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Olympus PEN E-P5 Review

October 2013 | By Richard Butler, Andy Westlake
Buy on Amazon.com From $799.00


Review based on a production Olympus PEN E-P5 with Firmware 1.2

When Olympus introduced the original Micro Four Thirds PEN E-P1 almost 4 years ago in June 2009, it was the first mirrorless interchangeable lens camera to adopt a compact, 'rangefinder-style' body that made no pretence to look like an SLR. It also saw the company striking out in a direction it's followed ever since - designing attractive yet capable little cameras that consciously draw on its long-running film camera heritage. Indeed the SLR-style OM-D E-M5 was one of last year's biggest hits, and even pipped the 36MP full frame Nikon D800 to the title of 'Best Camera of 2012' in our reader poll.

The PEN E-P5 - the fourth model in the E-P range - continues this theme, while adding an array of updates that make it easily the most desirable PEN yet. It includes many of the features that made the E-M5 such a compelling package, such as the same 16MP MOS sensor, advanced '5-axis' in-body image stabilization (now with automatic panning detection), 9 fps continuous shooting, and tilting rear touch screen. It also inherits the refinements debuted on the PEN E-PL5, such as enhanced in-camera RAW conversion, a broad-range 'HDR bracketing' mode, and the ability to specify whether you wish to use in-lens or in-body image stabilization with Panasonic OIS lenses. On top of this it adds-in a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, a 'peaking' display to assist manual focus, and this year's must-have feature: built in Wi-Fi for connection to your smartphone or tablet.

Olympus PEN E-P5 specification highlights:

  • 16MP MOS Four Thirds format sensor
  • Twin control dials (front and rear) with '2x2' dual-mode option
  • 1/8000 sec top shutter speed, 1/320 sec flash sync
  • '5-axis' image stabilization with automatic panning detection ('S-IS Auto')
  • ISO 'LOW' (100 equiv) - ISO 25,600
  • Up to 9fps shooting (5.0 fps with continuous AF)
  • Focus 'peaking' display
  • Intervalometer and Time Lapse movie creation
  • 1.04m dot 3" LCD touchscreen display - tilts 80° upwards and 50° downwards
  • Built-in Wi-Fi for remote shooting (iAuto only) and image transfer to smartphone or tablet
  • Optional VF-4 electronic viewfinder: 2.36M dot LCD, 0.74x magnification (equiv), eye sensor

One key change compared to previous E-Px models is a rearrangement of the controls - gone are the thumb roller and tiny rear dial, replaced by 'proper' front and rear dials that protrude horizontally from the top plate. The E-P5 features what Olympus calls a '2x2' dial interface: a small lever on the back of the camera switches these dials from controlling exposure parameters to changing ISO and white balance. If you don't like this arrangement, the lever can be customized to a couple of other options (described later in this review).

The E-P5 places emphasis on speed: it has a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, which Olympus says should help make best use of the company's F1.8 prime lenses, allowing them to be shot wide open in sunlight. This is aided by the addition of an ISO 100-equivalent 'LOW' setting, although this will likely come at the expense of some highlight clipping. The E-P5 also offers a fast startup time of just 0.5 sec, 1/320 sec sync with the built-in flash (1/250 sec with external units), autofocus tracking at 5 fps, and a fast shutter release mode with a lag of just 44ms (via a custom setting).

Additional features

In traditional Olympus fashion the E-P5 gets a few new features compared to previous models. There's a 'Super-spot AF' mode that allows extremely precise positioning of the AF point when using magnified live view, very much like the one seen on recent Panasonic models. It gains timed intervalometer shooting, along with the ability to assemble time-lapse movies in-camera. The Live Bulb mode, that allows you to monitor the progress of long exposures while the shutter is open, now features an on-screen histogram to help monitor exposure build-up. The image stabilization system is also now always active by default, to provide a stabilized live view feed (especially useful when using telephoto lenses).

The E-P5 also gets Olympus's 'Photo Story' feature that first appeared on the XZ-10 enthusiast compact. This is essentially an extension of Art Filters, allowing you to generate multi-image composites rather like the pages of a photo book, in a wide variety of themes. It may not be something enthusiast photographers will use all the time, and arguably better suited to lower-end PEN models, but it's good to see Olympus continuing to come up with new ideas.

Colour options

The E-P5 comes in three colour schemes; black, silver and white. The all-black version that we've shown in this review has a textured matte finish which we expect will be appreciated by street photographers - it looks particularly fine when coupled with the black versions of the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm 1:1.8, M.Zuiko Digital 45mm 1:1.8 and M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm 1:1.8 lenses announced alongside. The camera also comes in a very handsome silver-and-black finish that harks back to Olympus's classic cameras from the 1960s and '70s, and a white version with a beige grip. Olympus will also be offering a limited edition model with a wooden grip, and a range of premium accessories such as leather cases.

Silver E-P5 with black 14-42mm kit zoom and VF4 viewfinder White E-P5 with silver 14-42mm lens

Kit options

The E-P5 will be available either body-only for approx. £900/€999/$999, with the M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6R II collapsible zoom for £1000/€1099, or with the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm F1.8 and VF-4 EVF for £1350/€1449/$1449.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 497
1234
Ratzfatz

After almost 4 weeks I got the camera back today without any comment from Olympus. I asked several times for information, the only information I got was I have to be patient. Obviously they did nothing with it as the EP-5 still produces blurred pictures. I am really really annoyed and disappointed about the camera and the way I am treated by Olympus.
I cannot recomment buying a EP-5 because there seems to be a good chance that you get a defective camera and Olympus doesn't care much.

0 upvotes
SteveNunez

One ugly camera...just my opinion, which doesn't count for much, but I find it ugly!

0 upvotes
xMichaelx

I totally agree with you: Your opinion doesn't count for much.

0 upvotes
Michael Piziak

Doesn't look ugly to me.

0 upvotes
ThatsTheShot

I wish it has a flip out screen (one that you can twist and turn) so I can take low angle shots in the portrait orientation.

0 upvotes
Baron Von A

I am one of the disappointed owners of E-P5. The shutter shock is visible at 1/80 - 1/250 range even with 17mm. You have to be blind or indifferent to the quality of your work not to notice it. I went to the local store and tested the other copy to find out it to have the same problem. I believe all bloodline is affected. This is unacceptable for the camera of this price range, shame on you Olympus! I have a case created with Olympus Support regarding this shake and they are investigating further. I encourage any user who are not satisfied with the IQ to do the same thing. Let them work on fixing their mistakes.

BVA

3 upvotes
MajorMagee

I've tried and tried with a variety of lenses over the range of shutter speeds in question but can't seem to be able to make the "shutter shock" problem occur on my E-P5 (even checking images at up to 500X). Mine was purchased from Japan back in June, so perhaps it really is just a matter of one particular production lot versus another.

For now I'm back to just shooting with confidence and not worrying about it anymore.

4 upvotes
ThatsTheShot

I have also tried the same on variety of lenses over the range of shutter speeds in question but can't seem to produce the mentioned "shutter shock" issue. I purchased mine from a camera store in Australia.

0 upvotes
Dylthedog

You may laugh but try a taking a 'cat picture' - you know you should with a new camera anyway, it's the law :-P

Check the whiskers and I can almost guarantee you will see a double image if the settings are in the range mentioned here. I use an E-PL5 and get the results identified by DPR.

0 upvotes
TN Args

I would like DPREVIEW to give us an update here on the 'shutter shock' issue. The more I read, the more confused I become.

Are we looking at:
- all EP5 have this because it is a design fault?
- all EP5 have this but the degree varies?
- some EP5 have this and need to be changed or repaired because they are faulty? Is it repairable?
- it is nothing but a settings problem?
- it is nothing but a user/handling problem?

Is there something different about the EM5 that makes it exempt? And the EM1?

DPREVIEW: haven't Olympus given you any definitive response yet?

7 upvotes
Northgrove

Another problem that I saw in the forums is that some have experienced "shutter shock" at f/8. Any blur at this aperture on micro 4/3 may not be about that, but due to diffraction. Most m4/3 lenses seem to perform the best in the f/4-f/5.6 range. When testing for details like shutter shock, avoid using smaller apertures than that regardless lens.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 12, 2013)

Hello dear photo friends :-)
Today did some testing with the EP-5 again, third time.... to reproduce the shuttershock.
And... again, it did not occur with my camera. Will upload some pics to the test oly in my gallery.
But these shots were made with the 60mm macro f2.8 and the 45mm 1.8. And to be honest, the 14-42 can't stand in the shadow of these two lenses. The pics (if I shoot with it) of the 14-42 are less sharp and crispy as the 45 and to some extend the 60mm.

2 upvotes
FreedomLover

Dear Willem
Shutter shock seems quite evident if you look at 2719888.jpg the thumb's fingernail at x:1512 y:1554 and the 2719890.jpg vine at x:2309 y:1895 and x:2345 y:2204. You chose moving and largely out of focus objects again though. But the sharp definition of the short up-down shock movement trace is characteristic. The 2719889.jpg Orion building shows wonderful optics, no CA and great detail, except in the distant green trees. The flying red leaf is great :-)

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 13, 2013)

Oke, will look @ the pics again. Today another tour through the settings, I have the 1/8 shock option on right now. Let's see what happens.

0 upvotes
MajorMagee

FreedomLover,

I see what you're talking about in Willem's pictures, but why would it only occur in the out of focus areas and never on the sharply focused edges? If the sensor was being jostled by the Shutter Shock/IBIS combination wouldn't everything in the image have motion blurred edges of the same magnitude?

1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Nov 20, 2013)

thats indeed interesting... Tried some other options now, but sometimes it occurs and sometimes in -a kind of the same situation - (I'm not a tester) it does not occur.... so it does bug me a bit. Will try this weekend to make some pictures with antishock.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Dec 9, 2013)

Did not have much time to experiment... but wat do you guys think of this image? shot with the fuijfilm, to me it seems that this camera also suffers from the shutter shock issue...
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/reviewsamples/photos/2772739/dscf9888?inalbum=fujifilm-xf-23mm-f1-4r-samples-gallery
Isn't it just the way you handle the camera?

0 upvotes
Ratzfatz

I bought the EP5 last week. I tried it first with the Pana 12-35. Almost any pictures taken at around 1/60 or 1/80 at 12 to 30mm are massively blurred and I can replicate this any time. I sent these pictures to Olympus and awaiting a reply.
Turning in the menue the permantly IBIS off when touching the release button and have it only active when taking the picture (full press on release button) helps a lot. But this cannot be a solution. My OMD has a perfect working IBIS under any circumstances for thousands of pictures now and the body of the OMD (except from the EVF) is actually smaller than the EP5's. I hope my camera is just defect rather having a general construction fault.

Check this picture taken at 35mm and 1/80, IBIS set to Auto:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/qgeq1alnb5a74ii/London-7-2.jpg
I was standing still and taking my time to take it.

1 upvote
geoglyphs

The resolution of this picture is rather low, but still I can tell that there is much more blur than just the vertical one.

1 upvote
FreedomLover

Geoglyphs is right, there is massive horizontal movement in that picture, as can be seen on the number plate. Defective unit.

1 upvote
Stupidco

A lens has a focal length. The focal length in the image stabilizer can be changed. But how can the stabilizer know the effective focal length with a zoom? Are we comparing a general stabilizing function with the expectations of precision focusing?

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 11, 2013)

I own one myself, with fine lenses. This does not look the same as my images! So, your camera or lens has something that's not working very well....
Hope Oly helps you out.

0 upvotes
nrdlnd

Hello,
You must tell how you have taken this picture! Have you used the VF-4 viewfinder? Have you squeezed the trigger (not pushed it). Have you had your elbows against your chest to stabilize the camera? The reason I'm asking is because no camera can compensate for bad practice, If you have done all this and the pictures still are blurry then theres something wrong with your equipment. Was the stabilisation off on your lens?

I have just taken pictures handheld with my new E-P5 and the 17mm 1,8 at 1/60s (IS=auto) and the result is very sharp. I don't have the Pana 12-35 so I can't test that lens.

Regards

0 upvotes
nrdlnd

I like to add: And double check your settings! I did get wrong white balance and I had probably changed that setting. "Auto" works well most of the time but not always especially not for fluorescent light. Olympus gives you all possibilities to customize your camera but it's also possible something get's wrong in that process!

Regards

0 upvotes
Ratzfatz

I am a quite experienced Oly user. I took thousands of pics with my OMD and EPL5 and know quite well the limits of the IBIS. I still hope the camera is just defect. Olympus asked for uncompressed pictures and I will get an answer soon.

0 upvotes
tokugawa

Did you activate lens priority IS? If not, maybe IBIS and the OIS on the lens are interfering with each other.

0 upvotes
alan over 80

I have always maintained the shutter button should be at the bottom right a la Rollei. Particularly if one can look down into EVF at waist level.

1 upvote
Stupidco

The Image Stabilizer can be turned off. The Image Stabilizer can be turned on. But how can the Image Stabilizer be a little bit on?

The DP review reports that the camera can recognize the focal length of a native m4/3 lens, so it doesn't matter the the focal length set in the stabilizer remains at its manufactured setting. Put an adapter/ lens on the camera and the focal length in the image stabilizer must be changed by the user to a setting that corresponds to the focal length of the lens with the adapter. Take off the adapter/ lens and put on a native lens and everything is alright; even though the focal length set in the image stabilizer remains as changed when the adapter/lens was fitted.

The image stabilizer has been on all the time. Sometimes the focal length set in the image stabilizer matters? Sometimes the focal length set in the image stabilizer doesn't matter? Where is the logic and consistence in this? Out suffering shutter shock? I set the stabilizer to match the lens.

0 upvotes
geoglyphs

I bought the black E-P3 kit with 17mm 1.8 lens and the VF-4 electronic viewfinder for 1249 euros at camera.nl in Rotterdam. (In the meantime, the shop raised the price though). I find that very reasonable, considering the price of the separate lens (529 euros) and the separate viewfinder (280 euros). That leaves 440 euros for the body.
Since the review of the E-P5 on dpreview I have tried to reproduce the mentioned problem, but without any 'luck'. Pictures are consistently sharp. I used the 75mm lens at 1.8 aperture, varying the ISO so that the shutter speed would fall within the range that is supposed to cause the shutter shock problems. Anti-shock was not used. I used the normal release button (not the touch screen) and held the camera with the viewfinder to my eye.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
geoglyphs

I mean of course the black E-P5 kit.

0 upvotes
zateon

i don't understand why this blur is not picked up in other models with the same IBIS.

0 upvotes
peevee1

I am surprised that the unreasonably high price is not listed among the cons. A lot of higher-class cameras such as Sony NEX-6, Fuji X-E1 and now even Pana GX7 are actually cheaper, making E-P5 very bad value.

6 upvotes
TN Args

None of them have IBIS. This capability is important. So far it is unique. The GX7 inbuilt IS apparently is only 1-stop (Cameralabs review) and that's effectively zero in my book.

Are you saying IBIS should be 'free'? Canon charges $100's for every lens sold with IS!

2 upvotes
Northgrove

Most importantly, the E-M5 is cheaper and it has IBIS, and also an EVF and weather sealing that this camera lacks. The E-P5 was expected to come down in price, but still really hasn't. Yes, the E-P5 has a 1/8000 shutter speed and slightly better handling but I don't count these as premium features to make it pricier than the E-M5. It looks more like a crippled, but refined version (as for the features it kept) of the E-M5, with some lessons learned...

0 upvotes
Raist3d

Actually the GX7 IBIS is pretty good. Other reviews have put it much higher than the 1 stop you quote. Moreover, the work around for the blurry shutter shock introduces lag in taking a shot...

And if you think IBIS (which the GX7 has anyway) is important how about a silent electronic shutter for photographing a classic music concert, theater, or candid shooting?

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
drdwo

Video is described as mushy, indistinct with clumsy sharpening. As a P5 owner I cannot confirm this. Here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIAAIClmA6s is a GH3/P5 video shootout where it is not so easy to distinguish the video quality. Focussing is not an issue for me because I prefer manual focussing with video. I also don't want to produce huge files, so 20MB/s is ok for me. Has someone produced P5 videos clearly showing artefacts/moire or any other serious problems? Is there somewhere a GX7 / P5 video comparison?

1 upvote
FreedomLover

The GH3 video you link to shows heavy aliasing throughout (staggered lines). Is this normal for that camera or did Blunty add this in post-production? Also Youtube heavily degrades videos adding high compression.

1 upvote
FreedomLover

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympus-pen-e-p5/11
Sample video 2 shows strong moire patterns on the shirt of the guitar player, which is to be expected for a camera lacking an AA filter.
For Sample video 1, the starting airplane on the mountain lake, DPReview could have configured OIS to S-IS2 Vertical IS (Image stabilization applies only to vertical (Y) camera shake. Use when panning the camera horizontally), but the unsteady holding of the camera limits the usefulness of that sample anyway.

1 upvote
drdwo

Tried to reproduce the moire pattern in the 2nd video using my P5 and a grey/black striped shirt from different distances - no success. The video is described as 60i, only the M5 but not the P5 has a 60i mode. P5 is 30p. Can some other P5 owner confirm the moire effect?

0 upvotes
drdwo

There is a myth stating that M5 and P5 have no AA Filter, this is not true: http://fourthirds-user.com/forum/showthread.php?t=10734
Both have a weak one, but I am still searching info about their AA filter settings for video. For M1 the situation is different.

0 upvotes
drdwo

There is a strange shaking at the right side in the second video, which seems not present in the middle. Any explanation? Cannot reproduce this with my P5 IBIS on - why would anyone shoot video with IBIS off? Finally, after a lot of experimenting I could reproduce some moire, but to a lesser extend. Searched all my clothes to find something with the "right" striping, was only visible from a much larger distance than in video 2.

0 upvotes
Abratech

The easy way to resolve all these issues is NOT to buy Olympus cameras. Problem solved! Easy.

0 upvotes
peevee1

DPR wrote: "The E-P5 is the first Olympus to include Wi-Fi"

This is not true, there were at least SH-50 and E-PL6 before it.

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Richard Butler

Those two cameras came bundled with Wi-Fi SD cards but it wasn't a feature included in the cameras themselves.

3 upvotes
Dylthedog

The E-PL5 had a wifi SD card, the E-PL6 has native wifi but is only available in SE Asia. I'm not sure the E-PL6 came out before the E-P5 though.

0 upvotes
Infared

Dylthedog...incorrect. I imported an E-PL6. There is no Wi-Fi...same thing as E-PL5...some were bundled with Wi-Fi SD card..(not mine)...I also have the E-P5...I believe that that is the first MFT offering from Oly with Wi-Fi.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
AngelicBeaver

What happened to the ability to compare noise reduction levels? I'm really hoping that Olympus will go back to allowing control over the amount of noise reduction. Excepting for the high ISO shadow noise, I loved my EPL2 with noise suppression turned off. The grain had a lovely characteristic. My EPL5 took a big step backward. It smears fine detail no matter how low the noise suppression is set. I was hoping Oly would restore some of this control (and hopefully do a better job with shadow noise) in the new camera, but I don't see the noise comparison tool in this review.

Am I missing it?

0 upvotes
keithwee

mu-43 forums had someone who tested for shutter shock on EP5 and GX7.

text below was lifted wholesale from: http://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=53461&page=4

"Doesn't seem to be much difference between them. Both cameras were repeatably a little bit soft in the neighborhood of 1/100 to 1/125, handheld (stabilization turned on). Neither was particularly bad - just barely visible if you looked REAL close at normal viewing size, but both noticeable at 100%. The EP5 is weakest right at 1/100 and sharpens up at 1/125. The GX7 is slightly soft at 1/100 but notably soft at 1/125.

On a tripod (2 second delay, stabilization turned off), the EP5 is still soft right at 1/100, but is fine above and below that. The GX7, oddly, is soft at 1/60th but not at any other shutter speed."

seems like we have quite a few models to test for shutter shock maybe?

Comment edited 27 seconds after posting
1 upvote
FreedomLover

"On a tripod (2 second delay, stabilization turned off, Olympus 75mm lens), the EP5 is still soft right at 1/100, but is fine above and below that. The GX7, oddly, is soft at 1/60th but not at any other shutter speed."
http://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=53461&page=4

"Which makes me wonder if the E-M5 has the same issue.
Does it?" dombi (1 day ago)

"As stated very clearly in the review, no."
DPReview Andy Westlake (21 hours ago)

"another poster had made the rather broad global statement that there was nothing wrong with any of those shutter speeds on the E-P5 - and I doubted that their testing was anywhere near comprehensive enough to warrant such a sweeping conclusion"

0 upvotes
FreedomLover

"The specific mass of the lens used matters. Different weight lenses will have cause this effect at different shutter speeds and different degrees on different camera bodies.
Because of the fact that the propagation of the vibration is likely a resonance frequency, it's entirely possible that, say, the 45mm lens will show this effect on one body, while the 75mm will not, but the 45-175 again WILL show it."
http://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=53461&page=5

1 upvote
ginsbu

I'm glad to see this test updated to include results when using the anti-shock feature. I use is regularly to reduce risk of shutter shock with my E-M5. However testing with the 2 second delay is still needed in order to confirm DPR's claim that the E-P5's problem is IBIS failing to correct for motion introduced when pressing the shutter button, not shutter shock.

1 upvote
martink3S04

This sounds an awful lot like the shutter shake issues on the PZ 45-175x (same ranges and effects). I have that lens and on my older GF3 it was terrible in those shutter ranges (but works almost perfectly on the EM-5). I have the EM-5 and while it doesn't consistently have shake issues, the IS does significantly reduce in effectiveness when the focal lengths are long (over 100mm). At very short lengths, you can handhold reliably under a quarter of a second and even with the 45 1.8, you can often get below 1/10th, but once you get much longer, the IS just can't hold steady enough (it starts to skip around). Maybe this effect is amplified in the smaller body? On the EM-5, IF you can allow the camera to stabilize for a few seconds (and/or brace against a solid object such as a tree) the problem goes away.

0 upvotes
Stupidco

Is anyone testing the mismatch between the camera recognizing the focal length of the lens and the stabilizer not recognizing the focal length of the lens. The camera can be working one one focal length and the stabilizer can be working on a different focal length. Unless the two match, focusing error seems highly likely. The stabilizer can be made to recognize the focal length of the lens fitted, using the settings function of the camera.

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Andy Westlake

I think you're fundamentally misunderstanding what the focal length setting does. It's only used with third party lenses used on adapters, for which the camera needs to be told the focal length for the IS system to work. It doesn't have to be set with native Micro Four Thirds lenses, because they tell the camera their focal length automatically.

0 upvotes
m87501

Which lens(es) were used, with which in-camera settings for the tests that showed the double-imaging? Thanks..

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Stupidco

I used four 1:8 Olympus lenses. I think the manual has been baldly written. The camera changes the focal lens to match the lens. The stabilizer does not respond to the lens attached.

To change the stabilizer: Press menu button. Down arrow to Menu 2. Right arrow then left arrow down. Right arrow on Image stabilizer. Right arrow on still picture. With any s-is setting press right arrow. You will get the focal length menu. Up or down arrow till you get focal length of lens. Press OK.

The focal length setting at the bottom of the screen will now match the focal length of the lens.

It seems unlikely than focusing will be entirely accurate when the two focus settings disagree.

Set the focus lengths and take a picture. Set the stabilizer focus length to to 8mm and take a picture. Set the stabilizer to 1000mm and take a picture. Compare the results to discover the extent of any differences.

Gone to bed.

0 upvotes
Luke_A_P

Just to add my 2 cents. I have tested this in some detail on my E-P5, I agree with most of what dpreview concluded:
1. It is worst in telephoto ranges, with a shutter speed ~1/160s
2. A heavier lens reduces or eliminates the effect. I tried the 14-150mm MFT zoom (worse) and a 70-150mm OM zoom (better)
3. Using a tripod eliminates the effect
I will add the following:
1. It affected by how you hold the camera. Holding the camera closer to your body with two hands and a firm grip, or better still using a viewfinder, can emliminate the problem.
2. Setting the 1/8s anti-shock mode does not seem to fix the problem.
And I will speculate on the following:
I don't think it is a button pressing issue, I think it is a shutter shock issue. I suspect the acceleration of the shutter is causing the camera to move in your hand. You can feel the shutter through the body, much more than the click of the button. As for comparison to the M5; faster shutter = more force = more displacement of the camera?

6 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 8, 2013)

I practically tested this with my ep5. One time I had some double image effect on a spiderweb, the others were without any disturbing issues.
But, I did use the evf and that makes it a much more stable position. What might help as well is the release by screen if you don't have the evf.
I owned a d800 with several lenses, the macro 105 f2.8 was also very difficult to operate! When using a 300mm or 400mm on a d800 without tripod isn't working well either....
You can find some test images in my gallery under test. These are just shots to test, so nothing special :-)

0 upvotes
Northgrove

With EVF to stabilize against helping, tripod helping, most trouble in tele ranges... All this taken together just tells me you need to better stabilize the camera, and that this is completely unrelated to shutter shock. All these things to aid against the problem is common sense to any decent tele photographer, and no, not even 5-axis IBIS will help as well with telephoto as it does with wide angle. This doesn't mean any camera components are faulty or quirky; it's rather the laws of physics.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
keithwee

Dropped by the local Olympus service centre today for a visit & chatted with the technicians there regarding the 'shutter shock' issue.

In short, they will push this matter upwards and provide a answer. :)

will update here whatever answers I get.

4 upvotes
FreedomLover

Well done, keithwee :-)

Maybe they can awake the dragon.

1 upvote
photohounds

Interesting that this issue should be 'discovered' as micro four thirds began gaining more popularity.

The moving mass of a mirror (and sub-mirror) is MUCH heavier than a shutter and will shake the camera more, yet no one sees that as a "problem".

In the 'film days', one had to learn how to hold a camera and gently massage the shutter release for sharp pictures. Many 35mm camera makers added mirror lock up to their better models - always to "reduce camera shake". Sometimes I managed a hand-held shot with a 300mm lens at 1/8th second if the subject also remained still.

Most of the pics of dimly-lit alcoves in this gallery were taken at speeds down to 1/5th hand held

http://photohounds.smugmug.com/Places/Australian-War-Memorial/i-Tz3hbrm/0/L/P9079217-L.jpg

I looked at thousands of my other images, and found ZERO evidence of this "problem".

Simple solution: be still while shooting and don't blame something else.

1 upvote
FreedomLover

You need to look at the speeds at which this mostly occurs here.

And you are right the mirror was a problem, that's why it is being replaced.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Stupidco

More re image stabilizer.

You can actually change the focal length in all of the 4 still picture settings in the image stabilizer, to various lengths between 8mm and 1000mm. As this can be done, I imagine that changing the focal length to the appropriate setting will have an impact on the way the stabilizer works and on the results achieved when taking an exposure. I've not bothered to test this hypothesis.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover

A need for calibration could explain why some lenses are more affected.
It's also telling that they still don't employ qualified translators.

E-P5_INSTR_MANUAL_EN.PDF page 53:
http://olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_support_manuals.asp?id=1647

Reducing camera shake (image stabilizer)
Choosing a focal length (Micro Four Thirds/Four Thirds System lenses excluded)
Use focal length information to reduce camera shake when shooting with lenses that are not
Micro Four Thirds or Four Thirds system lenses.
• Select [Image Stabilizer], press the INFObutton, use HIto select a focal length, and
press Q.
• Choose a focal length between 8 mm and 1000 mm.
• Choose the value that most closely matches to the one that is printed on the lens.

0 upvotes
m87501

Yes I found that focal setting too and changed it last night. I also found the "anti-shock" setting buried in the menu which delays the shutter by 1/8 second after pressing it, and now need to try it without that set 'on', will try it just straight pushing the button with ibis and without.

Am in the middle of testing/shooting this EP5 and so far have not found any instance of the double-blur using the 17mm 1.8. Need more time & shots to be sure, but so far nothing...not a single one. Would like to find an issue upfront if it's there.

0 upvotes
grendak

This is only useful (and only helps) if you are using non-micro four thirds lenses. Otherwise the camera already recognizes the focal length (and you can see it on screen and in exif). So this setting will not help the issue at hand.

0 upvotes
keithwee

changing of focal length settings is only needed for non MFT lenses. Hence it should not form part of testing here.

I'm getting a bit frustrated as I am unable to reproduce even 1 instance of the 'shutter-shock'. I've tried it on the 17/2.8, 17/1.8, 12-35/2.8 and the 14-45mm (mix of oldest and newest lenses)

I am also waiting for Olympus to answer this issue. Have highlighted this to them over the weekend.

0 upvotes
Stupidco

The camera recognizes the lens length. The image stabilizer does not recognize the lens length.

0 upvotes
tokugawa

@Stupidco: yes it does. The image stabilizer is controlled by the camera. The focal length setting is ONLY used when using a lens that does not transmit focal length information. So if you're using a M43-lens with electronic contacts, the focal length setting is ignored, and the camera (and thus the IS) recognizes it automatically.

0 upvotes
dombi

The E-P5 and the E-M5 use the same IBIS mechanism. Which makes me wonder if the E-M5 has the same issue.

Does it?

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake

As stated very clearly in the review, no.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover

Users report the same problem with the OMD EM5, even in this thread.

Also did you see goblin's question?

2 upvotes
white shadow

Now, with all the spanners in the works for the E-P5, lets wait for the review on the E-M1.

It will be very interesting to know whether this "problem" will appear in the E-M1. Until then, everybody can hold on to their money for the time being.

It may be a good thing until things settle down. With the US budget shutdown still going on, the future seems bleak and may get worse.

Best to hang on to your money.

2 upvotes
grendak

Very glad to finally see a review that mentions the sensor shake/shutter shock. Most just believe the hype that the new 5-axis IBIS is the best thing since sliced bread, but aren't looking closely at images (especially in the telephoto range). I tried two E-P5's (assuming the first one was poorly manufactured) and ultimately sent them both back because they were so horrible around shutter speeds below 1/250 or focal lengths above 200mm. I hope Olympus listens and does something to correct the issue before continuing to throw this new IBIS system in every camera from now on! For now I'm sticking with my E-PL5

3 upvotes
Stupidco

The manual says 'the image stabilizer cannot correct camera shake that occurs when the shutter speed is set to the slowest speed.' It does not say what the slowest speed is relative to.

0 upvotes
JEROME NOLAS

Panasonic 14-42 power zoom lens had the same issue, right? Is it fixed?

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
dombi
2 upvotes
XAA

Unfortunately I have no any doubts regarding results shown by DPR. I also saw shutter shock in case of shutter speed in range 1/40-1/250. Effect is practically independently of IS mode. I saw this even if IS was switched off completely. Sometimes result was catastrofic even in case of lenses with short focal range under shutter speed about 1/200. The only solution was to use hard tripod which is crazy for this kind of camera. I tried to speak with some another owners of P5 but have no got confirmation of the problem. So many peoples met this problem, but many never saw this. From another side I am sure what DPR has informed Olympus about the problem several months ago and tried to get another pc of camera for the test. The first note about the problem was shown on this site about 2-3 months ago.

0 upvotes
keithwee

hi,

its interesting to read about e shock shutter issue. Have you all checked with Olympus about it? Having double images/blurring from 1/80 to 1/200 is definitely serious enough for any user to seek compensation or demand rectification.

I've emailed Olympus and Panasonic about the issue, hope we will have clearer answers as so far the whole issue seems very murky with differing views.

3 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 6, 2013)

Hi,
I probably don't understand the issue... I tried to do my best and reproduce it with my EP5.... I fixed it one time: outside, spiderweb, macro (60mm), handheld.... but I fixed it to get the same shot without double image effect.... so it could be that the spiderweb was moving in the wind too much... In my galleries you'll find an album Test Oly EP5 with some practical tests.

2 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 5, 2013)

....more on the practical test:

Settings: F200 / F160 / F80 and some appropriate F and ISO 320.
Conclusion: None of the images showed unsharpened areas where it was supposed to be sharp.... So no double leafs or edges...

So, how can I reproduce the bug or the unsharp results? In my case it all seems fine....

0 upvotes
riziks

Hi, Your samples are almost a half sized, please post some 100% crops! From my experience, it's seems old Olympus problem, I noticed this fail with my PM1, which in other ways was an very exciting camera;)

1 upvote
likeafoxow

riziks, you don't need full sized pictures to see that they are in fact clean and sharp images. the double image effect is clearly not present in any of willem's photos.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover

likeafoxow, you do need full sized pictures to see if shutter shock is present. Willem later did allow access to his originals.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 5, 2013)

Hello dear photo friends!
I own a Pen EP-5 for 2 months now, and actually I'm very pleased with it! I could buy the body with all of the best lenses, because after lots of trouble with my D600... (oil/dust on sensor) I sold my new D800 (gift of Nikon) with lenses and other stuff ;-) That was necessary because it's not an cheap camera indeed!

Until now not too much of a painful decision I can tell you, it is absolutely a lot of pixels less... but it fits in my pocket and small bag including all available 2.8 lenses and flashes. You try that with a Nikon D800 ;-P

I read the dpreview findings about unsharp photos, so I did a little testing myself. Maybe I'm not experienced enough, but this little practical testing is maybe helpful.

Set: EP-5 with 60mm f2.8 (all latest firmware).
Scene: Two shots of stuff @ 50cm and two shots of stuff @ 20meters away. Two shots because I wanted to test the stabilization of the camera. Automatic vs Mode 1 (all axis on).
see next post :-0

0 upvotes
Vincent Flanigan

After reading about the so-called shutter-shock problem here on DPR, I took a bunch of pictures with my E-P5 with shutter speeds between 1/100 - 1/160 and examined them closely - just to be sure, as I've had the camera for about a month now and I've never encountered the double-image problem. And the result is ... nothing, nada, not a single one of them had any double-image problems. Perfect focus and gorgeous colors in all of them. I am extremely happy with my E-P5. Though I purchased my E-P5 from Hong Kong. One possible explanation might be that DPR has encountered a bad batch - but this is only a guess.

In any case, there is an anti-shock option in E-P5 where you can dial in a 1/8 second delay (or 1/4 or 1/2 sec.), which I suspect would solve the problem.

1 upvote
FreedomLover

There are many easy solutions to this problem that practically doesn't exist according to reports like yours. You can add a shutter delay so your camera behaves like a cheap P&S and captures the moment after the one you wanted to catch. But the easiest is to select a smaller resolution (under the menu "Image quality", best would be 1280x960 and JPEG Compression rate 4).
Or you can buy the camera in Hong Kong like he did.

1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 5, 2013)

To be 100% shure, I will do the testimg again tomorrow. Seems to become a nice autumn morning :-) that I don't wanna mis.
As said before, I can't reproduce the unsharpness or double image problem.... Maybe it's lens related? Will try the 45, 60 and 9-18... We'll see!

0 upvotes
FreedomLover

Please try all the available OIS options and show us the originals tomorrow :-)
Looking forward to the feast of colours.

0 upvotes
keithwee

I have also tried on my side to reproduce the 'shutter-shock' problem and i failed miserably to do so.

if it matters, I purchased my EP5 body from Singapore.

lastly, comments i read here point to that this is an issue plaguing all mirrorless bodies, is this valid? Can't even start to imagine how can pple have been so blind to something so obvious for years.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Oct 6, 2013)

Today I did some testing again, I managed it to reproduce the issue one time with a spiderweb.... but I also managed it to shoot the spiderweb without the double image issue. So maybe the wind was hindering me! Results are in my gallery album Test Oly EP5.
Two shots, one with auto setting stabilization and the next shot all on.

0 upvotes
Strikeroot

Kudos to DPreview for dinging them on the video. The single frame rate and paltry bit-rate in a high-dollar camera with such capable hardware come down to nothing but neglect.

A better video codec would in no way sacrifice stills image quality or camera size, as cameras smaller and 1/3rd the price handily demonstrate.

4 upvotes
FreedomLover

Olympus - we make the best in-image backups (TM)

Olympus - bringing life to your pictures

Olympus - you pay, we sway.

Missing organs - no more - use Olympus Imaging Corporation redoublers (TM)

(Disclaimer: this is satire.)

1 upvote
Stupidco

Manual states peaking does not guarantee accurate focusing. When using snap manual focus lenses, use magnify or distance scale

0 upvotes
CaptchaFool

i've forgotten one point. Thanks to dpreview for doing an awesome job investigating new cameras. I never read abuot EP5 problems in the press until yet!

3 upvotes
sderdiarian

Yes, but now I'm curious to have other cameras checked for it and have it noted how often it crops up.

I'm left wondering how endemic it is in 1) mFT's with 5-axis (or other magnetic field) IBIS required to hold the sensor centered when using the camera, 2) all mFT's, 3) small and light cameras in general (technique causing the issue) and 4) all cameras.

Based on the impact this may have on E-P5 sales, DPR should now include this as part of their standard test, and in fairness back-check other popular models. Unfortunately this may slow down their tests further; how many E-P5's were sold without awareness of this due to the late timing of these findings?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Revenant

DPR noticed this in the course of examining their pictures as part of their normal, very thorough review process, and then decided to investigate further, just like they've done with other unexpected findings, such as the Fuji X10 "white orbs".

There's no reason for them to back-check other models, since they surely would have noticed the problem during the review process, had it been present.

0 upvotes
CaptchaFool

i wasn't able to get perfectly sharp images in many situations and until now i was not deeply impressed about the image quality delivered by my EP5 and 17mm 1.8 combination. Even my Canon 40d by far does a better job. So i felt a litle bit unhappy with my new Olympus. After the shutter shock finding discovered by dpreview i'm wondering wether this could be the reason. But the shutter shock is described to be a problem with tele lenses and shutter speeds below 1/160. May be, i have to get used a bit longer with mey new camera. Meanwhile, i've stopped my plan to buy a 75mm 1.8 prime.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
nickos_fr

sorry i make an error is 1/160
so if speed security being 1/120 for 60 mm stab it snaps you above? whether it does not lead you there overcompensation? Personal daylight because I always disables unnecessary.

0 upvotes
nickos_fr

take a picture of a flower to 1/60 and then say that there is a blur! he does not know that a flower moves in the slightest breeze and must be 1/125 to freeze motion

0 upvotes
dejongj

I don't get this...I've had my EP5 since early July here in the United Kingdom. Shot several thousand photos since then, and never seen this double image DPReview is talking about...Very odd...

2 upvotes
kreislauf

maybe they got a faulty model...
i laughed very hard when i red: "problem that risks ruining images taken around 1/80 - 1/200th of a second"
WTH is wrong with you people? IF a camera produces unsharp images ABOVE 1/80th of a second, it is broken!

0 upvotes
Revenant

Andy Westlake wrote in a comment that they tested multiple units, all having the same problem.

1 upvote
sderdiarian

I'm sure they were pretty careful before making their statement, but it is odd that other reviewers didn't turn this issue up and that posts on it haven't been rampant on the mFT forum, especially given the price.

Instead the shutter shock posts have mostly been on the E-M5. Maybe it's a bad batch (I know, I know) or how they were holding the camera (highly unlikely). Just odd.

1 upvote
kreislauf

true. makes me wonder, what exactly is responsible. i was looking forward buying one. seems save to bring your laptop to your dealer and examine the camera prior to use for that issue...

0 upvotes
Raist3d

That's easy to explain. Many if the "reviews" are
Made by over enthusiastic websites for either the brand- some even indirectly paid for, or whatever THE NEW camera of the day is.

Some will just have missed it

0 upvotes
chillgreg

Soooo, 78 for this stinkbomb, yet 79 for the unequalled RX100MII...

Yeah yeah, I know, I know. Apples, oranges, opinions and disclaimers, yada...

But Mom and Pop buy this and wonder why their precious photos of their grandchildren are spoiled. Yet their son buys the tiny Sony and the results awe everyone.

Perhaps it's time for DPR to take a long look into the mirror and ask why a more objective and less subjective scoring scale should not be introduced.

Now it DPR wasn't funded by advertising and commissions. it could be as subjective as it wants. The current model is deeply flawed, despite the best efforts of many decent, credible people to make it work.

As it stands, the credibility of test results is being questioned more often than not.

Perhaps 78 is the right score for this particular camera. But perhaps a final numerical score should be withheld, until the manufacturer addresses potential flaws.

3 upvotes
Chez Wimpy

Sounds like Mom and Pop could use some lessons in photography basics. Maybe their accomplished (and loving) son can help them out?

4 upvotes
kreislauf

besides, why did Mom and Pop not buy the RX100 II?

1 upvote
Barney Britton

"it DPR wasn't funded by advertising and commissions. it could be as subjective as it wants" [sic]

Revenue concerns do not impact on editorial. And I think you mean objective. Which we always try to be.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover

Well Mr. Britton, on the RX100ii review DPReview clearly and repeatedly stated that for the awards you want to be totally subjective: DPReview staff pretended only the "feeling"s of the reviewer would decide.

May I submit a wish? I would like some comments by the reviewers about how close the colours in choice samples matched what they saw. For example do you see a yellow tint in specific samples made with the RX100 or is this just a myth spread by the competition.

0 upvotes
DaveE1

For me, the recent DPR RX100II review was a tipping point. DPR's "Reviewgate".

Maybe DPR's commercial arm could stock up on salt, as we will be using quite a few pinches of it to go with some new reviews.

In any case, it is nice to see some photos of new equipment, credit to DPR where it is due. Also, some of DPR's non-review articles can be genuinely informative - hope they stay that way.

2 upvotes
sderdiarian

Andy, there was no mention of shutter shock effecting image quality in DPR's reviews of the E-M5 and E-PM2 (in fact no discussion of the performance of IBIS at all in the latter). Can you comment on this now, and does DPR now have any plans to look for it?

I think a discussion of shutter shock in general is in order, clearly it's not limited to just the E-P5 based on numerous posts by others on the subject. I would recommend this be made a standard part of DPR's testing.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
5 upvotes
The Photo Ninja

I just posted 29 pics regarding shutter shock here: http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52273869

2 upvotes
sderdiarian

Can you repost this as a link?

0 upvotes
Najinsky

This comment section of DPR doesn't create links from the URL.

To open the link, simply use your mouse to highlight the link (drag from the start of the link to the end).

With the link highlighted, right-click it and your browser should give you the option to open the linked page.

0 upvotes
sderdiarian

Thanks, I'll remember that. Didn't see any signs of shutter shock, but then I rarely see it in my E-M5 photos. My guess is it's not as common as DPR's statement on it in the E-P5 review makes it seem. They should more clearly note the frequency with which it occurred, otherwise it comes across like almost every shot taken in this common ISO range is afflicted by it.

2 upvotes
micksh6

Ironically, many of them are blurred, showing the exact shutter shock impact that was discussed here. Just read responses to your post and see 100% crops. You just didn't see it, did you?

Still, shutter shock is not a showstopper once you learn how to avoid it. IMO (and I am a pixel-peeper) other benefits of Olympus m4/3 cameras compensate for having to deal with shutter shock.

It's just pity that DPR discovered this phenomena only now and E-P5 became a "whipping boy" . This problem has been dealt with for many years.

0 upvotes
dharmagreg

I have owned this camera for about six weeks now. This is my second kit with the 17MM lens, the first one failed after a few weeks but that is another story. I was curious to read this issue about blurry images as have not seen any so far. I was thinking I may not have yet shot at those speeds which produce the blurred images.

I did my own personal test and shot half a dozen images hand held using the EVF at 1/160 sec with the 17MM lens attached. I also shot with the Anti-Shock function on at 1/8 sec as I read people recommend this solves the issue.

Anyway when I checked the results of both set of images none of them were blurred. I don't know if this helps or not, but so far have not seen the issue on my camera yet. Firmware is 1.2 and received my second kit a week ago.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ZoranC

Before one jumps into conclusion "shaken pictures" are due to "shutter shock" one needs to rule out possibility it is due to 5-axis IS system.

I have EP2 and EP3 and have had EM5. I have not conducted scientific side by side testing but my impression has always been that with EM5 I get "shaky pictures" at shutter speeds that I had no blurriness at with EP2 and EP3.

3 upvotes
sderdiarian

I've had the same thought. Never seemed to encounter it in my E-510, E-620 or E-PM1, only in my E-M5, mostly with the 75-300mm zoom (slow lens, so slower shutter speeds). And while I was never consciously looking for it before, the double image effect is quite different from blur due to camera shake. I wonder also since the magnetic field is always on to keep the E-M5/E-P5/E-M1 sensor centered. Something DPR might check into.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Felix11

DPR, since apparently Olympus includes an 'anti-shock' feature (1/8 second delay before capture) to work around this problem, it would be useful for us normal users if you could comment on whether this works and what the downside is.
Thanks

3 upvotes
JohnAn

A pretty natural question. Whether the unwanted sensor motion originates in the shutter button, the shutter curtain or elsewhere, you'd wonder whether adding the anti-shock delay helps. If the self-timer adds a delay between pressing the shutter button and the start of shutter curtain action, and anti-shock adds a delay between the first close and open of the curtain, you could compare the two. Maybe get data that might better narrow down which event seems to contribute most to the effect. Maybe anti-shock could be handy regardless of the exact cause. Downside? Well, it adds a 1/8 sec delay before the exposure...

1 upvote
RichRMA

Unless you bought this thing solely to mount a pancake lens and pocket it, it serves no purpose not done far better by the E-M5 or the M1. No EVF in a camera with its cost and sophistication is ridiculous. By that I mean buying it is ridiculous.

1 upvote
Mario G

Also the lack of integrated flash in the costly and sophisticated E-M5/M1 is just as ridicolous (and they missed my purchase for that). I'd find the flash more essential than the EVF (and more easy to put it in a camera, which makes its absence even more ridiculous). One (but maybe the only one) advantage of the E-P5 is just the flash. Still not much of an argument to buy the E-P5 though (and after these shutter issues I'd just go for the Pana GX7 instead)...

0 upvotes
Mike99999

Bogus. I use my PEN cameras in combination with a 40-150mm because this fits in my jacket breast pocket when in the mountains. An OM-D with the same lens does not fit, because of the added bulk.

The beauty of this combination is that I can have the EVF in another pocket ready for when I need it. The key is that I don't need to take off my backpack.

And yes, when shooting in the street I can use the 20mm pancake and slip the camera in an even smaller pocket.

This is why I prefer the PEN over any other camera. It adapts perfectly to my small camera needs.

3 upvotes
kreislauf

cameras for people. if you don't like the pen, then it's not for you. no one forces you to buy one.

dude, this attitude...
i don't like fast sport cars. do i tell people, not to buy them?

1 upvote
Karroly

For those who find the E-P5 too expensive, its cost is "double" the cost of the E-PL5 because it takes double pictures...

12 upvotes
kreislauf

is a feature, not a bug

0 upvotes
FreedomLover

An electronic shutter could also be used as a custom anti-aliasing anti-moiré filter by forming patterns just where moire occurs to filter it out on the spot, live.
It could also be designed as an additional but transparent EVF in front of the sensor, for example as an ND filter, which could also adapt to local highlights on the fly and increase the dynamic range, or blend in images from other devices.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 497
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