canon 1200D. Whats new about that camera ? Same sensor as a 5 year old 550D, same AF system as a 20D which is 10 years old. Smallest viewfinder of any DSLR camera in the market and possibly even past cameras or last but not least its class leading battery life of 500 shots.

18 upvotes
Segaman

hey Brendon, if you got nothing to say good bout Canon, you know what to do!

1 upvote
Chanex

Or maybe because these are popular cameras? (hint: look at the number of comments and the popularity chart on the main page)

1 upvote
Shamael

the only thing that is on the right place on a Canon is the button to switch it off. Hope that is said something good about Canon now...sic.

0 upvotes
brendon1000

@Segaman - Hey I am no fanboi. Its not that I have nothing good to say about Canon. Its just that I have nothing good to say about the 1200D which I feel is an insult to consumers who would buy it just for the Canon brand name. A Pentax K500 in comparison is miles ahead in technology.

If you move up the food chain in Canon then things start to look great. The 70D, 5d mk 3, 1DX are all very good cameras.

0 upvotes
Segaman

@ Richard Butler
I like the way you test the AF in that scene with the bike coming towards you.
This is the kind of test we need, to give us a little info on the camera speed and quality of images.
The dynamic range on the house is nice too!
"Real world exemple...Keep on rollin!"

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
peevee1

We actually need reproducible test in controlled environment (including light) so it could be comparable to other cameras. And of course test in indoor light too.
Yeah, it worked in bright sunlight. It does not mean it is going to work indoors. Other way around is usually easy - if it works indoors, it in most cases would work in bright sunlight even better.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
luigibozi

I would like DPR to test and have it in the specs (for all cameras):
if using a quick release plate for a tripod allows the screen to freely tilt. I had a Sony RX100 (very good camera!) and when I visited a Sony store here in Toronto and looked at a Sony RX10 (that looks better in hand than in the images) I was surprised to see that when I attached a quick release plate (a small Gitzo) the tilting screen was obstructed. I wonder if this (I would like to keep my quick release plate on the bottom of my camera) is a designed "feature" that has some reason behind?!

0 upvotes
AFishEye

You cannot seriously expect a generic plate to be a perfect fit for every shape and size of a camera body.
There are custom plates that do not interfere with the screen swivel of the a6000.
RRS is just one example of such a plate.

3 upvotes
Andy Crowe

You can always pull the screen out /before/ attaching a plate.

3 upvotes
Rob Sims

@Andy Crowe
Far too practical an answer, enough of that please!

2 upvotes
luigibozi

@AFishEye
I was talking about cameras, not plates.
In my opinion a good design should not make me waste my time+money. By the way, I checked RRS site for Sony RX and they do not have a QR plate for RX10, and those for RX100 and RX1 seemed to me ridiculously small, and respectively huge.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
AFishEye

@luigibozi
If I understand you correctly, you want camera manufacturers to make sure their body design works with the numerous types of plates out there, or do you just want them to check with you before they go to the drawing board to verify it works with plate you happen to own?
That's your definition of good design, seriously?
P.S
Yes, the RRS is Arca Swiss and not QR. I started with QR and moved to Arca Swiss once I realized that more custom designs are available for this kind of a plate. And, yes, they have a custom plate for a6000. This article reviewed the a6000 not the RX10

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 15 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
luigibozi

@AFishEye
QR~quick release. My tripod is Gitzo.
Good design in this particular case would be to test, with the camera standing on a table, if the screen opens and closes freely, which is not exactly rocket science, if you understand correctly. I have a solution to this equation too: camera manufacturers could design the position of the screen 2-3mm up, and every plate (including a table or my Gitzo QR plate) would fit under without problems. And DPR would have to check this again and tell us, eh?
What a wonderful world...

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
AFishEye

@luigibozi
Thanks for the insight and enlightenment; DPR and camera manufacturers are on it and will report back to you promptly

2 upvotes
munro harrap

I have found that sharpening AFTER noise reduction and applying 0.2 radius and 400 amount gives a far better result than the very crude 0.8 pixel radius chosen here. I never even tgo to 0.5 which is the best Lightroom can do! it coarsens grain and detail. The results I get are crisper and not as noisy as these because there simply is no point having a high resolution sensor and using the kind of sharpening that was the vogue a decade ago. The greater the radius the more fine detail gets left behind.

2 upvotes
Arsen

I just picked up mine about an hour ago.. Must say for a small camera the image quality is very good. Still no comparison to my Nikon D800E , but for a light camera has lots of features that my wife wanted in a small package. Overall very satisfied with it. I bought it with the kit lens, Ok overall, but like the compact size. The reason that I bought this camera was to use it when my D800E would be too big to take along. Its hard to sacrifice great IQ. So Far I am quite impressed, but time will tell based on various shooting conditions..

0 upvotes
Underdog 3000

Just out of curiosity, when is your D800E not too big to take along?

7 upvotes
Arsen

I use the D800E 95% of the time, but sometimes with my 2.8 lens and external flash, little big to take along to a small function or restaurant, it gets too much attention. I refuse to use a cell phone camera to take pictures, so the A6000 is a compromise in between. I can always use a small 50mm prime and internal flash but again sometime I want something light to carry along with me.. The camera is going to be used 95% of the time by my wife, and with Wi-Fi and NFC she can easily post pictures on social media or share via email..

1 upvote
DPJoe2

I'd like to 2nd this logic. My D800 with the 24-70 and others plus a flash is just too much weight and too much hassle for anything except those times I'm going out to create a piece of art work or get paid. If it's casual, or I have no specific reason for using the big-gun, then the a6000 will do quite nicely. Did I mention I really like all the extra features not found on my 'professional' camera. I'm just getting into this little fun machine. And the 11fps is a blast. I think this feature alone was made for little get togethers. You really can capture the spirit of laughs in the moment. Fast! Haven't had this much fun since my first camera and a darkroom. That was 50 years ago. 70 and still having fun. Who'd thunk.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
Shamael

who wants to use a 50mm prime on an APSC camera to go in a restaurant, except if your intents are to shoot your steak or the bartender on the other end of the room. I use a 20 or better a 24 mm for such events, eventually a 28, but that gets close.

0 upvotes
Arsen

The 50mm would be for FF camera.. Its my only prime I have.. All my other lens are 2.8 zoom..

0 upvotes
Thatsgr8

Nikon D800 is three times the price. No comparison. Apples to Oranges effect

0 upvotes
andrewD2

Page 9 with the pop up flash. Why use the camera upside down? :)
The other way up and you light from the top and your shadows go downwards. Because we are used to seeing people lit by the Sun the shot looks odd as you have it.

0 upvotes
Paul Kersey Photography

One criticism I have of these reviews; they all feature ratings based on things the reviewer perceives as important. These choices aren't necessarily shared by others. For example, I could not care less about a camera's video function or features. Secondly, I never use flash in my photography. Thirdly, don't care at all about lack of touch screen, in fact, didn't want it. No level gauge? No worries, don't need it. Get the idea here? Personal biases which are natural lead to different ratings based on feature preferences.

Incidentally, I have read reviews elsewhere that address the new evf is better than the former one on the Nex 6.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 42 seconds after posting
8 upvotes
Richard Butler

The overall score is based on the combined input of the 12 assessment categories listed in the widget, weighted fairly heavily towards image quality (and with much less input from subjective factors such as 'value'), so they try to be as consistent and useful as possible. We're not going to significantly reduce a camera's 'features' score for omitting a level gauge, for instance.

The Pros and Cons list is a list of the key points for and against the camera that the reviewer thinks a would-be buyer might want to be aware of. These are more likely to have an impact on whether the reviewer chooses to give the camera an Award or not.

Obviously if there were lots of concerns about image quality, it'd be less likely to get a Gold but not all Cons have equal weight, in our heads - the Gold award for this camera was never at risk because of the missing level gauge.

We try to explain and demonstrate what we did and didn't like about the camera so that you can draw your own conclusion

4 upvotes
Richard Butler

Re the viewfinder: it's hard to say whether it's better, but I didn't think it was significantly worse. In pure spec terms it's a downgrade (smaller, lower resolution) but, as I hope the review conveyed, this difference doesn't have a major impact on the experience. The refresh rate and contrast are good, and I didn't find my self hankering for greater resolution, so it's certainly not a drawback.

3 upvotes
J Frank Parnell

Sounds like you know exactly what you want in a camera. So what do you care what a camera's review score is? Surely you can read the review and determine if the camera is for you or not.

9 upvotes
Paul Kersey Photography

J Frank Parnell: you needn't concern yourself with my concerns.

2 upvotes
Reinhard136

thanks Richard ....... which opens an intriguing but geeky possibility - easily done with a spreadsheet : if you published your individual 12 assessment criteria scores, along with their weightings above them, people could then change the weightings to suit themselves - rich people could put 0 on price, and IQ people could put 10 on IQ - imagine how hard it would be to whinge about the DPR awards then - you can give your favourite camera a gold award, and find out something about your own preferences at the same time ...........

5 upvotes
straylightrun

Congratulations. That's exactly the whole point of a review. A critics subjective opinion on whatever it is being reviewed.

2 upvotes
Richard Butler

Reinhard136 - the system was designed to do exactly that. We may yet introduce that ability.

3 upvotes
Reinhard136

:-) , might be fun ......... and playing with the factors would be a great alternative to going outside and taking pictures ......

0 upvotes
DPJoe2

If you have pets or kids, you have to have this camera! After getting help today to get the 11fps going, I shot my cats. All three survived. You won't believe the action stopping shots you can get with this thing. I haven't had this much fun shooting in years. What a blast. Fun shooting is why I got into photography in the first place, 44 years ago. Thanks for putting so much fun into the hands of a regular Joe, Sony. BTW, it is possible to do the same thing with a Canon or a Nikon, but it will cost you about $8K. Sony Rules!

Comment edited 44 seconds after posting
9 upvotes
Total comments: 789
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