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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1 Review

December 2013 | By Allison Johnson
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Not quite a day after Sony made its announcement of two mirrorless cameras with full frame sensors, Panasonic unveiled something of a very different shape: the Lumix DMC-GM1, a pocketable camera with a 16 megapixel Four Thirds sensor. It uses the same Micro Four Thirds mount that its much larger Olympus and Panasonic siblings have been using for years, but at introduction will be sold with a specially designed 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 kit zoom sporting a smaller diameter for the GM1's especially diminutive form.

Panasonic GM1 specification highlights

  • 16MP Live MOS sensor
  • Built-in Wi-Fi (no NFC)
  • 3.0-inch, 1036K dot touch-sensitive LCD
  • 1080 HD video recording at 60i/30p
  • Built-in pop-up flash
  • 1/16,000 maximum shutter speed (with all-electronic shutter)
  • Focus peaking
  • Picture-in-picture magnification for manual focus
  • Micro HDMI output
  • Magnesium-alloy shell with aluminum top and bottom plates

Micro Four Thirds made its debut in 2008 with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1. The G1 was DSLR-shaped, with a handgrip and built-in viewfinder, but smaller and lighter than its other interchangeable lens peers at the time. Not long afterwards Olympus joined the party with the PEN E-P1, which was smaller and rangefinder-shaped. From there, the Micro Four Thirds platform split into roughly two camera styles - those that looked like DSLRs (mostly the preserve of Panasonic) and those that didn't (mostly those made by Olympus).

Understandably, in those early days neither manufacturer seemed entirely sure whether the platform would catch on more to step-up beginners or more advanced photographers looking for a lighter second camera, so they tried to appeal to both. Panasonic's first rangefinder-style model, the GF1, was a hit with enthusiasts, but Panasonic engineers quickly steered succeeding models away from that crowd toward the beginner set with simplistic control layouts and easy access to automatic exposure settings. The introduction of the button-and-dial-encrusted-GX1 marked a renewed focus on the enthusiast crowd, but by that time other manufacturers had a lot to offer that segment of the market.

So what's the 'State of Mirrorless' today? Rangefinder-style mirrorless cameras have enjoyed some popularity among enthusiasts, and the Olympus OM-D E-M5 and E-M1 have proven MFT cameras have real potential as serious alternatives to mid-range and semi-pro DSLRs. Their smallness as compared to DSLRs is no longer Micro Four Third's sole selling point - they've just become really good cameras that happen to be smaller and lighter. At the same time, compact enthusiast cameras with large sensors are becoming popular too. A fixed zoom lens no longer denotes a major sacrifice in image quality in a post-Cyber-shot RX100 world.

This is the enthusiast camera market that the Panasonic Lumix GM1 enters, donning the title of smallest interchangeable lens camera to date (by Panasonic's reckoning). It boasts the same 16 megapixel CMOS sensor as the GX7, with muted retro design cues borrowed from the same camera. The GM1 uses the familiar Micro Four Thirds mount and it is introduced alongside a new 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 with a retractable design that is specifically designed with a small enough diameter to fit neatly onto the camera body, which is barely taller than the lens mount itself.

It would draw obvious comparisons to the Pentax Q-series, the other miniature interchangeable lens system, but the Q7 uses a definitely compact-camera-sized 1/1.7" type sensor. The GM1 could also be compared to the Sony Cyber-shot RX00 II, both priced at $750 US at introduction and targeting roughly the same group of users. That camera offers a 1" type sensor that's big for a compact but nowhere near the size of a Micro Four Thirds sensor, as well as a fixed zoom lens. However, the Q7 and RX100 II seem most similar to the GM1 in terms of size and target audience, despite their smaller sensors.

Specifications compared to Pentax Q7 and Sony RX100 II

  Panasonic GM1 Pentax Q7 Sony RX100 II
Sensor 16MP, Four Thirds 12MP, 1/1.7" BSI CMOS 20MP, 1"-type BSI CMOS
Sensor size (mm2) 225mm2 42mm2 116mm2
Lens Mount Micro Four Thirds Pentax Q Fixed
Zoom range (kit or fixed, 35mm equiv.) 24-64mm 23-69mm 28-100mm
LCD 3.0-inch 1036K-dot fixed touch screen 3.0-inch 460K-dot fixed 3.0-inch 1229K-dot tilting
Viewfinder option None OVF accessory EVF accessory
Raw shooting Yes Yes Yes
Connectivity Wi-Fi None Wi-Fi with NFC
Video capture max. resolution 1080 60i, 30p 1080 30p 1080 60p, 60i
Stabilization In lens - Mega O.I.S. Sensor-shift IS Optical Steady Shot
Dimensions 98.5 x 54.9 x 30.4 mm (3.88 x 2.16 x 1.20") 102 x 58 x 34 mm (4.02 x 2.28 x 1.34″) 102 x 58 x 38 mm (4.00 x 2.29 x 1.51″)
Weight 274 g (0.60 lb / 9.60 oz) 200 g (0.44 lb / 7.05 oz) 281 g (0.62 lb / 9.91 oz)

There are any number of ways to slice and dice the information in the table above. In some respects, the GM1 seems to be miles ahead of the cameras we're comparing it against but in other ways there's an advantage to the Sony or the Pentax. The GM1 offers compatibility with a great many lenses (the Pentax Q 'system' is small and arguably not very 'serious' and the RX100 II's lens is fixed), but it lacks an accessory port or hot shoe. It offers 1080 HD video, but the specification falls short of the RX100's 60p offering. Such is the nature of the current enthusiast market - lots of options, and no clear leader in any single respect. And depending on how you look at it, the GM1 is poised to really shake things up.

The above chart shows just where the GM1 stands in terms of sensor size. Its Four Thirds sensor is head and shoulders above the Pentax Q7, and larger than the RX100 II's 1" type chip.

Enthusiasts also tend to be interested not just in the maximum aperture of a camera's lens, but also the size of its sensor, as depth of field control will depend on those two characteristics. Though the GM1 has a larger sensor than the Sony RX100 II, it doesn't really offer better depth of field control, and the RX100 II's ability to zoom out to a 100mm equivalent focal length gives it a little bit of an advantage in blurring backgrounds.

The chart above shows each camera's corresponding kit lens (or fixed lens) and its equivalent maximum aperture at wide and telephoto. Equivalent apertures tell you how the lens compares to a full frame lens with similar characteristics - much as the more familiar 'equivalent focal length' does.

It is certainly true that the GM1 represents a new feat in Micro Four Thirds - not just smaller and lighter than a DSLR but truly pocketable. Does that dramatic size reduction compared to previous M43 offerings come at the expense of features or performance? And does the GM1 come up short in handling and user experience just to nab the title of 'world's smallest'? Read on to find out.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

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This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 347
123
Reinhard136
By Reinhard136 (8 months ago)

You can't keep up, bought the Rx100ii couple of months ago, delighted, but this is a much greater achievement. High iso sharpness much superior. My apologies Panasonic, just voted for Rx in the poll, should have read the review first, then had a look at CS camera size comparator, and it is even smaller than the Rx100 ??? When they do one with a viewfinder, it will be an excuse dump the RX - Australia is a struggle without a viewfinder.

2 upvotes
bzanchet
By bzanchet (8 months ago)

Very nice camera indeed, although RX100 seems to be a bit sharper and less noise, even with the smaller sensor.
The article does not mention, but the GM1 probably has a lens cap. I prefer the RX100 as a real pockatable camera.

9 upvotes
Tonkotsu Ramen
By Tonkotsu Ramen (8 months ago)

i'm actually surprised how well the RX100 does against the GM1. I was expecting the gm1 to wipe the floor with it... but it wasn't the case!

1 upvote
mauijohn
By mauijohn (8 months ago)

I'll pass on this one. Price too high for me. I'll wait for the GM0.

2 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (8 months ago)

Just be patient.

Panasonic is well known for price cutting towards the end of a product cycle. The GX1 started out at $800 and ended up selling for $299.

1 upvote
Marcin Mo111347cicki
By Marcin Mo111347cicki (8 months ago)

I thought we already have GMO everywhere...

1 upvote
KBarrett
By KBarrett (8 months ago)

The flash sync speed is 1/50? Holy K1000, batman!

11 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (8 months ago)

The only real practical problem this body has.
Makes a fill in flash close to impossible.

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (8 months ago)

would really appreciate for a new version with much higher sync speed and a hot-shoe.

0 upvotes
seri_art
By seri_art (8 months ago)

Flash sync speed 1/50 sec is unbelievable and unacceptable. Flash fill in direct sunlight would not be possible. What were they thinking?

1 upvote
Ed Gill
By Ed Gill (8 months ago)

Ditto, ditto, and ditto. An electronic shutter and a flash synch of 1/50 WTF were they thinking! My LX5 gives wonderful portraits with full sun backlight at 1/1000 full synch with my manual strobes. Until the GX7 Panasonic seemed clueless about flash synch and support. Of course with reported non-sales of mirror-less cameras in the US, this is obviously targeted to the bus load tourists at the Grand Canyon, high noon, mid-summer, auto HDR mode. Fill flash - what's that?

1 upvote
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (8 months ago)

The flash-synch speed is limited not by the electronic first curtain, but by the mechanical second curtain, which in the GM1 is directly driven by a stepper motor rather than a conventional spring.

This means the curtain moves far slower than in a traditional shutter, limiting the fastest mechanical shutter speed to 1/500 s and the flash synch to 1/50 s.

Why use a stepper motor to drive the shutter curtain? Because by eliminating the spring and clockwork of a traditional shutter assembly, the GM1’s shutter can be made unusually tiny: about 1/5th the size of the GF5’s.

That’s why the GM1 is so small.

2 upvotes
Ed Gill
By Ed Gill (8 months ago)

Samuel, You may be correct but I don't believe the shutter opening/operating speed is a true limitation on electronic sensors like it was on film. It may be more to do with the CMOS sensor verses the CCD sensor design but, once the shutter is open in "electronic mode" and exposures are as brief as 1/16000 of a second, this has to be an electronic on-off not a mechanical on-off. I would think the only limit should have been the exposure start timing, namely matching the sensor start to the flash trigger. Something doesn't make sense and it might have been a R&D development budget or timing decision rather than a actual limitation. Might be a possible future firmware update or released with the next generation Panasonic cameras

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (8 months ago)

has anyone found anything special with the shutter?

0 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (8 months ago)

like Kbarrett said,
Flash sync only to 1/50th of a second.
That makes using the flash to fill in shadows outside very hard.

Could be an issue on the other hand there is nothing this small that does what this baby does. So it's the price we must pay for the portability

2 upvotes
Ed Gill
By Ed Gill (8 months ago)

Olympus PL-5, now on sale pricing, looks like a better speced serious camera at about $200 less. Equal sensor and better Jpeg engine, 1/250 flash synch, hot shoe, accessory finder available, in body stabilized, tilting LCD, etc.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (8 months ago)

Great camera, really love the idea and size of it. It could easily be my first m4/3 camera if only price would drop by 30-40%. Sadly right now it's quite poor when to comes to "bang for a buck" comparing to RX100 (which is in similar size and 1 step smaller sensor).
Still though - for those who don't mind it - right now it's one of best, if not the best travel camera out there.

2 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (8 months ago)

I agree with your bang for buck statement. The olympus EPM-2 has fallen to the price point of the Rx100. For this Panasonic you still have to pullout a premium for a unique product.

"The GM1's kit lens is reasonably sharp and fast enough for everyday shooting, and keeps the camera compact. If you're looking for a little more in terms of reach or image quality, the Micro Four Thirds system has a lot to offer. For something a little longer, Olympus's 45mm F1.8 provides other options for portraiture and moderate telephoto shooting. They add bulk and cost, but they're options available to the GM1 user that a fixed lens compact like the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 II (for all of its good image quality) just can't match".

Acces to the 20mm and 45mm could be worth it.

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
rpm40
By rpm40 (8 months ago)

I just got my E-PM2 2 lens kit for $350, but if the rx100 was that price, I would have snatched it. I still can't find even the old version for much less than $500 new.

2 upvotes
HelloToe
By HelloToe (8 months ago)

GM1 gets a 78% and is awarded Gold, GX7 gets a 79% and is awarded Silver. I've given up trying to understand the rating system around here...

12 upvotes
hybert46
By hybert46 (8 months ago)

I'll go for a different explanation:
The GM1 and GX7 do not really compete in the same category. While the GM1 has got some clear limitations (and therefore has only 78%) it competes in the ultra compact ILC and most of these limitation are direct consequences of its size. On the other hand, the GX7 competes rather in the high-end ILC and is therefore in direct competition with the NEX, FUJI or the Oly EM1. This is much tougher competition and the camera with its few bad points does not gain the gold award.

14 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (8 months ago)

I suspect the GX7 only got a silver because the badly implemented program exposure mode annoyed the reviewer (program exposure really should be a solved problem in camera design by now!)

0 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (8 months ago)

@Markol and there are not many total crap cameras these days ..

1 upvote
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (8 months ago)

@Andy .. and then this is a Gold camera for those who don't use Program mode :))

1 upvote
Northgrove
By Northgrove (8 months ago)

It's been said a lot of times that the rating does not directly correlate to the gold/silver award. It probably got gold because it is in such a unique format, but that comes at the cost of features that is often useful. But it's still an amazing format for the sensor size and lens choice, and if you want a small size, this one is just great. So... Gold with non-perfect rating.

GX7 may have got silver because the expectations are completely different for that one.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 56 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (8 months ago)

@Naveed I use aperture priority or manual 99% of the time, but for the odd occasions where I have the camera set up for a particular shot but then need to get a completely different type of shot quickly it's useful to be able to jam the thing in P or Auto mode and have it work. I'm still planning to get the GX7, but decent auto mode behaviour is the kind of thing that should be solved by now.

0 upvotes
TN Args
By TN Args (8 months ago)

What a great second or spare body for the travelling µ4/3 shooter!

That's in addition to the many photographers for whom this is just the right primary camera, of course. ;)

1 upvote
abortabort
By abortabort (8 months ago)

Actually don't get the fuss around the GM1? Ok it IS nice, sure. What I actually don't get is why everyone is going ga-ga over it, yet at the same time shun the E-PM2 as being the 'beginners' camera? It is 10mm taller, 10mm wider and 3mm thicker. That isn't a whole hell of a lot really (also DPR, why no comparison shot?). Thing is though, that unless using the 'kit' lens, the GM1 is a bit more awkward with existing m43's lenses, potentially needing the grip to make it that bit taller.

The E-PM2 on the other hand had the same great AF as the OM-D, the same sensor etc, it was basically a mini OM-D in a tiny body... But no, it's labelled as a lame duck. Adding to this that the E-PM2 has a hotshoe, can take an EVF (including the well regarded one from the E-M1) or OVF and it has IBIS all at a considerably cheaper price... I just don't get it?

To be continued...

3 upvotes
abortabort
By abortabort (8 months ago)

Point is, I really like the GM1, I think it is the epitome of what m43's should be about and I hope they continue in this way... But I don't get why the E-PM2 wasn't seen in this way (and considered / reviewed in this way) and the GM1 being compared against it and essentially dethroning it to become the new champion of 'tiny but capable m43's cameras'?

1 upvote
HelloToe
By HelloToe (8 months ago)

Probably the biggest thing that gets the E-PM2 its 'beginners' label is its lack of a mode dial. Plus its kit lens is about twice as big as the GM1's, and you're stuck lugging around an external flash, which hurts the whole mini/pocketable aspect.

http://camerasize.com/compact/#387.92,491.397,ha,t

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
14 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (8 months ago)

The GM1 is sort of like a "premium beginner" camera. It has an unusual good build quality (for a beginner camera) and premieres some new tech that would normally be featured in a more advanced model (and then the tech would normally trickle down to the beginner line later on).

For some people, it is also damn gorgeous too.

2 upvotes
rpm40
By rpm40 (8 months ago)

I have an E-PM2, and it's nice, it just doesn't break any new ground. The size is good, but it doesn't make you say "wow", and for the added bulk over the GM1, they should have been able to fit in an onboard flash.

Still, its a very capable small camera, and the price is good (I just got the two lens kit brand new for $350), but then again, I don't think too many would argue differently.

It's good, but its just not unique in a way that is eye-catching or headline making, like the GM1. Its still a nice camera.

3 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (8 months ago)

I must say Allison, having handled a preproduction and finally a production GM1, it is that dial that makes me prefer a Pentax Q7 over the GM1. You mentioned you were hitting that White Balance- me too! Out of 10 attempts I would say I was hitting it about 4-6 times per set of ten . That's an awful 40-60% of the time for a setting I didn't want!

The Q7 as small as it is has way better handling and controls than this. The touchscreen I found annoying as often changing focus area by mere touch, considering how small it is, easy to do.

What truly frustrates me though is that Panasonic already has a blue print for reasonable manual controls- the LX3/LX5/LX7 series of cameras. Why oh why they couldn't just avoid that wheel altogether and put it somewhere else while mark the back with solid buttons? That's what Pentax did with the Q and in my opinion accomplished rather very successfully.

I can't understand how they could miss it honestly. Oh yeah, and that grip is incredibly ugly.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (8 months ago)

As you mentioned those wheels are usually problematic but on the GM1 even more so because it is positively *tiny* and the resistance to hit the buttons is just too small while the resistance to turn the wheel is high. I understand why the wheel resistance has to be high but so should be the buttons. Of course the best solution is not to use that d*mn wheel + four cross buttons interface in the first place.

0 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (8 months ago)

What is “incredibly ugly” about a grip made of simple, well-proportioned, geometrical shapes, of high-quality materials, with an ageless knurled finish? I find it very beautiful. And looking at it, I bet it works far better than the typical raised lump of faux leather.

The industrial design of the whole camera is excellent.

3 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (8 months ago)

Ok let me amend that- the grip by itself is not that ugly- but what makes it incredibly ugly is how much of a mismatch it has when you attach it to the camera.

It stands out the wrong way. Seems like a complete hack/after thought. It doesn't matter the grip is of good
Material- you have the cover of te camera now marred by something that just doesn't fit visually in style and size.

Was it really that hard for panasonic to do the right built in grip to begin with?

0 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (8 months ago)

Every element of a design should be true to itself, Raist3d. It’s not modern or honest to design a grip in a way that makes it seem part of the underlying camera. It’s not integral to the camera, so it shouldn’t pretend to be.

By making the grip optional, Panasonic earns more money and gives users the choice of not using a grip. Win-win, except for people who always want to use the grip.

0 upvotes
reginalddwight
By reginalddwight (8 months ago)

I generally agree with this reviewer on the GM1.

During the day I shoot with DSLRs but for casual shooting, I used to carry the S95 with me everywhere. No longer. I recently picked up a GM1 and it immediately won me over.

The GM1 fits in my jacket pocket easily. Along with the retractable kit zoom and the 20mm f1.7 pancake lens, I am good to go for most day-to-day encounters.

This camera is stylish and a lot of fun to use. It is also backed by an ever-growing lens collection.

Kudos to Panasonic for producing this mini marvel.

12 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (8 months ago)

am with you on keeping the camera and a lens every day, if its this small .. I would only replace 20mm with 45mm!! or carry both!!
as stabilised 12-32mm is already quite good for walkaround lens!!

0 upvotes
rpm40
By rpm40 (8 months ago)

I agree that the GM1, 12-32, 20 and 45 is a really nice, small kit that covers a useful range. I have the E-PM2 kit with 20/45, and its great and pretty small, just not TINY like this.

Panny released a really intriguing camera here that pushed the envelope.

1 upvote
Markol
By Markol (8 months ago)

A very nice luxury toy IMHO.
But I just bought a NEX 3n for my sister and tested it a bit and was very impressed.
The thing is, it costs less than half what the GM1 is with a comparable lens.
As for dimensions- both won't fit in my pants pocket but both fir in my very small Lowepro bag, so the big size advantage isn't really practical for me. Plus, the GM1 is hard to handle being that small.
Of course it is better made (NEX 3 is quite disappointing material-wise).
For people who have invested in M43 it's not an alternative I guess, but for people who just want a rather small camera with good IQ and value, I wouldn't recommend a 700€ camera with a flash sync time of 1/50.
BTW, personally I am a bigger fan of M43 than Sony's mount, I am just comparing these 2 because I just had one in hand. The size argument could also be made comparing to the GX7.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (8 months ago)

NEX 3 is a luxury toy :)
This one got next to everything you might want from tiny, pocketable camera (where sadly NEX3 is lacking).

3 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (8 months ago)

NEX-3 may lack features but the NEX-6 is not. that camera is price-wise the competitor.

The thing about the GM-1 is that you can't compare it to the NEX-line. It's so much smaller and the lenses are as well. The best comparison would be the RX100mkII. That lacks the versatility but offers similar IQ(becouse of the kitlens wider apertures) and is slightly smaller with the lens.

Both are exceptional it's such a good time to be a foto-nerd

2 upvotes
Mister J
By Mister J (8 months ago)

I've been using an FZ150 for a while now, with good results apart from the odd blown highlight.

The GM1 could make an ideal partner when a long zoom is not needed. The extra chip size is a massive bonus.

2 upvotes
foocando
By foocando (8 months ago)

I do own one. I've been used it with Leica 25mm 1.4 lens. To me it is a killer combo for everyday casual shooting. Very light compact and produce great image quality. It deserves the GOLD Award.

Can't wait to get the 15mm 1.7 lens.

Happy holidays to all. Enjoy shooting pictures.

7 upvotes
abortabort
By abortabort (8 months ago)

Seems like this would be a rather uncomfortable combo to me? I had the PanaLeica 25 on an E-PM2 and it was just awkward. It was better on the E-P3, just, with the 'large' (but actually tiny) grip. Are you using it with the little alloy grip on the GM1?

0 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (8 months ago)

pana leica 25mm is massive compare to this lens!!
this one is good with its kit zoom lens, 14mm f/2.5 or oly 45mm f/1.8
you could do with 20mm f/1.7 too

0 upvotes
Battersea
By Battersea (8 months ago)

Beautiful design. Practical design. Seems very well thought out.

9 upvotes
undergrounddigga
By undergrounddigga (8 months ago)

with the collapsable zoom lens it's an awesome combination. Take along the Oly 45mm f1.8 .. and it is pretty powerful, at a very minimal weight and size.

I have been pretty good on controlling my GAS this year (actually I haven't bought any camera/lens), but I would love to have this camera - maybe in a year 's time, when it's about $200.
Although I'm a m4/3 shooter (and I may have some bias towards this system), I think this would complement a FF DSLR setup extremely well (I know, it misses the viewfinder - but for real, for carrying along, everywhere for casual shooting - I think everyone could live without one).

Well done Pany for the Gold Award.

9 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (8 months ago)

Seriously doubt it'll be $200 in a year... The GX1 came out two years ago and only reached that price point a couple months ago. Different lines but both are pitched as premium lines over the G/GF, and neither the build quality of the GM1 nor the new collapsible kit lens are gonna be significantly cheaper to pump out in a year's time. I could see it hit $350-400 if Panasonic announces a GM2 by the tail end of 2014 (specially body-only, though the neat kit lens isn't likely to get much cheaper).

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (8 months ago)

I sure hope the price will go down, quick. Right now it's the biggest complain for me about GM1. If only price would be around 350 quid (yea, I'm not asking for 200$, though if it falls that low - I'd be only happier) - I would be all over it.

As for lenses - I wish m4/3 would have as wide choice of pancake primes as Pentax does, but still their offer is quite good. I wouldn't recommend pancake zoom for people shooting RAWs - they're horrible. But if you shoot JPG - build-in automatic correction will do the job nicely and they'll work just fine :)

1 upvote
inorogNL
By inorogNL (8 months ago)

camera of the year

13 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (8 months ago)

Certainly it's worthy a title more than uber-overpriced EM-1 that won it on dPreview.

5 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (8 months ago)

@Plastek - the EM-1 was one of the DPReview writers' products of the year. The GM1 was another.

6 upvotes
Mike Ronesia
By Mike Ronesia (8 months ago)

I voted for it. I love the M4/3's system, but don't get the EM1. Not saying it's bad at all. It just doesn't push my buttons so I don't push its.

1 upvote
Total comments: 347
123