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Olympus PEN E-P5 Review

October 2013 | By Richard Butler, Andy Westlake


Review based on a production Olympus PEN E-P5 with Firmware 1.2

When Olympus introduced the original Micro Four Thirds PEN E-P1 almost 4 years ago in June 2009, it was the first mirrorless interchangeable lens camera to adopt a compact, 'rangefinder-style' body that made no pretence to look like an SLR. It also saw the company striking out in a direction it's followed ever since - designing attractive yet capable little cameras that consciously draw on its long-running film camera heritage. Indeed the SLR-style OM-D E-M5 was one of last year's biggest hits, and even pipped the 36MP full frame Nikon D800 to the title of 'Best Camera of 2012' in our reader poll.

The PEN E-P5 - the fourth model in the E-P range - continues this theme, while adding an array of updates that make it easily the most desirable PEN yet. It includes many of the features that made the E-M5 such a compelling package, such as the same 16MP MOS sensor, advanced '5-axis' in-body image stabilization (now with automatic panning detection), 9 fps continuous shooting, and tilting rear touch screen. It also inherits the refinements debuted on the PEN E-PL5, such as enhanced in-camera RAW conversion, a broad-range 'HDR bracketing' mode, and the ability to specify whether you wish to use in-lens or in-body image stabilization with Panasonic OIS lenses. On top of this it adds-in a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, a 'peaking' display to assist manual focus, and this year's must-have feature: built in Wi-Fi for connection to your smartphone or tablet.

Olympus PEN E-P5 specification highlights:

  • 16MP MOS Four Thirds format sensor
  • Twin control dials (front and rear) with '2x2' dual-mode option
  • 1/8000 sec top shutter speed, 1/320 sec flash sync
  • '5-axis' image stabilization with automatic panning detection ('S-IS Auto')
  • ISO 'LOW' (100 equiv) - ISO 25,600
  • Up to 9fps shooting (5.0 fps with continuous AF)
  • Focus 'peaking' display
  • Intervalometer and Time Lapse movie creation
  • 1.04m dot 3" LCD touchscreen display - tilts 80° upwards and 50° downwards
  • Built-in Wi-Fi for remote shooting (iAuto only) and image transfer to smartphone or tablet
  • Optional VF-4 electronic viewfinder: 2.36M dot LCD, 0.74x magnification (equiv), eye sensor

One key change compared to previous E-Px models is a rearrangement of the controls - gone are the thumb roller and tiny rear dial, replaced by 'proper' front and rear dials that protrude horizontally from the top plate. The E-P5 features what Olympus calls a '2x2' dial interface: a small lever on the back of the camera switches these dials from controlling exposure parameters to changing ISO and white balance. If you don't like this arrangement, the lever can be customized to a couple of other options (described later in this review).

The E-P5 places emphasis on speed: it has a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, which Olympus says should help make best use of the company's F1.8 prime lenses, allowing them to be shot wide open in sunlight. This is aided by the addition of an ISO 100-equivalent 'LOW' setting, although this will likely come at the expense of some highlight clipping. The E-P5 also offers a fast startup time of just 0.5 sec, 1/320 sec sync with the built-in flash (1/250 sec with external units), autofocus tracking at 5 fps, and a fast shutter release mode with a lag of just 44ms (via a custom setting).

Additional features

In traditional Olympus fashion the E-P5 gets a few new features compared to previous models. There's a 'Super-spot AF' mode that allows extremely precise positioning of the AF point when using magnified live view, very much like the one seen on recent Panasonic models. It gains timed intervalometer shooting, along with the ability to assemble time-lapse movies in-camera. The Live Bulb mode, that allows you to monitor the progress of long exposures while the shutter is open, now features an on-screen histogram to help monitor exposure build-up. The image stabilization system is also now always active by default, to provide a stabilized live view feed (especially useful when using telephoto lenses).

The E-P5 also gets Olympus's 'Photo Story' feature that first appeared on the XZ-10 enthusiast compact. This is essentially an extension of Art Filters, allowing you to generate multi-image composites rather like the pages of a photo book, in a wide variety of themes. It may not be something enthusiast photographers will use all the time, and arguably better suited to lower-end PEN models, but it's good to see Olympus continuing to come up with new ideas.

Colour options

The E-P5 comes in three colour schemes; black, silver and white. The all-black version that we've shown in this review has a textured matte finish which we expect will be appreciated by street photographers - it looks particularly fine when coupled with the black versions of the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm 1:1.8, M.Zuiko Digital 45mm 1:1.8 and M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm 1:1.8 lenses announced alongside. The camera also comes in a very handsome silver-and-black finish that harks back to Olympus's classic cameras from the 1960s and '70s, and a white version with a beige grip. Olympus will also be offering a limited edition model with a wooden grip, and a range of premium accessories such as leather cases.

Silver E-P5 with black 14-42mm kit zoom and VF4 viewfinder White E-P5 with silver 14-42mm lens

Kit options

The E-P5 will be available either body-only for approx. £900/€999/$999, with the M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6R II collapsible zoom for £1000/€1099, or with the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm F1.8 and VF-4 EVF for £1350/€1449/$1449.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 494
1234
RichRMA
By RichRMA (9 months ago)

Knew it wasn't as good as the E-M5. I still think the images are less sharp out of camera.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

i don't see that

0 upvotes
SW Anderson
By SW Anderson (9 months ago)

I wonder if the Olympus Pen E-PL5 has the same problems. Unfortunately, it appears DPreview only does previews of E-PL models, not reviews.

2 upvotes
Jorginho
By Jorginho (9 months ago)

I am unsure but noted some of my pics I took on a holiday were unexplicably blurred. I went through them and compared it with other pics of the same cam. On a tripod and long exposures everything was fine. I have found that the blurred pics indeed were taken at the same shutterspeeds (1/100 to 1/200 s). So my guess is that EPL5 does have this problem too...

2 upvotes
thecameraeye
By thecameraeye (9 months ago)

Yep, same observation here. Beyond that shutter range my photographs were incredibly sharp. It's very easy to fix that using the Anti-shock feature though. I really wonder why there's no mention of it in the review.

0 upvotes
Elite83
By Elite83 (9 months ago)

It's a nice device, but I can't see spending that kind of money on an ILC that wasn't even APS-C.

1 upvote
waitformee
By waitformee (9 months ago)

A camera is not just about the sensor size.

12 upvotes
name here
By name here (9 months ago)

Also note that latest Oly sensors perform as well as Canon's APS-C sensors. There's virtually no advantage to [Canon] APS-C in terms of noise or dynamic range. Other brands' APS-C do a little better.

5 upvotes
Jorginho
By Jorginho (9 months ago)

Is the sensosize more important the the IQ? You'll be hard pushed to find any differences between this sensor and APS-c sensors.

0 upvotes
rpm40
By rpm40 (9 months ago)

I am actually coming to prefer the m4/3 sensor size. I can shoot wide open at f1.7 or 1.8 in lower light and still get enough depth of field, and I can shoot landscapes only stopped down to f 5.6-8.

On the other end of things, if I want to limit depth of field, the 45mm 1.8 or any longer lenses give enough control for portraits, etc. It is a nice middle ground.

The performance from the new sensors is definitely good enough. Give one a try.

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
1 upvote
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

+1 rpm40

so many times i read about "shallow DOF", as if that is the holy grail in photography.
for me, DOF very often ruins tings.

though it's a thing, you can learn, many people are just overstrained.

one example, where a guy shot a em5 with a voigtlander lens mountet. here, the LENS was the main issue. but due to the shallow DOF, you hardly can see the lens details... fail for me

http://media.focoro.com/converted/reg/e2v/fc8ov4/8ow80og4g4/wronka-om_d_e_m5_with_voigtl_nder_nokton_17_5mm_f_0_95.jpeg

0 upvotes
iShootWideOpen
By iShootWideOpen (9 months ago)

Here's a camera review of all top of the line smartphones on the market by a top quality LA Times.

http://framework.latimes.com/2013/09/28/iphone-5s-camera-comparison-test/

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (9 months ago)

Find any banding boys?

0 upvotes
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (9 months ago)

The shutter shock problem is one that people have been complaining about for a long time with Olympus models. The others without the 5-axis IBIS, on those IBIS sometimes can make images look WORSE if you don't turn it off. Others have complained of blurred images around the 1/100 second mark, which is a ridiculous thing to have happen, 1/100 second should be PLENTY fast enough to prevent hand-held blur unless you're shooting with longer lenses.

In fact I switched to Sony NEX largely for this very reason & in fact I never see this problem anymore since I did so.

If mirrorless is to be a viable SLR alternative, it's going to need to be able to work the same in such ways. If you can get away with 1/80 or 1/125 second hand-holding for portraits etc on an SLR, you should with mirrorless too, regardless of the differences in weight & how they're hold. Otherwise there's no point in having mirrorless at ALL.

2 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (9 months ago)

Worth noting that Panasonic cameras also suffer from the shutter shock.

I can easily reproduce it on my GX7 at 100-150mm FLs (that's 200-300mm eq).

Sony NEX uses first curtain electronic shutter, which largely negates the shutter shock effect.

0 upvotes
mapgraphs
By mapgraphs (9 months ago)

Robin Wong's review of the ep5:

http://robinwong.blogspot.com/2013/06/olympus-pen-e-p5-review-street-shooting.html

See his Initial Thoughts article also:

http://robinwong.blogspot.com/2013/05/olympus-pen-e-p5-initial-thoughts-and.html

1 upvote
ivey3721
By ivey3721 (9 months ago)

I read somewhere that Robin Wong is Olympus' employee, isn't he?

1 upvote
white shadow
By white shadow (9 months ago)

He joined Olympus in Malaysia only about a month ago after he find his regular engineering job is becoming too taxing on him. He has to work about 12 hours a day very frequently to complete urgent project deadlines.

His E-P5 review was done before that. He uses many types of cameras including Sony. His blog is on photography in general. He is still working on his EM1 review for the moment.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

Yes he is, as he disclosed. @ White- he also disclosed he favored Olympus equipment (kudos to him on both disclosures) though he did attempt to portray himself as more objective than he was during the E-5 review. But that was then and this is now- still doesn't change the outcome, you need to weight the pluses and praises accordingly.

I am not saying his reviews are useless, they present a side of the camera that is very good to know, and he being a photographer shows real photography which I think it's great! But some things have to be weighted accordingly - that's all.

0 upvotes
TN Args
By TN Args (9 months ago)

Not one mention of the words shake or blur in relation to image quality.

0 upvotes
white shadow
By white shadow (9 months ago)

His joining Olympus Malaysia may be a good thing as he would be able to bring up complaints he encounter more effectively with Olympus Japan.

0 upvotes
white shadow
By white shadow (9 months ago)

@Raist3d

Most of us who use cameras has some preference of one over another. His happen to be Olympus. His reviews are not as comprehensive as we expected. We can always tell him that on his blog.

On the issue of not mentioning of the words shake or blur in relation to image quality it maybe that he didn't encounter such a problem. We can ask him this question too on his blog. I am equally interested to know.

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

@White - the issue is not that he can or can't have a preference. The issue is that if someone favors a brand heavily, you have to put a different weight to some of the things said. That's all.

Now that he is fully disclosed as an Olympus employee, you know he is paid to make the brand look good and promote the products. Kudos to him for disclosing it.

Once again, that doesn't mean his overviews of the product can't be valuable, but you bet a company employee reviewing the company's product you have to put some counter view or weight to some of the claims. That's pretty straightforward.

PS: I have told him myself what I have thought from time to time on each review. So that homework on my part is done, though a couple of times I didn't tell him the best way.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (9 months ago)

Noise is now on par with Canon APS-C (70D)

Impressive.

8 upvotes
abortabort
By abortabort (9 months ago)

Erm, it has been for a while, the sensor in the E-P5 has been used by Olympus for 18 months or so.

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (9 months ago)

I guess I haven't been following closely, then. The 70D is new, however, so all the more impressive to match Canon's latest APS-C for noise with a smaller sensor.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

Yes but when people think good APS-C knowadays, they think Pentax/Nikon/Fuji, which is not Canon. Canon is clearly a bit behind the times here. The K-5 of over two years ago, still does better.

4 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (9 months ago)

50% of ILC are still Canon, so it's relevant.

And while the Sony sensors have good low ISO shadow noise (and DR) compared to Canon, they don't beat Canon in high ISO. Compare this camera to the D7100 in the new Studio shots and there is no advantage to Nikon.

1 upvote
Jorginho
By Jorginho (9 months ago)

And all other things are better than that sensor.

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

Actually they do beat Canon at high ISO. A K-5 easily beats the Canon at high ISO, and so did the D7000 (same K-5 sensor).

It's not relevant because saying "we finally match current worst APS-C" doesn't mean much, particularly when the other option has been there for over two years now (and still is better than m43/rds)_.

1 upvote
zigi_S
By zigi_S (9 months ago)

Pentax uses in raw NR. And it looks bad.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (9 months ago)

A k-5 does not beat even a 60D at high ISO. It's the same sensor as the D7000.

0 upvotes
SHood
By SHood (9 months ago)

"shutter shock" is a problem with all mirrorless cameras. Smaller body is part of the problem but also due to the shutter requiring a close/open to start the exposure and then another close/open to end it. This quick double shutter action is different than DSLRs which just need to open to start the exposure and then close to end it.

I have found with my GH3 that shooting at hi-speed continuous shooting does help as liveview is disabled so you don't have the double shutter action except to start the first image and end the last image in the sequence. The electronic shutter on Panasonic bodies also helps but is limited.

The new 1/8000s shutter speed on the E-P5 and E-M1 has probably made it even worse as the shutter is now designed to move even faster. Only the global shutter will totally eradicate this.

0 upvotes
Robert Morris
By Robert Morris (9 months ago)

So you are saying that this also happens with Sony, Fujifilm, Samsung, Pentax, Canon, Ricoh, and Nikon mirror-less cameras also? I have not read anything in any of the reviews for those cameras about this major problem.

1 upvote
SHood
By SHood (9 months ago)

All prior m43 bodies had the issue as well and nothing was said in a review until now.

2 upvotes
jonikon
By jonikon (9 months ago)

I have never experienced shutter shock with my Nikon V1, so no, it is not a problem with all mirrorless cameras. Maybe Olympus just can't get good engineers since they are having financial problems?

1 upvote
John Driggers
By John Driggers (9 months ago)

RE: V1-Have you been using the mechanical shutter or the electronic shutter? I've got two V1s and shutter shock is demonstrable with the mechanical shutter--I always use the electronic shutter. I pick up my Panasonic GX7 in a couple of days. The electronic shutter was one of the reasons I selected it and chose to sell my OMD EM5.

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Gaëtan Lehmann
By Gaëtan Lehmann (9 months ago)

Not every mirrorless camera has this double mechanical shutter action per shot. The NEX (and the SLT, though not exactly mirrorless) cameras have a first electronic curtain that avoids that.
See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tpYDet-aUs
This may also be the case for other makers.
The GX7 also has a full electronic shutter mode but it limits the maximum shutter speed, is not usable with the flash, and shows rolling shutter deformations...

2 upvotes
rrr_hhh
By rrr_hhh (9 months ago)

Most other makers don't have an IBIS. I guess this is adding to the problem, since the sensor can move more easily when the shutter is operating

0 upvotes
SHood
By SHood (9 months ago)

IBIS is not the main issue. Both Panasonic and Olympus bodies share this issue equally.

0 upvotes
deleted-13120401
By deleted-13120401 (9 months ago)

Thanks for the good work. I'm looking forward to being able to compare the amazing DR performance on p17 with the latest Panasonic when you finish with that. Yours is my favourite DR comparison for the richness and succinctness of info... other websites don't go into as much detail or exclude certain brands.

1 upvote
CJ Lan
By CJ Lan (9 months ago)

I dislike this new studio setting. I really have hard time differentiating the quality of image between different cameras. Plus, it defeats the opportunity for me to make comparison with previous cameras. Why does dpreview make such a change?

2 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (9 months ago)

There were several reasons behind the change. You can read about them and about the things we have tried to add with the new scene.

An introduction to our new studio scene

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (9 months ago)

I love that it has a true low light setting to show more of a "real world" high ISO test.

1 upvote
rrr_hhh
By rrr_hhh (9 months ago)

I don't like the new studio setting either : I understand the need to change, but I don't appreciate the new setting, because everything is so scattered over the frame and it is difficult to pick the right place to look for sharpness.
I wonder why the choose to replace the 50mm F2 with the 45mm F1.8 : that lens is less sharp than the macro and not so good to judge the sensor capabilities.

0 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (9 months ago)

I still think that the DPreview should have the category of bronze medals in their options when reviewing a camera, and I'm not even talking about this camera specifically that personally quite like the camera, but as far concesual more logically and not radical assignment medals. Even in the Olympic Games there is always place for the bronze medal...

3 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (9 months ago)

Everybody has to be a winner, eh?

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

Funny thing: dpreview USED to have bronze awards :-) So they decided to remove them. They may have had a good reason for doing so.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 33 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (9 months ago)

This is the most "PEN-looking" of the digital PEN series yet. Pity the lenses don't really match.

1 upvote
Anfy
By Anfy (9 months ago)

Well, you can always mount - like I do on my other m4/3 cameras - some PEN F/FT lenses, like the 38mm f/1.8, 40mm f/1.4, 42mm f/1.2 or the lovely 38mm f/2.8 pancake!

0 upvotes
micksh6
By micksh6 (9 months ago)

There have been numerous reports about shutter shock (what you call camera/image shake) on E-M5 and other Pens at DPR m4/3 forum.
The shutter shock effect depends on camera body, lens and operator, you were just lucky that you didn't see it on E-M5 (and 17mm F1.8 wasn't available then).

You are wrong that it's caused by shutter button. It's easy to verify this - set up 2 second auto-timer and compare results. I don't see that you did this.
Most people use anti-shock setting - it's more effective than timer. But the shock is caused by shutter curtain movement and it may exist on tripod with timer or remote release.

6 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (9 months ago)

We shot handheld using the touch shutter and didn't see this particular shake pattern. We shot with the camera on a tripod *without* self-timer and didn't see this particular shake pattern. I don't see why you'd think it would come back again, if we turned the timer on.

3 upvotes
JohnAn
By JohnAn (9 months ago)

So, does the touchscreen feature involve a longer delay between the first closure of the shutter and the shutter opening? Does mounting the camera on a tripod affect the vibration? There are plenty of unknows, and I imagine the reviewers have thought about them and perhaps done unreported testing. Testing with anti-shock (if that's available) obviously would be of interest.

0 upvotes
micksh6
By micksh6 (9 months ago)

You wrote "lightweight cameras like the E-P5 are simply more prone to shake than heavier SLRs, and specifically to vertical movement just from pressing the shutter button"

I am saying that timer will eliminate shutter button movement but it will not get rid of shutter shock.
The shutter button may cause camera shake but generally it has very little to do with this if you press it carefully.

When you shoot using touch shutter you are holding camera differently. This affect how shock wave is distributed. Depending on operator this may either reduce or increase shutter shock effect. Many people see improvement when holding camera relaxed.

Of course tripod stabilizes camera. Check Anders W threads in m4/3 forum. He investigated shutter shock on E-M5.

5 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (9 months ago)

This is the E-P5, not the E-M5. It's a different camera with a different problem.

7 upvotes
ginsbu
By ginsbu (9 months ago)

From the description of your testing, I don't think you've established that. It all seems compatible with the shutter shock problem of the E-M5, where how the camera is held (including holding the camera differently when using the touch shutter release) can influence the appearance and degree of blurring. Testing using the self-timer (not anti-shock) while holding the camera in the same manner as has previously produced blurring should clarify the matter: if you still get blurring, it's the shutter itself — not pressing the shutter button — that's causing the problem (same as E-M5).

4 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

I have to say if holding the camera affects IBIS so much, that still reads to me like a problem, don't you think? Hell, you could say depending how you hold the camera affects how much blur you get- for ANY camera IBIS or not.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
rrr_hhh
By rrr_hhh (9 months ago)

It is a problem of course, but a different one than DPreview review indicated.

0 upvotes
ginsbu
By ginsbu (9 months ago)

@Raist3d: The shutter shock issues with the E-M5 isn't (primarily) an IBIS issue, but an issue of the impact of the shutter itself: how you support the camera alters how the impact of the shutter closing then opening before exposure translates into camera motion and hence blurring. DPReview is claiming the E-P5 has a different problem caused by IBIS failing to counteract camera body motion introduced by pressing the shutter button, but I don't think they've conclusively established that.

0 upvotes
micksh6
By micksh6 (9 months ago)

2 Andy Westlake
I don't think your logic is consistent. After you said that "lightweight cameras like the E-P5 are simply more prone to shake", you can't ignore the fact that E-P5 weights exactly the same as E-M5, so, it's equivalent camera in your problem statement.

It's the same problem as was reported on all Oly cameras including E-M5, Panasonic cams with OIS lenses (14-42mm X PZ in particular) and also on GX7 with any lenses. I wonder how could you not know about this, you don't read your forums?

What is consistent is inconsistency - shutter shock depends on operator and tripod too much, also on body and lens, so it's too hard to come up with solution that's good to everybody.

Shutter shock can be defeated in many ways, but camera owners have to spend some time testing to figure out what way is the best for them. That is only if they see this. Many are not affected.

BTW, you have traces of shutter shock on your studio samples of E-M1. You didn't enable anti-shock, did you?

2 upvotes
reginalddwight
By reginalddwight (9 months ago)

I am surmising you received a defective production copy with the built-in image stabilization.

Did you contact Olympus for a replacement test sample?

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (9 months ago)

We've used about 5 samples of the E-P5 all told, and all show the same thing.

20 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (9 months ago)

Hopefully it is an adjustment that can be fixed by a firmware update.

0 upvotes
oluv
By oluv (9 months ago)

this problem occured since the E-P1 some years ago, and they still haven't fixed it. why do you think they would fix it with a firmware suddenly?

0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (9 months ago)

I thought it was less costly to produce a camera without optical viewfinder and mirror box???

21 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (9 months ago)

It probably is. What's that got to do with anything?

3 upvotes
jonikon
By jonikon (9 months ago)

A thousand dollar camera body and it doesn't come with a viewfinder? Really? So you have to buy the big ugly VF4 EVF separately for another $300 which makes the camera body $1300 and to top it off, it takes blurry pictures! Who in there right mind would buy the E-P5 when the OM-D E-M5 with an EVF and no blurry pictures can be had for around $900? With designs and marketing like this it is little wonder Olympus is in financial difficulties.

21 upvotes
Mirrorless Crusader
By Mirrorless Crusader (9 months ago)

Who in their right mind would take anyone seriously who couldn't even be bothered to learn the difference between "there" and "their"?

12 upvotes
sunhorse
By sunhorse (9 months ago)

@Mirrorless
Why not refute what jonikon wrote? Are his points valid? If not, then provide counter arguments.

Who would take ad hominem attackers seriously?

13 upvotes
Chris_in_Osaka
By Chris_in_Osaka (9 months ago)

Are you talking suggested retail prices? Which market?
Here in Japan, the E-P5 plus VF-4 and 17mm f1.8 is sold in a kit for ¥110,000, or about $1,100 (tax included). I think that is quite reasonable considering the lens alone is about $420 here (¥42,000).

1 upvote
lighthunter80
By lighthunter80 (9 months ago)

I got the kit with VF-4 and 17/1.8 and it was $1,499. I sold the 17 for $450 as I owned it already from my E-PL5. If you look at the kit this camera is kind of reasonably priced, especially if you are going to keep all components of the kit.

I had the VF-2 before and thought about selling the VF-4 at about $250 so the camera price would have dropped for me to $800 but then I started using the VF-4... I kept it and sold the VF-2 for $200 instead.

So overall the E-P5 is only overpriced a bit if you buy the body only.

1 upvote
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (9 months ago)

Saying something "isn't too overpriced" is really hollow praise.

These things shouldn't be overpriced at all. After all, they do have competition.

Should the EP5 body cost more than a Fuji X-E1? (which comes with both a lens and a viewfinder for $999). I don't think it should.

Should the EP5 body cost about the same as a Sony NEX7 body? I don't think it should.

Olympus certainly isn't offering a great value here when you need to spend $300 more to get an EVF, and at least $100 more to get any sort of lens.

But that is just my view. Obviously, Olympus has different ideas.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (9 months ago)

This is like complaining that a Honda Civic can't fit your family of 7. Duh, that's how they designed it. It's not for you if you have a family of 7.

Incidentally, you CAN get a viewfinder for this camera, so maybe it is more like a car with an optional 3rd row.

1 upvote
ZAnton
By ZAnton (9 months ago)

I want to buy it for my wife. She doesn't need it, and without VF the camera is smaller.

0 upvotes
micksh6
By micksh6 (9 months ago)

Heck with EVF, this camera isn't for old skool, it's for growing generation. Smartphones don't have EVF, why should camera have one?

Built-in EVF uglified GX-7, NEX 6 and 7. These can't be put in small belt pouch anymore, EVF is protruding too much. Want EVF - get an optional one, seems like a logical modular concept.

0 upvotes
RStyga
By RStyga (9 months ago)

If Olympus 5-axis state of the art IS system cannot offer blur-free images in such speeds as 1/160s, then what sort of 5-axis state of the art IS system is it, really?? Are we sure it's not mirror vibration? :-)))

This is a major disappointment and I agree with the reviewer taking the gold award on account of that.

I hope a FW update would improve things...

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
15 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (9 months ago)

”then what sort of 5-axis state of the art IS system is it, really??”

One that clearly messed up the closed loop feedback parameters slightly.

It's tricky stuff, moving the sensor around to exactly compensate for camera motion. Get it ever so slightly wrong and it creates camera shake rather than reduces it!

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Jorginho
By Jorginho (9 months ago)

I have the EPL5 and it does show up every once in a while. Rarely but you want to trust your cam and it seems I cannot do that completely. I totally agree that this means no gold award. For a cam at that price, you can ask for perfection when it comes to these kind of things.

2 upvotes
Usher99
By Usher99 (9 months ago)

Image blurring looks exactly like shutter shock. Please restest wiht anti vibe mode at at least 1/8 sec. The pens tend to have noisier shutters, thus more shutter shock. I think the OM-D has the best in this regard but only a small amount of formal testing has been done. It would be nice to test all mirrorless cams for this.

http://cameraergonomics.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/micro-43-shutter-shock-revisited-omd-em.html

http://www.wlcastleman.com/equip/reviews/pz14-42/index.htm

The OM-D does best here. Very surprsed this issue is totally ignored by reviewers. At least Oly supplies a work around .
I think the OM-D shutter may be quiter, ie less shock than the EM-1 but have seen no formal testing.
An Electronic first curtain eliminates this but at the cost of motion artefacts and trouble using flash.

1 upvote
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (9 months ago)

"The issue is most prevalent at shutter speeds between 1/80th and 1/250th of a second, and most obviously visible when using short telephoto lenses [...]"

Wow. That's a biggie. No, that genormous and unacceptable for a camera positioned that high.

P.S. Gotta try to see whether the touch AF would do anything with the shutter shock on my GX7.

4 upvotes
NowHearThis
By NowHearThis (9 months ago)

I nearly bought and EPL1 but this issue kept me from buying it and other Olympus cameras. Until they implement an Electronic First Curtain shutter, those light weight Oly's will continue to suffer from Shutter-shock.

1 upvote
John Driggers
By John Driggers (9 months ago)

Try the electronic shutter on the GX7 (and turn off sounds for a silent camera).

0 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (9 months ago)

@John, I have already tried the e-shutter. I like it for what it is but I do not like it being so poorly integrated with the rest of the camera. Panny should have made an option to use the e-shutter when it is OK to use the e-shutter instead of the mechanical one. Manually switching between shutters is a chore and recipe for failed shots (since the e-shutter comes with its own bunch of limitations).

0 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

which limits are that?

0 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (9 months ago)

E-shutter is slow. It is said that it takes 1/10 of a second to retrieve image from the sensor. My observations are that GX7 is even slower, at around 1/7-1/8 of a second. That causes moving object to appear distorted in the frame. That also causes any flickering light source to introduce dark/light bands to the image. Because 1/10-1/7 of a second is real long time.

0 upvotes
Matthias Hutter
By Matthias Hutter (9 months ago)

Is there an button to switch the studio scene to 4 competitors?

1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (9 months ago)

Not at the moment.

We're experimenting with a 2-way comparison that can then be pushed to show other cameras from the descriptive text below the scene. We were worried that having four cameras would mean you might not notice the changes occurring as you clicked the links and that the navigation pane would be off the top of the page as you read the descriptive text.

However, a 4-up comparison is available from the bottom of the 'reviews' menu on all pages. If you click on the New Studio Scene Comparison Tool link, you should be able to choose any four cameras you like.

Comment edited 49 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Dave Luttmann
By Dave Luttmann (9 months ago)

Dynamic range charts for comparison are missing...at least on my computer

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (9 months ago)

That should be fixed shortly.

2 upvotes
Mirrorless Crusader
By Mirrorless Crusader (9 months ago)

Also it's a joke that the SL1 gets gold and this gets silver

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (9 months ago)

If I may distract you from your crusade for a moment - the review explains why it misses out on a Gold.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
16 upvotes
Mirrorless Crusader
By Mirrorless Crusader (9 months ago)

Okay. I just think every mirrorless camera should get a gold award and no DSLRs should ever get one.

7 upvotes
moimoi
By moimoi (9 months ago)

Lol!!!

1 upvote
thx1138
By thx1138 (9 months ago)

Woeful IS alone should see it excluded from gold. That level of shake from 17mm lens at 1/80 is pathetic with IS on. I can get a high % of sharp shots with my ancient 400mm IS lens at 1/60 and for 35mm I can get a good % of sharp shots at 1/20 without IS.

5 upvotes
Peter Bendheim
By Peter Bendheim (9 months ago)

Your name clearly gives away your agenda - silly really, you might to better if you were more subtle. The SL1 is a very competent camera, it's compact, has great IQ, and I don't think that your crusade is much enhanced by being destructive about another product. It just makes you look a bit foolish and I'm sure you would not want others to think that of you, would you?

3 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (9 months ago)

The SL1? You mean the one with the great photo quality, video quality, VF, and no issues at commonly used shutter speeds?

Seriously, do you need a wambulance? :-)

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Mirrorless Crusader
By Mirrorless Crusader (9 months ago)

I mean the SL1 that's built like disposable children's toy and looks as ugly as one, compared to the E-P5 which is one of the most beautiful and indestructible consumer cameras the world has ever seen,

0 upvotes
Peter Bendheim
By Peter Bendheim (9 months ago)

You really do write such rubbish. And so dramatic, too! Because it's aluminum doesn't make it indestructible. Or water-resistant. It's retro nice. But that doesn't make it beautiful. It makes it nostalgic. Anyone can copy old. And in the end only the images really count. Unless you collect objects. BTW, what's the crusade all about?

0 upvotes
Mirrorless Crusader
By Mirrorless Crusader (9 months ago)

You're wrong. It does make it beautiful because I said so and beauty is in the eye of the beholder. You're also wrong to say that apparently anyone can "copy old" because clearly Canon and Nikon have failed miserably in their attempts to do so.

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (9 months ago)

MC- give up your crusade. 10 Words in to reading your replies I dismissed you and moved on. You aren't helping.

1 upvote
Mirrorless Crusader
By Mirrorless Crusader (9 months ago)

That's a lie Carl. You didn't dismiss me, you went out of your way to write a response to them so clearly what I said caught your attention. Why don't you go hit up your "old source" from Sony to see when that A600 DSLR with 18MP sensor that got changed to 16MP is going to be released?

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

@Mirrorles - you are forgetting two things: price and class of camera.

0 upvotes
Mirrorless Crusader
By Mirrorless Crusader (9 months ago)

I'm not forgetting either of those things. They cancel each other out. The E-P5 is a higher class of camera so of course it's expected to have a higher price. Of course you get ridiculously more for your money with the E-P5.

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

What you just said proves the point I said: no, they don't cancel each other out. The point is the EP5 is a higher class of camera in which it competes it *and* a high price - so the issue that dpreview finds with IBIS becomes more unnaceptable.

I did not say price and class of camera as exclusives but as things that mark higher expectations from the camera.

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

i have fun reading this :D

0 upvotes
Mirrorless Crusader
By Mirrorless Crusader (9 months ago)

You left out the most important part - the scoring number at the end.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (9 months ago)

It should be there now.

1 upvote
Total comments: 494
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