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Body & Design

The Autographer is certainly an unusual-looking device. It's a vertically-styled box, with a lens at the lower right that can be hidden behind a rotating cover. Towards the top of the camera is a proximity sensor, beside which is a small OLED display for changing settings; most of the time this is turned off and completely invisible.

On the back there's big chunky clip for fixing the camera to your clothing, along with a loop to attach a neckstrap. There are just two buttons, labelled 'Menu' and 'Action', which are placed at the top on the left side of the camera, with a micro USB socket on the other side.

The body shell itself is made of shiny black plastic, and if there's any other material known to mankind that's more prone to picking up and showing off fingerprints, we haven't yet encountered it. The camera is extremely lightweight - you could easily wear it all day without really noticing - but still feels reasonably well put together.

Body elements

This little blue OLED display on the front of camera is used to show status messages (here it's just turned on, so is cheerfully saying Hello), and to display and change settings. It's hidden within the camera's body shell, such that it's invisible when nothing is being displayed.

The dome-shaped protrusion beside it hides the PIR proximity sensor.
OMG Life makes a big deal of Autographer's custom-designed wideangle lens, a 3mm F3.2 optic with a huge 136° angle of view. It's of the semi-fisheye type, by which we mean that straight lines towards the edge of the frame get very obviously bent.

The small hole beside the lens is the aperture for the camera's colour and light meter. This allows the camera to monitor the light without having to use the relatively energy-hungry image sensor.
When you're not using the camera, the lens can be protected behind the rotating cover.

The bright yellow inlay is designed to show friends and family that the camera is inactive.
The camera has just two buttons, 'Action' and 'Menu'. 'Action' is used to turn the camera on and off, and manually trigger a sequence of images. It also changes menu settings.

'Menu' is used to scroll through the camera's refreshingly short menu.
The Micro USB socket is used for charging the camera's internal battery, and transferring images to a computer.
There's a sturdy clip on the back, and a loop to attach a strap. The leather lanyard is included in the box.

Accessories

The Autographer comes nicely packaged, but with a minimal set of accessories. You get a rather nice leather lanyard that's easily adjustable in length, and a microfibre carry pouch. Also in the box is a Micro USB cable for data transfer and charging, but no actual charger (we suspect most potential users probably have boxes full of USB chargers these days).

Using Autographer

The Autographer is, from the user's point of view, a very simple device. Press and hold the 'Action' button for five seconds to turn it on, rotate the lens cover to open, and the camera will start recording images automatically. If you want to force it take a set of images at a specific time, press the 'Action' button. Press and hold the 'Action' button again to turn the camera off. That's pretty much all there is to it.

Displays and Menu Options

The front-mounted OLED shows status messages, and pressing the Menu button gives access to some basic settings, which are changed using 'Action'. In a refreshing change from most cameras, there are very few options indeed (the only setting related to taking images is the capture rate):

Setting
Options
Notes
(Status display) - Battery level
- No of recorded images
- Memory usage
- Displayed in percent

- Displayed in percent
Capture • High
• Medium
• Low
~200 images / hour
~100 images / hour
~50 images / hour
Bluetooth • Off
• On
For connection to smartphone
GPS • On
• Off
 
Sound • On
• Off
Turns on and off operational sounds (for sequence shooting and power off)
Indicator status • On
• Off
Blue circle blinks on display whenever a picture is taken

You have to switch on Bluetooth every time you want to connect to your smartphone, which isn't too much of a hardship. What is slightly annoying, though, is that when Bluetooth is turned on, pressing either button on the camera instantly switches it off and disconnects from your phone, and this is all-too-easily done accidentally. We'd prefer it to require either a 'long press' or a confirmation step before dropping the connection.

Sequence shooting

If you want some control over when Autographer takes a picture, then you can press the 'Action' button to initiate a sequence of shots manually. The camera doesn't start shooting immediately, but instead waits 10 seconds before making the first exposure. After that, it shoots another eight frames, apparently at intervals of its choice but usually within 30 seconds or so; this can be cancelled at any time by another press of the Action button.

GPS

One point we've noticed is that Autographer's GPS takes about 10 minutes to work out your location, even in an open environment with a clear view of the sky. Once locked, though, it keeps track of where you are perfectly accurately. Strangely though, the desktop app displays only a rough approximation of your path - the iPhone app gives a much more detailed view.

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Comments

Total comments: 123
12
photo perzon
By photo perzon (10 months ago)

nerdy product can i wear it on my head?

0 upvotes
Burbclaver
By Burbclaver (11 months ago)

There's an App for that.

0 upvotes
fishycomics
By fishycomics (Sep 7, 2013)

make it smaller size of a dice.

0 upvotes
tompabes2
By tompabes2 (Aug 30, 2013)

LOL at the price! :) With Google Glass coming for probably less who would buy this?

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Sep 22, 2013)

Somehow I'm sure people you meet will be more concerned about spy-glasses with direct link to NSA than a black box (though that black box is far from ideal too)

1 upvote
CaseyComo
By CaseyComo (Aug 24, 2013)

Iz teh sok.

0 upvotes
budi0251
By budi0251 (Aug 15, 2013)

a long & very far relatives of Google glass.

0 upvotes
whawha
By whawha (Aug 10, 2013)

There is nothing stupid about it, its a tool that could be very useful for specific tasks. I'd definitely use one for street and documentary photography, but at £400 imho its priced way too dearly.

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Aug 10, 2013)

It's not really street photography or even documentary photography if you have absolutely no input as to what is being photographed or when.

Since the camera makes the decision when to shoot the "photographer" is an unnecessary part of the equation other than being a means of transport.

In that sense you could call surveillance camera images street photography too.

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
whawha
By whawha (Aug 10, 2013)

So deciding where you are going with the camera, what you are aiming it at and what situations you are getting in is not an input?
Is it just the act of physically pressing the shutter that makes a photograph? I would say that there is more artistic input in taking a conscious decision in using surveillance camera footage and organising that footage in a way that it tells a story to , say, taking pictures of cats and obsessing over their sharpness and colour , perhaps spending hours comparing them online with other pictures of cats taken with other cameras ;)

1 upvote
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Aug 14, 2013)

The act of composing a scene and pressing the shutter release button at the right moment is MAKING a photograph. Walking around hoping the camera shoots at the right moment is being a transportation device for a snapshot machine. Maybe I'm l'd old school, but I still believe the "decisive moment" should be up to the photographer to capture. Otherwise it's just luck. The old "Put enough monkeys in a room with a typewriter they'll produce Shakespeare" scenario.

That is truly a situation where one could say "dude, your camera sure takes nice pictures!".

As far as dissecting cat pictures (pun intended), well, every photographer needs to find his niche. If it weren't for those folks camera discussion forums would be lonely places (and probably much more pleasant). :)

4 upvotes
whawha
By whawha (Sep 5, 2013)

Yes, I think you're definitely very old school but nothing wrong with that. :)

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Sep 22, 2013)

I love how you can call everything photography these days.

What whawha does is kinda like calling a random string generator a "writer".

0 upvotes
Jon Ragnarsson
By Jon Ragnarsson (Aug 9, 2013)

Nice try, NSA.

3 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Sep 22, 2013)

That's nothing. Just wait for Google Glass.

0 upvotes
canonalex
By canonalex (Aug 7, 2013)

I like it! It makes photography available to physically challenged people who cannot manipulate the complex menus and scroll buttons.

2 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Aug 8, 2013)

Not to mention mentally challenged people, who will absolutely love it.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
smorti
By smorti (Aug 9, 2013)

Nice derogatory comment there, Manuel.

0 upvotes
Pixnat2
By Pixnat2 (Aug 6, 2013)

Decadent? Perhaps... Stupid? Sure!

3 upvotes
Jim Evidon
By Jim Evidon (Aug 5, 2013)

Finally, a camera that is auto-everything; relieving the photographer even of the burden of actually having to take pictures. Ain't progress wonderful?

5 upvotes
CaseyComo
By CaseyComo (Aug 24, 2013)

All it needs to do now is auto-delete and we are golden.

1 upvote
dmanthree
By dmanthree (Aug 5, 2013)

Three words: get a life. This is really, really stupid.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Sep 22, 2013)

is "a" really a word?

0 upvotes
doctor digi
By doctor digi (Aug 4, 2013)

Several points:

Whether you love or hate this (or Glass), it's coming and you may as well get used to it. This reminds me of early digicams - large, clunky, and with poor image quality. The next gen., or several after, will be cheap, very small, and take great pictures.

As for privacy - what privacy? (if in public). I get photographed by CCTV a zillion times a day - so if people on the street do it, who cares. What I DO have issue with is if someone did this without my knowledge in my home.

What will be even more interesting is when micro-UAVs the size of an insect are (eventually) produced. That's perhaps more a worry than what people can stick around their necks. And that too is coming - perhaps sooner than people realise.

As for this device - way too expensive, way too big. But as I said, this is early days. I'd wear one because I'd like to make a diary and I have no time to write one each day, but I'd only be interested if it was not intrusive (which this thing is).

4 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Aug 5, 2013)

Who cares? I do. You may not care but plenty do. Don't take your own opinions as more than that. People don't want to feel like they are treated like criminals with CCTV's everywhere.

4 upvotes
sdribetahi
By sdribetahi (Aug 5, 2013)

Trollshave, tell it to the street shooter thread.

0 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Aug 5, 2013)

CCTV's and the police state is not the same as street shooting.

1 upvote
doctor digi
By doctor digi (Aug 5, 2013)

Trollshave: it is you who are taking my opinions as "more than that". While I am partly stating "my opinion", I'm mostly just stating what is inevitable - personal always-on camera recording is here to stay, whether you (or I) like it or not. Now, unless you are so sure that there is a chance to legislate in every country in the world and remove the right to take street photography, then I'd say the chances of stopping this are close to zero. Don't forget - you'd have to legislate against street photography, because why should someone holding a camera have more rights than someone wearing a camera? And how will you define holding/wearing once the cameras become really small?

As for my *opinion*. I'm neither for nor against. I can see useful things and also misuse with this tool. My main concern is what happens in private. In the street (i.e.: in public) I still say "who cares".

1 upvote
Lenscraft
By Lenscraft (Aug 6, 2013)

I love the idea of CCTV everywhere, so long as the footage is available to everyone, and not just the State.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Sep 22, 2013)

I think as soon as Google Glass comes out - everyone should aim themselves with high power laser pointers. These can damage DSLR sensors, so surely they can damage Google Glass as well, right?
#
BTW: I have no idea why they heck you compare CCTV to Street Photography, and that to Google Glass or any other spy camera. All of these are completely different things.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
SomebodyFamous
By SomebodyFamous (Aug 3, 2013)

I have a wristwatch that records video

2 upvotes
rowlandw
By rowlandw (Aug 3, 2013)

I already have a ballpoint pen that records (admittedly primitive) stills and video - and it looks like an ordinary pen.

0 upvotes
imsabbel
By imsabbel (Aug 3, 2013)

The sense of this thing aside (there are smaller cell phones with cameras around) - this thing disqualifies itself by its absolutely abyssmal image quality.

5MP is low to begin with, and the real resolution is far worse (I see no features less than 3-4 pixels in size, so those images could be reduces to at most something like 1280*720 if you want a sharp image).

The tiny sensor with a slow lens makes it almost useless except outside at sunshine... and there you got the crap flare resistance, and with such a wide fisheye the sun will be in the frame quite often.

But the last straw, and the worst part, is the price. If it was $50 from a chinese direct distributor, fine. but 400 pound? thats ridiculous!

2 upvotes
RichRMA
By RichRMA (Aug 3, 2013)

Real perverts will want one that fits in a shoe.

0 upvotes
Sebastian Firtman
By Sebastian Firtman (Aug 3, 2013)

Mmm, You need look : www.memoto.com :)

1 upvote
simmybear31
By simmybear31 (Aug 5, 2013)

Too bbbbbb expensive, at £100 or $148 I might just buy one on a whim but at $279 your having a laugh.

0 upvotes
smorti
By smorti (Aug 9, 2013)

And $9/month to use it after 1st year? No thanks...

0 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Aug 3, 2013)

It's not stealthy enough. A small camera head and a box on the belt, connected by a wire, would be better.

0 upvotes
MMitchellorg
By MMitchellorg (Aug 3, 2013)

I'll wear my GOPRO around my neck instead.

3 upvotes
tinternaut
By tinternaut (Aug 3, 2013)

I call Epic Fail on this one. Then again, I also called Epic Fail on Instagram.

1 upvote
John Koch
By John Koch (Aug 3, 2013)

Wouldn't the device work better if part of a hat or eyeglasses? Hanging on a strap, it is bound to shift or dangle about, aligning with the person's line of sight only accidentally. The tortoise (or is that a Tory MP?) in the stop-action video gets cut off.

0 upvotes
ponyman
By ponyman (Aug 3, 2013)

Can't wait for a Hasselblad version ...

9 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Aug 3, 2013)

It will have a hardwood handle bolted to it and will cost £2000.

4 upvotes
PCorvo
By PCorvo (Aug 3, 2013)

And dont forget the grip!!!

3 upvotes
backayonder
By backayonder (Aug 3, 2013)

Why WTF and Why followed by Why springs to mind

2 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Aug 3, 2013)

FAIL! This will be horrible for taking pics of my nine cats...

3 upvotes
springsnow
By springsnow (Aug 3, 2013)

No image stabilization even at that price? I mean considering its usage, IMO some sort of image stabilization is a must.
I do like the concept. I've been thinking of wearing one of those Sony Cybershot TX cameras in a similar fashion. :D

1 upvote
huyzer
By huyzer (Aug 3, 2013)

OMG Life has the built-in OMG for pricing! Wow.

2 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Aug 3, 2013)

Capture the moment people keep saying WTF is that and the horror reply when they understand what it is. Google glass -2.0

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Aug 3, 2013)

Just make an app for your smart phone to do the same thing and wear it around your neck like a tech geek who can't get a date.

6 upvotes
SW Anderson
By SW Anderson (Aug 3, 2013)

Next up, a medicine cabinet which, at certain times of the day, will lob pills at you if you're standing in front of it with mouth open and then open its door. What? You don't get it? Why have to actually reach in, take out and open a bottle or two, then take your pills manually, when technology can do 98 percent of the work?

Eventually, the Chow Plower — speed and efficiency preparing and feeding you a meal, beyond anything you ever imagined. You won't even have to lift a fork!

Seriously, this OMG Life "innovation" comes across as an odd, redundant contrivance in this era when most of the population feels naked without a smartphone-with-camera, and all-weather mini cams are reasonably priced and plentiful.

2 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Aug 3, 2013)

You won't meet the woman of your dreams looking like a creepy camera geek. That means no kids moments ect.

1 upvote
PicOne
By PicOne (Aug 2, 2013)

"what we don't like..
Image quality isn't great"

shocker. I love the understatement though. British humor I think

2 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Aug 2, 2013)

We're probably looking at a Bronze award. Silver at most.

2 upvotes
Alternative Energy Photography

Fellas, try to see the possibilities. Like may creative types, I'm getting a vibe from you .. a lot of resistance to new ideas here. Yes, resistance from creatives. ?

2 upvotes
WellyNZ
By WellyNZ (Aug 5, 2013)

Sadly, that's DPReview readers in the main. Anything that isn't the latest/greatest DSLR or doesn't have a tack sharp lens or is slightly outside of their narrow vision gets knocked.

This isn't necessarily something I'd personally be interested in using but I can see the possibilities of devices like this.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
dylanbarnhart
By dylanbarnhart (Aug 2, 2013)

The concept is absurb for a forum full of photographers. But this is no joke. There is an emgerging flow of thought brought along by Google Glass called Timeline. In the timeline, the present is most important. Then unimportant things in the past slowly fade away. That's how human memory works. Our eyes observe everything constantly, then retain only remarkable things in the past.

A person can just wear this device, or Google Glass, everyday and it silently takes pictures whenever something new or interesting happens. These pictures are only stored for a short period of time. When something interesting happens, the person, or friends can later revisit the photos and make them sticky, meaning to save them permanently. The photos that are not looked at are eventually deleted.

You'd be surprised how many interesting things in life are missed because they didn't seem photo worthy at the time. Think about the interesting moments of your life and whether you have pictures for them.

1 upvote
dylanbarnhart
By dylanbarnhart (Aug 2, 2013)

Let me name a few of those moments that you could've missed:
. When you first met your spouse
. When your kid ran to greet you with open arms
. When the 8rd grade friend punched you in the face
. When you stood in a podium to receive your diploma, and looked over the crowd seeing your parents clapping for you.

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Aug 2, 2013)

When I showed up late for work one time too many and had to go see the vice president of the company (and this was at Leitz, no less.) Alas, there are no photos of the event.

2 upvotes
Josh SZ
By Josh SZ (Aug 3, 2013)

Very interesting. I think you need two of it -ware one in front of you and one in back. Thus you wouldn't miss any actions.

0 upvotes
deleted-13120401
By deleted-13120401 (Aug 3, 2013)

It's great for photographers that inject art into their photography. Including landscape, portraiture, photojournalism (capturing a story rather than a moment). Because they will be further differentiated from the masses.

And this type of device, plus phones, glass etc. is great for photography where content wins and artistry comes second. E.g. The kind of photo we see in news these days captured from security cameras. Because nobody else and nothing better was there.

1 upvote
deleted-13120401
By deleted-13120401 (Aug 3, 2013)

It's great for photographers that inject art into their photography. Including landscape, portraiture, photojournalism (capturing a story rather than a moment). Because they will be further differentiated from the masses.

And this type of device, plus phones, glass etc. is great for photography where content wins and artistry comes second. E.g. The kind of photo we see in news these days captured from security cameras. Because nobody else and nothing better was there.

0 upvotes
deleted-13120401
By deleted-13120401 (Aug 3, 2013)

It's great for photographers that inject art into their photography. Including landscape, portraiture, photojournalism (capturing a story rather than a moment). Because they will be further differentiated from the masses.

And this type of device, plus phones, glass etc. is great for photography where content wins and artistry comes second. E.g. The kind of photo we see in news these days captured from security cameras. Because nobody else and nothing better was there.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Aug 3, 2013)

Hoosh, can you repeat that again, please?
Today something important happened and I didn't have a camera with me to register it: I got into a bus and the driver actually looked at me. What makes this memorable is that they never look at anyone. I wish I had this OMG thingie with me to capture that unique occasion. (The moment I bought my cigarettes was also memorable, but admittedly not so much as that bus driver looking at me.)
It is very important to capture all significant moments in our everyday lives. And there are so many.

2 upvotes
deleted-13120401
By deleted-13120401 (Aug 4, 2013)

Sorry for the repeats. I got an error every time I hit post, then went back and tried again twice because it said to try again later. Surprised to see it worked actually and now annoyed at looking like a noob. Login system seems to have changed to amazon web services which has problems with china, which is where I live.

0 upvotes
sdribetahi
By sdribetahi (Aug 2, 2013)

I thought it would be impossible to top the level of nerdiness seen in photog's that wear a camera with a neck strap or use a vest, but I stand corrected.

0 upvotes
John Koch
By John Koch (Aug 3, 2013)

Better a neck strap than a camera fallen to the ground or getting impregnated with lint in a pocket. Is today's fashion to balance one on the head or to carry it in a rolled-up shirt sleeve? Of course, most don't carry a camera at all, but only a phone.

1 upvote
PatMann
By PatMann (Aug 25, 2013)

Nerdy like Alfred Eisenstaedt, for example.

0 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (Aug 2, 2013)

It's a car camera for your body. Maybe good for police, etc., but really needs smarter software for searching the images. Gordon Bell at Microsoft was pushing this concept for quite a long time, and had some interesting stuff in MyLifeBits, etc. Links at his website: http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/gbell/

1 upvote
f64Craft
By f64Craft (Aug 2, 2013)

$609.59 US Dollars is alittle much for an iPhone accessory.

1 upvote
cfh25
By cfh25 (Aug 2, 2013)

Makes the GX7 at $1000 look a bargain

0 upvotes
Alternative Energy Photography

$610 is dirt cheap if it provides you with proof of having been brutalized by police. This just happened a week or so ago, and the police said that the people had no right to complain to the press. A picture is worth a thousand words.

0 upvotes
skysi
By skysi (Aug 2, 2013)

OMG! The Price!

0 upvotes
Bob Meyer
By Bob Meyer (Aug 2, 2013)

No doubt this is very useful for Alzheimer's patients, but there's a pretty big jump between that and normal everyday wear for everybody, which seems to be how it's being marketed.

0 upvotes
John Koch
By John Koch (Aug 3, 2013)

Would an Alzheimer's patient remember how to view the photos? Would the patient remember who or what were in the photos, or when or where they were taken?

1 upvote
Ted Williamson
By Ted Williamson (Aug 2, 2013)

Initially, this technology was created for Alzheimer's patients in the UK. http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/11/05/lifelogging.camera.memory.loss/

The research showed that these patients would forget significant amounts of their lives even in a few short days. With the cameras, they remembered as much as 85% when presented with photos of their day.

This technology has amazing potential for people who suffer from memory loss.

4 upvotes
Antzutd
By Antzutd (Aug 3, 2013)

@ 400 pounds, it's also for people who lost the concept of value of money.

seriously thou, i understand the concept for alzheimer patients, but the price has to be reduce significantly before making it viable for the average public to use

3 upvotes
John Koch
By John Koch (Aug 3, 2013)

Do the patients really "remember" what is in the photos? Or do they simply see images images and ponder, "Oh, that looks nice," and 5 minutes later not remember seeing the pictures or what they were about?

1 upvote
simmybear31
By simmybear31 (Aug 5, 2013)

As my dad has Alzheimer's I can say that in the very early stages it might be helpful but at the stage he is now he lacks comprehension to switch his TV on (he used to an aerospace engineer who worked on building Concord and Airbus) or to follow a newspaper - so a very small window of opportunity sadly, what I do for him is convert all his old slides to digital so I can show him things from 40 or 50 years ago in my youth and those he often does remember.

Comment edited 43 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Aug 2, 2013)

Interesting abuse of the word "intelligent".

3 upvotes
skysi
By skysi (Aug 2, 2013)

Could be something good for a wedding photog to sit down later and analyse your day. Maybe for some other professional.

0 upvotes
jmmgarza
By jmmgarza (Aug 2, 2013)

Not for me... privacy?

1 upvote
erichK
By erichK (Aug 2, 2013)

Yet another scheme to part the gullible from their money with the illusion of effortless recording of great images of great moments. There was the Brownie box camera, there was 110, and Polaroid and countless cheap plastic cameras. While with concentrated effort a skilled photographer could produce worthwhile images even from these, the main result was hundreds of millions of fading, worthless snapshots. This new toy promises to increase that by an order of magnitude...or two.

The making of images worth a second look almost always requires effort and concentration and disciplined skill. This new toy promises the opposite. But it may well sell.

1 upvote
makofoto
By makofoto (Aug 2, 2013)

As I suspected, the low light performance is not great ... and especially as a party camera ... that's important. Perhaps there should be an Infrared version with a IR flash that is invisible to our eyes. I use to shoot with an IR flash ... pretty neat getting full (IR) exposure in near darkness.

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Aug 2, 2013)

I'd like to have one of these, smaller so I could hide it in my tie clip, to go with my Hai Karate aftershave. But if that's not to be, I still want one for the dog. He's not in a league with Garry Winogrand...yet.

1 upvote
D B Morris
By D B Morris (Aug 2, 2013)

Love the idea of one for the dog - especially if it's a dog big enough to deter thieves!

"A day in the life of my dog" - sounds great.

0 upvotes
makofoto
By makofoto (Aug 2, 2013)

For those of us who have missed being in the moment while we take photos for a big part of our lives, this could be great for certain social and sport functions. Of course there is software to removed distortion. Like anything ... there is a time and a place ...

0 upvotes
makofoto
By makofoto (Aug 2, 2013)

I would think the place to release this would be Japan

2 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Aug 2, 2013)

This could pay for itself, as a party blackmailcam. (grin)

3 upvotes
Ferling
By Ferling (Aug 2, 2013)

Simple question: Would you feel comfortable around folks wearing these?

Thought so.

0 upvotes
Alternative Energy Photography

I might wear one. We'll see how all my friends who love red-light cameras feel about this.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 123
12