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Olympus PEN E-P5 Review

October 2013 | By Richard Butler, Andy Westlake


Review based on a production Olympus PEN E-P5 with Firmware 1.2

When Olympus introduced the original Micro Four Thirds PEN E-P1 almost 4 years ago in June 2009, it was the first mirrorless interchangeable lens camera to adopt a compact, 'rangefinder-style' body that made no pretence to look like an SLR. It also saw the company striking out in a direction it's followed ever since - designing attractive yet capable little cameras that consciously draw on its long-running film camera heritage. Indeed the SLR-style OM-D E-M5 was one of last year's biggest hits, and even pipped the 36MP full frame Nikon D800 to the title of 'Best Camera of 2012' in our reader poll.

The PEN E-P5 - the fourth model in the E-P range - continues this theme, while adding an array of updates that make it easily the most desirable PEN yet. It includes many of the features that made the E-M5 such a compelling package, such as the same 16MP MOS sensor, advanced '5-axis' in-body image stabilization (now with automatic panning detection), 9 fps continuous shooting, and tilting rear touch screen. It also inherits the refinements debuted on the PEN E-PL5, such as enhanced in-camera RAW conversion, a broad-range 'HDR bracketing' mode, and the ability to specify whether you wish to use in-lens or in-body image stabilization with Panasonic OIS lenses. On top of this it adds-in a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, a 'peaking' display to assist manual focus, and this year's must-have feature: built in Wi-Fi for connection to your smartphone or tablet.

Olympus PEN E-P5 specification highlights:

  • 16MP MOS Four Thirds format sensor
  • Twin control dials (front and rear) with '2x2' dual-mode option
  • 1/8000 sec top shutter speed, 1/320 sec flash sync
  • '5-axis' image stabilization with automatic panning detection ('S-IS Auto')
  • ISO 'LOW' (100 equiv) - ISO 25,600
  • Up to 9fps shooting (5.0 fps with continuous AF)
  • Focus 'peaking' display
  • Intervalometer and Time Lapse movie creation
  • 1.04m dot 3" LCD touchscreen display - tilts 80° upwards and 50° downwards
  • Built-in Wi-Fi for remote shooting (iAuto only) and image transfer to smartphone or tablet
  • Optional VF-4 electronic viewfinder: 2.36M dot LCD, 0.74x magnification (equiv), eye sensor

One key change compared to previous E-Px models is a rearrangement of the controls - gone are the thumb roller and tiny rear dial, replaced by 'proper' front and rear dials that protrude horizontally from the top plate. The E-P5 features what Olympus calls a '2x2' dial interface: a small lever on the back of the camera switches these dials from controlling exposure parameters to changing ISO and white balance. If you don't like this arrangement, the lever can be customized to a couple of other options (described later in this review).

The E-P5 places emphasis on speed: it has a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, which Olympus says should help make best use of the company's F1.8 prime lenses, allowing them to be shot wide open in sunlight. This is aided by the addition of an ISO 100-equivalent 'LOW' setting, although this will likely come at the expense of some highlight clipping. The E-P5 also offers a fast startup time of just 0.5 sec, 1/320 sec sync with the built-in flash (1/250 sec with external units), autofocus tracking at 5 fps, and a fast shutter release mode with a lag of just 44ms (via a custom setting).

Additional features

In traditional Olympus fashion the E-P5 gets a few new features compared to previous models. There's a 'Super-spot AF' mode that allows extremely precise positioning of the AF point when using magnified live view, very much like the one seen on recent Panasonic models. It gains timed intervalometer shooting, along with the ability to assemble time-lapse movies in-camera. The Live Bulb mode, that allows you to monitor the progress of long exposures while the shutter is open, now features an on-screen histogram to help monitor exposure build-up. The image stabilization system is also now always active by default, to provide a stabilized live view feed (especially useful when using telephoto lenses).

The E-P5 also gets Olympus's 'Photo Story' feature that first appeared on the XZ-10 enthusiast compact. This is essentially an extension of Art Filters, allowing you to generate multi-image composites rather like the pages of a photo book, in a wide variety of themes. It may not be something enthusiast photographers will use all the time, and arguably better suited to lower-end PEN models, but it's good to see Olympus continuing to come up with new ideas.

Colour options

The E-P5 comes in three colour schemes; black, silver and white. The all-black version that we've shown in this review has a textured matte finish which we expect will be appreciated by street photographers - it looks particularly fine when coupled with the black versions of the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm 1:1.8, M.Zuiko Digital 45mm 1:1.8 and M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm 1:1.8 lenses announced alongside. The camera also comes in a very handsome silver-and-black finish that harks back to Olympus's classic cameras from the 1960s and '70s, and a white version with a beige grip. Olympus will also be offering a limited edition model with a wooden grip, and a range of premium accessories such as leather cases.

Silver E-P5 with black 14-42mm kit zoom and VF4 viewfinder White E-P5 with silver 14-42mm lens

Kit options

The E-P5 will be available either body-only for approx. £900/€999/$999, with the M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6R II collapsible zoom for £1000/€1099, or with the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm F1.8 and VF-4 EVF for £1350/€1449/$1449.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 415
123
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (6 months ago)

....more on the practical test:

Settings: F200 / F160 / F80 and some appropriate F and ISO 320.
Conclusion: None of the images showed unsharpened areas where it was supposed to be sharp.... So no double leafs or edges...

So, how can I reproduce the bug or the unsharp results? In my case it all seems fine....

0 upvotes
riziks
By riziks (6 months ago)

Hi, Your samples are almost a half sized, please post some 100% crops! From my experience, it's seems old Olympus problem, I noticed this fail with my PM1, which in other ways was an very exciting camera;)

1 upvote
likeafoxow
By likeafoxow (6 months ago)

riziks, you don't need full sized pictures to see that they are in fact clean and sharp images. the double image effect is clearly not present in any of willem's photos.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

likeafoxow, you do need full sized pictures to see if shutter shock is present. Willem later did allow access to his originals.

0 upvotes
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (6 months ago)

Hello dear photo friends!
I own a Pen EP-5 for 2 months now, and actually I'm very pleased with it! I could buy the body with all of the best lenses, because after lots of trouble with my D600... (oil/dust on sensor) I sold my new D800 (gift of Nikon) with lenses and other stuff ;-) That was necessary because it's not an cheap camera indeed!

Until now not too much of a painful decision I can tell you, it is absolutely a lot of pixels less... but it fits in my pocket and small bag including all available 2.8 lenses and flashes. You try that with a Nikon D800 ;-P

I read the dpreview findings about unsharp photos, so I did a little testing myself. Maybe I'm not experienced enough, but this little practical testing is maybe helpful.

Set: EP-5 with 60mm f2.8 (all latest firmware).
Scene: Two shots of stuff @ 50cm and two shots of stuff @ 20meters away. Two shots because I wanted to test the stabilization of the camera. Automatic vs Mode 1 (all axis on).
see next post :-0

0 upvotes
Vincent Flanigan
By Vincent Flanigan (6 months ago)

After reading about the so-called shutter-shock problem here on DPR, I took a bunch of pictures with my E-P5 with shutter speeds between 1/100 - 1/160 and examined them closely - just to be sure, as I've had the camera for about a month now and I've never encountered the double-image problem. And the result is ... nothing, nada, not a single one of them had any double-image problems. Perfect focus and gorgeous colors in all of them. I am extremely happy with my E-P5. Though I purchased my E-P5 from Hong Kong. One possible explanation might be that DPR has encountered a bad batch - but this is only a guess.

In any case, there is an anti-shock option in E-P5 where you can dial in a 1/8 second delay (or 1/4 or 1/2 sec.), which I suspect would solve the problem.

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

There are many easy solutions to this problem that practically doesn't exist according to reports like yours. You can add a shutter delay so your camera behaves like a cheap P&S and captures the moment after the one you wanted to catch. But the easiest is to select a smaller resolution (under the menu "Image quality", best would be 1280x960 and JPEG Compression rate 4).
Or you can buy the camera in Hong Kong like he did.

1 upvote
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (6 months ago)

To be 100% shure, I will do the testimg again tomorrow. Seems to become a nice autumn morning :-) that I don't wanna mis.
As said before, I can't reproduce the unsharpness or double image problem.... Maybe it's lens related? Will try the 45, 60 and 9-18... We'll see!

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Please try all the available OIS options and show us the originals tomorrow :-)
Looking forward to the feast of colours.

0 upvotes
keithwee
By keithwee (6 months ago)

I have also tried on my side to reproduce the 'shutter-shock' problem and i failed miserably to do so.

if it matters, I purchased my EP5 body from Singapore.

lastly, comments i read here point to that this is an issue plaguing all mirrorless bodies, is this valid? Can't even start to imagine how can pple have been so blind to something so obvious for years.

0 upvotes
Willem Steenis
By Willem Steenis (6 months ago)

Today I did some testing again, I managed it to reproduce the issue one time with a spiderweb.... but I also managed it to shoot the spiderweb without the double image issue. So maybe the wind was hindering me! Results are in my gallery album Test Oly EP5.
Two shots, one with auto setting stabilization and the next shot all on.

0 upvotes
Strikeroot
By Strikeroot (6 months ago)

Kudos to DPreview for dinging them on the video. The single frame rate and paltry bit-rate in a high-dollar camera with such capable hardware come down to nothing but neglect.

A better video codec would in no way sacrifice stills image quality or camera size, as cameras smaller and 1/3rd the price handily demonstrate.

4 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Olympus - we make the best in-image backups (TM)

Olympus - bringing life to your pictures

Olympus - you pay, we sway.

Missing organs - no more - use Olympus Imaging Corporation redoublers (TM)

(Disclaimer: this is satire.)

1 upvote
Stupidco
By Stupidco (6 months ago)

Manual states peaking does not guarantee accurate focusing. When using snap manual focus lenses, use magnify or distance scale

0 upvotes
CaptchaFool
By CaptchaFool (6 months ago)

i've forgotten one point. Thanks to dpreview for doing an awesome job investigating new cameras. I never read abuot EP5 problems in the press until yet!

3 upvotes
sderdiarian
By sderdiarian (6 months ago)

Yes, but now I'm curious to have other cameras checked for it and have it noted how often it crops up.

I'm left wondering how endemic it is in 1) mFT's with 5-axis (or other magnetic field) IBIS required to hold the sensor centered when using the camera, 2) all mFT's, 3) small and light cameras in general (technique causing the issue) and 4) all cameras.

Based on the impact this may have on E-P5 sales, DPR should now include this as part of their standard test, and in fairness back-check other popular models. Unfortunately this may slow down their tests further; how many E-P5's were sold without awareness of this due to the late timing of these findings?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (6 months ago)

DPR noticed this in the course of examining their pictures as part of their normal, very thorough review process, and then decided to investigate further, just like they've done with other unexpected findings, such as the Fuji X10 "white orbs".

There's no reason for them to back-check other models, since they surely would have noticed the problem during the review process, had it been present.

0 upvotes
CaptchaFool
By CaptchaFool (6 months ago)

i wasn't able to get perfectly sharp images in many situations and until now i was not deeply impressed about the image quality delivered by my EP5 and 17mm 1.8 combination. Even my Canon 40d by far does a better job. So i felt a litle bit unhappy with my new Olympus. After the shutter shock finding discovered by dpreview i'm wondering wether this could be the reason. But the shutter shock is described to be a problem with tele lenses and shutter speeds below 1/160. May be, i have to get used a bit longer with mey new camera. Meanwhile, i've stopped my plan to buy a 75mm 1.8 prime.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
nickos_fr
By nickos_fr (6 months ago)

sorry i make an error is 1/160
so if speed security being 1/120 for 60 mm stab it snaps you above? whether it does not lead you there overcompensation? Personal daylight because I always disables unnecessary.

0 upvotes
nickos_fr
By nickos_fr (6 months ago)

take a picture of a flower to 1/60 and then say that there is a blur! he does not know that a flower moves in the slightest breeze and must be 1/125 to freeze motion

0 upvotes
dejongj
By dejongj (6 months ago)

I don't get this...I've had my EP5 since early July here in the United Kingdom. Shot several thousand photos since then, and never seen this double image DPReview is talking about...Very odd...

2 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

maybe they got a faulty model...
i laughed very hard when i red: "problem that risks ruining images taken around 1/80 - 1/200th of a second"
WTH is wrong with you people? IF a camera produces unsharp images ABOVE 1/80th of a second, it is broken!

0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (6 months ago)

Andy Westlake wrote in a comment that they tested multiple units, all having the same problem.

1 upvote
sderdiarian
By sderdiarian (6 months ago)

I'm sure they were pretty careful before making their statement, but it is odd that other reviewers didn't turn this issue up and that posts on it haven't been rampant on the mFT forum, especially given the price.

Instead the shutter shock posts have mostly been on the E-M5. Maybe it's a bad batch (I know, I know) or how they were holding the camera (highly unlikely). Just odd.

1 upvote
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

true. makes me wonder, what exactly is responsible. i was looking forward buying one. seems save to bring your laptop to your dealer and examine the camera prior to use for that issue...

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (6 months ago)

That's easy to explain. Many if the "reviews" are
Made by over enthusiastic websites for either the brand- some even indirectly paid for, or whatever THE NEW camera of the day is.

Some will just have missed it

0 upvotes
chillgreg
By chillgreg (6 months ago)

Soooo, 78 for this stinkbomb, yet 79 for the unequalled RX100MII...

Yeah yeah, I know, I know. Apples, oranges, opinions and disclaimers, yada...

But Mom and Pop buy this and wonder why their precious photos of their grandchildren are spoiled. Yet their son buys the tiny Sony and the results awe everyone.

Perhaps it's time for DPR to take a long look into the mirror and ask why a more objective and less subjective scoring scale should not be introduced.

Now it DPR wasn't funded by advertising and commissions. it could be as subjective as it wants. The current model is deeply flawed, despite the best efforts of many decent, credible people to make it work.

As it stands, the credibility of test results is being questioned more often than not.

Perhaps 78 is the right score for this particular camera. But perhaps a final numerical score should be withheld, until the manufacturer addresses potential flaws.

3 upvotes
Chez Wimpy
By Chez Wimpy (6 months ago)

Sounds like Mom and Pop could use some lessons in photography basics. Maybe their accomplished (and loving) son can help them out?

4 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

besides, why did Mom and Pop not buy the RX100 II?

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

"it DPR wasn't funded by advertising and commissions. it could be as subjective as it wants" [sic]

Revenue concerns do not impact on editorial. And I think you mean objective. Which we always try to be.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Well Mr. Britton, on the RX100ii review DPReview clearly and repeatedly stated that for the awards you want to be totally subjective: DPReview staff pretended only the "feeling"s of the reviewer would decide.

May I submit a wish? I would like some comments by the reviewers about how close the colours in choice samples matched what they saw. For example do you see a yellow tint in specific samples made with the RX100 or is this just a myth spread by the competition.

0 upvotes
DaveE1
By DaveE1 (6 months ago)

For me, the recent DPR RX100II review was a tipping point. DPR's "Reviewgate".

Maybe DPR's commercial arm could stock up on salt, as we will be using quite a few pinches of it to go with some new reviews.

In any case, it is nice to see some photos of new equipment, credit to DPR where it is due. Also, some of DPR's non-review articles can be genuinely informative - hope they stay that way.

2 upvotes
sderdiarian
By sderdiarian (6 months ago)

Andy, there was no mention of shutter shock effecting image quality in DPR's reviews of the E-M5 and E-PM2 (in fact no discussion of the performance of IBIS at all in the latter). Can you comment on this now, and does DPR now have any plans to look for it?

I think a discussion of shutter shock in general is in order, clearly it's not limited to just the E-P5 based on numerous posts by others on the subject. I would recommend this be made a standard part of DPR's testing.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
5 upvotes
The Photo Ninja
By The Photo Ninja (6 months ago)

I just posted 29 pics regarding shutter shock here: http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52273869

2 upvotes
sderdiarian
By sderdiarian (6 months ago)

Can you repost this as a link?

0 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (6 months ago)

This comment section of DPR doesn't create links from the URL.

To open the link, simply use your mouse to highlight the link (drag from the start of the link to the end).

With the link highlighted, right-click it and your browser should give you the option to open the linked page.

0 upvotes
sderdiarian
By sderdiarian (6 months ago)

Thanks, I'll remember that. Didn't see any signs of shutter shock, but then I rarely see it in my E-M5 photos. My guess is it's not as common as DPR's statement on it in the E-P5 review makes it seem. They should more clearly note the frequency with which it occurred, otherwise it comes across like almost every shot taken in this common ISO range is afflicted by it.

2 upvotes
micksh6
By micksh6 (6 months ago)

Ironically, many of them are blurred, showing the exact shutter shock impact that was discussed here. Just read responses to your post and see 100% crops. You just didn't see it, did you?

Still, shutter shock is not a showstopper once you learn how to avoid it. IMO (and I am a pixel-peeper) other benefits of Olympus m4/3 cameras compensate for having to deal with shutter shock.

It's just pity that DPR discovered this phenomena only now and E-P5 became a "whipping boy" . This problem has been dealt with for many years.

0 upvotes
dharmagreg
By dharmagreg (6 months ago)

I have owned this camera for about six weeks now. This is my second kit with the 17MM lens, the first one failed after a few weeks but that is another story. I was curious to read this issue about blurry images as have not seen any so far. I was thinking I may not have yet shot at those speeds which produce the blurred images.

I did my own personal test and shot half a dozen images hand held using the EVF at 1/160 sec with the 17MM lens attached. I also shot with the Anti-Shock function on at 1/8 sec as I read people recommend this solves the issue.

Anyway when I checked the results of both set of images none of them were blurred. I don't know if this helps or not, but so far have not seen the issue on my camera yet. Firmware is 1.2 and received my second kit a week ago.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ZoranC
By ZoranC (6 months ago)

Before one jumps into conclusion "shaken pictures" are due to "shutter shock" one needs to rule out possibility it is due to 5-axis IS system.

I have EP2 and EP3 and have had EM5. I have not conducted scientific side by side testing but my impression has always been that with EM5 I get "shaky pictures" at shutter speeds that I had no blurriness at with EP2 and EP3.

3 upvotes
sderdiarian
By sderdiarian (6 months ago)

I've had the same thought. Never seemed to encounter it in my E-510, E-620 or E-PM1, only in my E-M5, mostly with the 75-300mm zoom (slow lens, so slower shutter speeds). And while I was never consciously looking for it before, the double image effect is quite different from blur due to camera shake. I wonder also since the magnetic field is always on to keep the E-M5/E-P5/E-M1 sensor centered. Something DPR might check into.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Felix11
By Felix11 (6 months ago)

DPR, since apparently Olympus includes an 'anti-shock' feature (1/8 second delay before capture) to work around this problem, it would be useful for us normal users if you could comment on whether this works and what the downside is.
Thanks

3 upvotes
JohnAn
By JohnAn (6 months ago)

A pretty natural question. Whether the unwanted sensor motion originates in the shutter button, the shutter curtain or elsewhere, you'd wonder whether adding the anti-shock delay helps. If the self-timer adds a delay between pressing the shutter button and the start of shutter curtain action, and anti-shock adds a delay between the first close and open of the curtain, you could compare the two. Maybe get data that might better narrow down which event seems to contribute most to the effect. Maybe anti-shock could be handy regardless of the exact cause. Downside? Well, it adds a 1/8 sec delay before the exposure...

1 upvote
RichRMA
By RichRMA (6 months ago)

Unless you bought this thing solely to mount a pancake lens and pocket it, it serves no purpose not done far better by the E-M5 or the M1. No EVF in a camera with its cost and sophistication is ridiculous. By that I mean buying it is ridiculous.

1 upvote
Mario G
By Mario G (6 months ago)

Also the lack of integrated flash in the costly and sophisticated E-M5/M1 is just as ridicolous (and they missed my purchase for that). I'd find the flash more essential than the EVF (and more easy to put it in a camera, which makes its absence even more ridiculous). One (but maybe the only one) advantage of the E-P5 is just the flash. Still not much of an argument to buy the E-P5 though (and after these shutter issues I'd just go for the Pana GX7 instead)...

0 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (6 months ago)

Bogus. I use my PEN cameras in combination with a 40-150mm because this fits in my jacket breast pocket when in the mountains. An OM-D with the same lens does not fit, because of the added bulk.

The beauty of this combination is that I can have the EVF in another pocket ready for when I need it. The key is that I don't need to take off my backpack.

And yes, when shooting in the street I can use the 20mm pancake and slip the camera in an even smaller pocket.

This is why I prefer the PEN over any other camera. It adapts perfectly to my small camera needs.

3 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

cameras for people. if you don't like the pen, then it's not for you. no one forces you to buy one.

dude, this attitude...
i don't like fast sport cars. do i tell people, not to buy them?

1 upvote
Karroly
By Karroly (6 months ago)

For those who find the E-P5 too expensive, its cost is "double" the cost of the E-PL5 because it takes double pictures...

11 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

is a feature, not a bug

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

An electronic shutter could also be used as a custom anti-aliasing anti-moiré filter by forming patterns just where moire occurs to filter it out on the spot, live.
It could also be designed as an additional but transparent EVF in front of the sensor, for example as an ND filter, which could also adapt to local highlights on the fly and increase the dynamic range, or blend in images from other devices.

0 upvotes
Stupidco
By Stupidco (6 months ago)

Your report states 'mounting a camera on a tripod significantly counteracts shake'. It would follow that nothing within the camera causes shake. The shake must result from the interaction between the operator and the user. It might arise from the use of the camera without a viewfinder: holding the camera at arms length in tourist fashion. It might arise from personal bodily tremors beyond parameters recognized by the camera. It might arise from attempts to defeat the stabilization function. It might arise from inappropriate camera settings. Maybe the technology is underdeveloped. Maybe camera manufacturers are trying too hard, or promising too much. Or maybe some camera users don't really like photography.

0 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (6 months ago)

The problem is that DPR is funded by Nikon and Canon (why else do you think Canon and Nikon reviews appear mere days after the cameras come out).

Now that Olympus has a camera that beats the IQ of everything but the most expensive Canon and Nikon models, DPR switches to sabotage mode.

This kind of review which highlights some obscure malfunction on every page of the review is extremely unprofessional.

2 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

wowow, you see ghost my friend.

maybe DPR is biased, maybe not.
at least they had the issue (monday model or not, who knows?) and stated it. that's a good thing.
IMO they could have tested another p5 to check for consistency

but "sabotage mode"? dude, relax!

0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (6 months ago)

Why didn't they sabotage the E-M5 review then? The IQ is the same as the E-P5.
And they do not post reviews of Canikon cameras mere days after launch. You're confusing previews and first impressions pieces with reviews. Other manufacturers also get previews after announcement.

0 upvotes
Gryfster
By Gryfster (6 months ago)

It still got a Silver Award. In fact it could be argued that they were probably too easy on Olympus. Although I am wary that the E-1 will have the same issue (that is my dream camera right now)

1 upvote
Infared
By Infared (6 months ago)

I own the camera w/updated firmware. I am not really experiencing the problem. I wonder if it has something to do with the new "IS Auto" setting. That is a change from the E-M5.
I have read the DRP section on camera shake and I do not see what they have the mode set to????? The camera is set to "IS Auto" by default. Perhaps there is a problem with this new Mode. That could be suspect as the camera only does it in landscape mode..and it is an up-and-down vertical blur...perhaps there is glitch there that can be fixed with firmware..
...I have to say ....I am not really noticing any image problems with my camera but I am going to switch mine to Mode 1 which permanently puts all-axis IS on to be safe...
One would think that Olympus will respond to this issue. It is an occurring problem on one of there premiere cameras...so it should be address to the owners of a relatively expensive piece of hardware....Let's see what they do...
Thanks to DPR...it is really in everyone's face NOW!

3 upvotes
Oly72
By Oly72 (6 months ago)

Infrared, the reason why you're not experiencing any issues is because you are probably using the camera correctly. I bet it's a very slight issue in very few cases that has been blown out of all proportions by people on these boards and rattled 'Canikon' users. I have an E-P3 and OM-D and have never experienced any issues with blurred pictures at the fore mentioned shutter speeds.

6 upvotes
Stupidco
By Stupidco (6 months ago)

Blunty3000 has demonstrated the effectiveness of image stabilization in real time video mode. This review identifies a weakness when pixel peaking stills. We need get this stuff in proportion.We need to look more closely at camera settings and also consider the objectives of camera reviews.

1 upvote
Dimit
By Dimit (6 months ago)

Disregard the blur issue for a moment....this camera won't sell! It needs a good,A REALLY GOOD pricedrop.It's an OK stuff but not for this price.As far as the e-shutter is concerned,I think it'a a matter of time to be established ,common sense...

5 upvotes
sderdiarian
By sderdiarian (6 months ago)

And this review will likely be its death knell.

0 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

just because of you guys, i will buy one.

5 upvotes
millardmt
By millardmt (6 months ago)

The main difficulty is that camera mass and/or support do NOT seem to be reliably correlated to the occurence (or magnitude) of "camera shake". Put another way, it seems as though no one can predict the magnitude of the problem on the basis of camera weight, shutter release action, maximum shutter speed, lens focal length, or any other camera/lens attribute. For every conclusion I've read, a contradictory interpretation by another tester seems equally credible (given the evidence at hand).
Anyway, I for one like a camera whose features are MODULAR. (I know I'm in the minority.) But I just don't like or trust stuff that's built-in: In my opinion, it just makes for a camera that's heavier, less versatile, less trustworthy and less long-lived.
So I'll keep using my E-P3 for now until the problem's dimensions are fully known.

1 upvote
millardmt
By millardmt (6 months ago)

I have tried to conceptualize a research model that could embrace ALL of the variables that must somehow be interacting to produce the vertical displacement that DPR has noted in images from the E-P5. I am too ignorant to even CONCEIVE of how such a model might be fully specified for test! There must be thousands of factors that are ultimtely involved! And even if they could be identified, how could they ALL be feasibly measured?
... CONTINUED ...

1 upvote
millardmt
By millardmt (6 months ago)

I have just now cancelled my EP-5 order.
I believe I have read every word that's recently been written about mirrorless "camera shake" and also "shutter shock" -- two purportedly distinct phenomena -- and I still feel as if I haven't enough data. Or more precisely, I have read too many contradictory reports to know which observations should be dismissed and which are (demonstrably) relevant.
I'm no physicist, but I am a trained researcher and I've heard enough to be certain that the cause(s) of "camera shake" appear to be anything but 'prosaic.' (I should say however that I MUCH appreciate the efforts of Andy W., et al., and feel very grateful for DPR's candor -- especially given the many masters its testers are obliged to appease.)
... CONTINUED ...

1 upvote
zavaell
By zavaell (6 months ago)

I have an E-PL2 and E-PL3. I always have IS switched off and have never, ever had blur at any shutter speed that was not attributable to me. In other words at very slow shutter speeds (say, < 1/100) I can expect the possibility of camera shake even if I can usually achieve sharp shots at slower speeds. I find this E-P5 phenomenon puzzling and still not fully explained.

1 upvote
mapgraphs
By mapgraphs (6 months ago)

There is an inherent problem with making global statements based on opinion. For example, conjecture about blurry images maybe being caused by "shutter shock" or maybe created because there might be problems with image stabilization not correcting some vertical displacement, some of the time, with some lenses at some shutter speeds by some users is just that: conjecture.

The problem with the conjecture is that it doesn't answer why some users don't seem to have these problems and it doesn't explain for example, why all images taken at 1/160 with a specific lens aren't always blurry. If it's mechanical, the problem is always there. If it's user error, it may not be.

Sometimes reviews are more about someone learning how to use a specific camera than it is about the camera itself. There can be a value in that, but there are caveats, such as found at the bottom of DPR reviews: "Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer"

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Of course an almighty corporation like Olympus will never lower itself to talk to customers here and try to help find the source of the problem, admit mistakes and offer a solution.

Their pampered leaders prefer golden parachutes, paid reviews and lawyers stonewalling until the bitter end.

3 upvotes
Frank_BR
By Frank_BR (6 months ago)

"We've found that when examining our images closely, many are visibly shaken, showing a distinct double-image which is almost perfectly vertically displaced (when the camera is in landscape orientation)."

The blurring is probably caused by improper engineering of the shutter release button. The shutter button of a digital camera is basically an electrical switch that closes when the finger pressure reaches a certain value. However, just after the trigger point, the resistance of the shutter button decreases abruptly, what can easily induce a camera shake as the operator keeps pressing the shutter button. Curiously, in a purely mechanical SLR camera the operation is smoother because the resistance of the shutter button doesn't change when the shutter releases.

0 upvotes
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (6 months ago)

Seeing as you can get a Sony NEX5n with its bigger (and really excellent) sensor for less than 500 euros, how many units does Olympus expect to sell?

0 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (6 months ago)

Far fewer than Olympus' own E-PL5 model, priced similarly as the NEX5n.

The profit margin will be higher for the E-P5 though

2 upvotes
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (6 months ago)

DPR: "In a way, this isn't entirely the camera's fault ..."

What an odd statement. Does this mean it's the user's fault? Or that perhaps it's an "act of God"?

DPR: "... it's not some kind of mechanical malfunction that actively causes blurring"

Continuing oddity: Does this mean DPR thinks the blurring is from "passive" causes? Or that it's working as designed and so not a malfunction?

It's certainly the camera's fault and it's certainly a design flaw. It may be either significant or insignificant depending on workarounds and type of shooting. Some additional shots showing what the visible difference is when using the rear LCD or a tripod would have been more useful than these odd statements which appear intended more to palliate brand zealots than refine the issue.

9 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (6 months ago)

As you say, it's a design flaw, which is not the same as malfunction, which is a manufacture flaw. A design flaw is ultimately the designer's fault, which is probably what DPR meant by saying that it's not entirely the camera's fault.

2 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

yeah, right, olympus released their top pen model with a faulty IBIS system...

Comment edited 12 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (6 months ago)

i really dont understand all the pandering over the retro design.. who cares what it looks like as long as its not offensive.

1 upvote
retro76
By retro76 (6 months ago)

I dunno personally when I pay for a camera how it looks is part of the equation.

4 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (6 months ago)

When I pay for a camera, how it looks are not part of the equation. Especially if the results are superior to a nicer looking camera.

Comment edited 12 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Oly72
By Oly72 (6 months ago)

I care what a camera looks like and I absolutely love the retro styling of the Olympus PEN range and also the OM-D series cameras. Olympus have the image quality and functionality to back this up especially in their latest cameras.

But that's fine, if you have no appreciation of good design and aesthetics, you just go ahead and use a camera that looks like a fisher-price toy.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
plastique2
By plastique2 (6 months ago)

Could you please list me some cameras looking like a fisher price toy? (although i have no clue what a fisher priced toy is in the first place)

0 upvotes
plastique2
By plastique2 (6 months ago)

oh boy, of course i care how it looks like if it looks like as it looks like just to look like as it looks like and therefore has no grip and i get cramps from holding it even after a short time - so what does that that look like? soon we'll have cameras without a shutter button - but you'll have to lick the touch screen to release the shutter, sorry, not the touch screen but the lick screen, that would be fancieee

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (6 months ago)

lmao.. enjoy your retro looking EP5 and its double images.. i will shoot with my boring looking SLR that has never let me down.. I heard that the silver model has better DR and high iso performance

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Oly72
By Oly72 (6 months ago)

Plastique2, Have you not see the Canon Powershot G series cameras? Ugly and 'plastique' to the core. If you have never seen a fisherPrice toy then I suggest you google it and you might see a strong resemblance.

0 upvotes
Oly72
By Oly72 (6 months ago)

Jogger, I suggest you go out with your Canikon and practice taking photographs and after a couple of years come back on here and let me see what you have.

0 upvotes
Oly72
By Oly72 (6 months ago)

Seems very odd that 'What digital Camera' gave the E-P5 a rating of 90% and a 'Gold Award' and with absolutely no mention of blurred images at shutter speeds of 1/160. Olympus has the best image stabilisation system around - bar none. Are you sure that the sample used for the test wasn't just a faulty unit as I just cannot believe that Olympus would release a camera with such an issue.

'Camera labs' also gave the E-P5 a score rating of 86% and again with out any mention of blurred images at the fore mentioned speeds.

'Techradar.com' Gave the E-P5 a 5 out of 5 star rating and guess what? No mention again of blurred images at the stated shutter speeds?!!

2 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (6 months ago)

We used multiple cameras and tested them extensively. All behaved in the same way.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
11 upvotes
retro76
By retro76 (6 months ago)

No offense to What digital Camera, but most of these magazines do not go the length that dpreview does to review a camera. I have never been impressed with the quality of reviews done on other sites, in fact I dare to say that some of these sites may actually review a camera without even holding one in hand.

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (6 months ago)

I think its cause DPreview test cameras for long time before they write review. Which Im quite positive cant be said about certain other "review" sites. Thats most likely reason they noticed what others didnt.

Sure DPreview isnt without fault (bit too enthusiastic about any new product), but overall they produce fairly accurate reviews.

I will add that despite image quality of E-P5, they managed to produce rather nice image samples. Which again is something I dont see everytime I check other review sites, some of them seems like they actually cant even make decent photo)..

Conclusion is that if in review is that it produces blurry pics at 1/160th then it most likely really does.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (6 months ago)

Reviews from 'What Digital Camera', etc.. are more like product overviews rather than reviews based on testing/usage.

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (6 months ago)

I've always liked Olympus products but if there is even the potential of getting blurry shots at 1/160, I'd say all bets are off. I understand DPR tries desperately to balance everything but no amount of attractive retro styling will make those photos any sharper.

2 upvotes
Infared
By Infared (6 months ago)

Andy...what IS Mode was the camera set to? Auto IS?

0 upvotes
Philly
By Philly (6 months ago)

To Andy Westlake: the shutter shock on the E-P5 does not sound very encouraging for the E-M1. Based on the specs (1/8000 sec, 1/320 flash sync), and common sense, I would have believe that the E-M1 and E-P5 use the same shutter. I hope that dpreview will address this explicitly on the E-M1 review. I would like to buy the E-M1 and am hoping that it does not have the problem.

0 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

if they start bashing the EM1, no one will believe it!
The EM1 is too hot camera to badmouth with this blurred images. you will not read anything like that on DPR for the EM1

0 upvotes
Gryfster
By Gryfster (6 months ago)

In September, I read another review on the E-P5 that found the same issue.

http://admiringlight.com/blog/review-olympus-pen-e-p5/

The reviewer is very pro m43 as a concept, so he would not try to assasinate the E-P5 if it didn't have a real issue with "shutter shock". The reviewer also attributed the issue to the IS.

0 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (6 months ago)

About as mighty as crippled mouse..

Im looking forward towards that "we might do FF in future", dear Olympus.

Tho Im sure, it makes hipsters really happy, cause its expensive, with brand name and it looks good (which is pretty much everything positive about it). :D

1 upvote
Oly72
By Oly72 (6 months ago)

Oh dear another Canikon user... sigh.

3 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (6 months ago)

Question for the reviewers:

Has your test lens or anything else in the setup changed since the review of the E-M5 ?

A comparison of the lower right of the image (the water paint tubes) shows a significant loss of sharpness on both the E-P5 and the E-M1 versus the E-M5. Same on the eyes on the portraits.

Yet, I am sure that they can not be worse than the E-M5. With the lesser AA filter on the E-M1, it they should actually be sharper.

Setup differences ? Lens problem ?

Thanks in advance for your answer

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (6 months ago)

The EP5 sits in the same marketing spot as my E30 did.

"Not the best... but costs almost as much as the best"

Yes, the EP5 has a few nice features, but certainly not enough to justify selling it for exactly twice the price of an EPL5. If you can't stand the DSLR look, and just love using optional clip on EVFs, then the EPL5 is the obvious choice.

The EPL5 offers you an awful lot, for half the price of the EP5
The EM5 offers you more, at the same price.
The GX7 offers you more, at around the same price.
The GH3 and the EM1 offer you a LOT more, for just a little more money.

I suppose someone will want the EP5, and be willing to pay the high price for it. But it won't be me.

6 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

where do you get your conclusions from?

i heftet long between EM5 and P5: better removable viewfinder, focus peaking and 2x2 controls did it for me in favour of P5
what "more" is ther for the EM5 over the EP5?

GX7 offers you more? what does it offer you more? video for shure. but anything else?

basicly, you state no relevant functions here, so i take it as your opinion only...

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (6 months ago)

It really just depends on which features are important for you.

If you prefer:

* NOT having weather sealing
* NOT having a magnesium alloy body
* NOT having a built in EVF

and would rather spend $300 more for an EVF that you could lose or misplace, have those very usefull features like focus peaking and 2X2 controls... then the EP5 might be the ideal camera for you.

My priorities are different from yours, so I won't be getting one.

0 upvotes
m87501
By m87501 (6 months ago)

For anyone considering this camera, I own the EP5 and the simple fix to the trivial shutter shake issue mentioned is to simply use the 1-second delay (or 2 seconds). It's right next to the thumb...easy, solved. It's an ideal camera with wonderful flexible features and image quality for hobbyist landscape shooters like me who can no longer carry a tripod on hikes.

For landscape-only, technical shooting or non-fast action, it would deserve a much higher rating, but I did my homework reading the many helpful & useful tips by those on this forum and others, and knew this going in.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (6 months ago)

umm what? so, to make the camera useable at normal shutter speeds you have to use the timer function? how does that make any sense on a $1000 camera?

4 upvotes
Oly72
By Oly72 (6 months ago)

As an E-P5 user have you actually experienced this 'shutter shake' issue from first hand experience? Or is it one of those issues that has been blown massively out of proportion much like the claimed 'Orbs' issue o the Fuji X10?

3 upvotes
Matero
By Matero (6 months ago)

I've shot maybe 1500 pics with E-P5 and never found this issue in my shots. (Haven't been looking for it either) Did a quick review of shots with 1/60 - 1/200 shutter speed and didn't find one pic with the issue. Can't say it doesn't exist, but not so serious problem for me then

0 upvotes
m87501
By m87501 (6 months ago)

Yeah, the latter..it's a non-issue imo.

"Massively out of proportion" as you say, would be a good way of putting it.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
blohum
By blohum (6 months ago)

The EP5 is surely stuck between a rock and hard place... the EM1 body is about the same price as the EP5/VF4/17 bundle and the EM5 is dropping in price.

There's things to like such as 8000th sec, 'low' ISO and VF4 but so many missed opportunities... limiting WiFi to only iAuto mode was surely a marketing decision just so they could give those privileges to the EM1, same as limiting timelapse to 99 frames. If the EP5 was a cheaper camera I could accept these compromises but it's supposed to be a premium camera.

On top of these they've removed the option to use the larger grip, a must have for my EP3 as far as I'm concerned. Surely they could have placed the WiFi antenna behind the plastic AV door??

5 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

then don't buy the EP5. i, for one, will do. because i like the cam plus focus peaking with the other new features really talk to me...

0 upvotes
blohum
By blohum (6 months ago)

I won't at its current price... when the price drops I might look again. I owned an EM5 for a while but sold it as I found it fiddly to use, I find the ergonomics of EP3 to be far superior.

I've yet to find someone who makes an add-on grip like the third-party ones that are available for the EM5 but it could make an interesting DIY project. The WiFi issue (the only time my EP3 is ever set to an auto mode is when I pass it to my wife!) and timelapse limitations could easily be rectified in firmware... come on Olympus you know you can do it, the EP5 deserves better!!

1 upvote
ChrisPercival
By ChrisPercival (6 months ago)

I have and E-P5 with the 17/1.8. The magnify view and focus peaking work fine. My unit has firmware 1.0 for lens and camera.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (6 months ago)

Magnify view and focus peaking work when the camera is set to manual focus, but not when the lens's focus ring is pulled back to the 'Snap focus' position (according to Olympus, this is because the camera counts it as a different focus mode). In contrast, pulling back the focus ring on the 12-40mm engages 'true' manual focus, complete with focus assist.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ChrisPercival
By ChrisPercival (6 months ago)

Ah, I see. But focus peaking/magnify work in the S-AF + MF mode.

0 upvotes
Alberto6674
By Alberto6674 (6 months ago)

I still don't get this thing about blurred images. Why the E-P5 and not all the other cameras out there (especially mirrorless or compact cameras)?

If it was shutter shock, it could be said that the E-P5 has one of the most refined shutters in all the mirrorless cameras, so if should suffer less than others from this. If it's not shutter shock, as it seems from the testing they did, and just because of pressing the shutter... why don't cameras like the Fuji X-M1 or the Panasonic GF1/GF2/...GF5/GX1, Sony NEX5, etc... suffer it even more (since they don't have IS as the E-P5 has, which reduces this shake according to the tests)?

More testing seems to be needed to determine why this is occurring (especially comparing with other mirrorless cameras).

7 upvotes
ChrisPercival
By ChrisPercival (6 months ago)

I had the E-P3 and have the E-M5 and E-P5. I have experienced this problem with all these cameras. I found it particularly bad when I first got the E-P3, but I think I've developed my technique to mostly work around the problem. I just thought the issue was just as alluded to in the review; that of a small camera and shaky hands trying to use the rear LCD with the shutter button.
I find using the VF-2 helps a lot, helping to steady the camera against my eyeglasses.

1 upvote
retro76
By retro76 (6 months ago)

It is something specific to the Olympus design. I bought the OMD last year and although focus is fast and precise I found that 40% of my images were OOF, something i have never experienced even with the cheapest SLRs. I think Olympus bodies have an amazing feature set and love their lenses, but in terms of usability their bodies are a big let down.

Comment edited 55 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Olymore
By Olymore (6 months ago)

That sounds like you haven't learned how CDAF works rather than anything to do with shutter shock. Have you tried using a smaller focus point ?
And shutter shock has been seen on Panasonic m43 bodies, though to a lesser degree than the Olympus bodies. So it is not exclusive to Olympus but a result of having a lightweight body and an open shutter before taking the picture.

0 upvotes
plastique2
By plastique2 (6 months ago)

Like all the other PEN cameras and many other similarly designed cameras by Sony, Pentax, etc. - a fine piece of engineering - but NOT as a photographic tool should look like! Simple as that. Pretty camera? Maybe. A matter of taste. Ergonomic camera? Surely not. As so many cameras recently. I hate that. Who needs a pretty camera anyway? Any camera that would have an outstanding performance and would be easy to hold and easy to handle would be pretty because of that. Everybody would want to have it. But these new (ehm, old retro whatever design) cigarette box cameras are a hurdle to serious photographic work, amateur or pro ...
When will this 'who makes the camera with the smallest grip and the most invisible viewfinder' craze end?

1 upvote
Oly72
By Oly72 (6 months ago)

Says who? You? I for one appreciate and value good design and aesthetics and I'm more that happy to use my OM-D for professional use with exceptional results. But that's fine you just go ahead and you use your fisher-price designed Canikon and follow the rest of the herd.

1 upvote
plastique2
By plastique2 (6 months ago)

At the moment I have only two Olympus cameras, E-620 and PEN PL1. I have had and used most of the main camera models of all camera makers. I know what I am talking about. I have nothing against good design. But the design has to be ergonomical, otherwise what is the point of a photographic tool? Yes, a tool. You are happy with the OM-D. I would be too. It is much more ergonomical than the E-P5 and that's the model here in discussion. The new OLY which is about to come is even more ergonomical. Yet it is not am OLY PEN. Why did we have to go through the PEN phase with exceptionally good image quality, but with show off design of the camera body? That's what I'm talking about. And you go on being happy. By the way, herd followers are those who are prepared to use and praise a product even if it is clearly impractical in one or another way, just because it is fancy, modern, rare, designed by somebody famous, etc.
So do you understand what I am saying?

0 upvotes
plastique2
By plastique2 (6 months ago)

And yes, maybe the E-P5's images are shaky because it is difficult to hold it steady without a viewfinder pressed against the face to hold it even steadier ... it's meant to be a joke, but maybe it isn't so far from the truth ...

0 upvotes
Steve
By Steve (6 months ago)

A rating of 78 seems pretty high for a camera that is prone to blurry images...
In my ratiing world that would be a deal breaker.. and rating in the 60's... at best..

9 upvotes
simon65
By simon65 (6 months ago)

Me too. Blurred images in the 1/80-1/200th sec range is pretty serious. I take most of my pictures in that range. Olympus need to sort this out sharpish.

4 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (6 months ago)

I really can't see why someone would buy one of these over an E-M5, which is a sure-enough awesome device.

0 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (6 months ago)

let me help you with that:
removable, much better electronic viewfinder
focus peaking
wifi capabilities
on board flash
faster shutter
2x2 mode

for me: P5 over EM5

2 upvotes
Todd3608
By Todd3608 (6 months ago)

The E-P5 also has a MUCH better LCD, faster FPS and better battery life.

0 upvotes
Laszlo13
By Laszlo13 (6 months ago)

Could the blurring be due to the new Auto IS? Andy stated they're well aware of shutter shock, and this isn't it (i.e. putting the camera on a tripod greatly reduced the negative effect). I was wondering if it was tested with both Auto IS - and normal IS? Could it be that the camera is picking up the up / down motion of actuating the shutter as vertical panning?

0 upvotes
Miron09
By Miron09 (6 months ago)

With the EP3, I never had a blur issue. Could this be due to the fact that I use the touchscreen for shutter release most of the time?
Otherwise I prefer times faster that 1/200, and use flash and/or a tripod in low light.

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (6 months ago)

This was actually one of the first possibilities we though of. But we tested it extensively and found no difference in image blurring between S-IS Auto and S-IS 1.

1 upvote
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (6 months ago)

I get this kind of double-blurring when I attach a non-Olympus lens and configure the wrong focal length for the IS.

Never seen it using an Olympus or even Panasonic lens though. I took hundreds of pics on a recent trip to Italy with my EP-5, not one of my images has this double blur.

2 upvotes
Markol
By Markol (6 months ago)

I know, all cameras that cost more than 300$ get an award here as a rule, BUT a camera that produced double images at very common shutter speeds, especially one that is considered high-end and priced accordingly, would be a prime candidate for not getting an AWARD, not just no gold award.
Sorry but this is ridiculous, you are looking for reasons to give awards when there are so many that should exclude cameras from getting any.
The E-PL1 kit lens has a similar problem, what, years ago? Olympus should get a slap on the hand for not fixing this well known issue. And you should be a little more selective about which camera to give an award, maybe you should think about what an award is.

16 upvotes
peterpainter
By peterpainter (6 months ago)

Interesting. I came across 'shutter shock' a while ago, but many people seemed to be in denial at the time. I have a number of old cameras - a Zorki 4 and Pentax P30n in particular have pretty mean shutters. They make quite a 'snap' and it can be felt when holding the cameras 'casually' - hold on firm and it's not too bad.
There's probably a fair amount of energy involved in getting a focal plane shutter across fast with an abrupt start and finish, so the issue is not terribly surprising. I don't think the impact is restricted to cameras with sensor-shift stabilisation, however I guess it could be classed as 'camera shake' rather than shutter-shock, but the root cause, a 'rather violent' focal plane shutter, is the same.
It's interesting that I have come across it mentioned for Sony SLTs but not for Pentax SLRs in Live View. I wonder if that's because it doesn't happen or because nobody has noticed.

1 upvote
peterpainter
By peterpainter (6 months ago)

Note: to be fair to the Pentax, I only noticed the 'violence' because I'd been using a bridge camera before trying it out again fairly recently. The Zorki's shutter, on the other hand, always struck me as being pretty 'violent.'

0 upvotes
axlotl
By axlotl (6 months ago)

The unsharpness with double imaging described in this review sounds as though it might be due to shutter shock. A method of testing to determine if shutter shock is present can be found here..http://cameraergonomics.blogspot.com.au/2013/08/how-to-test-for-shutter-shock.html

1 upvote
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (6 months ago)

It's not shutter shock as described on that page - you don't get it with the camera on a tripod. As we, in fact, mentioned in the review.

3 upvotes
Karroly
By Karroly (6 months ago)

IS tries to anticipate user shake which is a slow, low frequency movement. It is possible that the shutter generates faster, higher frequency vibrations that cause no blur when IS is off (at least at shutter speeds compatible with handheld shooting), but disturb the IS system when active...

0 upvotes
compay
By compay (6 months ago)

i have taken a look at many 4/3 camera's but do not understand why the majority has such a loud shutter sound...I do not know exactly about the epl 5 but I believe it also made a huge shutter sound. The shutter sound and the lack of autofocus really small lenses...alwaus made me decide to buy another camera.

3 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (6 months ago)

Depends by what standard. Compared to compacts with tiny shutters, yes, they are louder.

By mirrorless standards, they are not loud though.

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Michael Geary
By Michael Geary (6 months ago)

I agree completely. The loud shutter is my least favorite thing about my E-P5. There are many situations where I simply can't use it because of the shutter noise. I was taking pictures at a tech presentation the other night and had to use my Canon S95 instead of the E-P5 because of the quieter shutter. Of course it was indoors in poor lighting, and I would have gotten much better photos with the E-P5. But I couldn't do it. I did not want to distract the audience.

3 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (6 months ago)

Mainly because most (all?) of them have to close the shutter briefly before taking a picture (so it's open for liveview, then shuts, opens again to take the picture, shuts again, then finally opens once more for liveview).

However electronic shutters are starting to appear on the new M4/3 models, which means they can (in electronic shutter mode) operate silently.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Zdman
By Zdman (6 months ago)

So the preview mentions shutter shock (which is blurring caused by the mechanical action of the shutter) but the actual text refers to shake induced by pressing the shutter button. It definitely the mechanical shutter and a quick search on google will find the cameraergonomics which has tested this before on a tripod and found and found that an electronic shutter completly solves this problem. If you search for Electronic First Curtain (used by Canon, Sony and now Samsung) you'll find a few microscope oriented sites which show this exact same issue is solved by the EFC. There's even a user article about this on Dpreview. I want this publicised as there is no reason all the camera manufactures can't introduce and EFC option.

1 upvote
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (6 months ago)

Ridiculous price!

4 upvotes
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