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Olympus PEN E-P5 Review

October 2013 | By Richard Butler, Andy Westlake
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Review based on a production Olympus PEN E-P5 with Firmware 1.2

When Olympus introduced the original Micro Four Thirds PEN E-P1 almost 4 years ago in June 2009, it was the first mirrorless interchangeable lens camera to adopt a compact, 'rangefinder-style' body that made no pretence to look like an SLR. It also saw the company striking out in a direction it's followed ever since - designing attractive yet capable little cameras that consciously draw on its long-running film camera heritage. Indeed the SLR-style OM-D E-M5 was one of last year's biggest hits, and even pipped the 36MP full frame Nikon D800 to the title of 'Best Camera of 2012' in our reader poll.

The PEN E-P5 - the fourth model in the E-P range - continues this theme, while adding an array of updates that make it easily the most desirable PEN yet. It includes many of the features that made the E-M5 such a compelling package, such as the same 16MP MOS sensor, advanced '5-axis' in-body image stabilization (now with automatic panning detection), 9 fps continuous shooting, and tilting rear touch screen. It also inherits the refinements debuted on the PEN E-PL5, such as enhanced in-camera RAW conversion, a broad-range 'HDR bracketing' mode, and the ability to specify whether you wish to use in-lens or in-body image stabilization with Panasonic OIS lenses. On top of this it adds-in a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, a 'peaking' display to assist manual focus, and this year's must-have feature: built in Wi-Fi for connection to your smartphone or tablet.

Olympus PEN E-P5 specification highlights:

  • 16MP MOS Four Thirds format sensor
  • Twin control dials (front and rear) with '2x2' dual-mode option
  • 1/8000 sec top shutter speed, 1/320 sec flash sync
  • '5-axis' image stabilization with automatic panning detection ('S-IS Auto')
  • ISO 'LOW' (100 equiv) - ISO 25,600
  • Up to 9fps shooting (5.0 fps with continuous AF)
  • Focus 'peaking' display
  • Intervalometer and Time Lapse movie creation
  • 1.04m dot 3" LCD touchscreen display - tilts 80° upwards and 50° downwards
  • Built-in Wi-Fi for remote shooting (iAuto only) and image transfer to smartphone or tablet
  • Optional VF-4 electronic viewfinder: 2.36M dot LCD, 0.74x magnification (equiv), eye sensor

One key change compared to previous E-Px models is a rearrangement of the controls - gone are the thumb roller and tiny rear dial, replaced by 'proper' front and rear dials that protrude horizontally from the top plate. The E-P5 features what Olympus calls a '2x2' dial interface: a small lever on the back of the camera switches these dials from controlling exposure parameters to changing ISO and white balance. If you don't like this arrangement, the lever can be customized to a couple of other options (described later in this review).

The E-P5 places emphasis on speed: it has a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, which Olympus says should help make best use of the company's F1.8 prime lenses, allowing them to be shot wide open in sunlight. This is aided by the addition of an ISO 100-equivalent 'LOW' setting, although this will likely come at the expense of some highlight clipping. The E-P5 also offers a fast startup time of just 0.5 sec, 1/320 sec sync with the built-in flash (1/250 sec with external units), autofocus tracking at 5 fps, and a fast shutter release mode with a lag of just 44ms (via a custom setting).

Additional features

In traditional Olympus fashion the E-P5 gets a few new features compared to previous models. There's a 'Super-spot AF' mode that allows extremely precise positioning of the AF point when using magnified live view, very much like the one seen on recent Panasonic models. It gains timed intervalometer shooting, along with the ability to assemble time-lapse movies in-camera. The Live Bulb mode, that allows you to monitor the progress of long exposures while the shutter is open, now features an on-screen histogram to help monitor exposure build-up. The image stabilization system is also now always active by default, to provide a stabilized live view feed (especially useful when using telephoto lenses).

The E-P5 also gets Olympus's 'Photo Story' feature that first appeared on the XZ-10 enthusiast compact. This is essentially an extension of Art Filters, allowing you to generate multi-image composites rather like the pages of a photo book, in a wide variety of themes. It may not be something enthusiast photographers will use all the time, and arguably better suited to lower-end PEN models, but it's good to see Olympus continuing to come up with new ideas.

Colour options

The E-P5 comes in three colour schemes; black, silver and white. The all-black version that we've shown in this review has a textured matte finish which we expect will be appreciated by street photographers - it looks particularly fine when coupled with the black versions of the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm 1:1.8, M.Zuiko Digital 45mm 1:1.8 and M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm 1:1.8 lenses announced alongside. The camera also comes in a very handsome silver-and-black finish that harks back to Olympus's classic cameras from the 1960s and '70s, and a white version with a beige grip. Olympus will also be offering a limited edition model with a wooden grip, and a range of premium accessories such as leather cases.

Silver E-P5 with black 14-42mm kit zoom and VF4 viewfinder White E-P5 with silver 14-42mm lens

Kit options

The E-P5 will be available either body-only for approx. £900/€999/$999, with the M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6R II collapsible zoom for £1000/€1099, or with the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm F1.8 and VF-4 EVF for £1350/€1449/$1449.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 415
123
stanmkl
By stanmkl (1 week ago)

Message from Olympus Japan:

Thank you for your e-mail regarding our product.

We apologize for any inconvenience for
the blurred/shaken images at certain shutter speeds.

As you know "anti-shock 0sec" for E-M1 has been updated and we
believe that this update can help to resolve the shutter shock issue you mentioned.

At this point, there are no firmware updates for E-P5 to resolve the
shutter shock issue.

However, we are planning to update the firmware for E-P5 similar
to "anti-shock 0sec" as well. Please wait for the update to be
released for a while.

We are sorry but we are not able to tell you when the update will be
released at this point.
Please check Olympus homepage from time to time for the latest
information of firmware.

We appreciated your kind cooperation and understanding,
looking forward to see your satisfaction on our service and product.

Best regards,

C.Nishino                 
Customer Support Center
OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP. Tokyo, Japan

Comment edited 49 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Horaciux
By Horaciux (3 weeks ago)

Hello,
A friend of mine is willing to buy my PEN E-PL5.
I'm not sure if buy E-PL5 again or go to this beauty with the extra cost.
I have 17mm f1.8 and 45mm f1.8 lenses.
My wife will love photo story and wifi connection for her whats app groups (she does not have facebook) will it work straigthforeward?
is it worth the change?
Thanks

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ChrisPercival
By ChrisPercival (1 month ago)

What lens was used for the studio scene test?

0 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (3 weeks ago)

The 45mm f1.8.

It's a pity they don't use the old 50mm f2 lens from 4/3 DSLRs since it is a bit sharper.

The m43 75mm f1.8 lens could be a better m43 alternative to the classic 50mm since it is also very sharp.

0 upvotes
Jon H Laake
By Jon H Laake (1 month ago)

On my E-P5, focus peaking seems to work with dedicated m4/3 lenses only, not with mf lenses that are attached via an adapter (zeiss zf.2 lens and metabones speed booster). Does focus peaking require electronic coupling between camera and lens??

0 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (1 month ago)

If it's like the E-M1, I think you have to set focus peaking to a function button. Dig in the menus and reassign one of the buttons to do just that.

The camera doesn't know when your manual focusing with legacy glass, you have to tell it (through the function button)

1 upvote
Troutguy
By Troutguy (3 months ago)

so, $1000 bucks for a camera prone to make blurry images.

and this wins a "silver award"? lol how about you scrap this "award" system , a camera prone to make blurry images deseves no award. period.

1 upvote
decodeddreams
By decodeddreams (3 months ago)

This cameras pretty convenient and the qualities nice. I haven't really touched my Canon 5D Mark II since I got this little thing.

1 upvote
photo perzon
By photo perzon (3 months ago)

The flash does not bounce. The LCD does not do selfies.

0 upvotes
The Big One
By The Big One (2 months ago)

"The LCD does not do selfies."

And nothing of value was lost...

3 upvotes
Infared
By Infared (3 months ago)

I absolutely LOVE my E-P5. Just an amazing camera. (Mine is in for repair right now as the main dial was not changing info on every click...). I have no shutter shock issue that I can find, tho. Tested in all the modes, shutter speeds with MANY lenses...cannot observe the phenomenon. I believe this may be a manufacturing or a batch issue....many posters here are not having the issue (but I do believe there is an issue.)
I think Olympus needs to be responsible to its loyal customers and issue a statement (or fix?), regarding this situation and also the shearing off of the lens mounts on the new 12-40mm Pro lens. BOTH of these situations are widely documented on the web...especially this open discussion about the shutter shock issue here throughout DPR's review of the camera. C'mon Olympus...step up!

0 upvotes
Infared
By Infared (3 months ago)

FYI..I do keep my camera set to the I-IS1 setting, which is standard full-time 5-axis IS. I totally avoid the Panoramic auto detect mode out of paranoia from reading about this "issue".

0 upvotes
biggles266
By biggles266 (3 months ago)

Hi, I have noticed my E-P5 front dial is starting to only sometimes change settings, or do its job, sometimes it does nothing. I googled it and this comment of yours came up first. What country are you in, and has Olympus given you any trouble over this warranty repair? Have you heard if it is a common problem with the dials going bad? p.s. I haven't seen any shutter shock either. I wonder if it is more common for users who don't use a viewfinder.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
biggles266
By biggles266 (3 months ago)

Where did you read that the auto-detect IS my contribute to the problem? Do you have a link?

0 upvotes
Mark Chan
By Mark Chan (3 months ago)

DPreview editors, could you please enlighten me (us) how to activate the tone curve settings? I haven't been able to get to the secret chamber...

0 upvotes
geoglyphs
By geoglyphs (3 months ago)

Page 14 of the review (Image Options) explains this: However, rather than offering the OM-D's handy in-viewfinder tone curve diagram, the P5 requires you to press the exposure compensation button, then the INFO button, then use the left and right buttons to adjust the shadow response. Pressing INFO again changes attention to the highlight portion of the curve.
But first, make sure that you have dedicated one of the camera's buttons to exposure compensation. I think that is the default function of the Fn button, but you can set this in menu-> detailed camera options -> B: Button/Dial/Lever.
I agree with DPReview that setting the tone curves while processing your RAW files is a more elegant solution.

0 upvotes
Ratzfatz
By Ratzfatz (4 months ago)

I am still struggeling. The camera was at Olympus for the second time. They changed the complete CCD unit this time. But the issue is still there. Sometimes I shoot 10 to 20 pictures without any fault. Then out of the next 10 pictures 5 are completely blurred. All with the same lens and settings (17mm 1.8) Sometimes I can even see on the screen that the picture will be blurred. The camera focusses, I get the green focus frame and light in the upper right corner, confirming focus (set to focus priority of course), I hear the IBIS working as usual, but the picture is not sharp. The performance of the IBIS is generally poor compared to my EM5 or EM1. With the 17mm I need a minimum of a 1/20 to get a decent sharp picture.
Check these pictures, the were shot in a sequence within a few minutes:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/s1rjtnd7t93xojg/XFqWWI1_n1

I am not sure if this is 'shutter shock' or another fault during taking and processing the picture.

0 upvotes
RStyga
By RStyga (4 months ago)

My test at 42mm (84mm ff eq.) on a firm surface revealed no blur issue. A far more comprehensive test in the following link also revealed no such issue whatsoever:

http://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=54504

I think DPR's interpretation is subjective at best.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (4 months ago)

Any news from the shuttershock issue cameras? I own the camera for 3 months now, but I don't have a telelens. Till 60mm I don't have the shuttershock issue when using the right technique of making images.... that has to be said. That was a lot easier with my nikon D600 and D800 ;-)
But on the other hand, try to make a nice shot with the D800 and the 105mm macro attached! With a shutter speed of 80-160 it will be quite difficult to make a sharp image. And have you tried it with a 600mm handheld? No chance @ all of making a sharp image with shutter speed 80 or so.
I'm getting used to the EP-5 now, and to be honest I like it more and more! 4 lenses (9-18, 45 and 60mm) Waiting for the ply 2.8 telezoom ;-)

0 upvotes
ThatsTheShot
By ThatsTheShot (4 months ago)

Have used the EP5 for a couple of months now and have not experience the shutter shock issue some users have reported. I even set the camera on Shutter speed priority and set it on 1/80s and can not produce the blur that some users have reported. I am wondering if the issue reported may be batch dependent?

0 upvotes
biggles266
By biggles266 (4 months ago)

Owned an E-P5 for a fortnight now, no sign of shutter shock for me.

0 upvotes
Richt2000
By Richt2000 (4 months ago)

Try the 12/2 at 1/160s. I get two exposures on the same frame its so bad...

0 upvotes
geoglyphs
By geoglyphs (4 months ago)

Did exactly that just now. No problems.

0 upvotes
Richt2000
By Richt2000 (4 months ago)

Goodbye ep5. The blurring of images is totally unacceptable. Too many ruined photos.
The fix of adding 1/8s delay to my shutter is a joke, and hardly a fix.

Shame, loved everything else about it. I won't be buying another Pen - they have obviously dropped the ball with the QC on the pen line.

A7r and GM1 thankfully give me tack sharp images :-)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Stupidco
By Stupidco (4 months ago)

Having had the E-P5 for three months, I've re-read your review and make the following 2 comments. (1)Your review states you used the IS Auto setting for the stabilizer. That setting is for Landscape Panning. eg Panorama mode. For the photos in your examples, the general IS-1 would be appropriate. If your problem is vertical use IS-2. If horizontal use IS-3. (2) When I turn on my machine and press OK the focal length 15mm is shown at the bottom right of the screen. (The last length I entered.) If I mount a Sigma 30mm, 30mm appears at the top right of the screen. The stabilizer setting remains at 15mm. Which is why I change the stabilizer setting the match the lens. I don't suppose this would be relevant, unless pixel peeking is practiced, but if the stabilizer automatically recognizes a native lens, why does the recorded stabilizer setting not change automatically?

0 upvotes
geoglyphs
By geoglyphs (4 months ago)

Good point, but I guess DP means IS1 = Auto, and not IS AUTO = Landscape Panning.
The manual says the following about the image stabilizer, which is somewhat confusing:
S-IS1: Auto
S-IS2: Vertical IS
S-IS3: Horizontal IS
S-IS AUTO: Landscape Panning I.S.

0 upvotes
Henry Falkner
By Henry Falkner (5 months ago)

3 weeks with 3- and 5-axis stabilisation on my SH-50 convince me of its necessity - and the P5 has 5-axis stabilisation. So I read the review. Double exposures at 1/80 second and thereabouts are indeed worrying. Are you sure that is not caused by Parkinsons? The stabilisation should take care of any roller blind shutter slap. The first of the sample videos is plain over-exposed (not uncommon in that kind of setting). The second sample has no bass in the sound (when compared to my SH-50 videos), suggesting the wind shield setting was at its highest. I get the impression the reviewer does not like video anyway. The level of customisation possible is stupendous indeed, yet the P5 does not look as knob-encrusted as my SP-570UZ.

0 upvotes
keithwee
By keithwee (5 months ago)

hi,

a request by TN ARGS a month ago for any updates by DPreview is mothballing... anyone official statement?

There's no statement from Oly Singapore as of today after my communication with them but so far the I've tried at least 4 sets of the Pen but i've not experienced the said shutter shock issue. I really hope to see the phenomenon (yes, in a warped sense)

0 upvotes
Baron Von A
By Baron Von A (5 months ago)

Here is what I got back from Olympus support:
"I also saw your second email with the sample images, thank you for sending these samples.
Please note that as mentioned on the DPreview article you referenced, this type of problem is not considered a mechanical defect of the camera, and in most case is due to vibration introduced by pressing the shutter button or vibration coming from other moving mechanisms of the camera. This can also vary by many other factors, such as lens used and way of holding the camera. To reach higher levels of sharpness in critical situations, the 'Anti Shock' function available in the Menu that can help reduce this blur.
If you feel strongly, even after using the anti shock function and tripod, that there may be something else wrong with your camera, we encourage you to send this in to our service center for testing, and possible repair or adjustments. For instructions on how to send this item to the Olympus service center"

0 upvotes
Ratzfatz
By Ratzfatz (5 months ago)

Sorry, just found out they replaced parts of the CCD-unit, so no blame on the Olympus service but still it has not resolve this problem.

0 upvotes
Ratzfatz
By Ratzfatz (5 months ago)

After almost 4 weeks I got the camera back today without any comment from Olympus. I asked several times for information, the only information I got was I have to be patient. Obviously they did nothing with it as the EP-5 still produces blurred pictures. I am really really annoyed and disappointed about the camera and the way I am treated by Olympus.
I cannot recomment buying a EP-5 because there seems to be a good chance that you get a defective camera and Olympus doesn't care much.

0 upvotes
SteveNunez
By SteveNunez (5 months ago)

One ugly camera...just my opinion, which doesn't count for much, but I find it ugly!

0 upvotes
ThatsTheShot
By ThatsTheShot (5 months ago)

I wish it has a flip out screen (one that you can twist and turn) so I can take low angle shots in the portrait orientation.

0 upvotes
Baron Von A
By Baron Von A (5 months ago)

I am one of the disappointed owners of E-P5. The shutter shock is visible at 1/80 - 1/250 range even with 17mm. You have to be blind or indifferent to the quality of your work not to notice it. I went to the local store and tested the other copy to find out it to have the same problem. I believe all bloodline is affected. This is unacceptable for the camera of this price range, shame on you Olympus! I have a case created with Olympus Support regarding this shake and they are investigating further. I encourage any user who are not satisfied with the IQ to do the same thing. Let them work on fixing their mistakes.

BVA

2 upvotes
MajorMagee
By MajorMagee (6 months ago)

I've tried and tried with a variety of lenses over the range of shutter speeds in question but can't seem to be able to make the "shutter shock" problem occur on my E-P5 (even checking images at up to 500X). Mine was purchased from Japan back in June, so perhaps it really is just a matter of one particular production lot versus another.

For now I'm back to just shooting with confidence and not worrying about it anymore.

4 upvotes
ThatsTheShot
By ThatsTheShot (5 months ago)

I have also tried the same on variety of lenses over the range of shutter speeds in question but can't seem to produce the mentioned "shutter shock" issue. I purchased mine from a camera store in Australia.

0 upvotes
Dylthedog
By Dylthedog (4 months ago)

You may laugh but try a taking a 'cat picture' - you know you should with a new camera anyway, it's the law :-P

Check the whiskers and I can almost guarantee you will see a double image if the settings are in the range mentioned here. I use an E-PL5 and get the results identified by DPR.

0 upvotes
TN Args
By TN Args (6 months ago)

I would like DPREVIEW to give us an update here on the 'shutter shock' issue. The more I read, the more confused I become.

Are we looking at:
- all EP5 have this because it is a design fault?
- all EP5 have this but the degree varies?
- some EP5 have this and need to be changed or repaired because they are faulty? Is it repairable?
- it is nothing but a settings problem?
- it is nothing but a user/handling problem?

Is there something different about the EM5 that makes it exempt? And the EM1?

DPREVIEW: haven't Olympus given you any definitive response yet?

7 upvotes
Northgrove
By Northgrove (5 months ago)

Another problem that I saw in the forums is that some have experienced "shutter shock" at f/8. Any blur at this aperture on micro 4/3 may not be about that, but due to diffraction. Most m4/3 lenses seem to perform the best in the f/4-f/5.6 range. When testing for details like shutter shock, avoid using smaller apertures than that regardless lens.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (6 months ago)

Hello dear photo friends :-)
Today did some testing with the EP-5 again, third time.... to reproduce the shuttershock.
And... again, it did not occur with my camera. Will upload some pics to the test oly in my gallery.
But these shots were made with the 60mm macro f2.8 and the 45mm 1.8. And to be honest, the 14-42 can't stand in the shadow of these two lenses. The pics (if I shoot with it) of the 14-42 are less sharp and crispy as the 45 and to some extend the 60mm.

2 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Dear Willem
Shutter shock seems quite evident if you look at 2719888.jpg the thumb's fingernail at x:1512 y:1554 and the 2719890.jpg vine at x:2309 y:1895 and x:2345 y:2204. You chose moving and largely out of focus objects again though. But the sharp definition of the short up-down shock movement trace is characteristic. The 2719889.jpg Orion building shows wonderful optics, no CA and great detail, except in the distant green trees. The flying red leaf is great :-)

0 upvotes
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (6 months ago)

Oke, will look @ the pics again. Today another tour through the settings, I have the 1/8 shock option on right now. Let's see what happens.

0 upvotes
MajorMagee
By MajorMagee (6 months ago)

FreedomLover,

I see what you're talking about in Willem's pictures, but why would it only occur in the out of focus areas and never on the sharply focused edges? If the sensor was being jostled by the Shutter Shock/IBIS combination wouldn't everything in the image have motion blurred edges of the same magnitude?

1 upvote
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (5 months ago)

thats indeed interesting... Tried some other options now, but sometimes it occurs and sometimes in -a kind of the same situation - (I'm not a tester) it does not occur.... so it does bug me a bit. Will try this weekend to make some pictures with antishock.

0 upvotes
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (4 months ago)

Did not have much time to experiment... but wat do you guys think of this image? shot with the fuijfilm, to me it seems that this camera also suffers from the shutter shock issue...
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/reviewsamples/photos/2772739/dscf9888?inalbum=fujifilm-xf-23mm-f1-4r-samples-gallery
Isn't it just the way you handle the camera?

0 upvotes
Ratzfatz
By Ratzfatz (6 months ago)

I bought the EP5 last week. I tried it first with the Pana 12-35. Almost any pictures taken at around 1/60 or 1/80 at 12 to 30mm are massively blurred and I can replicate this any time. I sent these pictures to Olympus and awaiting a reply.
Turning in the menue the permantly IBIS off when touching the release button and have it only active when taking the picture (full press on release button) helps a lot. But this cannot be a solution. My OMD has a perfect working IBIS under any circumstances for thousands of pictures now and the body of the OMD (except from the EVF) is actually smaller than the EP5's. I hope my camera is just defect rather having a general construction fault.

Check this picture taken at 35mm and 1/80, IBIS set to Auto:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/qgeq1alnb5a74ii/London-7-2.jpg
I was standing still and taking my time to take it.

1 upvote
geoglyphs
By geoglyphs (6 months ago)

The resolution of this picture is rather low, but still I can tell that there is much more blur than just the vertical one.

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Geoglyphs is right, there is massive horizontal movement in that picture, as can be seen on the number plate. Defective unit.

1 upvote
Stupidco
By Stupidco (6 months ago)

A lens has a focal length. The focal length in the image stabilizer can be changed. But how can the stabilizer know the effective focal length with a zoom? Are we comparing a general stabilizing function with the expectations of precision focusing?

0 upvotes
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (6 months ago)

I own one myself, with fine lenses. This does not look the same as my images! So, your camera or lens has something that's not working very well....
Hope Oly helps you out.

0 upvotes
nrdlnd
By nrdlnd (6 months ago)

Hello,
You must tell how you have taken this picture! Have you used the VF-4 viewfinder? Have you squeezed the trigger (not pushed it). Have you had your elbows against your chest to stabilize the camera? The reason I'm asking is because no camera can compensate for bad practice, If you have done all this and the pictures still are blurry then theres something wrong with your equipment. Was the stabilisation off on your lens?

I have just taken pictures handheld with my new E-P5 and the 17mm 1,8 at 1/60s (IS=auto) and the result is very sharp. I don't have the Pana 12-35 so I can't test that lens.

Regards

0 upvotes
nrdlnd
By nrdlnd (6 months ago)

I like to add: And double check your settings! I did get wrong white balance and I had probably changed that setting. "Auto" works well most of the time but not always especially not for fluorescent light. Olympus gives you all possibilities to customize your camera but it's also possible something get's wrong in that process!

Regards

0 upvotes
Ratzfatz
By Ratzfatz (6 months ago)

I am a quite experienced Oly user. I took thousands of pics with my OMD and EPL5 and know quite well the limits of the IBIS. I still hope the camera is just defect. Olympus asked for uncompressed pictures and I will get an answer soon.

0 upvotes
tokugawa
By tokugawa (6 months ago)

Did you activate lens priority IS? If not, maybe IBIS and the OIS on the lens are interfering with each other.

0 upvotes
alan over 80
By alan over 80 (6 months ago)

I have always maintained the shutter button should be at the bottom right a la Rollei. Particularly if one can look down into EVF at waist level.

1 upvote
Stupidco
By Stupidco (6 months ago)

The Image Stabilizer can be turned off. The Image Stabilizer can be turned on. But how can the Image Stabilizer be a little bit on?

The DP review reports that the camera can recognize the focal length of a native m4/3 lens, so it doesn't matter the the focal length set in the stabilizer remains at its manufactured setting. Put an adapter/ lens on the camera and the focal length in the image stabilizer must be changed by the user to a setting that corresponds to the focal length of the lens with the adapter. Take off the adapter/ lens and put on a native lens and everything is alright; even though the focal length set in the image stabilizer remains as changed when the adapter/lens was fitted.

The image stabilizer has been on all the time. Sometimes the focal length set in the image stabilizer matters? Sometimes the focal length set in the image stabilizer doesn't matter? Where is the logic and consistence in this? Out suffering shutter shock? I set the stabilizer to match the lens.

0 upvotes
geoglyphs
By geoglyphs (6 months ago)

I bought the black E-P3 kit with 17mm 1.8 lens and the VF-4 electronic viewfinder for 1249 euros at camera.nl in Rotterdam. (In the meantime, the shop raised the price though). I find that very reasonable, considering the price of the separate lens (529 euros) and the separate viewfinder (280 euros). That leaves 440 euros for the body.
Since the review of the E-P5 on dpreview I have tried to reproduce the mentioned problem, but without any 'luck'. Pictures are consistently sharp. I used the 75mm lens at 1.8 aperture, varying the ISO so that the shutter speed would fall within the range that is supposed to cause the shutter shock problems. Anti-shock was not used. I used the normal release button (not the touch screen) and held the camera with the viewfinder to my eye.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
geoglyphs
By geoglyphs (6 months ago)

I mean of course the black E-P5 kit.

0 upvotes
zateon
By zateon (6 months ago)

i don't understand why this blur is not picked up in other models with the same IBIS.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (6 months ago)

I am surprised that the unreasonably high price is not listed among the cons. A lot of higher-class cameras such as Sony NEX-6, Fuji X-E1 and now even Pana GX7 are actually cheaper, making E-P5 very bad value.

5 upvotes
TN Args
By TN Args (6 months ago)

None of them have IBIS. This capability is important. So far it is unique. The GX7 inbuilt IS apparently is only 1-stop (Cameralabs review) and that's effectively zero in my book.

Are you saying IBIS should be 'free'? Canon charges $100's for every lens sold with IS!

2 upvotes
Northgrove
By Northgrove (5 months ago)

Most importantly, the E-M5 is cheaper and it has IBIS, and also an EVF and weather sealing that this camera lacks. The E-P5 was expected to come down in price, but still really hasn't. Yes, the E-P5 has a 1/8000 shutter speed and slightly better handling but I don't count these as premium features to make it pricier than the E-M5. It looks more like a crippled, but refined version (as for the features it kept) of the E-M5, with some lessons learned...

0 upvotes
drdwo
By drdwo (6 months ago)

Video is described as mushy, indistinct with clumsy sharpening. As a P5 owner I cannot confirm this. Here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIAAIClmA6s is a GH3/P5 video shootout where it is not so easy to distinguish the video quality. Focussing is not an issue for me because I prefer manual focussing with video. I also don't want to produce huge files, so 20MB/s is ok for me. Has someone produced P5 videos clearly showing artefacts/moire or any other serious problems? Is there somewhere a GX7 / P5 video comparison?

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

The GH3 video you link to shows heavy aliasing throughout (staggered lines). Is this normal for that camera or did Blunty add this in post-production? Also Youtube heavily degrades videos adding high compression.

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympus-pen-e-p5/11
Sample video 2 shows strong moire patterns on the shirt of the guitar player, which is to be expected for a camera lacking an AA filter.
For Sample video 1, the starting airplane on the mountain lake, DPReview could have configured OIS to S-IS2 Vertical IS (Image stabilization applies only to vertical (Y) camera shake. Use when panning the camera horizontally), but the unsteady holding of the camera limits the usefulness of that sample anyway.

1 upvote
drdwo
By drdwo (6 months ago)

Tried to reproduce the moire pattern in the 2nd video using my P5 and a grey/black striped shirt from different distances - no success. The video is described as 60i, only the M5 but not the P5 has a 60i mode. P5 is 30p. Can some other P5 owner confirm the moire effect?

0 upvotes
drdwo
By drdwo (6 months ago)

There is a myth stating that M5 and P5 have no AA Filter, this is not true: http://fourthirds-user.com/forum/showthread.php?t=10734
Both have a weak one, but I am still searching info about their AA filter settings for video. For M1 the situation is different.

0 upvotes
drdwo
By drdwo (6 months ago)

There is a strange shaking at the right side in the second video, which seems not present in the middle. Any explanation? Cannot reproduce this with my P5 IBIS on - why would anyone shoot video with IBIS off? Finally, after a lot of experimenting I could reproduce some moire, but to a lesser extend. Searched all my clothes to find something with the "right" striping, was only visible from a much larger distance than in video 2.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (6 months ago)

DPR wrote: "The E-P5 is the first Olympus to include Wi-Fi"

This is not true, there were at least SH-50 and E-PL6 before it.

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (6 months ago)

Those two cameras came bundled with Wi-Fi SD cards but it wasn't a feature included in the cameras themselves.

3 upvotes
Dylthedog
By Dylthedog (4 months ago)

The E-PL5 had a wifi SD card, the E-PL6 has native wifi but is only available in SE Asia. I'm not sure the E-PL6 came out before the E-P5 though.

0 upvotes
Infared
By Infared (3 months ago)

Dylthedog...incorrect. I imported an E-PL6. There is no Wi-Fi...same thing as E-PL5...some were bundled with Wi-Fi SD card..(not mine)...I also have the E-P5...I believe that that is the first MFT offering from Oly with Wi-Fi.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
AngelicBeaver
By AngelicBeaver (6 months ago)

What happened to the ability to compare noise reduction levels? I'm really hoping that Olympus will go back to allowing control over the amount of noise reduction. Excepting for the high ISO shadow noise, I loved my EPL2 with noise suppression turned off. The grain had a lovely characteristic. My EPL5 took a big step backward. It smears fine detail no matter how low the noise suppression is set. I was hoping Oly would restore some of this control (and hopefully do a better job with shadow noise) in the new camera, but I don't see the noise comparison tool in this review.

Am I missing it?

0 upvotes
keithwee
By keithwee (6 months ago)

mu-43 forums had someone who tested for shutter shock on EP5 and GX7.

text below was lifted wholesale from: http://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=53461&page=4

"Doesn't seem to be much difference between them. Both cameras were repeatably a little bit soft in the neighborhood of 1/100 to 1/125, handheld (stabilization turned on). Neither was particularly bad - just barely visible if you looked REAL close at normal viewing size, but both noticeable at 100%. The EP5 is weakest right at 1/100 and sharpens up at 1/125. The GX7 is slightly soft at 1/100 but notably soft at 1/125.

On a tripod (2 second delay, stabilization turned off), the EP5 is still soft right at 1/100, but is fine above and below that. The GX7, oddly, is soft at 1/60th but not at any other shutter speed."

seems like we have quite a few models to test for shutter shock maybe?

Comment edited 27 seconds after posting
1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

"On a tripod (2 second delay, stabilization turned off, Olympus 75mm lens), the EP5 is still soft right at 1/100, but is fine above and below that. The GX7, oddly, is soft at 1/60th but not at any other shutter speed."
http://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=53461&page=4

"Which makes me wonder if the E-M5 has the same issue.
Does it?" dombi (1 day ago)

"As stated very clearly in the review, no."
DPReview Andy Westlake (21 hours ago)

"another poster had made the rather broad global statement that there was nothing wrong with any of those shutter speeds on the E-P5 - and I doubted that their testing was anywhere near comprehensive enough to warrant such a sweeping conclusion"

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

"The specific mass of the lens used matters. Different weight lenses will have cause this effect at different shutter speeds and different degrees on different camera bodies.
Because of the fact that the propagation of the vibration is likely a resonance frequency, it's entirely possible that, say, the 45mm lens will show this effect on one body, while the 75mm will not, but the 45-175 again WILL show it."
http://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=53461&page=5

1 upvote
ginsbu
By ginsbu (6 months ago)

I'm glad to see this test updated to include results when using the anti-shock feature. I use is regularly to reduce risk of shutter shock with my E-M5. However testing with the 2 second delay is still needed in order to confirm DPR's claim that the E-P5's problem is IBIS failing to correct for motion introduced when pressing the shutter button, not shutter shock.

1 upvote
martink3S04
By martink3S04 (6 months ago)

This sounds an awful lot like the shutter shake issues on the PZ 45-175x (same ranges and effects). I have that lens and on my older GF3 it was terrible in those shutter ranges (but works almost perfectly on the EM-5). I have the EM-5 and while it doesn't consistently have shake issues, the IS does significantly reduce in effectiveness when the focal lengths are long (over 100mm). At very short lengths, you can handhold reliably under a quarter of a second and even with the 45 1.8, you can often get below 1/10th, but once you get much longer, the IS just can't hold steady enough (it starts to skip around). Maybe this effect is amplified in the smaller body? On the EM-5, IF you can allow the camera to stabilize for a few seconds (and/or brace against a solid object such as a tree) the problem goes away.

0 upvotes
Stupidco
By Stupidco (6 months ago)

Is anyone testing the mismatch between the camera recognizing the focal length of the lens and the stabilizer not recognizing the focal length of the lens. The camera can be working one one focal length and the stabilizer can be working on a different focal length. Unless the two match, focusing error seems highly likely. The stabilizer can be made to recognize the focal length of the lens fitted, using the settings function of the camera.

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (6 months ago)

I think you're fundamentally misunderstanding what the focal length setting does. It's only used with third party lenses used on adapters, for which the camera needs to be told the focal length for the IS system to work. It doesn't have to be set with native Micro Four Thirds lenses, because they tell the camera their focal length automatically.

0 upvotes
m87501
By m87501 (6 months ago)

Which lens(es) were used, with which in-camera settings for the tests that showed the double-imaging? Thanks..

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Stupidco
By Stupidco (6 months ago)

I used four 1:8 Olympus lenses. I think the manual has been baldly written. The camera changes the focal lens to match the lens. The stabilizer does not respond to the lens attached.

To change the stabilizer: Press menu button. Down arrow to Menu 2. Right arrow then left arrow down. Right arrow on Image stabilizer. Right arrow on still picture. With any s-is setting press right arrow. You will get the focal length menu. Up or down arrow till you get focal length of lens. Press OK.

The focal length setting at the bottom of the screen will now match the focal length of the lens.

It seems unlikely than focusing will be entirely accurate when the two focus settings disagree.

Set the focus lengths and take a picture. Set the stabilizer focus length to to 8mm and take a picture. Set the stabilizer to 1000mm and take a picture. Compare the results to discover the extent of any differences.

Gone to bed.

0 upvotes
Luke_A_P
By Luke_A_P (6 months ago)

Just to add my 2 cents. I have tested this in some detail on my E-P5, I agree with most of what dpreview concluded:
1. It is worst in telephoto ranges, with a shutter speed ~1/160s
2. A heavier lens reduces or eliminates the effect. I tried the 14-150mm MFT zoom (worse) and a 70-150mm OM zoom (better)
3. Using a tripod eliminates the effect
I will add the following:
1. It affected by how you hold the camera. Holding the camera closer to your body with two hands and a firm grip, or better still using a viewfinder, can emliminate the problem.
2. Setting the 1/8s anti-shock mode does not seem to fix the problem.
And I will speculate on the following:
I don't think it is a button pressing issue, I think it is a shutter shock issue. I suspect the acceleration of the shutter is causing the camera to move in your hand. You can feel the shutter through the body, much more than the click of the button. As for comparison to the M5; faster shutter = more force = more displacement of the camera?

6 upvotes
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (6 months ago)

I practically tested this with my ep5. One time I had some double image effect on a spiderweb, the others were without any disturbing issues.
But, I did use the evf and that makes it a much more stable position. What might help as well is the release by screen if you don't have the evf.
I owned a d800 with several lenses, the macro 105 f2.8 was also very difficult to operate! When using a 300mm or 400mm on a d800 without tripod isn't working well either....
You can find some test images in my gallery under test. These are just shots to test, so nothing special :-)

0 upvotes
Northgrove
By Northgrove (5 months ago)

With EVF to stabilize against helping, tripod helping, most trouble in tele ranges... All this taken together just tells me you need to better stabilize the camera, and that this is completely unrelated to shutter shock. All these things to aid against the problem is common sense to any decent tele photographer, and no, not even 5-axis IBIS will help as well with telephoto as it does with wide angle. This doesn't mean any camera components are faulty or quirky; it's rather the laws of physics.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
keithwee
By keithwee (6 months ago)

Dropped by the local Olympus service centre today for a visit & chatted with the technicians there regarding the 'shutter shock' issue.

In short, they will push this matter upwards and provide a answer. :)

will update here whatever answers I get.

4 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Well done, keithwee :-)

Maybe they can awake the dragon.

1 upvote
photohounds
By photohounds (6 months ago)

Interesting that this issue should be 'discovered' as micro four thirds began gaining more popularity.

The moving mass of a mirror (and sub-mirror) is MUCH heavier than a shutter and will shake the camera more, yet no one sees that as a "problem".

In the 'film days', one had to learn how to hold a camera and gently massage the shutter release for sharp pictures. Many 35mm camera makers added mirror lock up to their better models - always to "reduce camera shake". Sometimes I managed a hand-held shot with a 300mm lens at 1/8th second if the subject also remained still.

Most of the pics of dimly-lit alcoves in this gallery were taken at speeds down to 1/5th hand held

http://photohounds.smugmug.com/Places/Australian-War-Memorial/i-Tz3hbrm/0/L/P9079217-L.jpg

I looked at thousands of my other images, and found ZERO evidence of this "problem".

Simple solution: be still while shooting and don't blame something else.

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

You need to look at the speeds at which this mostly occurs here.

And you are right the mirror was a problem, that's why it is being replaced.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Stupidco
By Stupidco (6 months ago)

More re image stabilizer.

You can actually change the focal length in all of the 4 still picture settings in the image stabilizer, to various lengths between 8mm and 1000mm. As this can be done, I imagine that changing the focal length to the appropriate setting will have an impact on the way the stabilizer works and on the results achieved when taking an exposure. I've not bothered to test this hypothesis.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

A need for calibration could explain why some lenses are more affected.
It's also telling that they still don't employ qualified translators.

E-P5_INSTR_MANUAL_EN.PDF page 53:
http://olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_support_manuals.asp?id=1647

Reducing camera shake (image stabilizer)
Choosing a focal length (Micro Four Thirds/Four Thirds System lenses excluded)
Use focal length information to reduce camera shake when shooting with lenses that are not
Micro Four Thirds or Four Thirds system lenses.
• Select [Image Stabilizer], press the INFObutton, use HIto select a focal length, and
press Q.
• Choose a focal length between 8 mm and 1000 mm.
• Choose the value that most closely matches to the one that is printed on the lens.

0 upvotes
m87501
By m87501 (6 months ago)

Yes I found that focal setting too and changed it last night. I also found the "anti-shock" setting buried in the menu which delays the shutter by 1/8 second after pressing it, and now need to try it without that set 'on', will try it just straight pushing the button with ibis and without.

Am in the middle of testing/shooting this EP5 and so far have not found any instance of the double-blur using the 17mm 1.8. Need more time & shots to be sure, but so far nothing...not a single one. Would like to find an issue upfront if it's there.

0 upvotes
grendak
By grendak (6 months ago)

This is only useful (and only helps) if you are using non-micro four thirds lenses. Otherwise the camera already recognizes the focal length (and you can see it on screen and in exif). So this setting will not help the issue at hand.

0 upvotes
keithwee
By keithwee (6 months ago)

changing of focal length settings is only needed for non MFT lenses. Hence it should not form part of testing here.

I'm getting a bit frustrated as I am unable to reproduce even 1 instance of the 'shutter-shock'. I've tried it on the 17/2.8, 17/1.8, 12-35/2.8 and the 14-45mm (mix of oldest and newest lenses)

I am also waiting for Olympus to answer this issue. Have highlighted this to them over the weekend.

0 upvotes
Stupidco
By Stupidco (6 months ago)

The camera recognizes the lens length. The image stabilizer does not recognize the lens length.

0 upvotes
tokugawa
By tokugawa (6 months ago)

@Stupidco: yes it does. The image stabilizer is controlled by the camera. The focal length setting is ONLY used when using a lens that does not transmit focal length information. So if you're using a M43-lens with electronic contacts, the focal length setting is ignored, and the camera (and thus the IS) recognizes it automatically.

0 upvotes
dombi
By dombi (6 months ago)

The E-P5 and the E-M5 use the same IBIS mechanism. Which makes me wonder if the E-M5 has the same issue.

Does it?

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (6 months ago)

As stated very clearly in the review, no.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Users report the same problem with the OMD EM5, even in this thread.

Also did you see goblin's question?

2 upvotes
white shadow
By white shadow (6 months ago)

Now, with all the spanners in the works for the E-P5, lets wait for the review on the E-M1.

It will be very interesting to know whether this "problem" will appear in the E-M1. Until then, everybody can hold on to their money for the time being.

It may be a good thing until things settle down. With the US budget shutdown still going on, the future seems bleak and may get worse.

Best to hang on to your money.

2 upvotes
grendak
By grendak (6 months ago)

Very glad to finally see a review that mentions the sensor shake/shutter shock. Most just believe the hype that the new 5-axis IBIS is the best thing since sliced bread, but aren't looking closely at images (especially in the telephoto range). I tried two E-P5's (assuming the first one was poorly manufactured) and ultimately sent them both back because they were so horrible around shutter speeds below 1/250 or focal lengths above 200mm. I hope Olympus listens and does something to correct the issue before continuing to throw this new IBIS system in every camera from now on! For now I'm sticking with my E-PL5

3 upvotes
Stupidco
By Stupidco (6 months ago)

The manual says 'the image stabilizer cannot correct camera shake that occurs when the shutter speed is set to the slowest speed.' It does not say what the slowest speed is relative to.

0 upvotes
JEROME NOLAS
By JEROME NOLAS (6 months ago)

Panasonic 14-42 power zoom lens had the same issue, right? Is it fixed?

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
dombi
By dombi (6 months ago)

No.

2 upvotes
XAA
By XAA (6 months ago)

Unfortunately I have no any doubts regarding results shown by DPR. I also saw shutter shock in case of shutter speed in range 1/40-1/250. Effect is practically independently of IS mode. I saw this even if IS was switched off completely. Sometimes result was catastrofic even in case of lenses with short focal range under shutter speed about 1/200. The only solution was to use hard tripod which is crazy for this kind of camera. I tried to speak with some another owners of P5 but have no got confirmation of the problem. So many peoples met this problem, but many never saw this. From another side I am sure what DPR has informed Olympus about the problem several months ago and tried to get another pc of camera for the test. The first note about the problem was shown on this site about 2-3 months ago.

0 upvotes
keithwee
By keithwee (6 months ago)

hi,

its interesting to read about e shock shutter issue. Have you all checked with Olympus about it? Having double images/blurring from 1/80 to 1/200 is definitely serious enough for any user to seek compensation or demand rectification.

I've emailed Olympus and Panasonic about the issue, hope we will have clearer answers as so far the whole issue seems very murky with differing views.

3 upvotes
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (6 months ago)

Hi,
I probably don't understand the issue... I tried to do my best and reproduce it with my EP5.... I fixed it one time: outside, spiderweb, macro (60mm), handheld.... but I fixed it to get the same shot without double image effect.... so it could be that the spiderweb was moving in the wind too much... In my galleries you'll find an album Test Oly EP5 with some practical tests.

2 upvotes
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