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Olympus PEN E-P5 Review

October 2013 | By Richard Butler, A Westlake
Buy on GearShopFrom $799.005 deals


Review based on a production Olympus PEN E-P5 with Firmware 1.2

When Olympus introduced the original Micro Four Thirds PEN E-P1 almost 4 years ago in June 2009, it was the first mirrorless interchangeable lens camera to adopt a compact, 'rangefinder-style' body that made no pretence to look like an SLR. It also saw the company striking out in a direction it's followed ever since - designing attractive yet capable little cameras that consciously draw on its long-running film camera heritage. Indeed the SLR-style OM-D E-M5 was one of last year's biggest hits, and even pipped the 36MP full frame Nikon D800 to the title of 'Best Camera of 2012' in our reader poll.

The PEN E-P5 - the fourth model in the E-P range - continues this theme, while adding an array of updates that make it easily the most desirable PEN yet. It includes many of the features that made the E-M5 such a compelling package, such as the same 16MP MOS sensor, advanced '5-axis' in-body image stabilization (now with automatic panning detection), 9 fps continuous shooting, and tilting rear touch screen. It also inherits the refinements debuted on the PEN E-PL5, such as enhanced in-camera RAW conversion, a broad-range 'HDR bracketing' mode, and the ability to specify whether you wish to use in-lens or in-body image stabilization with Panasonic OIS lenses. On top of this it adds-in a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, a 'peaking' display to assist manual focus, and this year's must-have feature: built in Wi-Fi for connection to your smartphone or tablet.

Olympus PEN E-P5 specification highlights:

  • 16MP MOS Four Thirds format sensor
  • Twin control dials (front and rear) with '2x2' dual-mode option
  • 1/8000 sec top shutter speed, 1/320 sec flash sync
  • '5-axis' image stabilization with automatic panning detection ('S-IS Auto')
  • ISO 'LOW' (100 equiv) - ISO 25,600
  • Up to 9fps shooting (5.0 fps with continuous AF)
  • Focus 'peaking' display
  • Intervalometer and Time Lapse movie creation
  • 1.04m dot 3" LCD touchscreen display - tilts 80° upwards and 50° downwards
  • Built-in Wi-Fi for remote shooting (iAuto only) and image transfer to smartphone or tablet
  • Optional VF-4 electronic viewfinder: 2.36M dot LCD, 0.74x magnification (equiv), eye sensor

One key change compared to previous E-Px models is a rearrangement of the controls - gone are the thumb roller and tiny rear dial, replaced by 'proper' front and rear dials that protrude horizontally from the top plate. The E-P5 features what Olympus calls a '2x2' dial interface: a small lever on the back of the camera switches these dials from controlling exposure parameters to changing ISO and white balance. If you don't like this arrangement, the lever can be customized to a couple of other options (described later in this review).

The E-P5 places emphasis on speed: it has a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, which Olympus says should help make best use of the company's F1.8 prime lenses, allowing them to be shot wide open in sunlight. This is aided by the addition of an ISO 100-equivalent 'LOW' setting, although this will likely come at the expense of some highlight clipping. The E-P5 also offers a fast startup time of just 0.5 sec, 1/320 sec sync with the built-in flash (1/250 sec with external units), autofocus tracking at 5 fps, and a fast shutter release mode with a lag of just 44ms (via a custom setting).

Additional features

In traditional Olympus fashion the E-P5 gets a few new features compared to previous models. There's a 'Super-spot AF' mode that allows extremely precise positioning of the AF point when using magnified live view, very much like the one seen on recent Panasonic models. It gains timed intervalometer shooting, along with the ability to assemble time-lapse movies in-camera. The Live Bulb mode, that allows you to monitor the progress of long exposures while the shutter is open, now features an on-screen histogram to help monitor exposure build-up. The image stabilization system is also now always active by default, to provide a stabilized live view feed (especially useful when using telephoto lenses).

The E-P5 also gets Olympus's 'Photo Story' feature that first appeared on the XZ-10 enthusiast compact. This is essentially an extension of Art Filters, allowing you to generate multi-image composites rather like the pages of a photo book, in a wide variety of themes. It may not be something enthusiast photographers will use all the time, and arguably better suited to lower-end PEN models, but it's good to see Olympus continuing to come up with new ideas.

Colour options

The E-P5 comes in three colour schemes; black, silver and white. The all-black version that we've shown in this review has a textured matte finish which we expect will be appreciated by street photographers - it looks particularly fine when coupled with the black versions of the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm 1:1.8, M.Zuiko Digital 45mm 1:1.8 and M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm 1:1.8 lenses announced alongside. The camera also comes in a very handsome silver-and-black finish that harks back to Olympus's classic cameras from the 1960s and '70s, and a white version with a beige grip. Olympus will also be offering a limited edition model with a wooden grip, and a range of premium accessories such as leather cases.

Silver E-P5 with black 14-42mm kit zoom and VF4 viewfinder White E-P5 with silver 14-42mm lens

Kit options

The E-P5 will be available either body-only for approx. £900/€999/$999, with the M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6R II collapsible zoom for £1000/€1099, or with the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm F1.8 and VF-4 EVF for £1350/€1449/$1449.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 494
1234
Infared
By Infared (9 months ago)

I own the camera w/updated firmware. I am not really experiencing the problem. I wonder if it has something to do with the new "IS Auto" setting. That is a change from the E-M5.
I have read the DRP section on camera shake and I do not see what they have the mode set to????? The camera is set to "IS Auto" by default. Perhaps there is a problem with this new Mode. That could be suspect as the camera only does it in landscape mode..and it is an up-and-down vertical blur...perhaps there is glitch there that can be fixed with firmware..
...I have to say ....I am not really noticing any image problems with my camera but I am going to switch mine to Mode 1 which permanently puts all-axis IS on to be safe...
One would think that Olympus will respond to this issue. It is an occurring problem on one of there premiere cameras...so it should be address to the owners of a relatively expensive piece of hardware....Let's see what they do...
Thanks to DPR...it is really in everyone's face NOW!

3 upvotes
Oly72
By Oly72 (9 months ago)

Infrared, the reason why you're not experiencing any issues is because you are probably using the camera correctly. I bet it's a very slight issue in very few cases that has been blown out of all proportions by people on these boards and rattled 'Canikon' users. I have an E-P3 and OM-D and have never experienced any issues with blurred pictures at the fore mentioned shutter speeds.

6 upvotes
Stupidco
By Stupidco (9 months ago)

Blunty3000 has demonstrated the effectiveness of image stabilization in real time video mode. This review identifies a weakness when pixel peaking stills. We need get this stuff in proportion.We need to look more closely at camera settings and also consider the objectives of camera reviews.

1 upvote
Dimit
By Dimit (9 months ago)

Disregard the blur issue for a moment....this camera won't sell! It needs a good,A REALLY GOOD pricedrop.It's an OK stuff but not for this price.As far as the e-shutter is concerned,I think it'a a matter of time to be established ,common sense...

5 upvotes
sderdiarian
By sderdiarian (9 months ago)

And this review will likely be its death knell.

0 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

just because of you guys, i will buy one.

5 upvotes
millardmt
By millardmt (9 months ago)

The main difficulty is that camera mass and/or support do NOT seem to be reliably correlated to the occurence (or magnitude) of "camera shake". Put another way, it seems as though no one can predict the magnitude of the problem on the basis of camera weight, shutter release action, maximum shutter speed, lens focal length, or any other camera/lens attribute. For every conclusion I've read, a contradictory interpretation by another tester seems equally credible (given the evidence at hand).
Anyway, I for one like a camera whose features are MODULAR. (I know I'm in the minority.) But I just don't like or trust stuff that's built-in: In my opinion, it just makes for a camera that's heavier, less versatile, less trustworthy and less long-lived.
So I'll keep using my E-P3 for now until the problem's dimensions are fully known.

1 upvote
millardmt
By millardmt (9 months ago)

I have tried to conceptualize a research model that could embrace ALL of the variables that must somehow be interacting to produce the vertical displacement that DPR has noted in images from the E-P5. I am too ignorant to even CONCEIVE of how such a model might be fully specified for test! There must be thousands of factors that are ultimtely involved! And even if they could be identified, how could they ALL be feasibly measured?
... CONTINUED ...

1 upvote
millardmt
By millardmt (9 months ago)

I have just now cancelled my EP-5 order.
I believe I have read every word that's recently been written about mirrorless "camera shake" and also "shutter shock" -- two purportedly distinct phenomena -- and I still feel as if I haven't enough data. Or more precisely, I have read too many contradictory reports to know which observations should be dismissed and which are (demonstrably) relevant.
I'm no physicist, but I am a trained researcher and I've heard enough to be certain that the cause(s) of "camera shake" appear to be anything but 'prosaic.' (I should say however that I MUCH appreciate the efforts of Andy W., et al., and feel very grateful for DPR's candor -- especially given the many masters its testers are obliged to appease.)
... CONTINUED ...

1 upvote
zavaell
By zavaell (9 months ago)

I have an E-PL2 and E-PL3. I always have IS switched off and have never, ever had blur at any shutter speed that was not attributable to me. In other words at very slow shutter speeds (say, < 1/100) I can expect the possibility of camera shake even if I can usually achieve sharp shots at slower speeds. I find this E-P5 phenomenon puzzling and still not fully explained.

1 upvote
mapgraphs
By mapgraphs (9 months ago)

There is an inherent problem with making global statements based on opinion. For example, conjecture about blurry images maybe being caused by "shutter shock" or maybe created because there might be problems with image stabilization not correcting some vertical displacement, some of the time, with some lenses at some shutter speeds by some users is just that: conjecture.

The problem with the conjecture is that it doesn't answer why some users don't seem to have these problems and it doesn't explain for example, why all images taken at 1/160 with a specific lens aren't always blurry. If it's mechanical, the problem is always there. If it's user error, it may not be.

Sometimes reviews are more about someone learning how to use a specific camera than it is about the camera itself. There can be a value in that, but there are caveats, such as found at the bottom of DPR reviews: "Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer"

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (9 months ago)

Of course an almighty corporation like Olympus will never lower itself to talk to customers here and try to help find the source of the problem, admit mistakes and offer a solution.

Their pampered leaders prefer golden parachutes, paid reviews and lawyers stonewalling until the bitter end.

3 upvotes
Frank_BR
By Frank_BR (9 months ago)

"We've found that when examining our images closely, many are visibly shaken, showing a distinct double-image which is almost perfectly vertically displaced (when the camera is in landscape orientation)."

The blurring is probably caused by improper engineering of the shutter release button. The shutter button of a digital camera is basically an electrical switch that closes when the finger pressure reaches a certain value. However, just after the trigger point, the resistance of the shutter button decreases abruptly, what can easily induce a camera shake as the operator keeps pressing the shutter button. Curiously, in a purely mechanical SLR camera the operation is smoother because the resistance of the shutter button doesn't change when the shutter releases.

0 upvotes
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (9 months ago)

Seeing as you can get a Sony NEX5n with its bigger (and really excellent) sensor for less than 500 euros, how many units does Olympus expect to sell?

0 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (9 months ago)

Far fewer than Olympus' own E-PL5 model, priced similarly as the NEX5n.

The profit margin will be higher for the E-P5 though

2 upvotes
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (9 months ago)

DPR: "In a way, this isn't entirely the camera's fault ..."

What an odd statement. Does this mean it's the user's fault? Or that perhaps it's an "act of God"?

DPR: "... it's not some kind of mechanical malfunction that actively causes blurring"

Continuing oddity: Does this mean DPR thinks the blurring is from "passive" causes? Or that it's working as designed and so not a malfunction?

It's certainly the camera's fault and it's certainly a design flaw. It may be either significant or insignificant depending on workarounds and type of shooting. Some additional shots showing what the visible difference is when using the rear LCD or a tripod would have been more useful than these odd statements which appear intended more to palliate brand zealots than refine the issue.

9 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (9 months ago)

As you say, it's a design flaw, which is not the same as malfunction, which is a manufacture flaw. A design flaw is ultimately the designer's fault, which is probably what DPR meant by saying that it's not entirely the camera's fault.

2 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

yeah, right, olympus released their top pen model with a faulty IBIS system...

Comment edited 12 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (9 months ago)

i really dont understand all the pandering over the retro design.. who cares what it looks like as long as its not offensive.

1 upvote
retro76
By retro76 (9 months ago)

I dunno personally when I pay for a camera how it looks is part of the equation.

4 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (9 months ago)

When I pay for a camera, how it looks are not part of the equation. Especially if the results are superior to a nicer looking camera.

Comment edited 12 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Oly72
By Oly72 (9 months ago)

I care what a camera looks like and I absolutely love the retro styling of the Olympus PEN range and also the OM-D series cameras. Olympus have the image quality and functionality to back this up especially in their latest cameras.

But that's fine, if you have no appreciation of good design and aesthetics, you just go ahead and use a camera that looks like a fisher-price toy.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
plastique2
By plastique2 (9 months ago)

Could you please list me some cameras looking like a fisher price toy? (although i have no clue what a fisher priced toy is in the first place)

0 upvotes
plastique2
By plastique2 (9 months ago)

oh boy, of course i care how it looks like if it looks like as it looks like just to look like as it looks like and therefore has no grip and i get cramps from holding it even after a short time - so what does that that look like? soon we'll have cameras without a shutter button - but you'll have to lick the touch screen to release the shutter, sorry, not the touch screen but the lick screen, that would be fancieee

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (9 months ago)

lmao.. enjoy your retro looking EP5 and its double images.. i will shoot with my boring looking SLR that has never let me down.. I heard that the silver model has better DR and high iso performance

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Oly72
By Oly72 (9 months ago)

Plastique2, Have you not see the Canon Powershot G series cameras? Ugly and 'plastique' to the core. If you have never seen a fisherPrice toy then I suggest you google it and you might see a strong resemblance.

0 upvotes
Oly72
By Oly72 (9 months ago)

Jogger, I suggest you go out with your Canikon and practice taking photographs and after a couple of years come back on here and let me see what you have.

0 upvotes
Oly72
By Oly72 (9 months ago)

Seems very odd that 'What digital Camera' gave the E-P5 a rating of 90% and a 'Gold Award' and with absolutely no mention of blurred images at shutter speeds of 1/160. Olympus has the best image stabilisation system around - bar none. Are you sure that the sample used for the test wasn't just a faulty unit as I just cannot believe that Olympus would release a camera with such an issue.

'Camera labs' also gave the E-P5 a score rating of 86% and again with out any mention of blurred images at the fore mentioned speeds.

'Techradar.com' Gave the E-P5 a 5 out of 5 star rating and guess what? No mention again of blurred images at the stated shutter speeds?!!

2 upvotes
A Westlake
By A Westlake (9 months ago)

We used multiple cameras and tested them extensively. All behaved in the same way.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
11 upvotes
retro76
By retro76 (9 months ago)

No offense to What digital Camera, but most of these magazines do not go the length that dpreview does to review a camera. I have never been impressed with the quality of reviews done on other sites, in fact I dare to say that some of these sites may actually review a camera without even holding one in hand.

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (9 months ago)

I think its cause DPreview test cameras for long time before they write review. Which Im quite positive cant be said about certain other "review" sites. Thats most likely reason they noticed what others didnt.

Sure DPreview isnt without fault (bit too enthusiastic about any new product), but overall they produce fairly accurate reviews.

I will add that despite image quality of E-P5, they managed to produce rather nice image samples. Which again is something I dont see everytime I check other review sites, some of them seems like they actually cant even make decent photo)..

Conclusion is that if in review is that it produces blurry pics at 1/160th then it most likely really does.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (9 months ago)

Reviews from 'What Digital Camera', etc.. are more like product overviews rather than reviews based on testing/usage.

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (9 months ago)

I've always liked Olympus products but if there is even the potential of getting blurry shots at 1/160, I'd say all bets are off. I understand DPR tries desperately to balance everything but no amount of attractive retro styling will make those photos any sharper.

2 upvotes
Infared
By Infared (9 months ago)

Andy...what IS Mode was the camera set to? Auto IS?

0 upvotes
Philly
By Philly (9 months ago)

To Andy Westlake: the shutter shock on the E-P5 does not sound very encouraging for the E-M1. Based on the specs (1/8000 sec, 1/320 flash sync), and common sense, I would have believe that the E-M1 and E-P5 use the same shutter. I hope that dpreview will address this explicitly on the E-M1 review. I would like to buy the E-M1 and am hoping that it does not have the problem.

0 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

if they start bashing the EM1, no one will believe it!
The EM1 is too hot camera to badmouth with this blurred images. you will not read anything like that on DPR for the EM1

0 upvotes
Gryfster
By Gryfster (9 months ago)

In September, I read another review on the E-P5 that found the same issue.

http://admiringlight.com/blog/review-olympus-pen-e-p5/

The reviewer is very pro m43 as a concept, so he would not try to assasinate the E-P5 if it didn't have a real issue with "shutter shock". The reviewer also attributed the issue to the IS.

0 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (9 months ago)

About as mighty as crippled mouse..

Im looking forward towards that "we might do FF in future", dear Olympus.

Tho Im sure, it makes hipsters really happy, cause its expensive, with brand name and it looks good (which is pretty much everything positive about it). :D

1 upvote
Oly72
By Oly72 (9 months ago)

Oh dear another Canikon user... sigh.

3 upvotes
goblin
By goblin (9 months ago)

Question for the reviewers:

Has your test lens or anything else in the setup changed since the review of the E-M5 ?

A comparison of the lower right of the image (the water paint tubes) shows a significant loss of sharpness on both the E-P5 and the E-M1 versus the E-M5. Same on the eyes on the portraits.

Yet, I am sure that they can not be worse than the E-M5. With the lesser AA filter on the E-M1, it they should actually be sharper.

Setup differences ? Lens problem ?

Thanks in advance for your answer

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (9 months ago)

The EP5 sits in the same marketing spot as my E30 did.

"Not the best... but costs almost as much as the best"

Yes, the EP5 has a few nice features, but certainly not enough to justify selling it for exactly twice the price of an EPL5. If you can't stand the DSLR look, and just love using optional clip on EVFs, then the EPL5 is the obvious choice.

The EPL5 offers you an awful lot, for half the price of the EP5
The EM5 offers you more, at the same price.
The GX7 offers you more, at around the same price.
The GH3 and the EM1 offer you a LOT more, for just a little more money.

I suppose someone will want the EP5, and be willing to pay the high price for it. But it won't be me.

6 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

where do you get your conclusions from?

i heftet long between EM5 and P5: better removable viewfinder, focus peaking and 2x2 controls did it for me in favour of P5
what "more" is ther for the EM5 over the EP5?

GX7 offers you more? what does it offer you more? video for shure. but anything else?

basicly, you state no relevant functions here, so i take it as your opinion only...

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (9 months ago)

It really just depends on which features are important for you.

If you prefer:

* NOT having weather sealing
* NOT having a magnesium alloy body
* NOT having a built in EVF

and would rather spend $300 more for an EVF that you could lose or misplace, have those very usefull features like focus peaking and 2X2 controls... then the EP5 might be the ideal camera for you.

My priorities are different from yours, so I won't be getting one.

0 upvotes
m87501
By m87501 (9 months ago)

For anyone considering this camera, I own the EP5 and the simple fix to the trivial shutter shake issue mentioned is to simply use the 1-second delay (or 2 seconds). It's right next to the thumb...easy, solved. It's an ideal camera with wonderful flexible features and image quality for hobbyist landscape shooters like me who can no longer carry a tripod on hikes.

For landscape-only, technical shooting or non-fast action, it would deserve a much higher rating, but I did my homework reading the many helpful & useful tips by those on this forum and others, and knew this going in.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (9 months ago)

umm what? so, to make the camera useable at normal shutter speeds you have to use the timer function? how does that make any sense on a $1000 camera?

4 upvotes
Oly72
By Oly72 (9 months ago)

As an E-P5 user have you actually experienced this 'shutter shake' issue from first hand experience? Or is it one of those issues that has been blown massively out of proportion much like the claimed 'Orbs' issue o the Fuji X10?

3 upvotes
Matero
By Matero (9 months ago)

I've shot maybe 1500 pics with E-P5 and never found this issue in my shots. (Haven't been looking for it either) Did a quick review of shots with 1/60 - 1/200 shutter speed and didn't find one pic with the issue. Can't say it doesn't exist, but not so serious problem for me then

0 upvotes
m87501
By m87501 (9 months ago)

Yeah, the latter..it's a non-issue imo.

"Massively out of proportion" as you say, would be a good way of putting it.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
blohum
By blohum (9 months ago)

The EP5 is surely stuck between a rock and hard place... the EM1 body is about the same price as the EP5/VF4/17 bundle and the EM5 is dropping in price.

There's things to like such as 8000th sec, 'low' ISO and VF4 but so many missed opportunities... limiting WiFi to only iAuto mode was surely a marketing decision just so they could give those privileges to the EM1, same as limiting timelapse to 99 frames. If the EP5 was a cheaper camera I could accept these compromises but it's supposed to be a premium camera.

On top of these they've removed the option to use the larger grip, a must have for my EP3 as far as I'm concerned. Surely they could have placed the WiFi antenna behind the plastic AV door??

5 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

then don't buy the EP5. i, for one, will do. because i like the cam plus focus peaking with the other new features really talk to me...

0 upvotes
blohum
By blohum (9 months ago)

I won't at its current price... when the price drops I might look again. I owned an EM5 for a while but sold it as I found it fiddly to use, I find the ergonomics of EP3 to be far superior.

I've yet to find someone who makes an add-on grip like the third-party ones that are available for the EM5 but it could make an interesting DIY project. The WiFi issue (the only time my EP3 is ever set to an auto mode is when I pass it to my wife!) and timelapse limitations could easily be rectified in firmware... come on Olympus you know you can do it, the EP5 deserves better!!

1 upvote
ChrisPercival
By ChrisPercival (9 months ago)

I have and E-P5 with the 17/1.8. The magnify view and focus peaking work fine. My unit has firmware 1.0 for lens and camera.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
A Westlake
By A Westlake (9 months ago)

Magnify view and focus peaking work when the camera is set to manual focus, but not when the lens's focus ring is pulled back to the 'Snap focus' position (according to Olympus, this is because the camera counts it as a different focus mode). In contrast, pulling back the focus ring on the 12-40mm engages 'true' manual focus, complete with focus assist.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ChrisPercival
By ChrisPercival (9 months ago)

Ah, I see. But focus peaking/magnify work in the S-AF + MF mode.

0 upvotes
Alberto6674
By Alberto6674 (9 months ago)

I still don't get this thing about blurred images. Why the E-P5 and not all the other cameras out there (especially mirrorless or compact cameras)?

If it was shutter shock, it could be said that the E-P5 has one of the most refined shutters in all the mirrorless cameras, so if should suffer less than others from this. If it's not shutter shock, as it seems from the testing they did, and just because of pressing the shutter... why don't cameras like the Fuji X-M1 or the Panasonic GF1/GF2/...GF5/GX1, Sony NEX5, etc... suffer it even more (since they don't have IS as the E-P5 has, which reduces this shake according to the tests)?

More testing seems to be needed to determine why this is occurring (especially comparing with other mirrorless cameras).

7 upvotes
ChrisPercival
By ChrisPercival (9 months ago)

I had the E-P3 and have the E-M5 and E-P5. I have experienced this problem with all these cameras. I found it particularly bad when I first got the E-P3, but I think I've developed my technique to mostly work around the problem. I just thought the issue was just as alluded to in the review; that of a small camera and shaky hands trying to use the rear LCD with the shutter button.
I find using the VF-2 helps a lot, helping to steady the camera against my eyeglasses.

1 upvote
retro76
By retro76 (9 months ago)

It is something specific to the Olympus design. I bought the OMD last year and although focus is fast and precise I found that 40% of my images were OOF, something i have never experienced even with the cheapest SLRs. I think Olympus bodies have an amazing feature set and love their lenses, but in terms of usability their bodies are a big let down.

Comment edited 55 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Olymore
By Olymore (9 months ago)

That sounds like you haven't learned how CDAF works rather than anything to do with shutter shock. Have you tried using a smaller focus point ?
And shutter shock has been seen on Panasonic m43 bodies, though to a lesser degree than the Olympus bodies. So it is not exclusive to Olympus but a result of having a lightweight body and an open shutter before taking the picture.

0 upvotes
plastique2
By plastique2 (9 months ago)

Like all the other PEN cameras and many other similarly designed cameras by Sony, Pentax, etc. - a fine piece of engineering - but NOT as a photographic tool should look like! Simple as that. Pretty camera? Maybe. A matter of taste. Ergonomic camera? Surely not. As so many cameras recently. I hate that. Who needs a pretty camera anyway? Any camera that would have an outstanding performance and would be easy to hold and easy to handle would be pretty because of that. Everybody would want to have it. But these new (ehm, old retro whatever design) cigarette box cameras are a hurdle to serious photographic work, amateur or pro ...
When will this 'who makes the camera with the smallest grip and the most invisible viewfinder' craze end?

1 upvote
Oly72
By Oly72 (9 months ago)

Says who? You? I for one appreciate and value good design and aesthetics and I'm more that happy to use my OM-D for professional use with exceptional results. But that's fine you just go ahead and you use your fisher-price designed Canikon and follow the rest of the herd.

1 upvote
plastique2
By plastique2 (9 months ago)

At the moment I have only two Olympus cameras, E-620 and PEN PL1. I have had and used most of the main camera models of all camera makers. I know what I am talking about. I have nothing against good design. But the design has to be ergonomical, otherwise what is the point of a photographic tool? Yes, a tool. You are happy with the OM-D. I would be too. It is much more ergonomical than the E-P5 and that's the model here in discussion. The new OLY which is about to come is even more ergonomical. Yet it is not am OLY PEN. Why did we have to go through the PEN phase with exceptionally good image quality, but with show off design of the camera body? That's what I'm talking about. And you go on being happy. By the way, herd followers are those who are prepared to use and praise a product even if it is clearly impractical in one or another way, just because it is fancy, modern, rare, designed by somebody famous, etc.
So do you understand what I am saying?

0 upvotes
plastique2
By plastique2 (9 months ago)

And yes, maybe the E-P5's images are shaky because it is difficult to hold it steady without a viewfinder pressed against the face to hold it even steadier ... it's meant to be a joke, but maybe it isn't so far from the truth ...

0 upvotes
Steve
By Steve (9 months ago)

A rating of 78 seems pretty high for a camera that is prone to blurry images...
In my ratiing world that would be a deal breaker.. and rating in the 60's... at best..

9 upvotes
simon65
By simon65 (9 months ago)

Me too. Blurred images in the 1/80-1/200th sec range is pretty serious. I take most of my pictures in that range. Olympus need to sort this out sharpish.

4 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (9 months ago)

I really can't see why someone would buy one of these over an E-M5, which is a sure-enough awesome device.

0 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

let me help you with that:
removable, much better electronic viewfinder
focus peaking
wifi capabilities
on board flash
faster shutter
2x2 mode

for me: P5 over EM5

2 upvotes
Todd3608
By Todd3608 (9 months ago)

The E-P5 also has a MUCH better LCD, faster FPS and better battery life.

0 upvotes
Laszlo13
By Laszlo13 (9 months ago)

Could the blurring be due to the new Auto IS? Andy stated they're well aware of shutter shock, and this isn't it (i.e. putting the camera on a tripod greatly reduced the negative effect). I was wondering if it was tested with both Auto IS - and normal IS? Could it be that the camera is picking up the up / down motion of actuating the shutter as vertical panning?

0 upvotes
Miron09
By Miron09 (9 months ago)

With the EP3, I never had a blur issue. Could this be due to the fact that I use the touchscreen for shutter release most of the time?
Otherwise I prefer times faster that 1/200, and use flash and/or a tripod in low light.

0 upvotes
A Westlake
By A Westlake (9 months ago)

This was actually one of the first possibilities we though of. But we tested it extensively and found no difference in image blurring between S-IS Auto and S-IS 1.

1 upvote
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (9 months ago)

I get this kind of double-blurring when I attach a non-Olympus lens and configure the wrong focal length for the IS.

Never seen it using an Olympus or even Panasonic lens though. I took hundreds of pics on a recent trip to Italy with my EP-5, not one of my images has this double blur.

2 upvotes
peterpainter
By peterpainter (9 months ago)

Interesting. I came across 'shutter shock' a while ago, but many people seemed to be in denial at the time. I have a number of old cameras - a Zorki 4 and Pentax P30n in particular have pretty mean shutters. They make quite a 'snap' and it can be felt when holding the cameras 'casually' - hold on firm and it's not too bad.
There's probably a fair amount of energy involved in getting a focal plane shutter across fast with an abrupt start and finish, so the issue is not terribly surprising. I don't think the impact is restricted to cameras with sensor-shift stabilisation, however I guess it could be classed as 'camera shake' rather than shutter-shock, but the root cause, a 'rather violent' focal plane shutter, is the same.
It's interesting that I have come across it mentioned for Sony SLTs but not for Pentax SLRs in Live View. I wonder if that's because it doesn't happen or because nobody has noticed.

1 upvote
peterpainter
By peterpainter (9 months ago)

Note: to be fair to the Pentax, I only noticed the 'violence' because I'd been using a bridge camera before trying it out again fairly recently. The Zorki's shutter, on the other hand, always struck me as being pretty 'violent.'

0 upvotes
axlotl
By axlotl (9 months ago)

The unsharpness with double imaging described in this review sounds as though it might be due to shutter shock. A method of testing to determine if shutter shock is present can be found here..http://cameraergonomics.blogspot.com.au/2013/08/how-to-test-for-shutter-shock.html

1 upvote
A Westlake
By A Westlake (9 months ago)

It's not shutter shock as described on that page - you don't get it with the camera on a tripod. As we, in fact, mentioned in the review.

3 upvotes
Karroly
By Karroly (9 months ago)

IS tries to anticipate user shake which is a slow, low frequency movement. It is possible that the shutter generates faster, higher frequency vibrations that cause no blur when IS is off (at least at shutter speeds compatible with handheld shooting), but disturb the IS system when active...

0 upvotes
compay
By compay (9 months ago)

i have taken a look at many 4/3 camera's but do not understand why the majority has such a loud shutter sound...I do not know exactly about the epl 5 but I believe it also made a huge shutter sound. The shutter sound and the lack of autofocus really small lenses...alwaus made me decide to buy another camera.

3 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (9 months ago)

Depends by what standard. Compared to compacts with tiny shutters, yes, they are louder.

By mirrorless standards, they are not loud though.

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Michael Geary
By Michael Geary (9 months ago)

I agree completely. The loud shutter is my least favorite thing about my E-P5. There are many situations where I simply can't use it because of the shutter noise. I was taking pictures at a tech presentation the other night and had to use my Canon S95 instead of the E-P5 because of the quieter shutter. Of course it was indoors in poor lighting, and I would have gotten much better photos with the E-P5. But I couldn't do it. I did not want to distract the audience.

3 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (9 months ago)

Mainly because most (all?) of them have to close the shutter briefly before taking a picture (so it's open for liveview, then shuts, opens again to take the picture, shuts again, then finally opens once more for liveview).

However electronic shutters are starting to appear on the new M4/3 models, which means they can (in electronic shutter mode) operate silently.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Zdman
By Zdman (9 months ago)

So the preview mentions shutter shock (which is blurring caused by the mechanical action of the shutter) but the actual text refers to shake induced by pressing the shutter button. It definitely the mechanical shutter and a quick search on google will find the cameraergonomics which has tested this before on a tripod and found and found that an electronic shutter completly solves this problem. If you search for Electronic First Curtain (used by Canon, Sony and now Samsung) you'll find a few microscope oriented sites which show this exact same issue is solved by the EFC. There's even a user article about this on Dpreview. I want this publicised as there is no reason all the camera manufactures can't introduce and EFC option.

1 upvote
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (9 months ago)

Ridiculous price!

4 upvotes
olypan
By olypan (9 months ago)

Good old DPR. Praise the non Canikon before slipping in the coup de gras. Pentax, Panasonic, Fuji, Olympus..... and on it goes.

1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (9 months ago)

So it couldn't be the case that these brands, which are trying something new, haven't yet ironed-out all the glitches, the way that companies taking a more conservative, iterative have?

How does that theory fit with our E-M5 review, by the way?

2 upvotes
Jinks81
By Jinks81 (9 months ago)

How come Fuji cameras are the only ones with practically no chroma noise in RAW?

0 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (9 months ago)

Either they changed physics or remove it during processing

0 upvotes
Jinks81
By Jinks81 (9 months ago)

I thought an obvious tweak like this usually gets criticized. One example is Nikon's noise reduction practice (found it in wiki on RAW files). I heard nothing but praise about Fuji lately. How come Fuji is getting pretty much zero criticism for this?

0 upvotes
A Westlake
By A Westlake (9 months ago)

In every review of every Fujifilm X-Trans camera we point out that the demosaicing process essentially includes noise reduction.

1 upvote
KW Phua
By KW Phua (9 months ago)

Nowadays, many manufacturers cheat dxo with half cook raw. So I rather check the picture and even compare the JPEG. If JPEG can be good also mean the actual quality of the raw, indirectly.

1 upvote
M Jesper
By M Jesper (9 months ago)

The difference is that x-trans is a hardware feature. Essentially the same as a OLPF, but with additional qualities (good and bad). We all know the bayer pattern gives moiré, but that magically disappears with a OLPF filter ? Well then they cooked it didn't they ! Same difference.

0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (9 months ago)

Olympus should have a new optional exposure setting in the menu of all its cameras, i.e."Avoid shutter speeds from 1/100 to 1/200 sec", for use at those times when critical sharpness is important. When selected, the camera will automatically adjust other settings to avoid those shutter speeds or at lease give a flashing warning.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (9 months ago)

This camera should not have been made, now that a better top camera, the E-M5 has already been on the market. Olympus should just update the E-M5 and forget this E-P5. It is too expensive but lacks an EVF. Once the real E-M5 replacement appears in a few months, with a new sensor, this camera will be left on the shelves, if not already.

(The E-M1 is a different camera for 43 users and those with special needs.) There is simply no room between the E-M5 or its replacement and the E-PL5 to slot in this E-P5.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (9 months ago)

I disagree Sergey. The PL and PM series have stripped down features to keep the cost and size down. The P series is full featured without going to an SLR style body.

While I personally prefer SLR style, I know a lot of people for whom the P is their ideal choice, and I don't see why they should be left out just because of my preferences.

Celebrate the difference!

3 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (9 months ago)

Image Shake / Shutter Shock.

I've had the EM-5 for over a year now and it's a fantastic balance between size and performance. Shutter shock was also a widely discussed topic when the EM-5 came out.

The 'fix' on the EM-5 is to engage Anti-Shock from custom menu 'E'. I use the fastest setting of 1/8s (shame there isn't a faster setting of say 1/32s) which essentially introduces a 1/8s delay to the shutter.

I was concerned about this delay but after a year of shooting, it's truly a non issue for me. Where split-second timing is critical, I use continuous drive anyway to capture 3/6 frames per second.

In rare cases where single frame and split-second timing is needed, ISO 400 or 800 give great IQ.

I suspect the reason it's a little more prevalent on the P5 is due to the new ISO 100 setting, leading to lower shutter speeds.

In short, if you wan't the performance/size benefits, don't let shutter-shock put you off. All cameras have compromises, and this issue is an easy work-around.

7 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

I trust Oly engineers they should believe that the shock will last longer than 1/32s to harm the image.

on the other hand, they also tell us that it's a serious problem and they cannot solve it with their 5-axis image stabilizer.

btw, I think 9 fps burst of 3 shots will do the job better. the second shot will be fired at the same time while you have the first shot to catch the moment.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (9 months ago)

Wow, finally the review is done.

Essentially, the camera is similar to the E-P3 but with updated tech (which DPR very much likes) and shutter shock (DPR no likey). I don't think I've ever experienced shutter shock on Oly cameras, but I'll take DPR's word for it.

I'm still surprised the camera was rated as high as it did considering how relatively low past Pen models were rated before.

I was considering the E-P5, but I think the E-M1 tickles more my fancy for essentially the same money (if you consider the E-P5-17mm-VF4 package deal). I'll probably wait for the next-gen for a smaller, lower cost model as an altertive (something like like an E-PL7). Always nice to have options though.

FF NEX is just around the corner but the heavily rumored high price of admission and slow primes make it less appealing to me. I'd rather get a D600 or a A99 for the money with some cheap f1.8 primes.

2 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

true, there are a lot of options. A A99 would not be in my scrapbook though. it is soo huge and bulky!

here is a comparison with 35mm lenses:
http://camerasize.com/compact/#377.60,459.383,ha,t

0 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (9 months ago)

All FF cameras are huge and bulky. The size differences between brands and models are only a matter of degrees. :)

1 upvote
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

not all, my friend.
take the RX1, for example.
or, by margin, the leica models (they are huge to some, but not bulky)
or wait for the new sony FF models...

0 upvotes
Dimitris Servis
By Dimitris Servis (9 months ago)

"...isn't correctly compensating for the initial low frequency, high amplitude motion of the initial shutter press..."

Sorry but technically this is only possible if you buy a tripod or don't forget to take your medication ;-P

Nice review overall, for an excellent camera. I have an E-PL5 and indeed its incredible advantage over APS-C and larger, that you can carry them in your bag or coat pocket, is slightly counterbalanced by the fact that these cameras are mode difficult to hold steady. The lack of a viewfinder is not a problem. They are just ultralight. I usually use speeds twice the focal length to compensate for that and often use the touch screen to shoot instead of the shutter button.

0 upvotes
Jorginho
By Jorginho (9 months ago)

Well. I just returned from Scotland and went out a lot into the highlands. I came across quite a few blurred images on the last day of my shooting. Wondered what it was. Of all the pics of some I remembered the shutterspeed. So when I read "1/160 s" I checked because I was sure that was the setting. And it was...Hmmm...I need to remember that. Wonder if E-M1 has the same problem...

I also feel that such a cam at that price really cannot afford such a mistake. Olympus needs to correct it. And if it existed since the E-P1 than I am disappointed in them for not correcting this.

5 upvotes
tinternaut
By tinternaut (9 months ago)

Nice review. The shutter shock is something I've only recently started believing in (had put it down to hysteria, on the hysteria prone Micro Four Thirds forum) as I've found I sometimes get sharper images from my E-PM2 if I leave IS switched off (and goodness, when you can get the sharpest image the 45 can deliver, it's nice).

I'm surprised shutter shock seems to occur with the best IBIS Olympus currently offers though!

3 upvotes
edu T
By edu T (9 months ago)

Loved the opening sentence, "been shooting for SOME MONTHS and have NOW completed the review."
(sorry, I know and appreciate how diligent you dpr guys are, but can't help but chuckle at it...)

1 upvote
ijustloveshooting
By ijustloveshooting (9 months ago)

sensor is dead...aps-c the least, rules!

0 upvotes
olypan
By olypan (9 months ago)

Brain dead.

7 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (9 months ago)

The hell, random words ?

2 upvotes
SETI
By SETI (9 months ago)

lens is alive... full-frame the first, google!

2 upvotes
ReallyMadRob
By ReallyMadRob (9 months ago)

There's a few odd bits in here really. I've looked back at the shots I've taken with this - for review - and I'm not seeing unaccountable blur at mid speeds. A lot of that was hand held macro and it just isn't manifesting as a persistent problem.

If I did have a gripe it would be that the Wifi features are pretty basic, and those are praised. And there's the tired old complaint about menus... too much control?

1 upvote
DELETED88781
By DELETED88781 (9 months ago)

Its over! dead
They need to develop FF based on that tech

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (9 months ago)

See Sony A99? D600?

5 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

the image quality at base ISO is not too bad.
it's more an issue of small aperture lenses.

0 upvotes
rpm40
By rpm40 (9 months ago)

Not everybody wants big and bulky FF. My m4/3 with 20mm 1.7 or 45mm 1.8 gives me all the image quality I need and I barely feel it when I bring it along.

6 upvotes
kreislauf
By kreislauf (9 months ago)

http://camerasize.com/compact/#377.60,459.383,ha,t

sony a99 vs p5 with 35mm FOV

0 upvotes
cadet stimpy
By cadet stimpy (9 months ago)

Since 2010 I've taken a guestimated 50,000+ shots on various E-P1, E-PM2, EM-5 and EP-5 and never noticed shutter shock, though I only use primes and never pixel peep. I find the IBIS excellent for handheld slow exposures. I have gripes about the e-p5 but shutter shock isn't one of them...

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
oluv
By oluv (9 months ago)

the E-P1, E-PL1, E-PL2, E-PL3 all suffered from this. I noticed that already with the first shots i took. I stopped my interest in Olympus cameras since then.

2 upvotes
rpm40
By rpm40 (9 months ago)

It doesn't happen all the time, but it's definitely an issue. I've seen it with my e-pl1.

2 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (9 months ago)

I've noticed it when I attach a non-Olympus lens to the camera and forget to enter the correct focal length.

When the lens is configured correctly I've never ever seen this issue on any of my PENs.

0 upvotes
cadet stimpy
By cadet stimpy (9 months ago)

I'm not suggesting it never happens, but I've never noticed it.

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

I have to admit I am a bit surprised to learn it has the shutter shock. I have noticed this in my E-620 a long ago, but that is a completely different IBIS mechanism. The easiest fix on that (at least for the 620) would have been for Olympus to automatically disable IBIS at higher shutter speeds that don't really need IBIS (the problem in the 620).

Seems like the EM5 did not have that problem, so maybe it's a problem with the smaller size of the Pen? If the EM5 didn't have it, the EM1 shouldn't have it (good news).

1 upvote
pdelux
By pdelux (9 months ago)

Although Shutter Shock may also exist in the EP5 - DPR are referring to Camera shake coupled by in accurate IS compensation, some people are mistaking it for Shutter shock but perhaps what they are seeing is a result of both.

Shutter shock can be compensated with Anti Shock. Time Delay does not work for the affected Shutter speeds. Camerashake can be compensated with Time Delay.

1 upvote
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

Semantics aside, I am talking about what dpreview was referring to.

0 upvotes
YetiYeti
By YetiYeti (9 months ago)

I have also experienced IS problems with II. gen IS (E6-20 and PENs), exactly as described here. But with this III. gen IS - I have no experience with it and heard about problems for the first time.

0 upvotes
CollBaxter
By CollBaxter (9 months ago)

Howzit Ricardo .
It was my understanding that the E-620 and Pens use the same IBIS system. It was not as effective as the IBIS on the other Olympus DSLRS. I Own one (E-620) and its definitely one ore more stops behind the E-5/30.

0 upvotes
TN Args
By TN Args (9 months ago)

If it is due to pushing the shutter button and light body combination, then EVERY light camera will exhibit it with IS off. Surely this is not true????

And why didn't you test it using self timer shutter release? If it is due to pressing the shutter, this will eliminate it. DPREVIEW come on, you haven't checked this. How do you know it isn't poor shutter design?

5 upvotes
thecameraeye
By thecameraeye (9 months ago)

Shutter shock is a reality for every light camera with a mechanical focal plane shutter.

0 upvotes
TN Args
By TN Args (9 months ago)

Okay, then you are confirming that it is NOT due to pressing the shutter button and light body combination.

OTOH if it is due to the momentum of the mechanical shutter, why does it not persist at SLOWER shutter speeds?

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (9 months ago)

Shutter shock?

Oh come on!

Get a leaf!

.

11 upvotes
jon404
By jon404 (9 months ago)

Elegant!

0 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (9 months ago)

Nice

0 upvotes
Walsh_uk
By Walsh_uk (9 months ago)

:D

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (9 months ago)

"This is because the ISO Low and ISO 200 settings are derived from the same sensor amplification setting - ISO 200 images are exposed to less light, protecting highlights, compared to ISO 100. "

"The upshot of this is that the ISO Low shots include less highlight detail but with 'cleaner' shadows, while the ISO 200 shots strike the opposite balance."

A little credit would have been nice :-)

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/31918699

Back then I remember there was head scratching about that E-30. All right, partial jest, ;-) there's many sources for this probably at this point :-)

0 upvotes
HappyVan
By HappyVan (9 months ago)

Not good.

D5100 IQ and AF competitive with $999 EP5 (optional EVF) . The D5100 does 4 fps with 16 RAW buffer in continuous AF.

Canon 100D is actually 17g lighter and only 1.2 inches deeper.

0 upvotes
TN Args
By TN Args (9 months ago)

1.2 inches is a lot. Plus the extra lens size is a killer in terms of size comparisons.

Better to compare with the EOS M

1 upvote
rpm40
By rpm40 (9 months ago)

Compare the size of a system, and see where you end up- the lenses make a bigger difference. I carry my camera, 4 lenses, filters, spare battery and memory cards, and a mini tripod in a case too small for an slr body and kit lens.

1 upvote
HappyVan
By HappyVan (9 months ago)

Hi rpm40,

I use the Nikon One V1 as a small camera, Bet I can carry all that stuff in a smaller case than you?

For the serious stuff, I carry a D800 and lenses in a Kata DL80. You'll be surprised how much stuff you can squeeze into a compact bag.

Luv that shallow DOF. For me, that's progress from APSC.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
name here
By name here (9 months ago)

Latest Olympus cameras have an anti-shock setting deep in the menus. If you set it to 1/8s, the shutter shock problem is largely eliminated based on other web reviews. If you google it, you can find tests online showing even OMD EM5 is impacted by shutter shock, but the problem goes away if you set anti-shock = 1/8. The downside: This setting increases the shutter lag, so you'll have to tradeoff sharpness with a slight lag.

I think DPR needs to investigate this particular setting, and update the review if it changes any of the conclusions.

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
11 upvotes
h2k
By h2k (9 months ago)

Thanks, very interesting and valid points here.

0 upvotes
thecameraeye
By thecameraeye (9 months ago)

I was just gonna say this. For most situations 1/8 antishock is hardly noticeable too. Very convenient feature. Most of the times when I want faster shutter response, I'm working with higher shutter speeds too(1/500 or so for action), so the shutter lag doesn't bother me.

1 upvote
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (9 months ago)

FWIW, setting this value to 1/8 has greatly improved the number of sharp pix I'm getting from the EM5/100-300 combination - when shooting at the long end. I don't really understand why but it definitely helps. I also now shoot short bursts which gives a further improvement. I haven't attempted to analyse ho the a/s setting relates to shutter speed which I try to keep as high as I can with this lens, obviously.

0 upvotes
bcalkins
By bcalkins (9 months ago)

Even better, once you've enabled the anti-shock setting (in Menu group E) you can quickly use it or not from the main SCP in both single shot and self timer modes. I leave mine on 1/8s most of the time, unless I'm shooting action/kids.

1 upvote
pdelux
By pdelux (9 months ago)

I think there needs to be clarified the difference between shutter shock and camera shake.
- the act of Pressing the shutter button causing vibrations through the camera is more like camera shake, as the camera is now moving. More likely with smaller/lighter bodies. This is what DPR is talking about and it is reasonable to expect the IS system should be able to compensate for such movements. Tripods and other methods can compensate as well.

- shutter shock, on the other hand is demonstrable even on a tripod, and and only involves the sensor moving due to vibrations caused butt the curtain opening and closing. Shutter shock is not an IS issue, though the IS may make it worse, or may not compensate for it enough. The root issue is the curtain.
Turn on Anti SHOCK which introduces a small delay should work around this issue.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
captura
By captura (9 months ago)

All true, but if Olympus would have bothered to add an electronic first curtain shutter like Sony does, there would be no shutter shock.

2 upvotes
pdelux
By pdelux (9 months ago)

True but it would not help the people who hold current olympus models.

I think also that Camera shake will often give a directional movement blur, where as Shutter Shock can often appear as softness in the entire image.

Although Shutter Shock may also exist in the EP5 - DPR are referring to Camera shake coupled by in accurate IS compensation, some people are mistaking it for Shutter shock.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
mapgraphs
By mapgraphs (9 months ago)

I suspect part of the clue is that not everyone experiences "shutter shock" at certain shutter speeds. And the effect apparently is heavily dependent on lens used.

Light weight cameras with light weight lenses demand a deliberate shooting technique. Vibration from a shutter closing and opening sequence apparently only compounds poor technique. This is something that has been discussed quite a bit. And will probably continue to be.

0 upvotes
Hubertus Bigend
By Hubertus Bigend (9 months ago)

Interesting to see this shutter shock thing coming up again. I remember that there used to be similar reports in forums about Olympus' DSLRs, and I think it were especially the 1/8000s capable bodies which seemed to be affected (although my own E-30 never was, and I'm shooting for four and a half years now with IS turned on about 99,9% of the time).

I do understand the logic behind the "shutter button" explanation, but I still have some doubts, given that something similar has been sporadically observed even with the heaviest digital cameras Olympus ever made.

Did you contact Olympus about the issue? Any feedback yet?

And did you observe anything like that with the E-M1, too, which presumably employs the same shutter?

1 upvote
Total comments: 494
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