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Olympus E-420 Review

June 2008 | By Lars Rehm


Review based on a production E-420

The Olympus E-420 is the most 'junior' member in Olympus line of digital SLRs. It was announced on the 5th March 2008, exactly one year after the launch of its predecessor, the E-410. Like the E-410 it comes with a 10 megapixel resolution, live-view and the SSWF dust reduction system; and like its predecessor at the time it is also the currently lightest and smallest digital SLR on the market, especially if you combine it with the Olympus Zuiko 25mm pancake lens that has been launched at the same time. All in all the E-420 is only a relatively minor update but it does also incorporate a number of new features.

New features (compared to the E-410)

  • Larger, 2.7" LCD display (versus 2.5" on the E-410)
  • Contrast detect autofocus (with select lenses)
  • Face detection in live view mode
  • Auto Gradation (Dynamic Range enhancement)
  • Faster continuous shooting speeds (3.5 vs 3.0 fps)
  • Improved right hand grip
  • Perfect Shot Preview
  • Wireless flash control

Note that a proportion of the descriptive text in this review is taken directly from the Olympus E-410 review, as the cameras are functionally very similar.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

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This article is Copyright 2008 Phil Askey and the review in part or in whole may NOT be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author. For information on reproducing any part of this review (or any images) please contact: Phil Askey

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