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Olympus PEN E-P5 Review

October 2013 | By Richard Butler, Andy Westlake
Buy on GearShopFrom $799.00


Review based on a production Olympus PEN E-P5 with Firmware 1.2

When Olympus introduced the original Micro Four Thirds PEN E-P1 almost 4 years ago in June 2009, it was the first mirrorless interchangeable lens camera to adopt a compact, 'rangefinder-style' body that made no pretence to look like an SLR. It also saw the company striking out in a direction it's followed ever since - designing attractive yet capable little cameras that consciously draw on its long-running film camera heritage. Indeed the SLR-style OM-D E-M5 was one of last year's biggest hits, and even pipped the 36MP full frame Nikon D800 to the title of 'Best Camera of 2012' in our reader poll.

The PEN E-P5 - the fourth model in the E-P range - continues this theme, while adding an array of updates that make it easily the most desirable PEN yet. It includes many of the features that made the E-M5 such a compelling package, such as the same 16MP MOS sensor, advanced '5-axis' in-body image stabilization (now with automatic panning detection), 9 fps continuous shooting, and tilting rear touch screen. It also inherits the refinements debuted on the PEN E-PL5, such as enhanced in-camera RAW conversion, a broad-range 'HDR bracketing' mode, and the ability to specify whether you wish to use in-lens or in-body image stabilization with Panasonic OIS lenses. On top of this it adds-in a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, a 'peaking' display to assist manual focus, and this year's must-have feature: built in Wi-Fi for connection to your smartphone or tablet.

Olympus PEN E-P5 specification highlights:

  • 16MP MOS Four Thirds format sensor
  • Twin control dials (front and rear) with '2x2' dual-mode option
  • 1/8000 sec top shutter speed, 1/320 sec flash sync
  • '5-axis' image stabilization with automatic panning detection ('S-IS Auto')
  • ISO 'LOW' (100 equiv) - ISO 25,600
  • Up to 9fps shooting (5.0 fps with continuous AF)
  • Focus 'peaking' display
  • Intervalometer and Time Lapse movie creation
  • 1.04m dot 3" LCD touchscreen display - tilts 80° upwards and 50° downwards
  • Built-in Wi-Fi for remote shooting (iAuto only) and image transfer to smartphone or tablet
  • Optional VF-4 electronic viewfinder: 2.36M dot LCD, 0.74x magnification (equiv), eye sensor

One key change compared to previous E-Px models is a rearrangement of the controls - gone are the thumb roller and tiny rear dial, replaced by 'proper' front and rear dials that protrude horizontally from the top plate. The E-P5 features what Olympus calls a '2x2' dial interface: a small lever on the back of the camera switches these dials from controlling exposure parameters to changing ISO and white balance. If you don't like this arrangement, the lever can be customized to a couple of other options (described later in this review).

The E-P5 places emphasis on speed: it has a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec, which Olympus says should help make best use of the company's F1.8 prime lenses, allowing them to be shot wide open in sunlight. This is aided by the addition of an ISO 100-equivalent 'LOW' setting, although this will likely come at the expense of some highlight clipping. The E-P5 also offers a fast startup time of just 0.5 sec, 1/320 sec sync with the built-in flash (1/250 sec with external units), autofocus tracking at 5 fps, and a fast shutter release mode with a lag of just 44ms (via a custom setting).

Additional features

In traditional Olympus fashion the E-P5 gets a few new features compared to previous models. There's a 'Super-spot AF' mode that allows extremely precise positioning of the AF point when using magnified live view, very much like the one seen on recent Panasonic models. It gains timed intervalometer shooting, along with the ability to assemble time-lapse movies in-camera. The Live Bulb mode, that allows you to monitor the progress of long exposures while the shutter is open, now features an on-screen histogram to help monitor exposure build-up. The image stabilization system is also now always active by default, to provide a stabilized live view feed (especially useful when using telephoto lenses).

The E-P5 also gets Olympus's 'Photo Story' feature that first appeared on the XZ-10 enthusiast compact. This is essentially an extension of Art Filters, allowing you to generate multi-image composites rather like the pages of a photo book, in a wide variety of themes. It may not be something enthusiast photographers will use all the time, and arguably better suited to lower-end PEN models, but it's good to see Olympus continuing to come up with new ideas.

Colour options

The E-P5 comes in three colour schemes; black, silver and white. The all-black version that we've shown in this review has a textured matte finish which we expect will be appreciated by street photographers - it looks particularly fine when coupled with the black versions of the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm 1:1.8, M.Zuiko Digital 45mm 1:1.8 and M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm 1:1.8 lenses announced alongside. The camera also comes in a very handsome silver-and-black finish that harks back to Olympus's classic cameras from the 1960s and '70s, and a white version with a beige grip. Olympus will also be offering a limited edition model with a wooden grip, and a range of premium accessories such as leather cases.

Silver E-P5 with black 14-42mm kit zoom and VF4 viewfinder White E-P5 with silver 14-42mm lens

Kit options

The E-P5 will be available either body-only for approx. £900/€999/$999, with the M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6R II collapsible zoom for £1000/€1099, or with the M.Zuiko Digital 17mm F1.8 and VF-4 EVF for £1350/€1449/$1449.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 497
1234
tedolf

I recently picked up this camera from my local bricks and mortar camera store. I will be posting a review in a few weeks after I have had time to take some photo's make some prints and do some comparisons.

So far I see no evidence of so called "shutter shock" at the relevant shutter speeds and I am not using any of the special anti-shock settings (Firmware Ver. 1.5). But then again, I never saw them on the E-pl1 either.

Tedolph

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
RobPH

Something I'm curious about...
In the studio scene the E-P5 seems unable to resolve the king of club's hair, something which the E-M10 does easily (and the GX-7 too), and in fact the image seems slightly soft throughout. I've not noticed this softness in other images from this camera, but since I'm trying to decide whether to buy one I'd like to know if there is any other explanation!
Thanks

0 upvotes
Paul U

Firmware 1.5 is available !

http://www.olympus.co.jp/en/support/imsg/digicamera/download/software/firm/e1/

0 upvotes
Snappy Happy

Well, it's good to hear Olympus got around to trying to fix this issue in the E-P5. I wonder if the same will happen for their other cameras. I got an E-PL5 around Christmas, but the image blur/shutter shock problem presented itself so frequently that I had to return the camera after a few weeks.

Comment edited 60 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
47872Mike

My E-PM2 has the most useless implementation of IS I have ever encountered. It is essential to keep it turned off to avoid dreadful double image blur. I have no idea why it's so much more pathetic than the IS of the E-PL2 (poor, but not normally harmful to sharpness except with telephoto lenses) and E-P2 (quite good at times).

1 upvote
Paul U

Good news!
Just received an info from olympus service Europe that a new firmware 1.5 (fixing the metering display issue) may be released "within the next days".

1 upvote
Nis

Good, hope this does not introduceret new errors😉

0 upvotes
Theelderkeynes

Olympus have now posted this firmware upgrade for the OM-D E-M10 here:

http://www.olympus.co.uk/site/en/c/cameras_support/downloads/e_m10_downloads.html

Perhaps consumer pressure does work!

0 upvotes
Paul U

wondering whether dpreview shouldn't change the recommendation for firmware 1.4 into a WARNING.

As a matter of fact, the metering display bug introduced by FW 1.4 heavily affects the usability of the camera in real life situations (outside of studio photography with well controlled lighting).

Yes, it IS essential to know the exposure values BEFORE pressing the release button (or tapping the screen). After the fact is doesn't help much.

While Olympus is working on a fix - I would definitely like to roll back to FW 1.3 or 1.2 but this is impossible as I learned... Very frustrating.

1 upvote
rahulreddy

I agree Paul.I too have observed the same metering display problem on my camera after upgrading to 1.4. Is Olympus aware of the problem?

0 upvotes
Paul U

My discussion with oly service in Germany lead to the fact, that they ackowledged the problem after few hours and said, they communicated it to Japan.
And I guess, only continuous customer requests/complaints from various directions might motivate Olympus enough to issue an update soon counteracting this very bug. It is all about setting priorities. As long as only few people complain, oly might prefer to work on other projects, whatever the severity of the bug might be.

0 upvotes
Nis

I updated two day ago, and see no problem as described. I updated with the VF4 mounted, maybe that could make the difference,or Oly already made a patch?

0 upvotes
Paul U

Interesting... But, well, the fix is annouced to be released within the next days. You certainly have the original FW 1.4. The fixed version should be FW 1.5.

Perhaps it is best just to wait now - since it has been confirmed from various sites, oly is really working an a short term fix. For the time being I activate live histogram - so that a force the camera to show the actual exposure settings.

0 upvotes
Nis

Read the threadhttp://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3671408 after having done so I saw that switching the histogram off I had the same problem, which indeed is frustrating! For me the workaround is having the histogram on, and wait for the 1.5

0 upvotes
BadScience

Sadatoni - it's a 4/3rds sensor, 18 mm x 13.5 mm

Pen F half-frame is 18 mm × 24 mm (vertically oriented).

0 upvotes
sadatoni

Is it half-frame like the old Pen F's it looks like?

0 upvotes
wilsonlaidlaw

New firmware a definite improvement, particularly with the 75-300 lens, which always seemed to settle at the critical 1/160 second. However Olympus could have made the menu implementation of the anti-shock simpler and lamentable documentation of the feature much better. Thank goodness for various reviews which documented and illustrated how to implement. The menu system for this camera must be the most convoluted and obscure ever. Wilson

0 upvotes
Paul U

Unfortunately FW 1.4 untroduced a very annoying metering display bug. (see my post for description below). I would be happy if I could (!) roll back to 1.3 or even 1.2. But that seems to be impossible...

0 upvotes
BadScience

I have never "road tested" the EP5 - but what is significantly different in its mechanism than the EP2 that causes this blurring? I've NEVER seen blurring with the EP2?

0 upvotes
bluevellet

The E-P5 uses the same 1/8000 shutter mechanism as the E-M1.

The E-P2 uses the old 1/4000 one, the same one used all the way to the E620 (possibly even older) along with the same 2-axis IBIS.

I don't know if that 1/4000 shutter was ever updated later on, but I know the E620 and E-P1 were essentially developed in parallel with many of the same parts. The E-P2 was merely a quick update to the E-P1

0 upvotes
BadScience

gmke

Part of the beauty for many who learnt to shoot with 35mm cameras and fast lenses (that includes me) - (OM10/1.8 50mm then OM4ti/1.2 50mm) was that the format was a convenient compromise that allowed for a wide range of possibilities in composition. Okay, grain boundaries were hit very quickly, but that was not a big issue. I used to have 400ASA kodak negatives published at A3 - the vagaries of the printing process for all but the most expensive publications hid a multitude of sins - 120 lpi on poor stock and cheap ink was the norm.

I now have a PEN (an old EP2, no rush to upgrade) - and it's still important to have a range of possibilities when shooting (offset litho is much better in the digital age too, so resolution and grain are important). I'd like the option of MORE VERY fast primes. Of course, I could buy a full frame camera - but I have never liked bulk and don't fancy lumping those ridiculously ugly plastic bricks about. Its all a happy compromise, as ever.

1 upvote
gmke

Does anybody remember Kodachrome 25? It was a very slow film that, given a decent camera, produced smooth, sharp slides, with great dynamic range. That's ISO 25 folks. The reason we all craved fast lenses was so we could use un-speckled films with greater freedom. That's the point, wide latitude to shoot. It's why we badmouth the odd camera--it takes away our freedom. On an entry level SLR, f1.8 was not thought special on the primes that were more popular than zooms. f1.4 was where cool began. So here we are, electronic sensors that take us out to ISO 1600 without much noise, and a step more with heavier noise reduction that steals a bit of detail. Typical kit zooms nowadays all start at f3.5. Yeesh. That is two stops slower than f1.8 but compensated for by the depth of the ISO on the sensor. Have it all. Get a PEN with a zoom AND that 17mm f1.8 prime. (The standard primes used to be quite inexpensive. The marketing department sticking it to us is what happened...)

1 upvote
wilsonlaidlaw

On the other hand it is great fun shooting in candle light with my M240 at 3200ISO or above and f0.95 Noctilux. I still use Kodak T-Max 3200 in my M4 but film grain is somehow much more acceptable than digital noise. The reduction in the noise of sensors over the last few years increases possibilities of imaging by a lot.
Wilson

0 upvotes
stanmkl

Sadly, "[♦] 0sec" does not work with sequential shooting.
Sequential shooting [♦]H & [♦]L cannot be switched.
That means the shake problem cannot be fix when sequential shooting.

0 upvotes
Paul U

... and the second issue I experrience after updating to firmware 1.4:

2) As it says, with firmware 1.4 and "0 second anti shock" active, the camera should switch to electronic first curtain at 1/320 and slower. In contrast to this, I cannot HEAR any difference between anti shock on and off and speed below and above 1/320. In any case there seem to be still 2 shutter movements. One before and one after the exposure.

Side remark: Despite of extensive testing I have never been able to find clear evidence of shutter induced blur with FW 1.2. And I don't see a clear improvement in this respect with FW 1.4 either.

I have no clue, what happened, and what the firmware REALLY does. Any Ideas or observations? Thanks, Paul

0 upvotes
Alien from Mars

Yes, the shutter still does full cycle, only at shutter speeds 1/320s ans slower there will be a 25ms delay after first curtain opens. Sensor is then reset via electronic first curtain and the exposure ends in a regular way with mechanical 2nd curtain.
I assume that 25ms difference is hard to observe by hearing.
You can check this thread for details:
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3648616

2 upvotes
Paul U

Thanks, Alien, for shedding light on the issue. I wonder, why Oly does not take the opportunity to communicate more clearly about it. Much of the confusion is unnecessary.
Thank you also for the reference. Very interesting findings indeed!

0 upvotes
Paul U

Good God... Based on the positive assessment of dpreview I updated my E-P5 from firmware 1.2 --> 1.4
Two problems now (see this and the following post):

1) It seems firmware 1.4 introduced a severe metering display bug:

The metering is FROZEN on the lcd. E.g. in "A" mode the S value is not being updated, in "S" mode the F value and in "M" mode the metering bar.
An update to the actual value can only be forced by a user interaction like pressing a button on the camera, a user interaction on the lens (if that forces a display update like changing the focal length or bringing up the magnified view when changing the focus) or if the "live histogram" display is active.

BTW: I like the new wifi remote control much more than the first implementation and ironically the metering update works on the smartphone app - but not on the camera itself - the former one being a nice-to-have, the latter one a must-have.

Can anybody reproduce the above issue?
Kind regards, Paul

0 upvotes
Michael Geary

Yes, I have the same metering problem after the update. It works OK when the X/Y levels are displayed, but in the full info or blinkies modes the shutter speed and aperture do not update in real time.

Pretty bad bug, I hope they will release an update soon.

1 upvote
Paul U

Hi Michael,
Thank you for confirming the issue on your side. When I realized what happened with my camera I couldn't believe Olympus has released a FW introducing such a massive bug. So I doubted my camera probably has an individual issue... Probably the issue arises due to updating directly from FW 1.2 to 1.4? Was that what you did as well?

0 upvotes
Paul U

Just had a telephone conversation with Olympus Service Europe and they claim, did not hear of any issue with FW 1.4 advicing me to reset the camera and if that doesn't help to send my E-P5 in for repair... Next FW update? Unknown if any. This is frustrating. It could be key to actively communicate the issue to the oly service department so that the issue gets priority. What do you think?

0 upvotes
Mingjai

You're not the only one with this problem--we've started a discussion about this issue over on the forums:
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3671408

0 upvotes
Paul U

Thanks. I consider thsi a severe issue. Thanks for mentioning the other thread.

PN: Oly service (Europe)meanwhile acknowledged a a second statement, they can reproduce the bug and communicated it to japan...

0 upvotes
Michael Geary

I don't think the problem is specific to updating directly from 1.2 to 1.4. I'm pretty sure I had 1.3 on the camera. Well I think I did anyway, can't say for sure.

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Nis

I updated 2 h ago. When I set to A mode the S value is live when I move the camera - and so on in the other modes. It counts both for the display and the VF 4, which I had mounted during the update. Did I misunderstand something?

0 upvotes
Paul U

So you are lucky! Are you using live histogram or x/y bars? Both seem to force continuous display updates? Or is it due to the fact you are using VF 4, which I don't have? Perhaps we can learn from your configuration and find a workaround until a bugfix is available!

0 upvotes
perry rhodan

It sadly won't change the way DPR rates the pen. The ratings are just that, ratings. Ever had the increasing feeling that the ratings are strongly influenced by personal bias?

2 upvotes
bluevellet

Reviews are subjective.

1 upvote
gmke

It would be nice if ratings were totally objective, yes. Even when a consistent attempt is made for objectivity, small mistakes are made because there is a need for subtle snobbery felt as a means of asserting a high ground that is appealing to readers, the currency of credibility and an assurance to the like-minded that you haven't lost yours. The bit about PROS and CONS is one of the places where these biases get traction. Each statement gets equal weight regardless of merit. Now as far as the PEN goes. I had one, but it got stolen, and I am thinking about getting another... It does seems that the hard points on the camera map are the DSLR and Pocket Camera, and that everything in between seems not so quite well established, like there is a period of experimentation whilst the jury is out. There are some great answers and the PEN is one of them. There is a market and ALL the camera companies are running a business, so it should not be a surprise that polemics are a part of the game.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (5 months ago)

Tested this morning, works fine no problem at all.

1 upvote
Gregm61

It is ideal to just leave the -0- antishock on all the time. It only engages at 1/320 second and below. At higher speeds it's not used, even if turned on.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (5 months ago)

Thanks for reviewing the E-P5 again. Although I don't agree with the results. Your gold award is not granted because of the inflation of the camera within the year. That's fine, but if you compare the camera with the A6000 comparison.... I can clearly see blurred backgrounds because of the shuttershock or other issues as well.
Even the A7r flagship is having trouble with this issue it seems....
Can somebody explain this, or do I see things blurred :-)
Btw, my PEN rocks....

2 upvotes
Marty4650

Based on the new test results, the 0 shock feature seems to work, and work very well.

Nice job, Olympus! The EP5 goes back on the list as a dream camera for anyone who doesn't require a built in EVF.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
bluevellet

PDAF would still be nice.

Maybe that's for the E-P7. :)

0 upvotes
retro76

My dream camera is one that doesn't have this problem from the start. This problem existed on my OMD EM5 and cost me quite a number of great shots, one of the many reasons I sold the camera (besides paint coming off after a few weeks, the well documented screen crack issue, etc). I understand manufacturers make mistakes, but to me it's simply unacceptable they didn't notice this when performing QA/QC on their products - I wonder if they knew about the problem but figured the blame would rest with user error.

Nice job Olympus ? Really ? How about offering a replacement for what I see as a manufacturing defect.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Marty4650

I suppose they could take your camera back, upgrade the firmware, and return it to you. Problem fixed!

Of course I realize your camera is only 18 months old, so you will demand a fresh one. Or you could just switch to a nice Nikon D600.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Theelderkeynes

It is still unclear to me whether the OM-D E-M10 or the Pen E-P2 and others so far not addressed with this fix will get or should have this type of fix. DP Review's assurances on this isssue being fixed as far as the M10 is concerned are conditioned quite rightly (in their review) by the phrase 'in our testing'. And not a thing from C.Nishino on the subject or anyone else at Olympus (see below). As an owner of both the M10 and E-P2 and a string of micro 4/3 lenses I would like to know if my faith in the system and specifically Olympus has been misplaced. Once again this loyal and long term customer waits for a positive and constructive response.

2 upvotes
bluevellet

At some point, looking too hard for problems make the results irrelevant in average, real-world uses.

2 upvotes
peevee1

As far as I understand, E-M10 uses the same shutter as E-M5, with slower curtains.

0 upvotes
Ross the Fidller

To peevee1, "As far as I understand, E-M10 uses the same shutter as E-M5, with slower curtains." Apparently there is a firmware upgrade (due on the 21st May I believe) for the E-M10 that will also add the 0 sec. Anti-Shock setting, so for E-M5 users this would be welcome too but I'm not sure if this will happen at some point in time.

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
smafdy

So, Oly made a less than stellar camera. It will be interesting to see if they can actually fix this problem.

Regardless, Oly's performance and product development over the past decade, or so, has been first class.

For the sake of the good will the company has developed, I hope there is a fix. If there isn't, I hope Oly is treated no more or less harshly than the big two.

0 upvotes
Ross the Fidller

You want to know if they can fix a mechanical issue? I believe they have made a reasonable result within the firmware for this situation that appears to be a very usable fix. You can't do that to fix for oil splatters on sensors by another camera maker. There is no perfect camera & most have to bring some sort of firmware upgrade to get around some issues & sometimes it's a physical issue that may need attention. At least Olympus replaced my display bezel with a tiny insignificant crack (from a slightly over tightened screw) on the E-M5.

0 upvotes
gmke

Agreed. This is something that should have been caught in the testing department at Olympus. It is going bit far using the word "THE" on the testing department presumed for DPreview and Imaging Resource because that would mean that Olympus has NO testing department. It is true, A flaw was detected AFTER the camera shipped. Nikon has been replacing whole cameras with dust spots on sensors without admitting there was a problem. For them it involved an unpublished design change and a quick change to a different model number to give everybody something else to think about than focus on something Nikon missed.

5 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer

Mistakes and problems occur. When computers are involved, a problem is called an "issue" to mask the seriousness of the problem. The problem with problems is that, unlike issues, sometimes there is no solution, short of redesigning or replacing the product.

0 upvotes
Maklike Tier

And Nikon designed a camera where oil can get on the sensor.

No company is perfect, and at least with Oly a simple (if rather late forthcoming) firmware upgrade fixes the problem.

0 upvotes
terryoregon

The unfortunate thing is that this issue was found on the E-P1 five years ago. Olympus has had five years to solve this problem. Here's the very detailed report on the "Olympus E-P1 Blur issue" as reported by Imaging Resources.

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/EP1/EP1BLUR.HTM

Even more embarrassing for Olympus, is that dpreview and Imaging Resouces has become the quality control department for Olympus.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
9 upvotes
iansmith

To be honest, shutter shock, and mirror shock have been problems with a lot of cameras, even before digital. The tiny size of the mirrorless cameras are making the problem worse, and as you can see, companies are slowly dealing with the issue.

Once shutters go away completely it will be a moot issue. The transition phase is however, unpleasant. I have an E-P5 and with the update and VERY happy with it.

1 upvote
Dylthedog

I hope they do a firmware update for the E-PL5 as well...

1 upvote
bluevellet

The fix is probably related to the 1/8000 shutter, which both the EM1 and EP5 share.

The E-PL5 probably has the same 1/4000 shutter of the EM5. I'm not saying it can't be done, but it was easy to apply the fix on the E-P5 after first doing it on the EM1.

3 upvotes
peevee1

Wow DPR, you have updated the review! Super respect!

4 upvotes
l_d_allan

I wonder if such a work-around would apply to the Sony A7 shutter-slap issue?

0 upvotes
Wally626

Just the A7r, the A7 has electronic first curtain shutter to eliminate the shutter shock issue.

2 upvotes
HarryLally

Just to point out a typo in line 4 of the final para of the updated review: 'received' not 'recieved'.

5 upvotes
Infared

Measurebate much? LOL!

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Andy Crowe

@Infared I don't think you know what that means. The correct term would be "Grammar Nazi", tho DPR are always appreciative of people pointing out mistakes in their articles.

7 upvotes
Karroly

Personally, I do not think I am kind of a "Grammar Nazi". But I think that good communication between people starts with speaking the same language. And "same" implies "correct" because bad English is not equivalent to good English. English is not my mother tongue but I always try to do my best to detect and correct my own typos... Doing so is just being respectful of my readers...

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
Michael Kilpatrick

Hmm. Calling someone a "Grammar Nazi" doesn't give the impression that "DPR are always appreciative.....etc".
Also, I would have thought it would be "Spelling Nazi". Maybe that makes me "Logic Nazi" and/or a "Courtesy Nazi".

0 upvotes
rich889

Has anyone with an E-P5 had a positive experience with this “Anti-shock” delay in actual practical use? Or is it too intrusive?

1 upvote
stevez

Can't attest to the EP5 but on the EM1 it works perfectly. It can also be used in continuous shooting but the anti-shock setting needs to be set to 1/8 second or longer for either of the two continuous settings (with the little diamond next to it) to be available in the drive menu.

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
1 upvote
stanmkl

Message from Olympus Japan:

Thank you for your e-mail regarding our product.

We apologize for any inconvenience for
the blurred/shaken images at certain shutter speeds.

As you know "anti-shock 0sec" for E-M1 has been updated and we
believe that this update can help to resolve the shutter shock issue you mentioned.

At this point, there are no firmware updates for E-P5 to resolve the
shutter shock issue.

However, we are planning to update the firmware for E-P5 similar
to "anti-shock 0sec" as well. Please wait for the update to be
released for a while.

We are sorry but we are not able to tell you when the update will be
released at this point.
Please check Olympus homepage from time to time for the latest
information of firmware.

We appreciated your kind cooperation and understanding,
looking forward to see your satisfaction on our service and product.

Best regards,

C.Nishino                 
Customer Support Center
OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP. Tokyo, Japan

Comment edited 49 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
Higuel

It is sooooo much similar to how canikon deals with costumers! :/

(PS:haters, I DO have and canon!)

1 upvote
Horaciux

Hello,
A friend of mine is willing to buy my PEN E-PL5.
I'm not sure if buy E-PL5 again or go to this beauty with the extra cost.
I have 17mm f1.8 and 45mm f1.8 lenses.
My wife will love photo story and wifi connection for her whats app groups (she does not have facebook) will it work straigthforeward?
is it worth the change?
Thanks

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ChrisPercival

What lens was used for the studio scene test?

0 upvotes
bluevellet

The 45mm f1.8.

It's a pity they don't use the old 50mm f2 lens from 4/3 DSLRs since it is a bit sharper.

The m43 75mm f1.8 lens could be a better m43 alternative to the classic 50mm since it is also very sharp.

0 upvotes
digifan

I'd use the 60mm Macro since it's in the same ballpark as the 50mm with regards to sharpness.

0 upvotes
Jon H Laake

On my E-P5, focus peaking seems to work with dedicated m4/3 lenses only, not with mf lenses that are attached via an adapter (zeiss zf.2 lens and metabones speed booster). Does focus peaking require electronic coupling between camera and lens??

0 upvotes
bluevellet

If it's like the E-M1, I think you have to set focus peaking to a function button. Dig in the menus and reassign one of the buttons to do just that.

The camera doesn't know when your manual focusing with legacy glass, you have to tell it (through the function button)

1 upvote
Troutguy

so, $1000 bucks for a camera prone to make blurry images.

and this wins a "silver award"? lol how about you scrap this "award" system , a camera prone to make blurry images deseves no award. period.

7 upvotes
wolfie

Hmmm -reminds of certain brand with purple spot issues that got high ratings somehow ... at least no sensor has to be replaced, just a firmware fix.

1 upvote
decodeddreams

This cameras pretty convenient and the qualities nice. I haven't really touched my Canon 5D Mark II since I got this little thing.

1 upvote
AlexRuiz

Ok, so you value portability over IQ. Not all of us are able to do that.

0 upvotes
BarnET

Alex buy the a7(r) you will get both.

0 upvotes
AlexRuiz

except the a7(r) or whatever has a lousy lens selection. And adapters are ok to play around with cameras, but definitely not convenient for serious shooting.

0 upvotes
BarnET

It really depends on your subjects.
It's a no go for reportage and sports thoughg

0 upvotes
tedolf

Manual lenses can work fine for sports. Just ask the Sports Illustrated photographers from the 1970's.

Tedolph

0 upvotes
photo perzon

The flash does not bounce. The LCD does not do selfies.

3 upvotes
The Big One

"The LCD does not do selfies."

And nothing of value was lost...

10 upvotes
tedolf

Obviously, not the camera for you?

Tedolph

0 upvotes
Infared

I absolutely LOVE my E-P5. Just an amazing camera. (Mine is in for repair right now as the main dial was not changing info on every click...). I have no shutter shock issue that I can find, tho. Tested in all the modes, shutter speeds with MANY lenses...cannot observe the phenomenon. I believe this may be a manufacturing or a batch issue....many posters here are not having the issue (but I do believe there is an issue.)
I think Olympus needs to be responsible to its loyal customers and issue a statement (or fix?), regarding this situation and also the shearing off of the lens mounts on the new 12-40mm Pro lens. BOTH of these situations are widely documented on the web...especially this open discussion about the shutter shock issue here throughout DPR's review of the camera. C'mon Olympus...step up!

0 upvotes
Infared

FYI..I do keep my camera set to the I-IS1 setting, which is standard full-time 5-axis IS. I totally avoid the Panoramic auto detect mode out of paranoia from reading about this "issue".

0 upvotes
biggles266

Hi, I have noticed my E-P5 front dial is starting to only sometimes change settings, or do its job, sometimes it does nothing. I googled it and this comment of yours came up first. What country are you in, and has Olympus given you any trouble over this warranty repair? Have you heard if it is a common problem with the dials going bad? p.s. I haven't seen any shutter shock either. I wonder if it is more common for users who don't use a viewfinder.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
biggles266

Where did you read that the auto-detect IS my contribute to the problem? Do you have a link?

0 upvotes
Mark Chan

DPreview editors, could you please enlighten me (us) how to activate the tone curve settings? I haven't been able to get to the secret chamber...

0 upvotes
geoglyphs

Page 14 of the review (Image Options) explains this: However, rather than offering the OM-D's handy in-viewfinder tone curve diagram, the P5 requires you to press the exposure compensation button, then the INFO button, then use the left and right buttons to adjust the shadow response. Pressing INFO again changes attention to the highlight portion of the curve.
But first, make sure that you have dedicated one of the camera's buttons to exposure compensation. I think that is the default function of the Fn button, but you can set this in menu-> detailed camera options -> B: Button/Dial/Lever.
I agree with DPReview that setting the tone curves while processing your RAW files is a more elegant solution.

1 upvote
Ratzfatz

I am still struggeling. The camera was at Olympus for the second time. They changed the complete CCD unit this time. But the issue is still there. Sometimes I shoot 10 to 20 pictures without any fault. Then out of the next 10 pictures 5 are completely blurred. All with the same lens and settings (17mm 1.8) Sometimes I can even see on the screen that the picture will be blurred. The camera focusses, I get the green focus frame and light in the upper right corner, confirming focus (set to focus priority of course), I hear the IBIS working as usual, but the picture is not sharp. The performance of the IBIS is generally poor compared to my EM5 or EM1. With the 17mm I need a minimum of a 1/20 to get a decent sharp picture.
Check these pictures, the were shot in a sequence within a few minutes:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/s1rjtnd7t93xojg/XFqWWI1_n1

I am not sure if this is 'shutter shock' or another fault during taking and processing the picture.

0 upvotes
RStyga

My test at 42mm (84mm ff eq.) on a firm surface revealed no blur issue. A far more comprehensive test in the following link also revealed no such issue whatsoever:

http://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=54504

I think DPR's interpretation is subjective at best.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (10 months ago)

Any news from the shuttershock issue cameras? I own the camera for 3 months now, but I don't have a telelens. Till 60mm I don't have the shuttershock issue when using the right technique of making images.... that has to be said. That was a lot easier with my nikon D600 and D800 ;-)
But on the other hand, try to make a nice shot with the D800 and the 105mm macro attached! With a shutter speed of 80-160 it will be quite difficult to make a sharp image. And have you tried it with a 600mm handheld? No chance @ all of making a sharp image with shutter speed 80 or so.
I'm getting used to the EP-5 now, and to be honest I like it more and more! 4 lenses (9-18, 45 and 60mm) Waiting for the ply 2.8 telezoom ;-)

0 upvotes
ThatsTheShot

Have used the EP5 for a couple of months now and have not experience the shutter shock issue some users have reported. I even set the camera on Shutter speed priority and set it on 1/80s and can not produce the blur that some users have reported. I am wondering if the issue reported may be batch dependent?

0 upvotes
biggles266

Owned an E-P5 for a fortnight now, no sign of shutter shock for me.

0 upvotes
Richt2000

Try the 12/2 at 1/160s. I get two exposures on the same frame its so bad...

0 upvotes
geoglyphs

Did exactly that just now. No problems.

0 upvotes
Richt2000

Goodbye ep5. The blurring of images is totally unacceptable. Too many ruined photos.
The fix of adding 1/8s delay to my shutter is a joke, and hardly a fix.

Shame, loved everything else about it. I won't be buying another Pen - they have obviously dropped the ball with the QC on the pen line.

A7r and GM1 thankfully give me tack sharp images :-)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Stupidco

Having had the E-P5 for three months, I've re-read your review and make the following 2 comments. (1)Your review states you used the IS Auto setting for the stabilizer. That setting is for Landscape Panning. eg Panorama mode. For the photos in your examples, the general IS-1 would be appropriate. If your problem is vertical use IS-2. If horizontal use IS-3. (2) When I turn on my machine and press OK the focal length 15mm is shown at the bottom right of the screen. (The last length I entered.) If I mount a Sigma 30mm, 30mm appears at the top right of the screen. The stabilizer setting remains at 15mm. Which is why I change the stabilizer setting the match the lens. I don't suppose this would be relevant, unless pixel peeking is practiced, but if the stabilizer automatically recognizes a native lens, why does the recorded stabilizer setting not change automatically?

0 upvotes
geoglyphs

Good point, but I guess DP means IS1 = Auto, and not IS AUTO = Landscape Panning.
The manual says the following about the image stabilizer, which is somewhat confusing:
S-IS1: Auto
S-IS2: Vertical IS
S-IS3: Horizontal IS
S-IS AUTO: Landscape Panning I.S.

0 upvotes
stevez

The stabilizer focal length setting will always show the last focal length that was manually set. When using a native lens though you should notice that the FL in the bottom right corner is grayed out meaning it's not being used. It only becomes active (white) when using a non native lens.

0 upvotes
Henry Falkner

3 weeks with 3- and 5-axis stabilisation on my SH-50 convince me of its necessity - and the P5 has 5-axis stabilisation. So I read the review. Double exposures at 1/80 second and thereabouts are indeed worrying. Are you sure that is not caused by Parkinsons? The stabilisation should take care of any roller blind shutter slap. The first of the sample videos is plain over-exposed (not uncommon in that kind of setting). The second sample has no bass in the sound (when compared to my SH-50 videos), suggesting the wind shield setting was at its highest. I get the impression the reviewer does not like video anyway. The level of customisation possible is stupendous indeed, yet the P5 does not look as knob-encrusted as my SP-570UZ.

0 upvotes
keithwee

hi,

a request by TN ARGS a month ago for any updates by DPreview is mothballing... anyone official statement?

There's no statement from Oly Singapore as of today after my communication with them but so far the I've tried at least 4 sets of the Pen but i've not experienced the said shutter shock issue. I really hope to see the phenomenon (yes, in a warped sense)

0 upvotes
Baron Von A

Here is what I got back from Olympus support:
"I also saw your second email with the sample images, thank you for sending these samples.
Please note that as mentioned on the DPreview article you referenced, this type of problem is not considered a mechanical defect of the camera, and in most case is due to vibration introduced by pressing the shutter button or vibration coming from other moving mechanisms of the camera. This can also vary by many other factors, such as lens used and way of holding the camera. To reach higher levels of sharpness in critical situations, the 'Anti Shock' function available in the Menu that can help reduce this blur.
If you feel strongly, even after using the anti shock function and tripod, that there may be something else wrong with your camera, we encourage you to send this in to our service center for testing, and possible repair or adjustments. For instructions on how to send this item to the Olympus service center"

0 upvotes
Ratzfatz

Sorry, just found out they replaced parts of the CCD-unit, so no blame on the Olympus service but still it has not resolve this problem.

0 upvotes
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