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Superzoom camera group: Studio comparison (base ISO)

On this page you'll find our standard studio comparison shot taken with each of the cameras in the group. Click on the thumbnail to see the full image.

  • All taken from the same tripod position with the zoom set to approx. 55-70mm (equivalent).
  • Manual white balance
  • Aperture Priority or Manual mode (~ F5.0)
  • Base ISO (lowest setting)
  • Luminance matched (middle gray ~L50)
  • Lighting: Daylight simulation, >98% CRI

Base ISO studio comparison:

All digital cameras produce their best output at the lowest ISO setting, and this is particularly true of compacts, where the very small sensors and high pixel densities mean that noise becomes an issue as soon as you start to move up the ISO range. We use this studio test as a quick and easy way to get an overall impression of what each camera's sensor and lens are capable of, particularly in respect to resolution, edge-to-edge sharpness and contrast.

It's worth mentioning that you need to be aware that the 100% crops shown here (and the full resolution images if you choose to download them) are slightly unrepresentative of the kind of enlargement at which typical users of compact cameras will be viewing their photographs. With 10 million pixels, for example, the 100% crops are roughly the same as looking quite closely at a print around 50 inches across.

If you're only ever going to produce 5x7 inch prints the best way to assess each camera is to download the full resolution images on this page (and elsewhere in the group test) and produce some prints yourself - or simply look at them on-screen at a lower magnification (if they look ok to you when reduced to fill a 20" screen you'll be happy with standard sized prints from them).

Canon SX10 IS
ISO 80
FujiFilm S2000HD
ISO 100
FujiFilm S8100fd
ISO 64
Nikon P80
ISO 64
Olympus SP-565UZ
ISO 64
Panasonic FZ28
ISO 100
Sony H50
ISO 100

100% crops: center

Canon SX10 IS
ISO 80
FujiFilm S2000HD
ISO 100
FujiFilm S8100fd
ISO 64
Nikon P80
ISO 64
Olympus SP-565UZ
ISO 64
Panasonic FZ28
ISO 100
Sony H50
ISO 100

Inevitably producing a lens with a zoom range of up to 20x involves a certain amount of compromise when it comes to optical quality, but we've been continually impressed with what the various manufacturers have been able to deliver over the years we've been testing superzoom cameras. In terms of sharpness and detail there's not a lot of difference between any of the cameras here, though the two Fujifilm models and the Nikon P80 are the least impressive (in all three cases this appears to be down to noise reduction / processing). None of these cameras can capture quite the same level of sharp detail as the best compact cameras with smaller zoom ranges, but you'll need to be producing big prints to see the difference.

100% crops: Edge

Canon SX10 IS
ISO 80
FujiFilm S2000HD
ISO 100
FujiFilm S8100fd
ISO 64
Nikon P80
ISO 64
Olympus SP-565UZ
ISO 64
Panasonic FZ28
ISO 100
Sony H50
ISO 100

Moving nearer to the edge of the frame we can see that the Canon, Olympus, Panasonic and Sony models are all roughly on a par with each other (the main difference is the amount of sharpening), with the Fujifilm S8100fd and Nikon P80 the only ones that really stand out as being slightly softer and less detailed. The Canon SX10 IS is - just - the best here, mainly because at a pixel level it shows the fewest processing artifacts and cleanest detail. The Olympus isn't far behind, nor are the Panasonic and Sony (though these both show a little too much sharpening for our liking).

Color comparison

Canon SX10 IS FujiFilm S2000HD FujiFilm S8100fd
Nikon P80 Olympus SP-565UZ
Panasonic FZ28
Sony H50

A quick glance at the color charts above shows that from a color and contrast point of view the seven cameras here are relatively consistent, with some variation in the default saturation (and the Sony H50 being the highest). There are also slight variations in the overall color rendition (mostly in terms of red saturation and how the color is tweaked to produce vivid blue skies and bright foliage), though as our 'real world' tests show this doesn't produce a lot of visible difference in photographs.

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Comments

Chiemba
By Chiemba (10 months ago)

My Lumix Fz28 has my picture images hostage SMILE .. I took pictures at granny's party and when I upload the images only a few showed . But when I put the sd card back into the camera I can see all 85 pictures . During my picture taking I change the setting and all pictures after that won't upload . But again I can see them all in my Fz28 .
How do I up load all of my images ?
Thanks in Advance
Chiemba E

0 upvotes