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Body Elements

The E-M10 looks a lot like the E-M5 - featuring a similarly angular 'prism' hump but, unlike the more expensive model, the M10's hump houses a small flash.

It's not a terribly powerful unit, with a Guide Number of 5.8m at ISO 100. But it does allow remote control of external flashes, such as the comparatively affordable FL-300R.
The rear control dial sits on a raised platform, giving a little more separation between the dial and other controls. The front dial is close-by, and easy-to-reach with your index finger.
The viewfinder is essentially the same as that on the E-M5, offering a large, 800 x 600 pixel view. It's not as high resolution as the E-M1 (or the higher-end cameras from Fujifilm or Sony), but the 'adaptive brightness' system makes it nice to work with.

As with the E-M1, the M10's eye sensor is disabled if you pull the rear screen away from the body - a little detail that makes a big difference to usability.

The mode dial on the top plate has the usual Olympus options, including iAuto, Art Filters, Scene modes, and 'Photo Story'.

One feature unique to Olympus is that any of the mode dial positions can be assigned to recall a custom camera setup (or 'MySet' in Olympus parlance).

Under the mode dial is the release for the pop-up flash, which is quite difficult to get at. Next door to that is the diopter adjustment wheel for the EVF.
The rear controls of the E-M10 closely resemble those of the E-M5 but, presumably because they're not weather-sealed, they feel more responsive (rather than exhibiting the slightly spongy feel of the E-M5).

The power switch is in the same slightly awkward position as the E-M5's, at the lower right of the body.
The I/O ports are under a rubber cover, and include USB + A/V output and micro HDMI.

The USB connector also accepts an electronic cable release (Olympus RM-UC1 or third-party clones).

The battery and card are located in the same slot on the bottom panel, which is less convenient for tripod work.

And, although there's little difference in size between the two, the E-M10 uses the 7.8Wh BLS-5 battery as used in the PEN series, rather than the 9.3Wh BLN-1 unit from the other OM-Ds models.

The result is a 320 shots/charge rating, according to standard testing.

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Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 322
12
Emmeline
By Emmeline (1 week ago)

I bought this camera last week. Pictures are excellent and the auto-focus is really fast. It's super lightweight; nice to take on walks and hikes. I am a complete neophyte and I'm using the camera to learn how to use the manual settings. I'm very happy with my purchase.

My question: I bought the camera with the kit Olympus 14-42 mm lens and used it for a week without problems. I had to press the unlock button to extend the lens. I also purchased an Olympus 40-150 mm zoom lens. After mounting the 40-150 and remounting the 14-42, the 14-42 lens clicks into place but it can now be extended without the need to simultaneously press the unlock button. I searched for a similar problem on Google but found nothing. Would appreciate hearing any suggestions as to what I might try to fix this.

0 upvotes
Lassoni
By Lassoni (2 months ago)

wtf.. ? The studio comparison shows this could be infact sharper than D7100 !
EDIT: oh nvm, that's just bad Nikon JPG. In raw d7100 better.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison/fullscreen?attr18=daylight&attr13_0=oly_em10&attr13_1=nikon_d7100&attr15_0=jpeg&attr15_1=jpeg&attr16_0=100&attr16_1=100&normalization=full&widget=66&x=-0.3252206223873665&y=0.5998816918071576

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison/fullscreen?attr18=daylight&attr13_0=oly_em10&attr13_1=nikon_d7100&attr15_0=jpeg&attr15_1=jpeg&attr16_0=100&attr16_1=100&normalization=print&widget=66&x=-0.7647402295799881&y=-0.8425317953268264

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison/fullscreen?attr18=daylight&attr13_0=oly_em10&attr13_1=nikon_d7100&attr15_0=jpeg&attr15_1=jpeg&attr16_0=100&attr16_1=100&normalization=full&widget=66&x=-0.5163161037754629&y=-0.08157349896480337

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
arieswar
By arieswar (2 months ago)

i'll go for this when i feel the need to have mirrorless ILC.. it has all i need: size, quality, control, speed, price. i've tested it in gear shop and it feels good in my hand. oh and it looks cool too.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
PhotoPoet
By PhotoPoet (3 months ago)

I love the size and easy of "Taking it along", and the photos are excellent, but for some reason over the past few weeks I find I am longing for my D7100. Not its size as much as its "reality". My adjustment to this camera is more philosophical than technical (although the menus system as we all know is a rabbit hole), it seems real, it performs, yet I continue to give it second looks. When I grab my S110 I know what it "is". The D7100 the same. This new "feel", small, light, powerful, DSLR-ish, I am learning to take it seriously... time will tell... I wore this last night after I left it at the bar, its diminutive size, unnoticed as I exited. This could have been aided by that third glass of wine..

1 upvote
tinpusher
By tinpusher (3 months ago)

The new EZ kit lens has proved to be too soft for my taste and although it looks the part its resolution is just not good enough at this price point leaving it out classed by my fixed lens compacts....RX100 and G1X .
With smallish fingers , I find handling to be awkward with knobs turning inadvertently and finger stretching to achieve simple tasks ( even to switch off)

Fitted with a decent prime there's much to like but overall I feel that it's been over rated.
Oh, the firmware change to electronic shutter has sharpened up the images a little ....enough to notice though.

0 upvotes
Leini Live
By Leini Live (3 months ago)

Is there a 37mm UV-filter available anywhere for the m.Zuiko 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 EZ kit lens ?

0 upvotes
overnightparking
By overnightparking (3 months ago)

Yes Hoya has a 37mm UV in their Pro1 range. Others might too but I'm sure about Hoya.

0 upvotes
Theelderkeynes
By Theelderkeynes (3 months ago)

Olympus have now posted the much awaited anti-shock firmware 1.1 upgrade for the OM-D E-M10 here:

http://www.olympus.co.uk/site/en/c/cameras_support/downloads/e_m10_downloads.html

This implements electronic first curtain below 1/320 sec shutter speed, thus reducing vibration, in theory, from the shutter.

Perhaps comnsumer pressure does work!

0 upvotes
Photoman
By Photoman (3 months ago)

Does the anti-shock affect the E-M5?

0 upvotes
Theelderkeynes
By Theelderkeynes (3 months ago)

Yes see the news item on the software update for the E-M5

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2014/05/15/does-the-new-olympus-pen-e-p5-firmware-reduce-image-shake?utm_campaign=internal-link&utm_source=news-list&utm_medium=text&ref=title_0_29

0 upvotes
framemate
By framemate (3 months ago)

I can't see this update. Has it been taken off?

0 upvotes
framemate
By framemate (3 months ago)

Didn't seem to be on the 'Oly' website although it's available via their updater.

0 upvotes
Theelderkeynes
By Theelderkeynes (3 months ago)

Its there under downloads for M10 here:

http://www.olympus.co.uk/site/en/c/cameras_support/downloads/e_m10_downloads.html

0 upvotes
framemate
By framemate (3 months ago)

I only get the option to download the instruction manual via that link.

0 upvotes
Theelderkeynes
By Theelderkeynes (3 months ago)

The download happens automatically once you have downloaded the Olymus updater software and connected your camera. I suggest you read the instructions carefiully. It is very straightforward. Read the instructions on updating.

0 upvotes
rich889
By rich889 (3 months ago)

Thanks for the update link. I do see a clear but subtle difference in the E-M10 output with anti-shock enabled.

0 upvotes
PhotoPoet
By PhotoPoet (3 months ago)

I just got the camera, working though the menus, adjusting to the smaller size, loving it so far.. Can anyone tell me where RAW is hidden in the menu system?

0 upvotes
Azrael96
By Azrael96 (3 months ago)

its in image quality settings. RAW+LF, RAW+LN, etc.

2 upvotes
PhotoPoet
By PhotoPoet (3 months ago)

thank you... got lost in menuville

0 upvotes
rich889
By rich889 (3 months ago)

After using the E-M1 with it's fabulous grip and button layout, I found the E-M10's lack of a proper grip and the close layout of the top deck's F2, Movie Record button (which I reassigned to ISO), and the F1, to be too awkward to use. I don't have large hands but found that I had to twist fingers and shift my hand position in to order to activate those controls, especially in using the camera with manual focus lenses, which meant using Magnify. All in all, very disappointing handling. I found that Allison Johnson also complained about “grip” issue in the Handling section, so I see that I am not alone. I did find the image-stabilization to be very effective though. And image quality was excellent.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
MV Atlanta
By MV Atlanta (3 months ago)

I am having trouble with E-M10 noise levels. Majority of the wonderful sample images in online reviews seem to be RAW based. Default JPEG noise is unacceptable above ISO800 for portraits. Both my 5 year old D300 and athe new Sony a6000 have much lower noise and significantly better dynamic range. I tried RAW and got fairly good results but do not have time for processing - this is for taking pictures of our kids to be uploaded to facebook and shared with family.
I use kit lens with 45mm 1.8 on its way. Still the lens should help with sharpness (I have problems with as well - mostly due to inaccurate focusing) but not with the noise.

I tinkered with noise reduction settings without much success. Even at ISO600 there is way more noise than one would expect. Any suggestions on settings? I know everything is relative but I am comparing it head to head with Nikon D5200 and Sony a6000 under the same settings and there is something wrong with the Olympus. Thanks.

0 upvotes
MichaelKJ
By MichaelKJ (3 months ago)

Your opinion isn't shared by the DPR review.
Are you using "noise filter" rather than "noise reduction"?

As the review noted above: The E-M10 keeps up with its APS-C and MFT peers with retention of fine detail until ISO 6400 when things take a turn for the worse. Olympus's noise reduction setting is accessed from the menu (Custom Menu E: Noise Filter), with four options available (Off, Low, Standard and High). Confusingly there's also a 'Noise Reduction' control, but this only applies to long exposures.

1 upvote
rocklobster
By rocklobster (3 months ago)

Try turning the sharpness down as the default setting for all recent Olympus E-Px and E-Mx models accentuates any noise.

0 upvotes
Eagle2352
By Eagle2352 (3 months ago)

I own the new EM10. So far I could not be more pleased. This is my first mirror less camera and it's more than met any expectation. But I have a question, that maybe some engineer or camera expert can explain. The in camera HDR , i was able to take a picture using the function that combines 4 shots at varying exposures hand held squaring down ( so no way steady), I say it takes a 1.5 to 2 secs to do this. And then it processes the images another 3 or 4 seconds. I was only expecting a blur, but I got a beautiful and detailed image. This is hand held. This did not work as well taking an image of a forest of trees. I am assuming some type of registration based on high contrast but not sure. Is this common to all in camera HDR. I am attaching image this is down loaded from IPad so maybe not as high definition but you get the idea.

0 upvotes
Blackpond1
By Blackpond1 (3 months ago)

As a former Olympus OM-1/OM-4 user, I am immediately drawn to this camera. I waited a long time to get into digital. I started with an Olympus E-Volt 500 and was very disappointed. I later moved to the Canon T3i, which I have been very pleased with overall. This model has me considering going back to Olympus, however, I have a few hangups.

I love the flip out screen on the T3i, but I can live with the tilt screen on the E-M10. My hesitations are the low light performance and lack of audio input. I do a lot of low light photography of food in dark restaurants, and I am concerned with the performance of the Olympus at higher ISOs. The Canon does very well with this. I also do lots of video and use a Sennheiser wireless mic system, so the lack of audio input is a major bummer. I would have to have another camera to do video. As much as I want the cool features and compact size of the Olympus, after reading the full review, I am leaning towards upgrading to the Canon T5i. Thoughts anyone?

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
datiswous
By datiswous (3 months ago)

Why don't you go for the em5 or em1? When you add the ema-1 external mic adapter (which doesn't work on the em10), you can add your microphone.

Btw. with the mft system you still have to invest in lenses, with the Canon, you don't have to (I assume).

Actually, I think the em# -range of camera's all have relatively good high iso and DR capabilities, so shouldn't be a concern.

0 upvotes
mfj197
By mfj197 (2 months ago)

Alternatively look at the Panasonic GH4 or even GH3. They have world-class video (GH4 does 4k), have the flip out screen you like and use the same great m43 lenses as the E-M10.

0 upvotes
atlien991
By atlien991 (1 month ago)

DXOMark's sensor evaluation says the e-M10 has a stronger high ISO capability compared to the Canon t5i.

0 upvotes
tinpusher
By tinpusher (3 months ago)

I bought one to upgrade my m4/3 kit.
With the EZ 14-42 lens IQ is just good not great and needs a lot of PP.
I enjoy the compact size and build quality but sensor noise is way above my expectations.

0 upvotes
Alan Cope
By Alan Cope (4 months ago)

Bought it and love it but I have a problem. I can download RAW from my EPL-2 to i-photo but i-photo won't accept RAW from the E-M10. Olympus tells me use Olympus Viewer 3 but that is a nuisance to have to go to another photo editing and storage program. i-photo will accept JPEGs from the EM-10 however.
I wonder why this situation has arisen.

0 upvotes
nealibob
By nealibob (3 months ago)

RAW support for the E-M10 will require an update from Apple. Each new camera requires an update, and Apple, Adobe, and other vendors release new updates periodically to support new cameras. The wait time is usually a month or two.

0 upvotes
Eagle2352
By Eagle2352 (4 months ago)

My EM 10 will arrive by Monday . I did a lot of research and comparison. I knew that I wanted in camera stabilization and I had a price point that I had to stay within. My photo mentor urged me to move to Olympus too. From all the comments from other real owners on this blog and others I know I made a very good choice. But what I really want to say is how much I value and appreciate the hard work you folks do at DPR. I can not say how much it has helped me over the years. Keep up the GREAT work!

4 upvotes
Robert Evagelista
By Robert Evagelista (4 months ago)

Check out some Image samples of this sensor
Olympus Inspired!
http://robertevangelista.blogspot.com/

1 upvote
redridge
By redridge (4 months ago)

For the purpose of buying a closely fitting case, is the OM-D E M10 the same size as others in the OM-D range ?

1 upvote
markalroberts
By markalroberts (4 months ago)

Would like to know too - I have an E-M10 (love it!) but there is a distinct lack of cases - I would really like a two part-close fitting case with enough space to accommodate the F2.0 12mm lens (which I also have and love!!!)

0 upvotes
framemate
By framemate (4 months ago)

Have a look at the Lowpro 'Apex' range.
I bought the '100 AW' and my EM10 fits in perfectly. I was after something snug for just camera (with prime lens on) and a couple of other smaller bits and bobs (lens cloth, spare battery etc.)
You can't go wrong with Lowpro. They have a huge range of options to suit most needs. They're inexpensive, and good quality. The best of both worlds.

0 upvotes
robgendreau
By robgendreau (4 months ago)

I've got a question about wifi: can it connect to an existing LAN, and then to a smartphone? From the description it seems it's just a rather limited peer-to-peer connection with one tablet or smartphone.

1 upvote
markalroberts
By markalroberts (4 months ago)

Good question - I have an Eye-fi card which does a much better job of going peer-to-peer when on the go and joining the lan when at home (automatically and seamlessly). Would be great if the Oly did the same... maybe with software/firmware updates? At the moment it's very clunky in comparison.

0 upvotes
jphelps
By jphelps (3 months ago)

markalroberts, perhaps off-topic here but which Eye-fi card do you have and how did you get it to seemlessly switch between direct-mode when away from home and home LAN when at home? feel free to PM me. thanks!

0 upvotes
CacoQ
By CacoQ (4 months ago)

Great camera for the price! Is a great complement for my E-M1 and to wonder around different cities doing street shooting is awesome. Light, fast and great image quality! I'm done carrying heavy camera and lenses for me this is the way to go!

1 upvote
Da Funk 1
By Da Funk 1 (4 months ago)

Hi guys i have seen today this offer http://www.foto-erhardt.de/product/6008588/olympus-om-d-e-m10-silber-+-14-42mm-rii+-40-150mm.html can you tell me is it worth,is this lens crappy?

0 upvotes
Azrael96
By Azrael96 (3 months ago)

I would prefer 25mm 1.8 rather than these two casual lenses.

0 upvotes
tjbates
By tjbates (4 months ago)

As a Panasonic GH2 owner, I bought the E-M10 because I wanted to see for myself what all the fuss is about. The E-M10 stills image quality is definitely a step up from the GH2. It's a keeper!
I find autofocus more accurate on the GH2 with the same Olympus lenses.
The viewfinder on the GH2 is still - after all these years bigger, brighter and clearer.
I miss the C1,C2 and C3 dials that the Panasonic cameras offer and the extra external controls. On the E-M10, I waste too much time scrolling through the Super control panel and miss shots even after assigning all Fn buttons. The GH2 is operationally faster. I know Olympus offer the Myset feature but only one Myset can be programmed to an Fn button.
The GH2 can easily be used one-handed. Great for parents! The E-M10 requires two hands.
The Olympus software better than Panasonic but unbearably slow.
The Olympus has auto ISO in manual mode!
Overall the E-M10 is fantastic but I'll keep the GH2 for video.

1 upvote
tjbates
By tjbates (4 months ago)

Wanted to update my impressions of the E-M10 after 3 weeks of use.
I've now discovered the target auto focus mode and find it to be superior to my GH2 for nailing focus on a moving subject.
To use- press left arrow next to OK, then INFO and then scroll to the focus mode with tiny stand alone boxes.
This little wonder really can keep a sharp focus on subjects moving towards the camera at 3.5 f/s.
I still miss the C1-C3 dials on the GH2 but have found a work around on the E-M10 by assigning Myset1 and Myset2 to the ART and SCN mode positions.
Olympus software is very slow with Raw files but okay with Jpegs.
My files look like film - I'm very impressed. Lovely film like grain and beautiful rich colours without adding saturation to skin tones.
My focus accuracy is 90% better than my 5DMK2 and the file quality is very similar.

1 upvote
Robert Evagelista
By Robert Evagelista (4 months ago)

You will be amazed on the lens line up too
Olympus Inspired!
http://robertevangelista.blogspot.com/

0 upvotes
tmurph
By tmurph (4 months ago)

Just a question, why isn't the Lumix G6 not on the list of camera's to compere with the E-M10?

3 upvotes
photohounds
By photohounds (5 months ago)

I sold OM-10s (and manual adapters) :)
The "big 5" Nikon, Canon, Olympus, Pentax, Minolta and a few 'blads. Pentax 6x7s and Mamiya RB-67s on the side.
.
This body looks just like the OM-10 revisited,the best semi-auto camera of the day. If you make photocopiers, shavers, cookers, etc., you MUST make a better camera, right? WROMNG.
.
I shot a nice D800 and SONY with some fancy lenses at a 21st on the weekend, swapped EM1 with owners.
MORE maneuverability, 1/2 the weight, 1/3 the volume. BOTH owners remarked on EM-1's size, weight, and its VERY similar output quality.
.
One almost spat his Croissant and coffee when I said that I had 8 lenses ON my person!
.
The BIG guns gave nothing extra.
.
Like horses? Happy for some Crit ..
http://photohounds.smugmug.com/Equestrian/NCHTA-Canberra-Horse-Trials-2a/
.
... and
.
http://photohounds.smugmug.com/Equestrian/NCHTA-Canberra-Horse-Trials-20/
.
Be kind, it was an event shoot as well :)
.
Cheers from Downunda .

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
NameFinder
By NameFinder (5 months ago)

The new Olympus E-M10 as well as E-M5 and E-M1 are nice cameras. The classic vintage look, the small size, the picture quality, the in-body stabilizer. I write this as a long-time OM-4 User (still have it).

Of course, Olympus is not Panasonic and an E-M10 or E-M1 is no a GH4.

However, if Olympus decides to include basic video features, this is more than welcome - for example if you like to travel light with basically one piece of gear.

BUT:
Why not include the 25 fps for us 50-Hz-people in Europe?
Should be a simple firmware upgrade, doesn't it?

Of course, we're in digital times and these 25 frames per second become more and more irrelevant.
But for compatibility's sake (with other equipment) they're still very useful.

Frankly: This ignorance from Olympus' side is felt more and more like arrogance (sorry!) and for me a reason to stay away: "Who cares for the other part of the world, WE are 60 Hz and 30p (e.g. in Japan and US) - be it all the others too!"

2 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (5 months ago)

"Of course, we're in digital times and these 25 frames per second become more and more irrelevant."

No this is not the case.
In Europe all our indoor lighting is also 50hz instead of 60hz.
Therefore filming at 60fps will lead to serious flickering in video. Making indoor footage pretty much useless.

Panasonic also has better bitrate compression which allows more grading in post and less artifacts. This is just a selling point for video enthusiasts though.

7 upvotes
NameFinder
By NameFinder (5 months ago)

There are occasional hints, that filming with 30p (or 60i) and shutter speed 1/50 sec instead of 1/60 might help preventing flicker from artificial light in PAL countries.

I wasn't able to test this so far.

0 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (5 months ago)

It's funny because I live in Europe and I only see the flicker mentionned before in the very first second I turn on an Olympus camera, even one as old as the E-PL1. Then, something happens within the camera and I never see the flicker again when the camera is on, whether framing my shots or recording and viewing videos.

So the whole issue of frame rates appears irrelevant to me when just making casual videos.

0 upvotes
optima moving
By optima moving (5 months ago)

Good camera. color rendition and noise low levels, and compact size is what makes me a OM-D E-M10 future user. ))) still will keep my baby D600.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
David Smith - Photographer
By David Smith - Photographer (5 months ago)

This new Olympus OM-D E-M10 has got me excited about micro four thirds again! Why? Because it doesn't seem to suffer from shutter vibrations, shutter shock or whatever you want call it. Many micro four thirds cameras suffer from it (i.e. Panasonic GX7, Olympus E-M5, E-M1, Sony A7R). It seriously degrades image quality at normal (and most used) shutter speeds.

The E-M10 is an awesome little camera that offers the same image quality as the E-M1, but in a much smaller (but high quality) and more affordable package. And without the shutter shock problem! What more do you need? If you don't specifically need the extra features (like shutter shock) of the E-M1 or the E-M5, I'd go for this excellent E-M10.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
mrdancer
By mrdancer (5 months ago)

Hmmm, I've taken several thousand photos with my GX7 and haven't noticed any shutter shock...?

10 upvotes
Northgrove
By Northgrove (5 months ago)

I think "Shutter shock" is a misnomer since it isn't about a shutter shaking the camera around to cause a blurry picture.

From everything I've read on this, it rather seems to be the IBIS overcompensating for movement (regardless if said movement is from a camera's shutter, your shaky hands, or something completely different).

The GX7 has no 5-axis IBIS. The E-M10 has no 5-axis IBIS. Both of these have in-body stabilization, sure, but it isn't of the 5-axis kind. I think this is a key difference. (I have heard very little if anything as for "shutter shock" from GX7 owners)

The E-M5 do have it reported though, and the E-P5. Both have identical IBIS mechanism.

This is actually not news. Overcompensation is a known problem with some stabilization algorithms, showing its ugly head in various ways. My Nikon D90 has the option to turn off stabilization since it'll otherwise overcompensate when already stable, like on a tripod.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
srados
By srados (5 months ago)

Everyone have their own priorities and expectations on their camera.

0 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (5 months ago)

There is no Ibis issues on GX7 of any kind as far as my testing goes!!

1 upvote
guido1953
By guido1953 (5 months ago)

IMO, this "shutter shake" is a reflection of users abilities and not at all camera related.I borrowed a family members E-P5 for a day trip to the area mountains. Shot 10 gigs of raw and never experienced any shutter shake.Nada , zip, none.

0 upvotes
David Smith - Photographer
By David Smith - Photographer (4 months ago)

Shutter shock most certainly is not a 'reflection of my abilities as a photographer'. I have a steady hand and a lot of experience with many types of cameras (35mm, 6x6, 6x7, compact, MFT, APSC, full frame, you name it). I know what a lens hood is and I am familiar with the tool called tripod. Shutter shock is not made up by some photography noobs who don't know a thing about getting the best results from a camera. It's a very real problem and it becomes more apparent if you are critical and technically skilled.

I'm thrilled about the fact that I havent seen any evidence of shutter shock with the Olympus E-M10. I love this little camera.

1 upvote
RichRMA
By RichRMA (5 months ago)

Before anyone renders an uninformed, negative verdict, go try the camera. It feels good, it looks good and it shoots well. Well worth the money they ask for it.

8 upvotes
wkay
By wkay (5 months ago)

Where do we see which lens/ f-stop/iso is used for these studio comparisons, has as much influence as the bodies they portend to compare.

1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (5 months ago)

Click on the little 'gear' icon at the bottom right of each image - you should find the information you need there.

1 upvote
Matt1645f4
By Matt1645f4 (5 months ago)

Can you please stop with the lower marks for bloody poor video!!! this site is called Digital Photography review, it you insist on scoring cameras down because of video make it a totally different section or start a Digital Video Review Site, i'm bored about the lengthy failings a camera has in its lack of video......

21 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (5 months ago)

believe it or not most people don't buy video cameras anymore. So still and video are in one package. video rating is very much relevant.

4 upvotes
mmartel
By mmartel (4 weeks ago)

I come from a different camp of user and have different expectations. I want excellent still and excellent video and don't want to carry separate specialized devices in order to do both well. It's very relevant for me to know how well a device can do both tasks.

So I'd say to you (politely), please ignore the video section if it's irrelevant to you. It's certainly useful and relevant to me and, quite likely, many others as well.

1 upvote
Matt1645f4
By Matt1645f4 (4 weeks ago)

I do appreciate the need for video but i feel that a camera should have two different scores one still and one video to make comparison easier for the consumer. But i will try and ignore the video scores :)

1 upvote
mmartel
By mmartel (4 weeks ago)

Fair enough! Actually that might help me out, too, come to think of it. Happy shooting.

1 upvote
Mark Ortiz
By Mark Ortiz (5 months ago)

This is also Awesome buddy.

0 upvotes
mr.izo
By mr.izo (5 months ago)

very nice colour rendition ang good detail definition in jpeg mode. nice work, olympus, wish canon could handle colours like that..

12 upvotes
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (5 months ago)

I bought recently bought a Canon DSLR because of the Canon colour rendition!!!

5 upvotes
Glen Barrington
By Glen Barrington (4 months ago)

Colors in jpg images are the things people talk about when they have run out other things to say. It is SO subjective, that it really has no place in a dialog open to the world.

2 upvotes
miqk
By miqk (3 months ago)

For the subject matter that I plan to photograph, it's not worth it to do PP and work on the raw files, I just want easy photos out of the camera. So for that reason I listen to the comments on jpeg colors, although it is of course subjective. Beats hearing nothing about jpeg color.

0 upvotes
vittorionava
By vittorionava (5 months ago)

I spent some time comparing the images and I do not find any superiority of the Fuji... On the contrary! I can still read the words on the red brush in the lower right corner even at very high sensitivity... Just try and see...

2 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (5 months ago)

Oly left, X-T1 right, raw, then go up to 1600 and 3200 ISO and move the rectangle over darker areas. Chroma noise in Oly wants to scratch your eyes out.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Robert Garcia NYC
By Robert Garcia NYC (5 months ago)

XT-1 and EM-10 are very close. The colors are pretty close and but the EM-10 is sharper at all ISO's. X-T1 images look like Fuji processed them to remove noise and maybe added fine grain that is why they look so soft and require lots of work to get right.

3 upvotes
rmxa
By rmxa (5 months ago)

"X-T1 images look like Fuji processed them to remove noise and maybe added fine grain that is why they look so soft and require lots of work to get right."

This might explain it:
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/53311246

0 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (5 months ago)

@rmxa: Yes, I read that thread, excellent. However, graphs indicate Fuji cooks raws at ISO 3200 and above. The disparity (aggressive Oly chroma noise) starts earlier. I think (not an expert in that area, so take it as a guess) that it might have to do with demosaicing from X-Trans. Some detail is lost (not very much), but chroma noise is very well controlled. Perhaps they're doing some clever averaging, don't know.

If you look at moire, it also seems to support it. This is from the DPR studio scene at ISO 400, so well below the cooking levels: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison?attr18=daylight&attr13_0=oly_em10&attr13_1=sony_a3000&attr13_2=fujifilm_xt1&attr13_3=sony_nex6&attr15_0=raw&attr15_1=raw&attr15_2=raw&attr15_3=raw&attr16_0=400&attr16_1=400&attr16_2=400&attr16_3=400&normalization=full&widget=1&x=0.6384483929702549&y=0.08475566050933485

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
rmxa
By rmxa (5 months ago)

@onlooker: If the observed NR applied to the RAW files is due to the X-trans demosaicing process, then isn't it more likely that it's applied at all ISOs? And maybe the fact that there's minimal noise at those lower ISOs makes it appear that NR isn't being applied although it is? But I'm just guessing as well.

But we should also consider that X System cameras seem to overstate their ISOs by around 1/2 - 2/3EV as indicated here:
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilm-x-e2/13

For the studio scene at ISO 800, the XT-1 shutter speed was 1/250, the E-M10's was 1/320.

If the studio shots for both cameras were exposed similarly, I would assume that the noise disparity between them wouldn't be as pronounced?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
badi
By badi (5 months ago)

@rmxa: It is visible at all ISOs. If you compare low iso images, you'll see that fuji X is more soft. Also while at all camera there is visible chroma noise even at low ISOs (400-800), in Fuji you don't see it ever.
This is one reason that Fuji's image quality is a bit overrated, and also the reason that is more dificult to compare head by head...
I use Fuji, and i love it, but the fact is better or worse with a whooping 1/10 stop just doesn't matter to me.

0 upvotes
Mel Snyder
By Mel Snyder (5 months ago)

I've never been a MFT fan - I believe size matters in sensors - but at under 800 ISO, this is impressive. For those who shoot in high light levels and post only on the web, this camera will do very well - impressively,

It was interesting to see how much better the lowly A3000 is than this camera over IS0 800. One poster who claims to have sent back his A7r and bought this for the IBIS must have been shooting under high light levels, because there's no comparison. If the A3000 sensor i what is in the A6000, I'd think that's a better machine for those who don't need IBIS to take slow shutter speed shots.

I guess if Olympus could pack this performance in a package as small as my old Olympus XA, just about any photographer could rationalize buying it as a true pocket rocket. But in a size and price competitive with small APS-C DSLRs, it will remain a niche product appealing mostly to MFT fans who can't afford or justify the top-of-the-line model.

0 upvotes
Steven Ellingson
By Steven Ellingson (5 months ago)

That same poster was talking about shooting 1/3 second shutter speeds. Tell me why you'd need to go above ISO 800 again?

4 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (5 months ago)

> That same poster was talking about shooting 1/3 second shutter speeds. Tell me why you'd need to go above ISO 800 again?

Tell me again, how do you shoot moving objects at 1/3 of a second?

5 upvotes
String
By String (5 months ago)

Mel, the problem with that logic is that even though your shooting with a small APS-C body, your still very limited in lend choice. Neither Canon or Nikon has a very rounded out lens selection for them which forces you to go to their FF selection. Not very ideal. Both P and O have excellent lenses for the m43 sensor.
And if you believe that this is a sensor only for showing images on the web, sorry but you really have no clue.

18 upvotes
gmke
By gmke (5 months ago)

All other things were they equal could make sensor size the only thing that mattered. More techinical than Nikon-ese admitted, it is also not true that pixel size is the number that matters when it comes to deep ISO. The precision of the manufacturing process matters a great deal more. Yesteryear's Panasonic sensors were crap and their pixels were pretty big. Miraculous Sony sensors made Nikon big, and they are saving Olympus' bacon. If you are going to take pictures in the dark, the trick is a bright lens and a tripod, not a great sensor behind a crummy lens. Let's be honest, that one in 2000 shots taken by the "entusiast" in poor light does not say anything against the 1999 that are awesome and perhaps superior in other ways.

0 upvotes
rmxa
By rmxa (5 months ago)

The Sony A3000 is better at ISOs above 800? Are you looking at the RAW comparison?

The EM-10 has noticeably less noise than the A3000 RAWs starting at ISO 800 onwards. It's most visible if you look at the Jackson Triggs wine bottle at the bottom part of the low light studio scene.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison?attr18=lowlight&attr13_0=oly_em10&attr13_1=sony_a3000&attr13_2=sony_a7r&attr13_3=sony_nex6&attr15_0=raw&attr15_1=raw&attr15_2=raw&attr15_3=raw&attr16_0=3200&attr16_1=3200&attr16_2=3200&attr16_3=3200&normalization=full&widget=1&x=-0.10682398444332082&y=-1.007087512864699

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (5 months ago)

A camera that only does well under ISO 800 is useless. To me.

0 upvotes
String
By String (5 months ago)

"A camera that only does well under ISO 800 is useless. To me."

And that has what exactly to do with the EM-10 review?

10 upvotes
droplet
By droplet (5 months ago)

X-sync (external flash) for E-M5 should be 1/250s in your comparison table.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (5 months ago)

Not according to Olympus's specifications:

Synchronization speed: 1/250sec. or less* (using the bundled flash) * It depends on flash models or flash mode FL-50R: 1/180 sec. Exept FL-50R: 1/200 sec. Super FP: 1/125-1/4000 sec.

0 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (5 months ago)

The Conclusion - Cons list was pretty short. DPR needs to work harder, to find more Cons. :-)

0 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (5 months ago)

- built-in flash can not tilt (Some Pen cameras can do it)
- battery life kind of short (but common problem for mirrorless cameras)
- no significant IQ improvements since E-M5
- no PDAF means limited functionality with 43 DSLR lenses

I tried but it's hard. :)

3 upvotes
mrdancer
By mrdancer (5 months ago)

So.... this is kinda like a GX7, but it trades a slightly better EVF for the GX7's awesome video capabilities...

0 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (5 months ago)

Better IBIS too. 200 bucks cheaper.

Probably why it earned the gold while the GX7 got the silver.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
10 upvotes
The Jacal
By The Jacal (5 months ago)

And better ergonomics, I know it's subjective, but that rear dial on the GX7: not in the right place, highly recessed and with a rubber grip behind it, not good, for me. And the front grip, poor button layout..

4 upvotes
MrAndyC
By MrAndyC (5 months ago)

Plus there's no auto-ISO in Manual mode on GX7, so the twin control dials aren't as useful.

1 upvote
Henry McA
By Henry McA (5 months ago)

Better colors, too.

2 upvotes
chrohrs
By chrohrs (5 months ago)

Given that the E-M10 outdoes the E-M5 in many respects, should we assume an E-M5 replacement is in the works? Would love to see the PDAF/wifi (and possibly EVF if that's possible) from the E-M1 in the smaller/lighter/cheaper E-M5 body.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not complaining. I have an E-M5 and love it, and I'm unlikely to upgrade until I can buy a replacement in the used market. Just speculating here.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
1 upvote
bluevellet
By bluevellet (5 months ago)

Yep, it's heavily rumored for this year, probably after the Pen line is refreshed in the Spring.

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (5 months ago)

At this price point, with a fairly good EVF built in, and the incredible feature set.... we can pretty much assume that the Pen series is dead.

Perhaps not officially, but defacto.

Would anyone buy an EPL5 for around the same price?
Does the EP5 make any sense now?

The Pen Mini might be the only survivor, for those who must have the absolute smallest and cheapest.

2 upvotes
Oli4D
By Oli4D (5 months ago)

Well... maybe.
In this interview, one of the Oly marketing guys talks about the positioning of the PEN vs. the OM-D.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9M7voKGHKDs

0 upvotes
lighthunter80
By lighthunter80 (5 months ago)

The Pen is a different camera concept and a different target group. Probably more the female or hipster market? In any case, I don't think Olympus would give it up.
Perhaps there will be no more 'top of the line' Pen like the E-P5 but only more entry level featured Pens to not compete too much with the OMD. I love my Pen and like the option to take off the VF ;)

2 upvotes
bluevellet
By bluevellet (5 months ago)

I prefer the smaller rangefinder bodies. EVF can be useful, but I'll take the optional route. The camera just needs a hotshoe for it.

The EPM2 and EP5 are already discontinued. The new Pen line is expected to be revealed in May. There could be a few surprises (although no built-in EVF, that much is clear from interviews with Olympus executives). My bet is the EPM line will continue, perhaps marged with the EPL line, it's lower cost after all. The EP line is more in doubt.

2 upvotes
jtan163
By jtan163 (5 months ago)

Actually I went to an Olympus release presentation for the EM10 last week (yes we're behind here) asked that exact question.
Surprisingly the Aussie product manager said no the PEN series is still seen to have life within Oly amongst.
He said it was thought people who don't use viewfinders were the target as well as the fact it can be priced lower.

0 upvotes
Ryan_Valiente
By Ryan_Valiente (5 months ago)

Olympus OM?

Auto-GOLD

8 upvotes
quangzizi
By quangzizi (5 months ago)

Easy gold

1 upvote
Timbukto
By Timbukto (5 months ago)

The video still studio comparison widget is so cool...is this review the debut of it? And why would all Canon gear be absent...it looks like the current list just happens to be some staff members personal camera collection or something?

It would be stupid not to include the Canon 5DMKIII, 6D, and 70D to the video still comparison. And yes I want instant gratification. Other ideas besides better camera coverage would be to include low light modes, ISO, and 720p as well as 1080p and of course 4k if capable still capture.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
MikeStern
By MikeStern (5 months ago)

I returned my A7r for the oly em1. And I am sooo pleased with this decision.

Some here talking about m4/3 vs. apsc vs. full frame. I would rather concentrate on olympus rather than m4/3 in general. Because 5 axis ibs is out of this world. 3 axis is also very good. And it's not just my opinion, everybody who try it will agree with me.

I have not taking a single blurry picture yet. Including 1/3 of a second exposures.

8 upvotes
Jan Chelminski
By Jan Chelminski (5 months ago)

Funny about 1/3 sec and the m1, I just got one tonight (out of a five shot group) using it with the sigma 60mm (a must have lens, for those who don't know about it yet), really thought it was remarkable, its a very slow speed to get a sharp result at that FL!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (5 months ago)

Olympus IBIS has always been quite good (all the way back to my first DSLR, the E-510). I agree with your assessment of the E-M5; I rented one once and was blown away, and would probably have one if Olympus made the telephoto options that I wanted. It just does so many things right.

Nikon VR has caught up, though: I can handhold 1/30s at 400mm with the 80-400.

0 upvotes
quangzizi
By quangzizi (5 months ago)

Yes but that's with lens and it makes everything heavy and cumbersome. On the other hand, Oly is rolling out 40-150 2.8 this year and 300 2.8 next year so I think you should consider again.

0 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (2 months ago)

It's 300 f/4, isn't it? That's what I'd rather have anyway.

If I'm able to sell my D7100 + 80-400G for E-M1 + 300 f/4 + 1.4x TC, I will definitely consider it.

0 upvotes
Lassoni
By Lassoni (2 months ago)

that just proves the sony's A7r isn't much of a camera. It's a good sensor with bad body

0 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (5 months ago)

Can't do good ISO 3200 in JPEG?

Can't do good video?

Is this a joke? Don't let this suggest to anyone that mirror-less can't be better. It's just not yet.

I'm boycotting both mirror-less and DSLR's, until makers combine the best of both worlds.! Enough is enough.

Time for Nikon and Canon to give it up.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
pacnwhobbyist
By pacnwhobbyist (5 months ago)

It's amazing how you've managed to fit so much stupidity into just a few short sentences. All this stuff about "Is this a joke?" and that you're "boycotting" certain cameras is a bunch of silly-talk.

34 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (3 months ago)

Hey well joke this: By boycotting I only meant my personal wallet is staying in my personal pocket. Do you think I don't know a bunch of first adopters bought into the M10 (that's fine a like the price/value stuff) and are now personally trying to defend their decision? That's what folks tend to do. That doesn't make it right, wrong, evil or best necessarily. It makes it biased. I change my opinion not.

I EXPECT any camera to cover video well, and without hindering first the still photography in today's design.

I EXPECT mirror-less camera to get the lead out, and work on their cons in comparison to DSLR's, and to do it without excessive pricing.

I EXPECT quality cameras to be photographically balanced toward all things related to taking better pictures, with less trouble, limits, carry hassles, and COSTS!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Neodp
By Neodp (3 months ago)

Mainly I EXPECT, that logical folks would understand these mass produced items afford so much massive profit, when sold in these great numbers that it is only us driving the per unit prices through the roof.

What we have today is marketing schemes and disposable cameras; more than we are appropriately rewarding quality photographic equipment.

But you reward what you will and get what you will.

1 upvote
pacnwhobbyist
By pacnwhobbyist (2 months ago)

I understand where you're coming from actually now that you've explained it. It's just that the original comment seemed rather rediculous and over the top.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (2 months ago)

That's very kind and mature of you to say.

Yes what's really ridiculous is the state of the market.

Vote wisely and with much restraint, please. That will determine the better state-of-the-art offerings and their value. Two things we are sorely missing.

0 upvotes
The Jacal
By The Jacal (5 months ago)

For any body who feels like whining about bokeh, or in case others may be taken in by the shills here, look at this:

http://admiringlight.com/blog/fuji-56mm-f1-2-vs-panasonic-leica-42-5mm-f1-2-nocticron/

Admittedly, a cople of high end lenses, but the same difference is the same at all levels between the two formats.

0 upvotes
badi
By badi (5 months ago)

I read the coparison, as i didn't see a head to head yet, and it confirms my expectations: both awesome!
It would be nice a bokeh comparison between the ~50 equiv: Fuji 35/1.4 and panasonic 25/1.4.
For the ~35 equiv they don't have an answer yet to fuji's 23/1.4.
However, there are some manual focus alternatives at 0.95 .... from voigtlander and black magic, which i understood that they are real magic :)

Comment edited 54 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
itsastickup
By itsastickup (5 months ago)

This is ridiculous. You can get a decent amount of bokeh from a $160 lens on APS-C. With m4/3 you have to pay an absurd amount of money for a f1.2 to get anywhere near.

That lens should be $200 max.

1 upvote
The Jacal
By The Jacal (5 months ago)

itsastickup: Did you look at the link I posted?

0 upvotes
tokugawa
By tokugawa (5 months ago)

itsastickup: you can get a decent amount of bokeh with a 20$ lens on m43 too.

0 upvotes
szafir51
By szafir51 (5 months ago)

for itsastickup the lens is only about "bokeh". No other parameters are important - sharpness, geometry, vignette, aperture!, etc.
It's so important to have 1 mm depth that m43 lenes are useless. Leica or Voightlander are worse then a $200 APS-C lens.

Wake up kid. "The major disadvantage of opening lens aperture wide is shallow depth of field" - it's a sentence written in a book from 1982. Did the photography changed since 1982?

2 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (5 months ago)

The go-to affordable portrait lens on m4/3 is the Olympus 45/1.8, which is a few hundred bucks. It is wicked sharp wide open and gives nice bokeh.

What else do you want?

0 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (5 months ago)

The no-bokeh stuff is just stupid. Obviously the paid posters from competing manufacturers collaborate on their talking points. I shoot 4/3 and m43 and routinely stop down my fast lenses to get enough DOF in portraits.

I thought the review was fair. Slightly (very, at high ISO primarily) better IQ on an APS-C DSLR, better controls on the E-M10.

This will come as no surprise to people who shoot mirrorless. The controls and screen, etc. are all much more functional on mirrorless than DSLRs. Mirrorless is a more natural format for a digital camera. It may come as a surprise to DSLR shooters, simply because many of them haven't shot a mirrorless camera long enough to learn what it can do.

Do you need the last drop of IQ in a DSLR? That question is personal. To me, the answer is no. I don't even need the IQ of the E-M10. IMHO, we are WAY past the point of "needing" slightly better IQ on these cameras; functionality is the ONLY (or at least most important) factor to consider.

14 upvotes
Mellowmark
By Mellowmark (5 months ago)

I use both APS-C DSLR and micro four thirds cameras - the dslr controls are better as the bigger size (bigger buttons and more space between them) makes it much quicker and easier to change settings with the camera to your eye.

Therefore the biggest advantage of micro four thirds (smaller body and lens sizes) is also it's biggest disadvantage in some ways. Great travel cameras, great when you don't want to (or cannot) take the dslr and some fun features (live bulb for example).

But better controls? No. Same with ergonomics - worse not better. Image quality I agree is very similar - generally a bit better high iso and bit more dynamic range with APS-C but not much in it.

I don't understand this blind loyalty to a manufacturer or format though - any objective observer can see that both have their advantages and disadvantages + everybodys needs/wants are different.

As for "paid posters from competing manufacturers collaborate on their talking points" - ridiculous, paranoid nonsense!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
12 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (5 months ago)

Nice intelligent summary by bobbarber.

I've had a lot of DSLRs (and still have one, which sits unused in the cupboard). My EM1 is such a complete photographic tool, largely because everything is so immediate and easy: focussing, changing settings and particularly the viewfinder (which is so much more informative than the old "guess the exposure" mirror and prism design), all in a very handy package. The OMD series is now a very mature system.

IQ is a given these days, on anything from m4/3 up (and even, in some cases, on cameras with smaller sensors). The older technology of using a mirror has been refined for decades and has reached a high level of technical excellence but it is no longer superior and will, increasingly, become limited to specialist applications. I'm sure of that!

4 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (5 months ago)

Mellowmark--

So how do those controls work for zooming in while you're focusing, or putting the focus point anywhere you want on the screen, or previewing exposure visually, by seeing underexposed or overexposed directly on the screen, according to your shutter speed, aperture, and ISO, etc. etc. etc.?

Oh, that's right. You don't have such controls. So what you are saying is, "For the (far) fewer controls that a DSLR has, they are better implemented than in mirrorless cameras." OK, I'll buy that. It's probably a fair statement. Your point being...?

4 upvotes
Henry McA
By Henry McA (5 months ago)

But with a DSLR you have to look for front-/backfocus again and if you use the ovf, you are likely to get more metering errors...

So you might win at high isos but you have to work harder to get sharp and well exposed images (check the focus on the back lcd after every shot etc - to me, that´s nothing I ever want to do again). And you get a very capable ibis with the Oly.

3 upvotes
Mellowmark
By Mellowmark (5 months ago)

Bob--

If by zooming in when focussing you mean magnifying the image when using manual focus, then yes an evf has that advantage - as I said there are disadvantages and advantages to both. However I almost never use manual focus - so for me it's not really an advantage at all. Like I said everyones needs are different too.

Actually as the dslr (technically an SLT) I use is a Sony - I do have that option as well as the advantages of the evf you mentioned. However I just ran my Lightroom meta data through Lightroom Analytics and the amount of times I used more than 1 stop of exposure compensation either way (+ or -) is - almost never. Modern camera metering (and this applies in general to m43 and dslrs) is very accurate and shooting raw means any minor adjustments to exposure in post are quick, easy and have no effect on image quality.

Having used ovf dslrs as well (Canon) I know that ovfs have advantages too (no lag, no battery drain, easier to see in bright light etc).

0 upvotes
Mellowmark
By Mellowmark (5 months ago)

contd.

Dslrs do not have "far fewer controls" - everything I need is right there and with enough space to easily find and push the button with eye to the viewfinder.

Placing focus anywhere is great too - but focus and recompose works fine on a dslr too. What is quicker on a dslr is changing the focus point while looking through the viewfinder - I use mine for wildlife and you have to be fast sometimes! Anything above entry level dslrs will have plenty of focus points too, with a reasonable spread around the screen, albeit excluding the edges.

The small buttons on my G3 (and from what I have heard the OMD EM-5 and EM-10 are similar) makes moving the focus point using the back buttons slow and I often have to take my eye from the viewfinder to check where the buttons are first! DSLR - you just press the centre of the rear dial and use the front scroll wheel or the rear buttons.

Touch to select focus point I use mostly when the camera is on a tripod - when yes, it is a great feature.

0 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (5 months ago)

"...The small buttons on my G3 (and from what I have heard the OMD EM-5 and EM-10 are similar) makes moving the focus point using the back buttons slow..."

Nah, moving focus points on the EM1 is the quickest and easiest on any camera I have used since my wonderful eye-control Canon EOS30. The buttons are easy to reach and feel.

1 upvote
Mellowmark
By Mellowmark (5 months ago)

@deep7

On the EM1 - but this review is of the E-M10 and I was talking about the G3, the EM-5 and EM-10.

In fact that proves my point - the m43 cameras with the best controls and ergonomics are the bigger most 'dslr like' shaped bodies with larger grips - the EM-1 and the Panasonic GH series and to a lesser extent the G5 and G6 (still dslr shaped/styling but smaller.)

The EM-1 body is a similar size to small dslrs - wider than both the EOS100D and D3300 for example:
http://camerasize.com/compact/#448,509,482,381,wa,f

The EM1 is also the same price as a full frame dslr like the Canon 6D or Nikon D610 and more expensive than the mirrorless full frame Sony A7 (at UK prices anyway).

Comment edited 27 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
marco roman
By marco roman (5 months ago)

Mellowmark, I just think you're doing an unfair comparison, as at the em-10 price point, the comparison is the likes of the Nikon d5300. This camera has only one control dial. I have been shooting with a d5100 for two years and think it's a great camera, but it is too much weight to carry around (personal opinion). I have a 18-105, 35 f/1.8 and the 70-300. That kit with the bag is over 3 kg.

I have been to a local shop yesterday and tried the em-10. I can't tell about other people, but Olympus got it right for my desire: a small, light and very capable camera. I may give up a tiny bit of image quality, but I am getting much better controls and portability. The camera with the 25mm 1.8 did fit in my jacket pocket (a bit cumbersome, I admit). But my d5100 needs to be hanging on my neck all the time.

My Nikon kit will soon be on ebay and gumtree...

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Mellowmark
By Mellowmark (5 months ago)

Or the Pentax K-50 dslr - two control dials, weather and dust sealed, 1/6000 top shutter speed, 100% view pentaprism viewfinder and a UK launch price of £525 almost identical to the £529 of the OMD E-M10.(Current K-50 price is £429).

Depends what your priorities are - if (small) size and (low) weight are high on the list then the EM-10 looks like a great choice. If amazon ever refund me the money I paid for a G6 that they failed to deliver, then I might even get one.

0 upvotes
techmine
By techmine (5 months ago)

Don't Samsung/Fuji/Sony (MILC line) provide better alternatives?

Comment edited 32 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
The Jacal
By The Jacal (5 months ago)

No.

13 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (5 months ago)

Olympus makes nice cameras. Try one out.

7 upvotes
Alex Permit
By Alex Permit (5 months ago)

Fuji xt-1, sony a6000 are better in some ways, worse in others. Depends on what is important to you. All three are great cameras.

5 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (5 months ago)

Perhaps they make better cameras. Olympus makes great lenses, and that's sort of the draw of Micro Four Thirds. Just off the top of my head, the lenses that are known to be quite good:

7-14/4, 9-18/4-5.6, 12/2, 14/2.5, 20/1.7, 25/1.8, 25/1.4, 12-40/2.8, 45/1.8, 45/1.2, 60/2.8 macro, 75/1.8, 35-100/2.8, 100-300/4-5.6, 75-300/x-6.7, exotic f/0.95 MF things, upcoming 300/4 and 150/2.8...

If you want to do it, there's probably a lens for it.

3 upvotes
photosen
By photosen (5 months ago)

Looks like a really nice camera.

1 upvote
BBking83
By BBking83 (5 months ago)

So... 10 years ago when the first 4/3 camera came out, no one complained about the lack of bokeh. The Olympus E-1.

I can guarantee that all the "no bokeh, no buy" spokes people never knew this and will refuse to recognise or accept that it's the SAME SIZE (regarding sensor) as this.

And every other m4/3 camera.

0 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (5 months ago)

My Leica 25/1.4, Olympus 45/1.8, Olympus 75/1.8 and Olympus 40-150mm all provide plenty of bokeh.

The 75/1.8 is competitive with full frame. It's like carrying a 150/3.6 IS. And it's tiny. It's awesome.

1 upvote
itsastickup
By itsastickup (5 months ago)

"My Leica 25/1.4, Olympus 45/1.8, Olympus 75/1.8 and Olympus 40-150mm all provide plenty of bokeh."

The only normal lens among those has very little bokeh, more like a 50/2.8, and it costs a bomb.

Until prices become reasonable these m4/3 cameras aren't a practical proposition to the non-pro bokeh photographer. That's a large market missing.

1 upvote
sandy b
By sandy b (5 months ago)

Actually, they did. This has been an ongoing debate since day 1.

0 upvotes
Michael_13
By Michael_13 (5 months ago)

@ itsa: You seem to have no idea about bokeh/DOF.

An m43 "normal" with 50mm/F2.8 (equiv.), effective speed of F1.8 and excellent sharpness is much more usable than a cheap FF 50mm/F1.8 that does not focus correctly and shows heavy vignetting.

1 upvote
itsastickup
By itsastickup (5 months ago)

Michael_13, you're making not much sense here. Whatever the inadequacies (in your opinion) of the lenses, f2.8 equiv normal bokeh is not enough to please the bokeh crowd. That's the issue.

0 upvotes
MajorMagee
By MajorMagee (5 months ago)

Seriously, you have to go back and slam the E-P5 again? I've had one for a very long time now and have never seen the shutter shock issue (and believe me, you made me look for it). Is it impossible for you to admit that your review copy may not have been entirely representative of the model's real world performance after all?

4 upvotes
Jan Chelminski
By Jan Chelminski (5 months ago)

OM-4ever
;)

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (5 months ago)

Gotta love the 'no bokeh' whining.

11 upvotes
Brixham Steve
By Brixham Steve (5 months ago)

Yes - these people whining about no bokeh have no idea what this camera is capable of. See Robin Wong's blog for examples of what this little gem of a set up can do with a good eye and in the right hands: http://robinwong.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/it-has-been-while-petaling-street-again.html#more

5 upvotes
The Jacal
By The Jacal (5 months ago)

Just wait till Yabokkie or Francis Carver get on the case!

7 upvotes
Dimit
By Dimit (5 months ago)

I wouldn't personally use an m43 camera as my first and only camera.
As a second camera-being an enthusiast or semipro or pro or any-I would vote for a csc and consequently an m43 for sure.
This is an excellent little camera and let me say,for it's use stated above,I strongly prefer it vs em-1 !! Em-1 mimics dslrs dimentionswise although I'd never get it it as my sole camera if I had to choose.
Summary: Em-10 will be a hit for a long time.Small,balanced in all respects,excellent built quality(nobody pointed out so far!),reasonable price.

3 upvotes
Total comments: 322
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