Previous page Next page

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Review

March 2014 | By Richard Butler, Allison Johnson
Buy on Amazon.com From $599.00

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 is the third camera in the company's OM-D range and represents another tier in the lineup - sitting below the E-M5 and the even more expensive E-M1. It uses the same 16 megapixel Four Thirds sensor as the E-M5, though doesn't offer that camera's weatherproofing. From the E-M1 it gets the latest TruePic VII image processor and built-in Wi-Fi connectivity. Clearly, the E-M10 leans on some highly capable genetics.

The E-M10 doesn't have all the enthusiast trimmings of the E-M1, but it is targeted to a slightly more serious or developing photographer, rather than a casual snapshooter. With a built-in viewfinder, dual control wheels and number of customizable controls, it's aimed for the photographer who wants to take some control over shooting settings, though it does have an Auto mode for shooters not yet ready to take that step. It presents all of the light-and-compact benefits of Micro Four Thirds, with a few more SLR-like touches (viewfinder and direct controls) that an enthusiast will appreciate.

The first of Olympus's OM-D models, the E-M5, impressed us a great deal when it was launched, and struck a chord with our readers - comfortably winning our first annual 'camera of the year' poll. And the cause for the excitement? A combination of the best image quality we'd seen from a Four Thirds sized sensor and a well-considered set of controls that offered an enthusiast DSLR-style experience in a much smaller body, which was genuinely unprecedented. Overall it was the most complete and coherent mirrorless camera we'd seen up until that point.

The E-M10 offers almost everything the E-M5 did, plus a bit more, at a much lower starting price. Whereas the E-M5 debuted at a cost of around $999 body-only, the E-M10 hit the market at around $699 (or $799 with the collapsible 14-42mm II R lens).

The story is slightly different in the UK, where Olympus is bundling the E-M10 with the tiny 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 EZ power zoom lens that was announced at the same time. This kit costs around £699, with a £529 price tag to buy it body-only. This means the body-only price is only around $30 more expensive than the US price, if VAT is removed to compare them on an equal footing.

OM-D E-M10 key features

  • 16MP Four Thirds CMOS sensor
  • Twin control dials
  • Built-in flash
  • 8 fps continuous shooting
  • Tilting 1.04M dot LCD touchscreen
  • 1.44m dot LCD viewfinder
  • Wi-Fi allowing remote control and file transfer to smartphones
  • Focus peaking
  • '3-axis' image stabilization

Looking through that list, you'll see that the E-M10 is essentially an un-weather-sealed E-M5 but with a better rear screen and the ability to easily send images off to a smart device. And, in use, that's a pretty accurate way of looking at things. But just looking at what's new or different risks downplaying how much is carried over from the E-M5.

Despite its fairly modest (mid-range DSLR level) pricing, the E-M10 retains not only a full twin dial control setup, giving you plenty of direct access to exposure settings, but also a touchscreen that helps make it quick to change secondary settings (gradation, white balance, ISO, etc.). As usual, Olympus hasn't made any moves to simplify or dumb-down its menu system, with all the advantages and disadvantages that brings.

Model
OM-D E-M10
OM-D E-M5
PEN E-P5
 Sensor
16MP CMOS
16MP CMOS
16MP CMOS
 Image processor
TruePic VII
TruePic VI
TruePic VI
 Image stabilization
3-axis
5-axis
5-axis
 Stabilization effectiveness (CIPA)
3.5 stops
~4 stops
~4 stops
 Accessory Port?
No
Yes
Yes
 Screen specifications
1.04m dot,
WVGA LCD
614k dot,
VGA equiv. OLED
1.04m dots
WVGA LCD
 Electronic viewfinder
1.44m dot,
SVGA LCD
1.44m dot,
SVGA LCD
Optional
 Built-in flash?
Yes
No
Yes
 Wi-Fi?
Yes
No
Yes
 Maximum shutter speed
1/4000 sec
1/4000 sec
1/8000 sec
 X-Sync speed (external flash)
1/200 sec
1/200 sec
1/250 sec
 Movie options
1080/30p MOV
up to 24Mbps
1080/60i MOV
up to 20Mbps
1080/60i MOV
up to 20Mbps
 Battery life (shots/charge, CIPA)
320
360
330
 Environmental sealing?
No
Yes
No

In the negative column, you can see that the E-M10 misses out on the E-M5's 5-axis stabilization - which means it's not quite as effective (particularly when shooting close-ups). The shutter mechanism, meanwhile, allows a maximum shutter speed of 1/4000th of a second, in contrast to the 1/8000 sec offered by Olympus's most recent models, the E-P5 and E-M1. The good news is that we didn't find it to be prone to the image shake that can occur with the PEN E-P5.

The E-M10 also does without an AP2 accessory port, but this isn't necessarily a huge drawback - with the exception of the SEMA-1 stereo mic option, most of the available accessories aren't terribly relevant for E-M10 owners thanks to its built-in EVF and Wi-Fi.

However, the things the E-M10 adds are rather nice - the rear screen is a noticeable improvement, as is the inclusion of the 'Adaptive Brightness' viewfinder technology first introduced in the E-M1. This brightens and darkens the viewfinder panel, based on the ambient lighting conditions. As a result, the viewfinder ends up being bright in bright light without then being blinding in low light. It's a little thing (to the point that you don't necessarily notice it happening), but it helps provide a more OVF-like experience.

Although we wouldn't expect a huge number of E-M10 owners to buy lots of extra lenses, there are a healthy number of comparatively affordable (circa $300) lenses available from Olympus and Panasonic.

Electronic zoom

In the UK, the E-M10 is sold with the m.Zuiko 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 EZ MSC power zoom. It's a very compact lens (even smaller than Panasonic's 14-42 Vario X powerzoom) but despite its size, finds room for both a zoom and focus rings. Our test unit includes a clever sprung-iris lens cap that gives a compact-camera-like experience. It's a nice touch, but unfortunately not included with the lens and is offered at an additional £40 in the UK. In the US (initially, at least), the lens will only be available separately, at a cost of around $349 (and another $40 if you want the neat lens cap).


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2014 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

Previous page Next page
398
I own it
191
I want it
48
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 332
12
BBking83

So... 10 years ago when the first 4/3 camera came out, no one complained about the lack of bokeh. The Olympus E-1.

I can guarantee that all the "no bokeh, no buy" spokes people never knew this and will refuse to recognise or accept that it's the SAME SIZE (regarding sensor) as this.

And every other m4/3 camera.

0 upvotes
Mike99999

My Leica 25/1.4, Olympus 45/1.8, Olympus 75/1.8 and Olympus 40-150mm all provide plenty of bokeh.

The 75/1.8 is competitive with full frame. It's like carrying a 150/3.6 IS. And it's tiny. It's awesome.

1 upvote
itsastickup

"My Leica 25/1.4, Olympus 45/1.8, Olympus 75/1.8 and Olympus 40-150mm all provide plenty of bokeh."

The only normal lens among those has very little bokeh, more like a 50/2.8, and it costs a bomb.

Until prices become reasonable these m4/3 cameras aren't a practical proposition to the non-pro bokeh photographer. That's a large market missing.

1 upvote
sandy b

Actually, they did. This has been an ongoing debate since day 1.

0 upvotes
Michael_13

@ itsa: You seem to have no idea about bokeh/DOF.

An m43 "normal" with 50mm/F2.8 (equiv.), effective speed of F1.8 and excellent sharpness is much more usable than a cheap FF 50mm/F1.8 that does not focus correctly and shows heavy vignetting.

2 upvotes
itsastickup

Michael_13, you're making not much sense here. Whatever the inadequacies (in your opinion) of the lenses, f2.8 equiv normal bokeh is not enough to please the bokeh crowd. That's the issue.

0 upvotes
MajorMagee

Seriously, you have to go back and slam the E-P5 again? I've had one for a very long time now and have never seen the shutter shock issue (and believe me, you made me look for it). Is it impossible for you to admit that your review copy may not have been entirely representative of the model's real world performance after all?

4 upvotes
Jan Chelminski
1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo

Gotta love the 'no bokeh' whining.

12 upvotes
Brixham Steve

Yes - these people whining about no bokeh have no idea what this camera is capable of. See Robin Wong's blog for examples of what this little gem of a set up can do with a good eye and in the right hands: http://robinwong.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/it-has-been-while-petaling-street-again.html#more

5 upvotes
The Jacal

Just wait till Yabokkie or Francis Carver get on the case!

7 upvotes
Dimit

I wouldn't personally use an m43 camera as my first and only camera.
As a second camera-being an enthusiast or semipro or pro or any-I would vote for a csc and consequently an m43 for sure.
This is an excellent little camera and let me say,for it's use stated above,I strongly prefer it vs em-1 !! Em-1 mimics dslrs dimentionswise although I'd never get it it as my sole camera if I had to choose.
Summary: Em-10 will be a hit for a long time.Small,balanced in all respects,excellent built quality(nobody pointed out so far!),reasonable price.

3 upvotes
itsastickup

It's a beautiful camera.

However:

Show me the bokeh, show me the bokeh, show me the bokeh!!!

And not at $900, FFS. These clowns won't crack mirroless until they realise that the common man wants everything but his kid's face out of focus. And he gets it from APS-C for less than $200

5 upvotes
SkiHound

How much less DOF does APS-C have than m43 at approximately equal effective focal lengths? The difference is a bit less than 1 stop.

6 upvotes
Brixham Steve

Bokeh? See Robin Wong's blog on all things Olympus M43

http://robinwong.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/it-has-been-while-petaling-street-again.html#more

1 upvote
The Jacal

Bokeh, APS-C? Pah!! Medium format is where it's at.

13 upvotes
Don Karner

In my experience, the common man and woman want to see everything in the picture in focus. Only us photographers enjoy creamy out-of-focus areas.

15 upvotes
taktak91

Bokeh, a Japanese word, have double meaning.
-soft, out of focus areas
-dimwitted

So, one way of seeing bokeh is checking oneself in a mirror.(^~^)

12 upvotes
NilsBV

You bokeh-obsessed trolls are really tiring. It's not all about bokeh. In particular, not every camera has to be about a shallow depth of field. And that's coming from a DSLR shooter, not a mirrorless shooter.

And please nominate the APS-C SLR with lens that will give you a shallow depth of field for less than $200. You can't, because it doesn't exist. Well, unless you buy a 10 year old used DSLR and an old manual focus lens, that might come in under $200.

0 upvotes
bobbarber

What an awful, rehearsed post from a representative of a competing manufacturer.

The common man wants everything out of focus but his kid's face?

Ha, ha, ha!

Chortle, chortle, chortle!

The common man is busy taking pictures on his cell phone. The common man has always wanted photos to be in focus. This is new information for you?

3 upvotes
Photomonkey

Bokeh refers to the quality of the OOF image. That is a characteristic of the lens.
The AMOUNT of OOF image is a function of the sensor size/lens aperture/ subject distance.
You are not talking about bokeh so stop using the term.
Your preoccupation with a narrow DOF does not imply any creative sensitivity or knowledge but a fanboy waving of the "I'm a dork flag".

3 upvotes
Mike99999

More whining from people who don't know what they are talking about.

The cheap Olympus 45/1.8 provides the same amount of background blur as a Canikon 50/1.8 but the bokeh is far, far better. And I don't know a single APS-C lens that has bokeh as beautiful as the Olympus primes.

1 upvote
itsastickup

"Bokeh refers to the quality of the OOF image. That is a characteristic of the lens."

..to a purist, but these days it's used interchangeably with OOF. And everyone knows what you are talking about.

0 upvotes
itsastickup

"The cheap Olympus 45/1.8 provides the same amount of background blur as a Canikon 50/1.8 but the bokeh is far, far better."

Sure, but it's not a normal. m4/3 needs a normal with equivalent bokeh at the right price. The £800 42.5/1.2 is not it.

0 upvotes
itsastickup

No bokeh no buy.

You have to pay a bomb to get anywhere near the bokeh of an APS-C 35/1.8.

m4/3 is fine for many purposes, but without affordable bokeh it's off many of our radars.

That 25/1.2 should be a maximum $200.

Who are they kidding. Grow up, Olympus. Get some cojones and do what you know you have to do.

2 upvotes
sbszine

Just buy a 45 / 1.8, one of the cheap primes mentioned in the review.

You did read the review, right?

21 upvotes
Robert Garcia NYC

you want bokeh go full frame not APS-C... Show me the bokeh!!

14 upvotes
RichRMA

25mm f1.2 for $200? Are you insane? Nikon's 32mm f/1.2 for the 1 system is $899.

5 upvotes
Photomonkey

Troll or fool. You decide.

12 upvotes
T3

Uh, maybe its you who should grow up? Just get the Oly 45/1.8. Its a beautiful lens, and it does produce nice bokeh. But keep in mind that there is a lot more to a successful photo than bokeh. I use FF, APS-C, and m4/3. I get great images from all of them, with and without bokeh.

0 upvotes
Mike99999

If you are referring to the Nikon 35mm f/1.8G, that lens has the worst bokeh of all the lenses I've ever used.

0 upvotes
itsastickup

"Just buy a 45 / 1.8, "

That's a portrait lens. Where's the normal?

1 upvote
wansai

are you really going to get caught up by it being a portrait lense? who in the world uses a normal focal length to take bokeh shots. only rank amateurs expect that.

you want normal focal lengtb bokeh, go full frame. why waste your time on apsc? the difference between m4/3 and apsc is tiny enough not to matter at all.

i am shocked you talk about these things as if you have some knowledge of them, then drop the apsc bomb as the solution when it's less than a stop difference.

one would think if you wanted eaiser bokeh, they'd move up to FF, not apsc. like... duhh...

0 upvotes
itsastickup

"If you are referring to the Nikon 35mm f/1.8G, that lens has the worst bokeh of all the lenses I've ever used."

It may be the 'worst' but it's actually quite good and very usable.

0 upvotes
itsastickup

"are you really going to get caught up by it being a portrait lense? who in the world uses a normal focal length to take bokeh shots. only rank amateurs expect that."

Total nonsense.

1 upvote
itsastickup

"25mm f1.2 for $200? Are you insane? Nikon's 32mm f/1.2 for the 1 system is $899."

It may be insane, but the point is that it's necessary to make this camera equivalent to aPS-C and give enough bokeh as a starting point. There's just not enough in the cheaper lenses mentioned.

1 upvote
KakoW

In need of a new camera, I went to the store today to try it out.

I was blown away : it offers full manual control in a small package and a very impressive IS. With the 17 f1.8 it handles well.

My GF didn't like it. The grip is short and shallow. She voted for the X-T1. She felt the E-M10 requires an aperture ring, since your left hand rests under the lens.

Try it before you buy it, is what I'm trying to say.

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
1 upvote
RoJack725

Are you committed to a system yet? If the grip is the issue, the OMD-EM1 has a nice chunky grip similar to the Fuji XT-1. Both are excellent systems, but they have different lens offerings, lens weight, sensor 'look' etc. But, if you did buy the XT-1, you've purchased an amazing image-making machine.

2 upvotes
kreislauf

i disagree. the E-M10 does not "need" an aperture ring. though it is nice to have one with the fuji lenses, people might see it as a must have, which is odd.
for example: with the 25/1.8 prime, your left hand is not needed to stabilize a E-M10, because it is that light!
and my right hand can do all the adjusting

2 upvotes
KakoW

@RoJack725 I tried the E-M1, and I felt the E-M10 has everything I want (except 5-way IBIS) in a smaller package for half the price.

0 upvotes
Michael_13

KakoW:
You should probably get...

... a new girlfriend!
;-)

2 upvotes
kreislauf

what's wrong with his old one?

0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev

This is just confirming what we all knew or expected, i.e.

The E-M10 is the camera for you, if you want to spend the least amount of money and get the most camera in the smallest but fully functional body and be in the best mirrorless system in terms of lenses, quality, portability, and future growth.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
19 upvotes
itsastickup

..and get no bokeh unless you spend more than twice as much again.

No thanks.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
The Jacal

itsastickup: Pretty much like any other camera system then.

18 upvotes
peevee1

itsastickup does not know what "bokeh" means.

18 upvotes
Pierre Couture

Very impressed to see the dynamic range using gradation auto in the samples. Very nice indeed.

0 upvotes
The Jacal

I feel a camera of the year award coming......!

8 upvotes
peevee1

... to X-T1. ;)
But a lot of cameras are going to be released at Photokina. Sony A9r anyone? ;)

1 upvote
showmeyourpics

For a long time as an outdoor photographer I could not find a better balance of features, ergonomics and price than with the Olympus OM2n and its Zuiko lenses. I am happy that with their E-M camera system Olympus is back to that level of quality. I love exploring and my photography is always challenging, requiring getting up at some ungodly hours, a well supplied backpack and being ready for some tough weather. I am lucky to live close to B&H and visit monthly to check out the new toys. Last week, I had the E-M10 in my hands for a while. I left asking myself how it was possible not to fall in love with it. Minimum size and weight but excellent build quality, beautiful EVF and LCD, good control layout, awesome features and customization, and a sensor that can give you fine-art quality poster prints through a good ISO range. If I compare my beloved Pentax K5 with the two DA* f/2.8 zooms to the E-M10 (or the weatherized E-M1) with the equivalent M43 pro zooms at comparable prices ...

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
onlooker

"If I compare my beloved Pentax K5 with the two DA* f/2.8 zooms to the E-M10 (or the weatherized E-M1) with the equivalent M43 pro zooms at comparable prices ..."

Then what?

5 upvotes
showmeyourpics

For me, Pentax is in the APS-C system what Olympus and Panasonic are in the M43: a winning combination of features, ergonomics and prices. I find it difficult to give up my Pentax gear - I would get the K3 in a heartbeat if I could afford it - but handling the E-M cameras with the available selection of M43 lenses makes it really tempting. If I had the budget for it I would keep them both just for the pleasure to shoot with such amazing tools.

0 upvotes
onlooker

Pentax is a winning combination of features, ergonomics, and prices? Sorry, with all my love for Pentax (LX - need I say more?), their recent practice of slapping a new color coat on their old lenses and jacking up the price into stratosphere does not strike me as a winning combination. Show me good new lenses at reasonable prices. That's what Pentax used to be.

1 upvote
Macintosh Sauce

Um... The HD Pentax lenses that Ricoh released have a new coating on the lens. Much better from what I've seen!

0 upvotes
KonstantinosK

But... but... this camera was announced less than two months ago! Such a little time for a review is AWESOME!

0 upvotes
peevee1

Comparison to X-M1 is just awkward. In all respects E-M10 is a direct competitor of X-E2, and should be compared accordingly (including viewfinder size). t5i and D5300 are the same class.

0 upvotes
BarnET

peevee,
The XE-2 is a far more expensive camera. And also more capable especially with the very good 18-55 F2.8-4 kitlens.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
1 upvote
BarnET

Amazon.com

XE-2 with 18-55 $1299,-
EM-10 with 14-42mm $799,-
Panasonic GX7 with 14-42 $949,-
Panasonic G6 with 14-42 $579,-
Sony NEX 6 with 18-55 $799,- (you might be able to get good deals on this one)
Sony A6000 with 18-55 $799,-
Fujifilm XM-1 with 16-50mm $599,- with $200 off since a short while

You can see the XM-1 comparison was fair. But i don't know why they didn't mention Sony which is the closest competitor in both size and features.

The GX7 is slightly better specced but also a bit more expensive. And vastly underestimated by the Dpr crew.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
peevee1

Being more expensive does not make it automatically more capable. Yes, the kitlens is better. I am pretty sure you can buy X-E2 body and Fuji 16-50/3.5-5.6 for it, or buy E-M10 with really more capable 12-40/2.8. The review is about cameras, not just their kit lenses, and cameras are in fact very similar in capabilities (except X-E2 does not have tilting touchscreen).

0 upvotes
Pap38

A GOLD, wow that's a surprise!

0 upvotes
imperialdrive

WOW - One hell of a review... thank you DPR!!! I bought the EM10 asap and no regrets - such an amazing piece of technology :-)

Overall score of 80% though? This is a solid 90%+ from everything I've read.

9 upvotes
peevee1

"E-M10 Video Modes
Image comparison tool"

How to access actual comparison, between different cameras that is?

0 upvotes
Richard Butler

At the moment, you can either select the E-M10 from widgets in other reviews, or compare the different modes of the same camera in this widget. We'd not fully expected this usage of the comparison tool, so we're still working out how to adapt its function.

2 upvotes
Richard Butler

Reload the page and you'll now find a link to a standalone page that lets you select the cameras you want to compare.

2 upvotes
peevee1

Wow, thanks, that was quick! Time to add the widget to your Reviews menu?

Surprised to see that E-M10's video resolution is so much better than Fuji X-E2 and even Nikon D610 and Sony A7, and almost on par with mighty Panasonic GH3. Oly makes some progress?

1 upvote
xt1isdabomb

What's the best reviewed camera(s) on DPR from a numerical/percentage point? That's the camera I need!

0 upvotes
Sad Joe

PLUS: Nice new cheaper OM model. CONS: Perhaps they should speak with their pals at Panasonic about video before bringing out anymore...

5 upvotes
yabokkie

I think Oly and Pana may have talked about it long time ago and agreed that Oly should concentrate more on still and Pana on video.

7 upvotes
Erick L

"... agreed that Oly should concentrate more on still and Pana on video."

Olympus is worse at both IMO.

Comment edited 10 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
kreislauf

right. your opinion. everyone's got one...

4 upvotes
cruz031

Nice review, but on page 7, wrong full size image is linked above section that reads: "Created using Live Composite, converted Raw file from ACR with tweaks to noise reduction. " :)

0 upvotes
Richard Butler

That should now be fixed - sorry about that.

2 upvotes
ginsbu

Regarding he rear dial, if it's like my E-M5 it's easily turned by your index finger. When I'm using the camera one handed, I find it very comfortable to work both dials with my index finger, and still preferable to a single dial. Might be worth trying for folks who finds the rear dial awkward to work with their thumbs.

4 upvotes
Brixham Steve

I agree - takes a little bit of getting used to but I now turn the rear dial with my index finger too. After a while, muscular memory kicks in and it feels totally natural.

3 upvotes
Leif1981

"Memory card slot on bottom panel is blocked with use of tripod plate"

This con isn't completely true because it depends on the plate being used. I'm using a small arca swiss compatible plate and can still open the battery door without a problem.

10 upvotes
Henrik Herranen

Ohm Sweet Ohm.

5 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo

Yeah, I love Kraftwerk too.

0 upvotes
Shamael

we are all robots, we know that since a bit of time

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo

This is the Autobahn to happiness.

1 upvote
Jim in Hudson

I still think it's a shame Olympus hasn't brought that excellent 12 - 60 lens over to the m4/3 mount. Seems like it would be an outstanding walk-around lens for this camera plus the E-M1 and E-M5.

7 upvotes
ShatteredSky

Fully agree here.

0 upvotes
yabokkie

ZD12-60/2.8-4 was the first ZD lens that I consider good, a great lens if one thinks it was designed for a stupid mount. but I think mZD12-40/2.8 should be good enough for casual walk-around.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
deep7

The 12-40 probably fills that role. I had the 12-60 and have the 12-40 and the latter is every bit as good, if not better, though I do miss the extra reach sometimes. However, the size difference is very real and means I can carry a much smaller camera bag.

1 upvote
Jim in Hudson

yabokkie and deep7 -- I would agree but for my opinion that a 3.3x zoom range isn't enough to really cut it as a single walk-around lens. The 5x range on the other lens is much better especially considering it's reputation as having very good optics.

1 upvote
ShatteredSky

Yep, that is the crux. I think if you would use the same size as the old 12-60, one might probably arrive at a 12-60/2.8 for m43. Any engineers who want to chime in?

0 upvotes
tipple

DPR team: hang in there! Just because some see you as not perfect, that does not mean that you do not do a good job. You do!

7 upvotes
Lab D

The only real "con" is video which should be a big "pro" with this camera. If Olympus would increase the bit rate and add 24p, those combined with the IBIS would make it one of the best cameras for video.
IMHO the default NR is too high which makes high ISO jpegs and video mushy, but any user can lower it or turn it off completely.
I agree with DPR and all the review sites that at almost every ISO this camera equals any APS camera but adds IBIS which most don't have.

5 upvotes
108

i'm gonna get killed for this but somehow, from looking at the samples, I wish this fine piece of Olympus engineering had the older 12 mp panasonic sensor , with better high iso capabilities of course.

3 upvotes
cadet stimpy

Agreed! I've been looking through my images and the most 'wow' shots comes from my old e-p1, that old panasonic sensor produced some magic colours that latter pens\omds don't.

1 upvote
BarnET

While i agree about the ridiculous lack of the k3 review.
Let's complain about that somewhere else.

The em10 is a very good value mirrorless. So let's continue our discussion on topic.

9 upvotes
InTheMist

Too right, BarnET. I'm so sick of Pentax people complaining in every thread here.

May I respectfully add for mirrorless mirrorless folks - please avoid SLR threads.

5 upvotes
mauritsvw

And I think Pentax users are so sick of waiting for that ever promised never appearing review.

8 upvotes
BarnET

Maurits,

And rightfully so. However this EM10 is a very good mirrorless camera that deserves it's own attention.

2 upvotes
Richard Butler

@mauritsvw - we've always promised that it will happen (and it will), but we've only recently been able to spend a concentrated period of time working on it. There should be several pages of review added to the preview this week.

0 upvotes
Lucas_

I still don't get it, the Oly OM-D E-M10 seems pretty nice, but how can it get a "gold" and the Sony A7 FF a "silver"? IQ, AF, ergonomics, technology, don't matter any more, only a retro look and lower price? Whatever... DPR is really not to be considered serious on their conclusions/ratings any more!

4 upvotes
photofan1986

Well maybe the better performance, autofocus, lens line-up, homogeneity, IBIS, ...

24 upvotes
InTheMist

Because they didn't like using it enough for gold. I get that.

8 upvotes
Daedbird

Maybe because compared to its competition, the EM10 is a better value, and a better performer for its range.

The A7 looks to be the start of what could be an awesome camera line, but it has some faults, the R version even more so. Also, It does not have the native mount lens selection.

What makes the A7 better than the 6D or the D610? Those are its competition for price on the FF level. If you think its other mirror less, please tell me why this would be better than the XT1 to justify its price tag?

12 upvotes
Treeshade

So we have to keep telling people: different camera, different class. For A7's rating, please read the review.

In short, A7 is a powerful package with a handful of drawbacks when comparing to other entry-level FF / high-end mirrorless.

4 upvotes
deep7

What I don't get is why dpreview prefer the A7r to the A7. My experience of both was quite the opposite!

That's why it pays to read around and not make all your decisions based on one review. This site is one of the most informative and unbiased but you shouldn't avoid a camera just because it didn't get a gold rating. Duh!

1 upvote
RoJack725

Maybe if the A7's shutter didn't sound like a heartsick seal, it would have netted the gold.

1 upvote
Revenant

The awards are based on the subjective user experience, how much the reviewer enjoyed using the camera, taking into account all aspects that are important to the reviewer in question. It's like an "editor's choice".
Also, the two cameras are in different categories, and therefore not directly comparable.

Also, I think it's up for debate whether the A7 really has better AF or ergonomics. The CDAF systems in the latest m43 cameras are better than some hybrid CDAF/PDAF systems. And ergonomics is very subjective; some people are not happy at all with the ergonomics of the A7.

0 upvotes
szafir51

Please see comparision between A7 with 24-70 and E-M1 with 12-35 at Polish Olumpus users forum
http://forum.olympusclub.pl/threads/90535-Sony-A7-24-70-vs-E-M1-12-35?p=1066318#post1066318

0 upvotes
Brixham Steve

I've had this camera and the Panasonic 12-35mm F2.8 zoom for just over a week now. It is a total joy to hold and use with no noticeable drop in image quality compared to my Nikon D7000 with good lenses. The big thing that has dropped though, is the bulk and weight compared to my Nikon set up.

The build quality and feel of this camera is just fantastic - it seems a much better engineered product than the slightly plasticy Nikon.

I had been looking for a while to replace my Nikon as I was finding that I used it less and less due to the size and weight making it inconvenient to just take along with me casually. This little OM-D must be less than half the size & weight with no sacrifice in image quality.

A little cost saving tip for UK residents: I paid £699 for the pancake zoom lens kit then sold the little pancake lens on ebay for £299. It sold almost instantly. So the 'body only' cost to me was just a fraction over £400 compared to the £529 retail price :-) A complete bargain!

7 upvotes
sceptical1

I use d7100's and was going to get the m1 as a lighter 2nd backup. I got this m 10 instead as I was satisfied with the feature set.
I had d7000' s before the 7100 and I must mildly disagree that the quality is comparable. It's not on two common situations.
First a little background so you see why I have different conclusions. I am a longtime wildlife photographer and earned a decent part time income doing after many years of having a portrait studio ( that was a long time ago.) Recently a good friend and pro pet photographer decided to retire early for health reasons and asked me to take over his business. So my photography is now mostly pets, with some landscape / wildlife to try to maintain a stock portfolio.
For both of these applications the Nikons produce somewhat better results. Here is why.
1. For pets, my style involves creating a shallow depth of field frequently using a fast zoom or 50 and 85mm primes. Due to the smaller sensor size, it is more difficult duplicate that effect . After a couple weeks of practice with the Oly, but I doubt I can completely close the gap. The difference is not huge, but noticeable.
2. For wildlife, the platform lacks a great fast tele zoom. It also doesn't track moving object s a well.

I just want people to know the limitations.

That said, I just love it! First, it's a perfect second camera for dogs that are initially nervous about the bigger camera / lens. It's size is wonderful because it is really easy to maneuver on a dual strap. It stays out of the way until you need it. The tilt able LCD makes shooting from the hip a breeze ( of course, the Nikons lack this feature). The builtin HDR makes natural HDR shots a breeze by lining it all up for you. It does all this while delivering more than good enough quality in nearly every situation. Finally, as a frequent traveler, it will be great to leave my DSLR home. As an older photographer this is a real boon. I switched entirely from heavy full frame to DO when I knew I could get good enough quality in a lighter package. Now I am looking forward to the day where I can completely replace my DSLR's with something good enough in an even lighter package. These Oly's are close and give it another couple years and it will be here. In the meantime, I will get the best results from this Oly given its small limitations.
Enjoy

12 upvotes
Higuel

THANKS for the TRULY constructive AND HELPFUL and actually TRUE comments because they'r experienced as opposed to just read or even simply imagined!!! ;)

3 upvotes
Brixham Steve

Hi Sceptical1

Thank you for your thoughtful comments.

I agree that for wildlife - or sports - the M43 system is not great at tracking fast moving subjects. The crop & full frame sensor cameras and lenses are much better for this.

Regarding narrow depth of field, I find the Olympus 45mm 1.8 prime creates a lovely background bokeh for portraits (animal or human) when shot wide open and is still tac sharp across most of the in focus frame. I honestly struggle to see any discernible difference between this lens and the 50mm f2.8 on my Nikon D7000 in most situations.

I would add that I don't shoot professionally however, so can't comment on what folks actually like to see/buy when having their pets photographed.

Like you I am an older photographer and travel a lot so really don't need or want to be lugging around heavy, bulky camera kit any more.

As an enthusiastic amateur this camera will fulfill my needs and surpass my skill level for many years to come. Like you I love it!

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
67gtonr

It only takes a cheap 50mm f2.8 on an old APS-C camera to equal the latest and expensive m4/3 camera and lens, good to know.

1 upvote
Brixham Steve

Hi 67gtonr - my D7000 cost me almost £1,000 when new + £150 for the 50mm f2.8.

This little OM-D cost me £400 new (after I sold the kit pancake lens for £300 on ebay) + £175 for the 45mm f1.8 prime.

And it has IBS, & wi-fi control. And is half the weight & size of my plastic Nikon kit.

Even though I loved my Nikon gear and the photos I shot, there is no way I can equal the price / size / quality ratio plus the shear joy of handling such a nice piece of engineering in any comparable APS-C kit. Even when buying second hand.

Just my tuppence worth :)

5 upvotes
Mellowmark

You were lucky to sell the lens for £300 on ebay as you can buy them brand new UK dealer stock with a 2 year Olympus warranty for £269 - so you found a sucker! In reality unless another sucker comes along you may get £240 or so at best, probably not much more than £200 after ebay fees and as the camera + lens kit costs £170 more than the body only, hardly worth the hassle for a mere £30 'profit'.

The Olympus 45mm 1.8 is at least £210 new, not £175. Nikon 50mm f1.8 is around half that at £109 the 50mm 1.8 G is £148. The Canon EF 50mm f1.8 II Lens is £79.

1 upvote
sceptical1

Hi Brixham,

This is in reply to your comments about depth of field. I must admit, the Nikons have the advantage of being compatible with the Sigma 50mm 1.4 lens. This lens is fairly sharp, but produces really creamy bokeh. It's easy to create, so some of the difference is likely the lens. I will look at the lens you suggest (also mentioned in the review...) and see if it helps produce better results. Right now, I am using the Olympus 12-40 2.8. I am waiting on the Olympus 40-150 2.8. The 12-40 2.8 is very nice and super sharp but the bokeh is only okay, IMO. I will need to get roughly a 25mm and 40-50mm primes as budget allows and these will probably help.
Regardless, as I previously stated, I am very happy overall.

0 upvotes
fdfgdfgdgf

Flat IQ and colors
Nikon D3300/5300 outperform it by a leap.

They need to move to APSC, then it will challenge DSLR's

5 upvotes
Gully Foyle

...and your feet smell bad, troll. There!

29 upvotes
photofan1986
9 upvotes
yabokkie

they need better lenses but I'd prefer mZD12-40/2.8 over DX16-85VR.

1 upvote
Gordks

I agree, the D5300 does do a better job on the Image Quality comparison, but I don't want to carry those heavy lenses around, and I don't intend to be shooting at ridiculously high ISO settings often anyway. I am VERY satisfied with m43 image quality in general.

Also, 'moving to APSC' is not necessarily going to create better results. Look at the Canon T5i links in the last paragraph on the Image Quality page. The EM-10 just 'holds it own'?!? No, it thoroughly trounces the T5i at 3200 ISO. Much sharper and less noisy. And later "the EM-10's JPEGs look comparable to" the T5i?!? Not even close. Yes, the EM-10's image is more yellow, but it is all the same yellow. That is correctable. The T5i's image has pinkish and yellowish patches all over the face and the black border slightly to the left of the face shows far more noise. I can only think that Canon donates a good bit of support to this site. Other than that, this seems like a very fair review.

5 upvotes
Bhima78

/shrug

I use a D7000 at work and I own an EM10. Image quality difference for the type of photos I take at work and the type of printing I do (most images are no larger than 8x10" for brochures and marketing material) is non-existent.

3 upvotes
kreislauf

so i assume you have a nikon DSLR and feel threatened?

2 upvotes
nathondetroit

I miss the days when cameras used to suck—I mean REALLY suck. Back when megapixels doubled weekly and ISO 200 was intolerable. Those reviews were exciting.

Now I just think, “Wow, most people will never take interesting pictures with this.”

22 upvotes
SkiHound

Don't know that I agree with missing the days when cameras really sucked, but I do agree with your bottom line. We have tons of amazing tools, some better at certain tasks than others, but so many wonderful cameras. But I sense many don't get used in ways that produce very interesting images.

3 upvotes
MrAndyC

I wonder if the live composite and interval features can be used in the remote wi-fi control mode via a tablet.... now that would be something.

2 upvotes
Michael Ma

Dpreview, can you retest the Panasonic GH3 with the new test scene so it can be compared to reviews such as this?

2 upvotes
.Sam.

Typo: Page 10, under "image stabilization" should say "E-M10"

0 upvotes
Richard Butler

Argh. Fixed now. Sorry about that.

2 upvotes
Jogger

Nice camera, but, sensor is still too small.

12 upvotes
kreislauf
36 upvotes
bluevellet

lol indeed

Some comments just don't deserve a reply.

37 upvotes
RoJack725

I think it is AMAZING that we have a smaller sensor that gives more dynamic range than the fantastic APS-C sensor in the Nikon D5300. Technology races on...

20 upvotes
Lab D

The DxO graphs are almost the same as the new Sony A5000 graphs. They are close enough that in real life you won't be able to tell the difference.
Add IBIS and the better lenses and you have a winner.

23 upvotes
nekrosoft13

your brain is too small

24 upvotes
W5JCK

I doubt a 4/3 sensor will ever compete in low light photography. too much noise. Maybe it is okay for daylight use, but not low light use.

2 upvotes
photofan1986

@W5JCK :
Compete with what? Noise levels are on par with Canon APS-C sensor cameras, for example.
And you clearly don't know what you are talking about. Show me a camera where you can shoot a 50mm equivalent 1.4 lens wide open, with great sharpness and decent DOF, all that at ridiculously low shutter speeds (I'm talking 1/10-1/5 of a second), and get perfectly sharp results. Well, my OMD does it, finger in the nose. No aps-c dslr comes close to that.

11 upvotes
Couscousdelight

"...I think it is AMAZING that we have a smaller sensor that gives more dynamic range than the fantastic APS-C sensor in the Nikon D5300...."
SEriously ?
Take a tour at DXO, for dynamic range, the d5300 show 13.9Ev, against 12.3 dor the OM10.
I mean, Oly's OMD are excellent cameras, but please, don't even try to say than a smaller sensor with equal technology have better results than a bigger one...

4 upvotes
zxaar

@ Couscousdelight , you dealing with blind and deluded m43 fanboys here. There is no way they are going to change what they believe. No amount of facts can change what they think.

3 upvotes
BarnET

Canon 700D has 11,2 stops so it's right in the middle.
Considiring it's sensor IS smaller i think it's rather good.

Yes a Nikon D5300 will have better image quality but that's not the whole story here. The EM10 is cheaper smaller and uses smaller lenses.

It also has in body stabilisation and some more advanced features. Like real time exposure in bulb dual dials etc.

The D5300 has that great AF system though. Different animals both good in their own right.

5 upvotes
RoJack725

@ Couscous and zxaar, my apologies. I was only grabbing the info from the DPReview results. I am not a fanboy, I am a photographer. I love the Nikon APSC quality and consider their sensors to be class-leading. If I mispoke based on a small amount of info, I apologize. Still, to have m43 be even compared to the larger, higher MP sensors in the industry is quite something, especially considering how poorly they performed just a few years ago.

0 upvotes
wansai

what do you mean compete at low light photography? the OM models are superb night shooters, in some cases, besting even much bigger and better sensor cameras because you can set shutter at ridiculously low speeds.

these are superb event cameras. wedding photographers also use em5's and em10's. you want less noise in low light, you pay several grand more for it. there are in fact even photographers who like the noise pattern of the OMD's.

the reviews here, elsewhere and from real world users all say the sane thing: you have to move up to full frame to get any noticably better results.

also, look at the price.... where else are you going to get the handling, control, size, weight, feature set at these price points and have better IQ?

every answer you give will be something that is larger, clunkier, less feature rich, more expensive or all of those.

tbe trolls will just pass it off as m4/3 fanboi ramblings. those guys gearheads, not photographers.

1 upvote
67gtonr

"ridiculously low" shutter speeds do not combine well with event and wedding photography.

0 upvotes
Bellavida

If sensor size is the end all, then there would be such a lacking market for 4/3. There obviously is not and enough people are still willing to choose it over APS or FF and producing gorgeous images https://www.flickr.com/groups/olympus-omd-em5/. So, jog away.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Horshack

Anyone notice how the conclusion page of the reviews have gotten longer and longer? No doubt because most readers jump directly to that page anyway :)

8 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer

I try to guess if there's enough wrong to get a silver award--say a Foveon camera for example--and then jump to the end to confirm the camera has gotten the gold. I thought I was clairvoyant until the review of the Df.

0 upvotes
ThePhilips

"No doubt because most readers jump directly to that page anyway :)"

... and still fail to read it.

3 upvotes
turvyT

I have no particular interest either in this OM10 nor in the Pentax k3. But I'm curious about new cameras and like to be informed. K3 was announced almost half a year ago. OM10, less than two months. Still waiting for K3 review --or for Godot in this fully interesting exercise in surrealism by Dpreview. Personally I don't believe anymore in any of the excuses Dpreview has been producing about the lack of interest in the Pentax K3 by readers. I'm now convinced that under those foggy words of lame excuse there is only a lack of respect for people interested in new cameras and camera's technology.

21 upvotes
Barney Britton

I'm afraid if that's what you really believe, that with all due respect you haven't been listening.

We're not an infinite team of people. We're not just sitting around wasting time. We are reviewing the K-3 right now and I'm sorry it's taken so long.

26 upvotes
RoJack725

Thank you for all the great reviews, Barney and DPR team! Also, thank you for using a variety of lenses on the OMD EM10 review, so people can get a good idea of what results they may achieve with their existing or wish list lenses.

1 upvote
misha marinsky4

"Still waiting for... Godot"

Where have you been? Godot just arrived and apologized for being late. We're now back from lunch.

1 upvote
M Jesper

I'm amazed how upset people can get about cameras 'receiving' reviews or not. DPR is just a website with a few people writing down their thoughts about stuff they get their hands on, what exactly do you expect will change after they've given it some golden banner or not. The pros and cons are not set in stone, they're different for everyone. Pentax will be Pentax, and Olympus will be Olympus etc. What you like, need or don't is as personal as it gets, and these days all you need to know is online almost instantly at the day of release, and more so when they've hit the stores, not to mention going out there and hold one yourself. Point is, why do you people so desperately need dpreview to hold your hand?

4 upvotes
Daedbird

Barney Barney Barney - We have been listening. I paid close attention to your response, and others from DPR on several threads, including the comments on the D610 review.

We get that you do not have infinite staff, BUT when numerous other cameras which were made available publicly, or even announced, months after the K3, it kind of dilutes your argument.

Especially when you yourself have said that search volume and mindshare drive your priority list for reviews.

"We're working on it" in January after your best gear of the year poll doesn't help. And your quick turnaround on the FLU card review shows that the previous delays were a bit of a mistake.

14 upvotes
Barney Britton

@ Daedbird - we have been working on it, it's just a lot of work, and as you've hopefully noticed we've been presented by a lot of new cameras announced between then and now, which all need coverage. Also, again hopefully an obvious point but the FLU card review was not written by an in-house writer, but by a freelance contributor.

2 upvotes
tonywong

I think DPR has really chased the consumer end of the market at the expense of the traditional photographer.

I believe the implementation of DPR Connect, the Gear Shop and more blogging, casual type of updates has taken its toll on the rate and detail of traditional camera reviews.

Also the implosion of Point and Shoots and decline of higher end SLR sales has resulted in the declining fortunes of all camera sites, and DPR is struggling not just to stay in the forefront but also to stay relevant in the future of imaging and photography.

Traditional photography and SLRs are yesterday's news, according to 'everyone', and smart phone cameras and ILCs are the future.

1 upvote
ranger604

Everybody still waiting for the Pentax K-3 review should demand for a refund from DPR. Y'know.. for all the money that they've paid in subscriptions to the site. To fund the writers/reviews. It's outrageous!..

What's that?.. it's free?..

Oh.

1 upvote
KonstantinosK

ranger604, it doesn't need to be a subscription site for its readers to have an opinion about it. OBVIOUSLY!

4 upvotes
abluesky

Ok - so now I have to admit that I think something strange is going on. How much earlier was the K3 released? How much later was the OMDEM10 announced? How much time elapsed between the announcement of the EM10 and the review.

14 upvotes
Sourze

Why does everybody have to complain all the time? Thank you DPreview for another great review. I haven't read this one yet but I know it's gonna be good.

29 upvotes
Daedbird

Well, we have gotten assurances that the K-3 review will start to roll out this week (not sure if that means we get the full review, or the shooting examples).

It would have been wise of them to hold this review back until at least the K3 began to roll out. But I guess they have more people on staff who are familiar with Olympus than they do about Pentax cameras. That and, like the 610, it must be easier to do a review on a camera that is a variation of a camera already reviewed than one which is different than its predecessor (so take that K5IIs, you are not like your younger brother).

2 upvotes
Daedbird

We complain Sourze because many of the people who come to this site have come to respect it over the years, and because this - as a photography and camera news and review website - should be seen as an impartial place for us to get information about cameras and equipment.

I should be able to come here and read about Samsung's NX line, as well as Sigma's SD cameras, and Pentax, just as much as any Nikon or Canon model that comes out. We trust them to compare, or at least review these models so we can see if it is worth our money to buy. We expect they will cover almost all of it because they seem to pride themselves on it.

But it appears to people who love certain brands that DPR is focusing on the big-named models. The K3 seems to symbolize to many this mindset - it is a good camera that adds some features its competition does not, and keeps pace with its range. It came out late last fall, but there have been reviews of many more cameras that came after it.

12 upvotes
Daedbird

We're not saying those cameras did not deserve reviews - Anything from the Df, A7(r), any OMD or XT should get a review. But the others should not be left behind.

5 upvotes
bluevellet

If I were running DPReview, I would just never post a K3 review, just to teach the whiners a lesson.

16 upvotes
Higuel

Daedbird, i completely agree with you!
Also with the comment above that the blog like actions of dpreview seems to be taking it beginning edge and speed that it had when the site started!
It is really NOT excusable that delay of the pentax review!!!
OR some sigma cameras also!
Indeed think all of us come here for proper and UNBIASED reviews! (ok, i excluding fanatic fanboys!), by simply not reviewing some brands the final result is indeed EXTREMELY BIASED!
And it is truly a pity dpreview!

PS: I am a canon user since at least 97!!!

1 upvote
kadardr

So DPR can be pretty fast, a really high performer if they want to (or have to)

13 upvotes
Ryan_Valiente

IF camera_maker in ('Nikon', 'Canon', 'Sony', 'Olympus','Panasonic')
THEN review_asap = 'Y'
ELSE
review_asap = 'N',
review_never = 'Y'
END IF;

EXCEPTION
WHEN camera_maker = 'Pentax' THEN review_never = 'Y', lol_review = 'Y';

2 upvotes
ThePhilips

DPR's Canonites review Canons.
DPR's Nikonites review Nikons.
DPR's Retro Fanboi Squad reviews Olympus and Fuji.
... and the rest is... ...

That is also a perfect explanation why Sony, Panny and Samsung cameras are reviewed and compared against the "peers" and get bad rep for all minor nitpicks. While CaNikons are generally compared only to their respective CaNikon predecessors, and since they are reviewed by Canonites/Nikonites who generally dismiss other brands... You guess the rest.

In the end, be glad that Pentax isn't reviewed by the P&S/iPhone reviewer as was the case with the Panasonic GX7.

2 upvotes
AKH

Impressive that the IQ is about the same level as the almost 7 year old Nikon D300.

4 upvotes
harveysteeves

had a D300, would take my EM-5 over it any day of the week for what I do.

16 upvotes
Rachotilko

@AKH

Are you uninformed or do you spread the fallacies purposely ?

According to DxOMark ISO-dependent SNR and DR curves, E-M10 is (compared to D300):

1, by 1/3 stop better in terms of signal-to-noise ratio all over the ISO range

2, by almost 1 stop better in terms of dynamic range - with the exception of lowest ISO values.

Besides that, you'll get much smaller/sexier cam, with fast video&live-view AF and other goodies.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
13 upvotes
Richt2000

As an EM-5 user, it looks a very nice camera. Too similar to what I already have to be of interest, but it is very nice to see this coming in at a lower price point especially when you consider the EP5 came in at £900 and the EM5 around a thousand...

Cant see the point of bundling it with the pancake zoom though, that lens only really makes sense on a small pen camera.

4 upvotes
Bhima78

My EM10 came with the standard kit lens thankfully as the pancake makes too big a sacrifice in IQ for its size reduction.

0 upvotes
h2k

Please post a E-M10 camera guide with recommended settings and modes of use!

You did this in the past with at least one Oly camera. In this review you mention repeatedly the E-M10's complicatedness and i personally have found Oly menus and manuals nauseatingly complicated, with some information even lost in translation in anyway unintuitive, clumsy manuals and menus (while the camera itself does remain quite attractive).

So "DPR's Guide to Setting up the E-M10 Usefully" would be very welcome!

Thanks!

PS.
I'd prefer a written "Guide to Setting up the E-M10 Usefully" very much over a video.

Comment edited 47 seconds after posting
11 upvotes
peevee1

Look in Micro Four Thirds forum, under E-M5. ;)

1 upvote
RoJack725

Have the silver one on order. Can't wait to try this little cam out with the 17 1.8. I'm coming over from the Nikon world: D40 to be exact. I loved the Nikon but really wanted something a bit smaller that I can take everywhere.

The EM-10 looks like the perfect price/performance balance for my needs.

5 upvotes
h2k

I think on page 3 in the size comparisons, you mixed up several OM-D cameras, while i believe that you only wanted to talk about the M10, comparing it to Fuji and Nikon rivals.

Comment edited 8 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd

The E-PM2 seems to stack up well against this camera when you consider the price. The E-PM2 can be had for less than $400 with two lenses. The E-M10 has wireless and some other really nice features. However, it is much more expensive as well.

6 upvotes
erichK

It's likely perfectly possible to use and get good pictures out of the PM-2, which a real bargain, as I found to be the case with the PL-5. BUT as an advanced photographer, you get a lot more convenient and complete control over a really wide set of options with the OM-D series, and also more ergonomic handling with larger lenses.

5 upvotes
The Jacal

mpgxsvcd-Wow, a non-troll like thread. Well done there.

4 upvotes
peevee1

E-PM2 is really in different class: controls and EVF and even tilting screen, and of course price. No DSLR even exist in this class because of OVF. NX2000 and NEX-3 and GF6/GM1 can be compared.

0 upvotes
Bhima78

Is the AF system as good in the PM2 as this camera? I remember dpreview expressing some concern over mis-focusing on the PM2 more than they would like.

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd

The "PROs" seem to far outweigh the "CONS".

7 upvotes
erichK

The cons -except for the so-so video- are mostly minor irritants which one finds with almost any camera. I don't like the little plastic flaps over the I/O of the EM-1 or EM-5 or even the bigger one on the E-3/5, for example. The pros, though, are big things that cause me to like - and use - my OM-D's and lenses more every day.

2 upvotes
67gtonr

So-so video is a major con for any camera to me and many others.

0 upvotes
alanscapist

Interesting how the jpeg and raw files are both sharper with the E-M10 and the E-M5 than the E-M1... this is something I have not found in practice.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 332
12