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Olympus OM-D E-M1 Review

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Based on a production Olympus OM-D E-M1 with Firmware 1.0

The E-M1 is the second model in Olympus's OM-D series and extends the range further into semi-pro/enthusiast territory. There are two main distinctions that set the E-M1 apart from its little brother (the E-M5) - a more sophisticated autofocus system and a 'buttons for everything' design approach. As such the two models will coexist, with the E-M1 sitting at the very top of Olympus's lineup.

The biggest technological step forward on the E-M1 is the addition of on-sensor phase detection elements, giving the camera two distinct focus modes. The phase-detection system is used when lenses from the original Four Thirds system, which were designed for use that way, are attached. With native, Micro Four Thirds lenses, the camera will mainly stick with the contrast detection system that has proved so fast and accurate on the E-M5. Only if you use tracking AF will the camera utilize phase-detection information with a Micro Four Thirds lens.

The E-M1 also gains the excellent 2.3M-dot electronic viewfinder panel we first saw as the VF-4 accessory for the PEN E-P5. Not only is the resolution very impressive, but the viewfinder optics give a viewfinder with magnification of up to 1.48x (depending on display mode), which puts it only a fraction behind the 0.76x viewfinder in Canon's 1D X and ahead of Nikon's pro-grade D4 DSLRs.

There's also a more advanced 'TruePic VII' processor in the E-M1 that conducts a variety of lens corrections, when creating JPEGs, leading the company to proclaim the best image quality offered by one of its cameras. Not only can the E-M1 remove the colour fringing caused by lateral chromatic aberration, Olympus says that it also tunes its sharpening to take into account the lens's sharpness, and to combat any softening due to diffraction (particularly at very small apertures).

The biggest difference between the E-M1 and the E-M5, though, is the degree of direct control on offer. We really liked the E-M5's twin-dial control system, but the E-M1 goes beyond that by providing button-and-dial combinations for quickly changing almost every imaginable setting on the camera. It's the kind of approach you don't usually get until the very top of manufacturers' lineups - it means you have to get used to where every function is, but can shoot fluidly once you have.

The E-M1 inherits the '2x2' dial approach Olympus previously used on the E-P5 - flicking a switch on the camera changes the dials from controlling shutter speed, aperture or exposure compensation to changing ISO and white balance. However, all this direct control doesn't come at the expense of the potentially slower but easier to find touch-screen interface - the E-M1 has this too. Overall the camera can be operated pretty much however you fancy.

Olympus OM-D E-M1 specification highlights:

  • 16MP MOS Four Thirds format sensor with no low-pass filter
  • On-sensor phase detection elements
  • Twin control dials (front and rear) with '2x2' dual-mode option
  • '5-axis' image stabilization with automatic panning detection ('S-IS Auto')
  • ISO 'LOW' (100 equiv) - ISO 25,600
  • Up to 10fps continuous shooting (6.5 fps shooting with continuous AF)
  • 1.04M-dot 3" LCD touchscreen display - tilts 80° upwards and 50° downwards
  • Electronic viewfinder: 2.36M-dot LCD, 0.74x magnification (equiv.), eye sensor
  • Built-in Wi-Fi for remote shooting and image transfer to smartphone or tablet
  • Dust, splash and freeze-proof (to -10 °C)

Gained over the E-M5

  • True Pic VII processor, with lens corrections
  • 1/8000 sec top shutter speed, 1/320 sec flash sync
  • Built-in microphone socket (rather than optional accessory adapter)
  • Flash X-sync socket
  • Built-in Wi-Fi
  • Focus 'peaking' display
  • In-camera HDR blending (two modes), previewed in viewfinder

Four Thirds is dead. Long live Four Thirds.

As well as representing the highest-end Micro Four Thirds camera yet, the E-M1's role is also about offering continued support for users of the original Four Thirds SLR system. Olympus created some very nice Four Thirds lenses, but the company struggled to make enough impact in the SLR market to justify the cost of continuing development for both systems in parallel.

The company claims to have studied what the E-M1 and a hypothetical 'E-7' SLR could offer, and concluded that, while image quality, durability and speed would have been the same, the OM-D design allowed both a substantial size advantage and a much greater viewfinder magnification than would be possible with an optical finder. As such the E-M1 should be considered the successor to the E-5.

We'll look at the performance of the camera with Four Thirds lenses in a little more depth later in this article. But in principle, the on-sensor phase detection autofocus system should be much more effective than contrast detection when it comes to controlling Four Thirds lenses, all of which were primarily designed to be driven by phase detection-based systems.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 2063
23456
sdribetahi

Why don't they ever test AF with moving objects. It's not even discussed? If I don't shoot still life scenes, what am I getting with AF, or AF tracking?

2 upvotes
Mescalamba

In shortcut?

Nothing you would like.

But at this point of time I think everyone knows that AF-C in mirrorless is something you dont want to try.

0 upvotes
Richard Shih

Did you see the Continuous AF/Tracking section on the Real World AF experience page? http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympus-om-d-e-m1/8

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
TN Args

@sdribetahi -- So, you didn't read the review then, before making wrong comments?

0 upvotes
vesa1tahti

Nobody says these kind of cameras are TOO small to be kept in hands. I buy a Nikon D7100, an impressive camera, having optimal size.

3 upvotes
Mescalamba

Well, they hope that we will grow smaller fingers..

0 upvotes
TN Args

Hands come in many sizes. I'm surprised you haven't noticed this!

3 upvotes
areichow

People don't say that because most enough people seem to disagree. Not everyone wants the same size, shape, or weight of camera. Shocking, isn't it?

1 upvote
Stu 5

So how did all those people use to cope holding Olympus OM series and Pentax M series cameras then for all those years?

2 upvotes
Shamael

If nobody said that, it is because they never used one. The problem with small cameras is shooting at slow shutter speeds. Lower than 1/60 is difficult for most. I can use the Fuji S5, Nikon D200 body, with shutter speeds and handheld up to 2 seconds. 5 shots on 10 end clean. With the NEX-7 I am limited to 1/30 second and here, 3 shots on 10 end clean. Those cameras are too light for handheld slow speed shooting and Makro. For that you need a heavy camera. Sony had the good idea to make a grip for the new A7 series, what gives it more weight. One can not have it all. In normal situations, sports and every days press events, a small camera is a bargain. With a tele lens, a heavy barrel, the problem occurs again. You have no counterbalance and for that, you need a heavy camera again. What proves that for some reasons you need a DSLR as well as a mirrorless. You will shoot much more mirrorless as a normal all day user, but Pro's in certain specific works can't live wthout the heavy box.

1 upvote
Olymore

Well, if you can't shoot at lower shutter speeds with a small camera don't buy one then. There's plenty of choice out there.

1 upvote
Plastek

Sure, but it's still important to point that out to unaware buyers.

2 upvotes
PerL

This is a beautifully made camera that sits much better in the hand than an EM-5, but it is not as capable for action shooting as its semi pro APS-C rivals. It is also not as good in IQ (compare the DxO Marks scores that is just out to a Nikon D7100).
And the bottom line for me, the images. I don't like using APS-C kit lenses - not for the sharpness, but for the flat look with to much DOF. Why would I want a sensor size with even more DOF, no matter that the camera body is very nice. One has to decide - are you more interested in a camera body - or the images? That is why FF is the right answer for me personally. But I can see why many are attracted to this camera - just not me.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
9 upvotes
Jorginho

What matters to buyers of m43 camwera's is their ideal of small size- good IQ and flexibility (types of shooting you can do). This OMD simply adds good PDAF for fast action, one box extra is checked now. That is all.
To others it is the best IQ they can get for the money. So may be they can buy an 800E or a A7 or 600D. Etcetc.

This review is clear: the camera does very well in so many apsects that it deserves 84 points and a Gold Award. For those who like the m43 cams and have the money, this one might be the right choice.

2 upvotes
Cailean Gallimore

I don't shoot anything with a sensor smaller than APS-C. The reason is very simple: I've never seen anything with a smaller sensor that can output comparable images. I bailed out of m43 after three cameras because the dynamic range wasn't good enough, the 2X crop factor was, and is, pretty inconvenient and the images often looked 'flat' as you say.

People say that things have moved on, and maybe they have, but I gave it a good try and it didn't work for me.

Good luck to anyone who disagrees with me - I'm no expert, anyway.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
joseluismx

I'm at a point were I need more DOF. I mostly shoot ballet presentations and 4/3 is probably the limit of high ISO noise and DOF I need to do the job.

1 upvote
TN Args

Most people need MORE depth of field, not less. This "half of one eyebrow in focus" look is like a one-trick pony: it has no photographic merit and gets tiring very quickly.

9 upvotes
Stu 5

TN Args it is already getting to be a very dated look. Something that the vast majority of pros avoid.

3 upvotes
PerL

@TN Args and Stu 5
Is creative use of DOF control a "dated look"? Well, it has been used as a tool in the box by professionals for 50 years and still is, since most professionals don't use small sensors.

2 upvotes
TN Args

Like I said, it's a trick. You can paint it on afterwards if you're really desperate to copy some pro you know. But you can't paint sharpness back onto a ruined Big Glass shot when the client says they don't like the fuzzy noses and one fuzzy iris. :)

0 upvotes
Abu Mahendra

Let me see it I get this straight: Olympus wants me to pay $1399 for a camera with a Sensor smaller than APS-c? Yeah... right...

21 upvotes
TN Args

I think the price is a bit high too, but not because the sensor size only merits a certain price.

Olympus have long felt that 43 is the optimal digital camera format combining image quality and total kit size. They have stuck to this product philosophy and good luck to them for that.

The camera is made for people who agree with that product philosophy, not people like you who disagree with it. You just go buy something else, bigger and clunkier, okay? But for those who agree on philosophy, what better product is there, at any price?

2 upvotes
Dave Oddie

"Let me see it I get this straight: Olympus wants me to pay $1399 for a camera with a Sensor smaller than APS-c? Yeah... right..."

Why would you care if it delivers comparable performance to its aps-c competitors which it clearly does?

You can effectively choose between cameras on features and you tend to have to pay more for cameras with more features.

If "size matters" above all else just buy an entry level aps-c camera and brag about the size of its sensor.

Comment edited 54 seconds after posting
9 upvotes
Chez Wimpy

Its not the sensor, its the lenses... and since "bigger" APS-C lines *across all makers* still don't compare with the dedicated optics m43 has amassed (in barely 5 years!), if you intend to shoot the classic focal lengths, its this or FF. And of course with m43, 28/40/90 equivalent primes fit together in a single pocket.

3 upvotes
Abu Mahendra

Why do I care? Because, despite being able to afford the Olympus at $1,399 I try to remain grounded in reality and still care about being sensible with my money. A Canon Rebel is still a more complete package in a more mature and varied system. And it's half the price.

1 upvote
TN Args

I agree the Canon Rebel is unbeatable IQ per dollar. But too plasticky for some, and clunky when you include the lenses. And what do you do for a 24mm equivalent prime, high quality, compact?

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
1 upvote
David Stinson

Then go troll somewhere else and save your money.

0 upvotes
chj

Weather sealed, live view continuous shooting, touchscreen. This combination is extremely appealing to people who take photos in dynamic situations. The only other camera with this combination is the EM-5.

0 upvotes
KariIceland

Thank you Olympus very much for just stabbing the E-M5 users in the back when you said back in 2012 "this is our highest range and will be the top in our range of mirrorless cameras, and low and behold then you bring the E-M1.

I am leaving Olympus after years of dedication since the E-PL2 and going back to my roots the company I started with.
You don't even know if you want the lenses and cameras to be silver or black. you release a silver lens and say "we will never make this model in black" then you bring a black model ask for twice the price & then you lower it effing the customers who already bought it.

If there are two things olympus are good at, it's making good primes & effing it's customers over and over.

1 upvote
tkbslc

So you think Olympus should stop making progress once they sold you a camera?

You said in your first sentence "back in 2012".

24 upvotes
Revenant

They were referring to the OM-D range, not specifically the E-M5 model. OM-D is still their highest range, sitting above the PEN range. They said from the start, that they would make a more "professional" OM-D model, and possibly also a more beginner-friendly model than the E-M5.

Anyway, I don't see in what way you've been stabbed in the back. The E-M1 takes nothing away from the E-M5 being an excellent camera. The only thing you lost is the bragging rights of having the top-of-the-line model. But what serious photographer cares about that?

8 upvotes
Jorginho

Good luck on your quest to find an honest decent cameramaker that always keeps his promises and never changes its strategy..

3 upvotes
Mescalamba

Go to Nikon, they are so much better (D600 vs D610).

Go to Canon, they are so much better (one sensor, recycled over and over and over..).

Go to Sony, they are so much better (temporary dSLTs, unsure future of Alpha mount lenses .. not much lens upgrades).

Go to.. nowhere left to go.

10 upvotes
TN Args

Looks like you didn't notice what the word 'range' means! :)

1 upvote
mrmiguel

The E-M5 is still a great camera! The sensor is not that different if you look at the actual DXOMark numbers. In fact, the one thing the E-M5 has in its favor is the fact that is actually modular. You can go smaller if you want to.

I see the E-M1 as a camera for those that want to use 4/3 glass.

2 upvotes
Jude McDowell

I have an E-M5 and I don't think I've been stabbed in the back; now if they had arranged for the E-M5 to stop working when the E-M1 started shipping I would have agreed with the OP. As it stands I really can't see what he's complaining about - they introduced a new model to the range which adds new features; I would call this a) an upgrade path and b) evidence that Olympus are continuing to invest in the OM-D range. I consider both of these to be good things.

7 upvotes
linux99

Have you been drinking?

0 upvotes
RPJG

Bwahahaha. Poor baby.

1 upvote
CameraLabTester

Easily the winner of the prestigious award: "Made You Look! 2013"

.

4 upvotes
Brian Wadie

As with the EM-5, if you set this up to use as a "Real" camera ie: EVF only, post-shot review off etc then it is possible to comfortably exceed the CIPA rated shots / battery charge.

With both cameras, shooting sequential action shots (motorcycle racing, windsurfing, birds in flight etc) I regularly exceed 1000 shots / battery charge (even with a bit of Chimping)

4 upvotes
Digitall

"Oh Lord, won't you buy me a Olympus E-M1?
My friends all drive DSLR's, I must make amends
Worked hard all my lifetime, no help from my friends
So Lord, won't you buy me a Olympus E-M1?"

9 upvotes
Cailean Gallimore

BECAUSE IT'S NOT AS GOOD AT SPORTS!

2 upvotes
Brian Wadie

Depends on how you define "Sports", indoor basketball / soccer probably not, but for m'cycle track racing, windsurfing, surfing, kite surfing etc - its more than capable. If you want the ultimate, shallow DOF, continuous tracking shooting with minimum intervention from the photographer under difficult lighting conditions, then you are stuck with the likes of the 1DX + top L lenses ( with the associated extra weight and cost) for anything else the EM-1 will meet the needs of 90%+ of most photographers (in my opinion, having come from a 7D + L lenses) YMMV of course, particularly if you haven't tried the EM-1 for sports shooting

Comment edited 49 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Cailean Gallimore

I wonder what fraction of 1% of photographers shoot sports of any kind...

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
marike6

Lot's of photographers shoot sports of all kinds. But if this EM-1 is being marketed as a sports / wildlife cameras (the above poster mentioned the 1DX + L lenses) it sure is missing the high grade telephoto part of the equation.

Consumer variable aperture telezooms are not going to get it done.

4 upvotes
tkbslc

Anyone with children or grandchildren likely shoots sports at some time in their life.

5 upvotes
Jorginho

@marike6....There are not any 4/3 lenses that fall in yoru category of high grade telephotozooms???

0 upvotes
Ocolon

Actually, I think this Janis Joplin song (“Mercedes Benz”) would be interpreted as: Both DSLRs and E-M1s are prestigious quality products, but more than we really need. Asking god to buy you one is ridiculous. And the motivation – not to take photos, but to own something as impressive as your “friends” – is even more ridiculous. You'd ask god for help if you don't have anything to eat. The song criticizes or ridicules the attitude of people who get as serious about being able to show off with luxury articles as if they were struggling to stay alive (and while others in the world actually have to struggle for life).

Not sure how this turned into a discussion which type of camera is a notch better for sports. ^^

0 upvotes
Plastek

Cailean Gallimore - Every mother and father shot sports at some point. ;)

1 upvote
Cailean Gallimore

Looks like a nice camera.

DSLR user: "It's not as good as a DSLR for sports!"
Mirrorless user: "That's no problem - I don't shoot sports."
DSLR user: "BUT IT'S NOT AS GOOD AS A DSLR FOR SPORTS!!!!"
Mirrorless user: I don't shoot sports - I shoot portraits and landscapes!"
DSLR user: "OK fair enough then. I don't shoot sports either.

And then they lived happily ever after.

46 upvotes
pdelux

best comment ever.

0 upvotes
The Photo Ninja

And the retraction of the shutter shock is here in this review. Did olympus really change the ibis or shutter between this and the ep5? I'll probably upgrade to this camera because I like the form factor and the integrated EVF, but there is nothing wrong with my EP5

2 upvotes
justmeMN

A Reuter's article points out that mirrorless "has so far failed to connect with consumers outside of Japan" and "Olympus admits that its overseas marketing has been lacking so far."

If Olympus is going to stay in the digital camera business, it is going to have to improve in that area.

3 upvotes
Shamael

What makes Olympus a non attractive gear is the 4/3 sensor. Yes, you might say that it is proper to Pana and OLy, we all know that. But, me, as an advertized photographer since more than 50 years now, will never buy it, it can be as good as it can be. The GX7 is a dream camera in functionallity, but I wait to see such a camera with an APS-C sensor, or even a FF sensor. Sony has made the A7, but the viewfinder position is not what I expected. They have done it in right position in the NEX-6&7, Pana has shown us the optimal way to do it on GX7, and Sony puts it in the center, conform to Nikon's ugly V2 duckling. No camera will ever be perfect in our view, but there are elementary things one can do and that will open marketing possibilities. Oly and Pana should produce there cameras in APS-C as well and then see what of the both options has the better sales rates. After that they can chose to keep or to drop one or the other format, and I bet all you want that 4/3 will lose that game.

2 upvotes
pdelux

Shamael dumbest post ever. Why would you want all cameras to be the same? ASP-C or FF.

M4/3 gives you another alternative almost as good in some areas and miles ahead in others.. Not everyone wants an APSC

2 upvotes
chj

nah, I agree with Shamael. I want the functionality of the GX7 with an APS-C sensor. I'm holding out for a camera that shoots low light moving subjects and goes where I go. The technology is here, just give the NEX6 or XE2 a touchscreen (and weatherproofing) and I'm sold. If you just shoot stills in good light, well just about any camera will do.

0 upvotes
MPA1

Shame the grip does not incorporate a second card slot.

2 upvotes
Digitall

A gold medal well deserved! Excellent camera Olympus, and nice review.

5 upvotes
D1N0

It's the only camera in it's category. Of course it gets a gold award. It is not smaller than some compact dslr's though. (except in depth). So what is the advantage over those camera's?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Brian Wadie

look at it as a system not just the body if you want to see the advantage

6 upvotes
D1N0

dslr systems have more choice in lenses. next!

3 upvotes
ravduc

It can use almost any lens available on the market. What's the problem with the number of lenses available? How many do you really need?

1 upvote
D1N0

there is no other camera than this one. All dslrs suck. Olympus is god. Good bye!

2 upvotes
Brian Wadie

Next? weight and cost to match the performance of the EM-1 / 5 + lenses vs DSLR + lenses (I'm still buying my Olympus gear with the money I got from selling my canon pro kit, the rest of the money I make from selling the images I create with the EM-5 (and now EM-1) to customers who can't tell the difference in output up to 30"x20" (except that they tend to prefer the colours from the Olympus compared to the warmer colours of the canon system) On the other hand, you clearly prefer to stick with your DSLR and that's excellent, for you, so no worries either way :)

5 upvotes
marike6

> the warmer colours of the canon system

Huh? You cannot find warmer colors than the Olympus m43 cameras, and EM1 seems to have taken a warm color bias to a new level. Just look at the red faces in the raw comparison. On the other hand, all your models will look like they just got back from the Bahamas. :-)

DPR Studio Scene (change to RAW via drop down menu)

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympus-om-d-e-m1/16

1 upvote
Jorginho

The advantgae is that you can put lenses on it. A lot of them. And once you use a couple of them, even IF the body would be bigger, the system would still be a lot smaller.
As a body, there is no DSLR APS-c that comes close with the same or similar specs. Weathersealing. coldresistant, fliapble screen, EVF the size of the best FF DSLR OVFs, 7 fps with focustrakcing and 10 without.

You need a heavy DSLR APS-c cam to come close to that. That is the point. And it can be small too, as dpreview pointed out.

It wins a gold award because of its excellence.

1 upvote
lazy lightning

Still just the same flat, lifeless images as all m4/3 cameras. No separation (not talking bokeh), everything in the image appears to be on the same plane giving the impression of a one dimensional universe. Lovely colors though!

11 upvotes
mister_roboto

keep on trollin'

18 upvotes
veroman

I agree and have been saying the same thing for quite a while. These images are as flat and lifeless as they come.

5 upvotes
D1N0

Bigger sensors give freedom to images. People who don't see that don't see.

4 upvotes
ironcam

If your images look lifeless with deep dof, it will look lifeless with shallow dof. It's the same boring subject, the same crappy composition and the same horrible light. The main difference is that your bad distracting background has turned into brownish green backdrop.

23 upvotes
blohum

I love it how some people still seem to think that m43 passes this imaginary boundary where thin DOF is somehow no longer possible...

15 upvotes
Boerseuntjie

+1 I must be a troll

0 upvotes
chadnchady

For those that say you can't achieve shallow DOF on the omd. Check out this example I took with the 75mm f1.8 on the omd

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=4253367944100&set=a.4201143158513.2164954.1582831756&type=3&theater

The only thing I'll give you is that the DOF will be more on the omd for the same given F stop on a equivalent lens but with a quick switch to their faster prime lens 25mm f1.4, 75mm f1.8 and the soon to be released 42.5 f1.2 etc you will have more than enough shallow DOF to satisfy you. Not to mention the quality of the bokeh with the 75mm out right matches or even beats the the Nikon 85mm f1.4 that I have as well.

I use both Nikon FX and OMD extensively and have pretty much most the pros lens for each format.

So this is an unbiased opinion.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
pdelux

if you need Shallow DOF to make your images not look lifeless, then you need to work on your composition skills.

Canon and Nikon should stop making glass slower than F1.4 because SKILLED photographers only want everything blurry.

1 upvote
gerard smits

Chapeau Olympus, excellent camera it is !!!

1 upvote
Trollshavethebestcandy

I see this as a bridge camera for pro users to go small and light and an ideal enthusiast camera where you are willing to sacrifice a bit more of size and weight for a responsive camera over say a Pen. It is not for me due to size and weight but looking forward to the tech to go in smaller and lighter bodies in the future. Please Oly make a fixed small and light cam with the best 4/3 sensor, 5 axis IBIS with a fast lens say f1.4 for $900 to compete with the Ricoh GR and Nikon A.

3 upvotes
Paul Farace

What a beautiful looking camera! And although I am sure the EVF is state of the art... if only I had the option to buy this camera with a prism viewfinder! Wow, what a competitor it would be for the rumored Nikon digital FM or the gems in the Fuji X lineup! Well done Olympus!

4 upvotes
olypan

Read this from a pro. - Ming Thein. He thinks it's direct competitor is the D4. Pro enough for you.

http://blog.mingthein.com/2013/09/11/the-2013-olympus-om-d-e-m1-review-2/

2 upvotes
Jorginho

Yeah...Ming Thein. The guy that did not think much of the GH3's vidoe qualities a year ago in his review of that cam....I think he is a great photographer, no doubt about that. But I don;t take his reviews all too serious. To me it is very obvious he is a fan of Olympus.

3 upvotes
steelhead3

Thein is an Oly salesman

5 upvotes
Jude McDowell

@steelhead3 What evidence do you have for that statement? After all, he also uses and writes about Nikons and Leicas; not something you would expect Olympus to want their salesmen doing...

3 upvotes
Optimal Prime

The page is quite buggy at the moment. Loads correctly less than 50% of the time.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
atamola

DP reviewer: "Ok guys, Just finished. Quick, we need something negative to say about the camera? Anyone?

Guy 1: "well, maybe we can say that the Interface and controls can be overwhelming"

Guy 2: "All interfaces and controls at this level are. We should add **initially**"

DP reviewwer: "Great. We need more"

Guy 1: "we can say... (pause)..."

Guy 2: "... that the In-camera Raw conversion interface is somewhat unintuitive!!!"

DP reviewer: "You are a god-send!!! What else!? What else!?"

Guy 1: "We can say that Auto focus with Four Thirds lenses is slow"

Guy 2: "but it is not"

DP reviewer: "Let's add **in dim conditions with tricky subjects**"

Guy 1: "What are tricky subjects??"

DP reviewer: "Stay focused, damn it! We need to say negative things!! got it?? Got it??"

Guy 2: "If that's the case why not that the "Multi-screen live view interface looks very dated"

DP reviewer: perfect, we are almost done.

48 upvotes
Richard Butler

Oh no! The office has been bugged.

45 upvotes
Optimal Prime

That's strange... When I listened to the tapes I could only hear moans and groans.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
micksh6

While trying to find more Cons DPR forgot to list 5-axis IBIS in Pros. It's not like many mirrorless cameras have IBIS.

16 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer

Let's just give all cameras over $600 that don't have Foveon sensors the gold award and close up shop. Here are two examples. Nikon 610: gold award! "Takes a winning package and makes it even better". New Nikon retro SLR: gold award! "While it has a few limitations (not the least of which is price) we think the retro appeal combined with excellent image quality will make this new Nikon a cult favorite." New Sonys: Gold award! (but with slightly lower score) "Sony deserves a lot of credit for doing what nobody else has done. And while a few features, like the shutter, could stand improvement, for flexibility alone and competitive pricing, these Sonys clearly earn the gold."

5 upvotes
Dédéjr

You make a good point. When you consider there are not many lenses for the ff sonys, and virtually none at affordable prices, one would think silver was more the colour n'est ce pas???

0 upvotes
marike6

The EM-1 gets a Gold Award and fans are still parsing the reviewer's words and accusing them of intentionally adding "Cons"?

It's perfectly valid for the review to address the slightly obtuse, unintuitive menus / interface. That would no doubt be something a new user might want to know.

1 upvote
Michael Kaufman

I prefer the new power switch. On the old one, I had to look to turn the camera on. It takes two hands now, but I can do it without looking at the camera.

2 upvotes
jkrumm

Me too. Don't see what the fuss is about. Much better than the EM5 micro-switch. Just like the switch on my OM4.

2 upvotes
Stu 5

That fact is in real world use it is quicker to use. You can be switching the camera off with your left hand whilst then immediately start changing the lens with your right. It is a much quicker system. It saves wasting time.

0 upvotes
johnlegrand

Great camera indeed!

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
johnlegrand
0 upvotes
CeleryBeats

Let me tell you this;

This camera is 5 times more exciting then the Sony A7 and A7R together.

Why?

Because it expresses PERFECTION.

What a sexy camera this is!

21 upvotes
johnlegrand
0 upvotes
marike6

Tell that to all the people in Micro 43 Forum talking about jumping ship to the Sony FF.

12 upvotes
DaveE1

If "perfection" is flat-ish images, it's perfection alright. The next Olympus will most likely be better, but there is a long way to go before it - or any of the other cameras in this category - meets perfection.

It's a nice Camera no doubt, but as your dig at another manufacturer shows, it can come down to fanboyism how some perceived it in the end. I had a chance to try this one out. I liked it, but not sure I'd buy it.

As is the case in recent times, the Gold rating from DPR reflects what the Olympus means to DPR's business, not necessarily how it performs.

2 upvotes
Revenant

You could easily avoid the "flat-ish" images by tweaking your raw files to taste with your choice of raw converter, rather than using the default settings in ACR, which is what DPR is doing.

The gold award reflects the reviewer's subjective opinion (which is what the awards are supposed to do), no more, no less.
When the E-P5 review was published, DPR was accused of having been paid by Canon and/or Nikon to sabotage the review by mentioning a problem that supposedly didn't exist. And now suddenly DPR and Olympus are partners in crime.

Why not learn to accept that a reviewer's opinion may not conform with your own, rather than inventing conspiracy theories?

3 upvotes
Stu 5

It is a lot better to start with a flat-ish Raw files as well for post processing. The E-M1 Raw files withstand a large amount of highlight and shadow recovery as well.

0 upvotes
DaveE1

Thanks for your RAW revelation. We wish it was that simple!

I am comparing it to something that is a couple of leagues above in terms of image tonality, so the comment was made in the context of the previous "perfection" comment.

As for reviews? You do have quite a lot to learn. Let's leave it at that.

1 upvote
Olymore

DaveE1. As half the people on here think Olympus are going bust in the next six months I can't see why DPReview would think there is any commercial value inbeing biased towards Oly.
Maybe it's just a good camera....

1 upvote
DaveE1

@Olymore: Thanks for the laugh! :D

0 upvotes
Iskender

DaveE1: You can laugh, but you're not likely to find anyone who agrees with your conspiracy theory above. As Olymore said, it would work better with a manufacturer which actually has a lot of money...

0 upvotes
DaveE1

@Iskender: First, I have great admiration for what Olympus and Panasonic have done for photography. Having used this particular camera, it's not for me. But many will love it.

Also, you would be amazed by how many notice review quirks! Read more comments on some of the glaring reviews.

0 upvotes
pdelux

ALL HAIL THE MAGICAL EM-1 it will cure your sick, bring your lepers and disabled.. say goodbye to baldness.

1 upvote
David Stinson

and bring out trolls like yourself..

1 upvote
c76

basicly the Olympus EM5/EM1, Sony A7 and A7r start age of mirrowess, DSLR will soon to be end.

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW

"Start age of mirrorless", um unless you don't count the Epson RD1 and the Leica M8.

And the Sony Nex 7 had the first good EVF at least a couple of years ago.

Forgot Fuji.

The Sony A7s are mighty loud for mirrorless systems.

Unlikely SLRs are going away.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
mister_roboto

yes and no- I wouldn't exactly call a rangefinder mirrorless in the same way sony + fuji + oly/panasonic has handled mirrorless.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW

mister_r:

There’s no “yes and no”. What say the Fuji or Samsung system have that the LeicaEpson rangefinders don’t have is auto-focus, and in the case of Fuji not particularly good manual focus.

EpsonVoightlander did the first digital mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses, and Leica did the first full framed variation. (Not Sony with the A7, and this new Sony is embarrassingly audible–particularly since Sony would own the rights to the metal bladed shutter from the Konica Hexar RF.)

Nobody said anything about total sales, video, EVF, or auto-focus, the word was “first”.

Also check out the design of the Fuji XPro1, Fuji XE1, Fuji XE2, Panasonic GX7, and the Sony Nex 7–all are very clearly based on the basic design of a M rangefinder by Leica+Voightlander, Konica, Zeiss.

Right Olympus didn't copy Leica, nor did Samsung.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Edymagno

Interesting and powerful camera but nothing to divert me from my Nex 6 /16-50 combo. Portability and image quality at its best. Much possibly a good prime on the Olympus will match or trump this Sony combo but never ever its low-light performance.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW

Ed:

These Olympus lenses easily beat the optical quality of the Sony brand E mount lenses for the Nex system. And this Olympus is perfectly useable at ISO 6400.

Right the Nex 6 is good at high ISOs.

0 upvotes
peevee1

As soon as the review has been posted DPR experiences intermittent access problems.

1 upvote
FujiXpro1

Gosh so confused now, OM-D EM1 or Sony A7R.....HELP!!!

0 upvotes
bluevellet

Get the A7R if you have lots of legacy glass (especially the 35mm kind) and need 36MP. Landscape photography, studio portraiture and specialized video work are probably better with this camera.

Get the EM1 if you want a cheaper, tougher, faster kind of camera with a vastly superior choice of native lenses. If you do street photography, shoot family and friends, pets, nature or even some sports, this is probably the best and most versatile mirrorless camera you can get.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
13 upvotes
FujiXpro1

Thanks Bluevellet, I shot Street and Landscape photography and sometime wedding photography for friends. I am a bit nervous about shutter sound of the A7R (a bit loud) and AF, but at the same time I am a pixel picker.

0 upvotes
Parkettpolitur

I'm in the same boat. I'm probably going to wait until the A7R hits the stores, but it's really, really hard to make a decision.

0 upvotes
Northgrove

That decision shouldn't be too hard, since there's a HUGE difference in lens weight. Not if you stick to normal primes only, but as soon as you move into zoom lens territory.

Basically, if you do studio work or love tripod-based photography of various kinds, or have an extreme passion in photography, having mastered lighting setups and color theory a long time ago, by all means go for the Sony A7R.

If not? Well, even the E-M1 may be too much for you, since it's ALSO a pro-level camera, but for lighter traveling, so probably more useful for photojournalism, street photography, travel photography.

3 upvotes
Stu 5

FujiXpro1 better to be a photographer than a pixel peeper.

Nothing worse as well than a distracting noisy shutter when taking street photos. Plus what small compact AF portrait lens are you going to use on the A7r?

0 upvotes
maxola67

So is there anybody to explain to me why this camera considered as pro?
Two moments why it couldn't be pro:
- too small shots-per-a-charged battery value(aka CIPA measuremens)
- articulating screen - how can you provide REALl water/dust resistance with such screen?

3 upvotes
Nerval

Weathersealing does not mean waterproof and recent cameras are pretty tough, so not much of a concern.

The notion of pro or not... I am not saying you cannot make a good large print with MFT gear, just that it is not best in industry (There are other advantages though).

Well, to be honest, the only things I would really consider If I were to use it as a professional tool (my way of thinking might be dated. I was taught to use a camera by my father, who happened to begin shooting in the era of fully manual gear... you know when you had to open the aperture ring to focus and stop it down to expose) :
Imager size : Laws of physics... you know.
AF System : Currently CD-AF and as it seems on-sensor PD-AF is not the industry's best.
Sensor properties : DR,SNR, sensitivity to blue (I hate ugly skies and blue channel induced noise under artificial lighting).
Lenses : What subject, from what perspective?
Mechanism sturdiness.

Canikon still set the industry standard in this regard.

2 upvotes
Nerval

I do not mean to generalize, just that in a pro perspective, you have priorities and constraints and you have to make an investment accordingly. There are high chances that you'll end up with the above stated companies, especially given the instability, these two companies have continued support for their glass.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
maxola67

Canikon?
Oh no!
I'm pure Pentaxian.

3 upvotes
Nerval

Well, they did reinvent their Medium format, which is pretty cool for LS. And their small primes and weather-sealed bodies tend to be pretty interesting in mountaineering. But in event/crowd photography, reportage, you'll see a lot of FF.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
1 upvote
bluevellet

I think the E-M1 is considered "semi-pro". As to why it is considered as such, I think it's a mix of the build quality ("built like a tank"), the level of weather-sealing, large EVF and general fast performance (AF, continuous shooting, buffer, flash synch).

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Alejandro del Pielago

Quote: "So is there anybody to explain to me why this camera (the Olympus EM 1) considered as pro?".

Answer: No, nobody is able to explain something to a believer in the "holy and inmaculate" Pentaxianism.

3 upvotes
showmeyourpics

Hi, no such thing as a clear answer here. I've been a part-time pro for a bunch of years, often photographing in challenging environmental conditions such as very low and high temperatures, very wet, dry and windy, very bright and dark, while exploring, rock climbing, caving, and winter mountaineering from sea level deserts to 16,000' mountains. I make and sell fine art prints up to 24x36". I never had weatherized gear before my Pentax K5 (which IMO is another pro level camera) but I took care of it and it NEVER failed me. The E-M1 is solidly built, weatherized, with a great EVF and IQ and such a vast feature set to rival cameras that are commonly accepted as pro models. If portability is paramount, then the E-M1 outperforms them all. Less powerful batteries are the inevitable price to pay for reduced size. Unless Olympus is outright lying to us, the screen is not a weather-resistance issue.

1 upvote
McFern

What is a Pro Photographer? One who makes all his income from photography?, part of his income? Can I no longer be considered a Pro if I work for free?, begin to draw Social Security? We cant define a Pro Photographer ergo we cant define a Pro Camera. Someone will make all their income with this camera, some will make some of their income and some will not make a dime and they will produce beautiful images. Pro is a label applied to the camera to imply something special...kinda akin to "New and Improved" on a detergent box.

0 upvotes
fakuryu

The EM1 is a pro level camera per se w/ regards that it was built for what a professional photographer might need and it ticks all the right boxes, build quality, all the external controls needed, speed and accuracy regardless the sensor size.

I'm a Pentaxian too :)

1 upvote
pdelux

"So is there anybody to explain to me why this camera considered as pro?
Two moments why it couldn't be pro:
- too small shots-per-a-charged battery value(aka CIPA measuremens)
- articulating screen - how can you provide REALl water/dust resistance with such screen?"

I guess Pros dont know how to change batteries or need an articulating screen

0 upvotes
Nerval

Hi, I am a bit late to the battle, but having owned 3 FT cameras in the past (still have one) I'd be interested to know (and not only for this review but future ones as well) how does the camera perform with long exposure shots.

You never post samples of over 1 second exposures.

I tend to shoot on tripod with filters or at night (or both), and there are some strange phenomenons occurring with noise and color rendering when making long exposures with digital cameras at base ISO.

For instance, my old E-30 is near unusable even at ISO 100 under certain artificial lighting conditions. On the other hand The 650D which (although not class leading) has a very good IQ does (much less though) still suffer with base ISO shots.

The 6D, which shows little improvement in IQ under ISO 800, still manages to deliver extremely clean long exposures. And I'm sure sony sensors behave differently (probably better given the astounding DR).

Give us some 10+ sec exposures in the samples, please !

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
bluevellet

The interesting thing with this kind of camera is the mode called Live Time/Live Bulb. You set up the shot/settings like you normally do, but the difference is you see the exposure develop on screen as it is shooting and you can stop it when you think it's right.

Steve Huff covered it (with samples) in his review of the camera:

http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2013/10/12/the-olympus-om-d-e-m1-full-review-the-most-versatile-mirrorless-camera-ever/

9 upvotes
daddyo

Not to worry Biniou1907 -- I'm fairly certain those are just nesting egrets greatly out of focus.

What concerns me is the sinister appearance of the car in that image -- very insect like!

0 upvotes
Biniou1907

Hi, it seems that an IQ problem appears in some OMD EM1 pictures.
You can see it in the sample gallery of this first impression review (P9010042 image).
Leaves in the trees show a lot of artefacts (white rings).
A new owner of the camera complains about this on Flickr too.
What do you think about that?
Thanks

1 upvote
Guy Parsons

My comment in http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52303037
If it is the Olympus 60/2.8 then there is something wrong with the camera or the way it was used, as I only see truly nice background bokeh with my 60mm macro.
If it is the Sigma 60/2.8 then I'd avoid that lens and/or body until proved whether the doughnuts are due to camera or lens.
If the Flickr complainer found it with other lenses then there is a body or operational problem.

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake

This is about how the lens used renders out-of-focus highlights, so isn't anything to do with the camera itself. The shot you're referring to was taken with the 12-60mm lens originally designed for Olympus's Four Thirds SLRs - you won't generally see the same thing with other lenses.

5 upvotes
Nerval

Hi, I'm a bit late to the battle, and I know it's probably in your schedule (I mean at DPReview), but it would be nice to include cameras with older sensor designs, to have a means to follow the evolution, the comparison is just not as accurate when looking up cameras on the previous chart and the new one.
I guess that really is a workload, so good luck.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Aposmaragos

I've read many posts of people wondering whether the IQ OF EM1 is superior to that of EM5. I was wondering about the same thing. I suggest you take a look at Robin Wong's review of EM1 (and comparison between EM1 and EM5). I believe the answer to this question is there.
Unfortunately up until now i can only read the review (and particularly the part 5 where the comparison is being done) only when i use my android phone to enter the site (can't access the review when using my pc). Probably in a few days it will also be available for pc users...
Hope this helps!

currently using a film contax g2 (LOVE IT) and a nikon D200 (looking for a replacement for the D200)

0 upvotes
rbarbara139

Question: On 4/3 I'm on the outside looking in but want to switch over. . Thoughts on the the E-M1 vs the E-M5?
In light of the cost difference would the extra money be spent on lens?

0 upvotes
SkiHound

Hard to say, value is in the pocket book of the buyer. I've not touched an EM1 but have an EM5. My take is the E-M1 has largely fixed most of the niggles of the first generation E-M5 and added some new features. The EVF is reputed to be much better, more controls, 1/8000 second shutter, IBIS is reputedly improved over the already very good IBIS in the M5. I have the grip for the EM5 and find that really improves handling, but it also bridges the cost gap. OTOH, without the grip the EM5 is certainly smaller. I really like the E-M5 and probably won't upgrade (I say knowing I'll get GAS). Unless the money difference really matters I'd probably go for the E-M1. Though investing in good lenses is always a good investment. In the short run, I'd rather have the E-M5 with good glass than the E-M1 with the basic kit lens. Just some thoughts.

0 upvotes
hols

Is it my eyes or is the EM5 sharper (according to test chart above). No matter which part of the chart I use as long as I keep the ISO at 800 or lower this appears to be the case. Only when I set the chart to higher ISO values does the EM1 outperform the EM5?

1 upvote
Revenant

The cameras were tested with different lenses, I believe, so it's not a fair comparison.

2 upvotes
hols

Well that's useful! Thanks for the update.

0 upvotes
Tim in upstate NY

Did someone post down below (or was it somewhere else) that the 75/1.8 is made by Sigma? Is it true? (seems unlikely to me.

....BTW For those here who may wonder where I've been since last year, my absence has been caused by an illness that involved major surgery (to the brain x2 and countless bouts of radiation and chemotherapy. If I ever get out of this wheelchair, I still hope to get some more usage from my OMD, 75/1.8 and several other m4/3 lenses . With partial paralysis in my left arm and hand, I may have to teach my wife how switch lenses or just use the one that's already mounted when I leave the house. I don't want go back to a P&S but who knows?

Have I missed much?

1 upvote
white shadow

Welcome back to life. It must be daunting to go through all those therapy.

Never mind whether the 75mm f/1.8 is made by Sigma or not. It does not look that way but even if it is, it is probably just a business arrangement. Even Zeiss lenses are made by Cosina to their quality standards. Most important, the 75mm f/1.8 is still the best Micro 4/3 prime so far.

Carry on enjoying your OMD. Get well.

1 upvote
white shadow

.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Artpt

I think the next large step would be to remove the mirrors from DSLRs and improve EVF to the point where the responsiveness of an OVF would provide no better advantage. If Canon or Nikon would introduce a full frame with these mirror less features, the think the market would react favorably.

It seems like within 5 years or sooner.

Happy photo taking to all!

0 upvotes
rikyxxx

No, the 75/1.8 might have been designed by Sigma but is made by OLY.

0 upvotes
Jorginho

Tim, I wish you and your family a lot of strength! I hope you will do well and hope you make a good revovery. Okey, now something very trivial: yes, it seems Sigma made the Oly 75 (but unsure).

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Opinionator

It sounds more like what software programmers call spec creep. These may have been on the wish list for the precursor and now u can pay for them at a 45% hike. None of them are deal makers unless u own original 4/3 lenses. Then I'd say inquire within. The VF-4? Come on. That's should be free. I don't like marketing which in the case of the E-P5 says u can have this $279 item gratis if u take the 17 off our hands. They're piling up in the warehouse at AMZN. These differential upgrades are silly. And consumers aren't asking for that. We're looking for real improvements in end products not itsy bitsy dinky upgrades. The retro look? Please.

3 upvotes
Woodgeese

I think You never shoot with an Olympus Camera, otherwise You woldn't no go confusing and say "None of them are deal makers unless u own original 4/3 lenses" The Camera is designed for micro FT with a special to use also FT Lenses. And You also dont know the advantage of the Cropfactor of 2 instead of omnly 1,3 ... 1,4 You know?

0 upvotes
kikiriki

@Woodgeese - advantage of crop 2? What advantage? Can You please explain?

0 upvotes
Jan Chelminski

And a new Oly patent just publicized puts PD under every pixel.

1 upvote
sfphotoarts

This is a very attractive camera, but aside from looks, why would anyone spend this much when for less than half the money you can get the equally small Canon SL1 or T4i, with a much wider range of lenses, bigger sensor and faster AF, more resolution, better battery life and an optical viewfinder! Doesn't really make any sense for a photographer to pick the Olympus.

2 upvotes
pdelux

really? - you are comparing a pro grade camera with pro build and functions to an entry/mid level DSLR and wonder why it costs twice as much.

Im not saying its cheap, but it certainly should cost more than those 2 plastic boxes.

If you dont know why you would use the E-M1 over an SL1 or T4i, then certainly its not for you... and an SL1 or canon rebel would suit you better, but there are other people who have different needs and are willing to pay for them.

18 upvotes
white shadow

Absolutely agree with pdelux.

You can't compare a Pro grade level camera with an entry level camera, even if it is a DSLR.

For a similar Pro grade DSLR, one would have to go for the Canon 1DX with the 24-70mm f/2.8 L Mk2. It may have slightly better tracking focus but it will cost you about $5,000.00 for the body and another $2,300.00 for the lens eventhough you are willing to take the weight.

For people who want a lighter weather proof camera with a similar focal lenght lens, this camera is it. And it will only cost you about the price of the 24-70mm f/2.8 L Mk2 lens making the combo actually quite affordable.

An excellent combo if you are trotting the globe. Picture quality is not far off from a full frame DSLR.

8 upvotes
Jan Chelminski

@White Shadow, agree except the C-AF tracking is not "slightly worse". The top line 35mm C/N tracking is state of the art and in some fields this is a very meaningful benefit over what the E-M1 can accomplish.
S-AF could be described as excellent, possibly tops, but C-AF should be described as good. It was quite poor in the E-M5, so that is very positive and I believe it will continue to improve as O is clearly interested in improving this.
Something that interests me is this suggests new potential over what would have been possible with analogue based PDAF performance in the 4/3 format, which was always inferior compared to its implementation in the 35mm format due to reduced sensitivity....

1 upvote
white shadow

Olympus is definitely trying their best to improve the tracking focus capability of their Micro 4/3 cameras to be competitive. Thus, the EM1 has in-chip PDAF as well as CDAF. One can feel that it is faster than previous Micro 4/3 cameras like the EM5.

However, it is still not fast enough if one is to track a bird flying pass. Maybe Oly may have to introduce some fast telephoto lenses in future with Ultrasonic Motor. For fast tracking focus, one still have to use a Canon 1DX with an EF 400mm f/2.8 L IS lens, for example.

Incidently, I have tried using the classic Oly 150mm f/2.0 lens on the EM1 and found it to hunt a bit despite its improved capabilty. Its far from what one would experience with the Canon 1DX. A lot of improvement needed here.

For now, the Micro 4/3 system is definitely not good enough for sports. However, the EM1 would make an excellent travel camera.

1 upvote
Jan Chelminski

And they apparently cut a deal with Sony to get it (on sensor PDAF tech), an indication of just how serious was their perceived need for it. I do think this needed improvement will come and it's possible it will even surpass what is possible in off chip PDAF in the not too distant future...

You mean the (4/3) ZD 150mm f2.0, the 'classic' OMZ 150mm f/2.0 was a MF lens, available in white or black ;)
There was also an OMZ 250mm f/2.0 and an OMZ 350 f2.8.

0 upvotes
white shadow

It would be good if Oly can improve on the tracking focus in the near future and perhaps introduce a Micro 4/3 version of the ZD 150 f/2.0 with a Ultrasonic Motor like those used in the Canon.

This is important if they want to attract nature photographers.

Yes, I used the ZD version, not the OMZ version on the EM1 recently.

The EM1 is introduced with On-Chip PDAF to cater for those who own the ZD auto-focus lenses.

Oly has no intention to continue the E series with an E-6.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
chadnchady

sfph is obviously new to cameras.

0 upvotes
BeyondPluto

S-AF is faster on the E-M1. E-M1 sensor scores much higher than either camera you mention on DXOmark. This is just the tip of the iceberg. But if you want to buy a plastic box with a 5-year-old sensor in it, Canon has a tourist special to fit your budget.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
gary payne

The EM5 is noticeably sharper/cleaner than the new EM1 and I am just guessing that the difference is that (despite the click-on lens info box), the shots of the EM5 were taken with the Oly 50mm f2, as other commentors have noted, and this is a sharper lens than the 45mm.

Really, please check the details, this would turn me off on the EM1 if I thought the info was correct. I have the EM5 and I don't want to go backwards on quality despite the great new features of the EM1. I am otherwise ready to pre-order the new body. gp

0 upvotes
Woodgeese

Where did You check the EM-1 to come to this opinion? ;-) I think You checked another camera ... but not the EM1 :-)

0 upvotes
Torsten Hoff

I have not used the E-M5, but someone mentioned it has a higher sharpening setting by default than the E-M1.

0 upvotes
Digitall

A natural evolution from from EM-5, with some great adictions, better EVF, better grip, virtually no CA, better detail IQ, better stability, better AF, better noise at high iso, and so on..., well done Olympus, Just please, down the price and will be an instant hit. I Like this E-M1.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
microscope user

Does anyone know if tethered shooting (from e.g. Lightroom) finally is possible with a micro 4/3 :)

0 upvotes
white shadow

Having tried the 12-40mmf/2.8 lens, this is what I would say about it.

It has a very good built and feels like a Zeiss ZE full frame lens. It is made of aluminium.

Priced at $999, it is much cheaper than the Lumix 12-35mm f2.8. Optically, it is also much better than the Lumix which is a bit soft at f/2.8.

It is best used wide open from f/2.8 to f/4.0. The colour rendition is very similar to a Zeiss lens. It has that 3D look, clarity and colour saturation.

The AF is silent and fast.

It is probably the best and sharpest Micro 4/3 zoom lens so far.

14 upvotes
Camediadude

Very cool to hear. For now I will drool and dream ...

0 upvotes
Tanngrisnir3

"A bit soft at 2.8"? LOL!

Thanks for admitting you've never actually used that lens, troll.

0 upvotes
white shadow

@ Tanngrisnir3

Well, if you think the Lumix 12-35mm f/2.8 is sharper at f/2.8 compared to the Oly 12-40 f/2.8, then you can go ahead to buy the Lumix.

You may not know who I am. I am one of those fortunate few who have the opportunity to try major cameras and lenses when they are introduced.

Do camera companies invite you to their pre-launch events?

3 upvotes
Tanngrisnir3

It's quite irrelevant who you are if you're spouting utter nonsense about the Panny being 'a bit soft at 2.8'; it qualifies you as a fool who doesn't know what he talking about.

Thanks again for admitting you haven't tried the Panasonic but desperately want to appear important by bloviating.

0 upvotes
white shadow

Go try the Oly 12-40 f/2.8 if you can get hold of one and compare with your Lumix 12-35 f/2.8 and see for yourself.

You can also check out the conclusion by photozone.de on the Lumix 12-35 f/2.8 and photographyblog.com.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
chadnchady

If you buy it with the Kit in australia who are also giving you the grip rebate. You are paying only like $600 for that lens. For that money it is definitely the best m/43 zoom lens for the money and may very well be the best value vs cost 2.8 zoom lens of any system full stop.

Comment edited 28 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Thomas Karlmann

Can anyone address what the Histogram is doing? Apparently there are FOUR colors displayed WITHIN the Histogram. Here is the bit from the E-M1's Manual:
"Histogram display: Display a histogram showing the distribution of brightness in the image. The horizontal axis gives the brightness, the vertical axis the number of pixels of each brightness in the image. Areas above the upper limit at shooting are displayed in red, those below the lower limit in blue, and the area metered using spot metering in green."

Question: What are the Upper and Lower limits referred to here? Interesting!

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Macx

You can set values to when you want highlight and shadow (over- and underexposure) warnings to appear.

0 upvotes
Thomas Karlmann

Is this great or what? How come this issue isn't being raved about? Has this feature been in earlier models, and therefore not considered as new? Thanks!

0 upvotes
Richard Butler

I think we fairly regularly point out the ability to set the upper and lower limits, since those then feed into the 'highlights and shadows' display mode. This marks areas above the upper brightness threshold as red and those below the lower limit as blue - at the point you shoot.

0 upvotes
joes49

An Oly E-3 owner here who has waited ... patiently ...for this, the EM-1. A load of wonderful glass in my bag, and finally, truly innovative hardware to make better use of. So much nonsensical prattling over what is professional equipment, what is not. In the end, it is the creative mind behind the viewfinder. Photography is not my full time profession, but I do make a good income from prints and photo shoots. New, unique, and leading edge. I love what I see.
My order went in today!

12 upvotes
white shadow

Good for you. You have made the right choice.

Tested the EM-1 yesterday at an Olympus event.

If one is thinking of going Micro 4/3, this is probably the best Micro 4/3 camera to date. The icing on the cake is the marvellous 12-40mm f/2.8.

This is a Pro standard camera made to the likes of the Canon 1DX, only to a smaller format. The body with the 12-40mm lens is weighty but not heavy and balance well while shooting. This is important if one will be using it regularly. Unlike the EM5, the grip is comfortable. It is completely shower proof. So, one can walk in the rain without worrying about it.

The built-in sensor phase detect AF has made quite a lot of improvement to tracking focus. Although it is fast, it still can't match the speed of the Canon 1DX but definitely faster than any mirrorless camera.

SOOC image quality is surprisingly impressive. Shooting up to ISO 3200 do not pose any problem at all. Even ISO 6400 is very useable.

An excellent choice for the intrepid traveller

2 upvotes
audiomarc

I own two E-Series bodies and half a dozen 4/3 lenses. I played with a friend's E-M5 recently and loved it but would have never have purchased one because of lack of real compatibilty with my old lenses. The E-M1 now provides a fabulous upgrade path to leading edge technology and easy entry into m4/3 while protecting my investment in glass. I am now saving up to get an E-M1 soon. Smart move, Olympus. Thank you!

4 upvotes
white shadow

For those who have tried the EM-1 would definitely agree that it is the best Micro 4/3 and mirrorless camera to date. It perform very well with the new 12-40mm lens and also reasonably well with the classic 4/3 lenses. Focusing is fast and one will have the opportunity to use the high grade 4/3 lenses. Optically, they can be said to be the best even when compared to Canon L lenses. The 14-35 f/2.0 is one of them.

It is a good thing Olympus is making this premium model. It has been long overdued. When Micro 4/3 was first introduced it was targeted at amatuers and beginners. Until recently, most of the Micro 4/3 lenses were made to a compromised quality although some still maintain their standards, namely the 14-45mm f/3.5-5.6 and the 20mm f/1.7 which came with the Lumix GF1. The subsequent models from both Olympus and Panasonic were made to entry level standard with the exception of some primes.

Olympus is setting a new standard now with the 12-40mm f/2.8.

0 upvotes
white shadow

Amateurs may consider the EM-1 and the new lens to be expensive but for what they are, they are actually quite cheap. One can have the whole combo for about the same price as the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L MkII which is about $2,300.00.

The main advantage is one is getting a professional grade camera and lens in a small package. Although APS-C cameras and lenses are cheaper, they are not made to this standard.

It is really weather proof; water resistant, dust resistant and freeze proof.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
white shadow

Eventually, what the EM-1 can provide is a very robust and capable camera which one can carry around easily and able to shoot in almost any condituon.

For me, that's important because I could be trekking the cold and wet mountain of Tibet or Wales, the dense and humid jungle of Borneo or the dusty desert of the Australian Outback or Morrocco.

Isn't it comforting to know that the photos that one desire to take could be achieve without much hazzle.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
ligurt

Is the e-m1 all olympus could do for those enthusiast who waited so long time to see the e-m5 sensor on a full 4/3 model in substitution of the extra aged E5?
I'm so disappointed with it that I'm selling my E3 with grip, 12-60and 50-200 swd lenses plus 50r shv1 on ebay. If their choice is to cut out professionals, that's right. Bye bye baby.
Nikon never did such a bad joke to his lenders (all of us), the epilogue is that I will never get an olympus camera anymore.

0 upvotes
yabokkie

think E-M1 means better ergonomics than E-M5.

about Oly 4/3", it's a shameful history of a shameful company with some best employees and products (other products) but I have no problem to get an Oly if it's of good quality at good price.

0 upvotes
Jason1972

I'm dumping Nikon to get this nice new Oly :) And I can't wait!!! The Oly is THAT good!!!

1 upvote
bw79st

Unless I've missed something, everyone seems to be dancing around the issue of whether the E-M1 will properly phase detect AF with a Lumix Leica 14-50mm f2.8-3.5 or any other Lumix 4/3 lens. One report I read said the camera will only work properly with Olympus 4/3 lenses. Any clarification on this?

0 upvotes
bluevellet

idk

I don't think it's dancing around the issue, more like forgetting there were 4/3 lenses from Panasonic. :)

1 upvote
pdelux

4/3 is 4/3 im sure it will work..how well... who knows

0 upvotes
sadwitch

10 more comments to reach the MSRP!

0 upvotes
Thomas Karlmann

Please Test the Olympus OMD E-M1 on the OLDER Studio target. I just spent over 1/2 hour on the "new" target and realized I cannot determine even 1/10 of the information I was able to glean from the OLDER Studio target.

Please do not shortchange your readers with this new target!!!!

Besides which, many of the cameras I need to compare to the E-M1 are not in the new target camera selector -- and may not ever get there -- Sony a99.

6 upvotes
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