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Nikon D7000 Dynamic Range (JPEG)

Our Dynamic Range measurement system involves shooting a calibrated Stouffer Step Wedge (13 stops total range) which is backlit using a daylight balanced lamp (98 CRI). A single shot of this produces a gray scale wedge from the camera's clipped white point down to black (example below). Each step of the scale is equivalent to 1/3 EV (a third of a stop), we select one step as 'middle gray' (defined as 50% luminance) and measure outwards to define the dynamic range. Hence there are 'two sides' to our results, the amount of shadow range (below middle gray) and the amount of highlight range (above middle gray).

To most people highlight range is the first thing they think about when talking about dynamic range, that is the amount of highlight detail above middle gray the camera can capture before it clips to white. Shadow range is more complicated; in our test the line on the graph stops as soon as the luminance value drops below our defined 'black point' (about 2% luminance) or the signal-to-noise ratio drops below a predefined value (where shadow detail would be swamped by noise), whichever comes first.

Note: this page features our new interactive dynamic range comparison widget. The wedges below the graph are created by our measurement system from the values read from the step wedge, the red lines indicate approximate shadow and highlight range (the dotted line indicating middle gray).

Picture Controls

The D7000 produces a tone curve that is very similar to what we've seen on previous Nikon models. At standard settings it measures a total dynamic range of approximately 9.2 EV which is a tad better than some of its direct competitors. All the different picture control settings offer the same highlight range of approximately 3.8 EV but vary in contrast. The Neutral setting applies the least contrasty tone curve while the vivid and landscape settings produce a 'punchier' tonality. The measured dynamic range remains pretty much unchanged along the ISO scale.

Active D-Lighting

Active D-Lighting is Nikon's method for capturing more information in the brightest parts of the scene and conveying a wider range of tones in the final image. When the system is activated the camera uses a darker exposure to capture more highlight tones and then analyses the scene and selectively brightens parts of the image to give correct brightness without losing local contrast. ADL offers five settings - Low, Normal, High, Extra High and Auto - or can be totally switched off.

The effect of Active D-Lighting differs depending on the scene, so this test, performed using our 13-stop wedge, isn't necessarily an accurate indication of 'typical' performance. It does clearly show, however, the way in which ADL is designed to work, extending the visible dynamic range by lifting shadow areas and darkening highlights, to get the most detail out of these areas in a single exposure.

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Comments

Total comments: 8
Nabeelmyousuf

Hello all,

How to check shutters in D7000 ?

0 upvotes
Michael 59

I recently upgraded or downgraded "depending on how you look at it" from the D3200 to the D7000. Although I lost MP, I gained a lot more features. My first D7000 had serious focus, back focus, and pixel issues. After contacting the seller and receiving another one, I finally had a good one and was very pleased. Years ago I had a D5100 which is said to have the same sensor as the D7000, but I find the D7000 images to look much better. I would recommend the D7000 to anyone serious about photography but not able or willing to spend too much money. Be sure you use a good prime lenses like a Nikkor 35mm f1.8 or the 50mm f1.8. Otherwise you will be wasting your time and/or money.

0 upvotes
Bas Veerkamp

It took me a while to get juse to the d7000 the ergonomics are just fine only lighter body after my d200 which was outdated a long time ago on which i got
great foto's only the colors are very different from my old d200 which i liked a lot never thought about the 10 mp

0 upvotes
BobFoster

Very subjective to speak to responsiveness as it depends greatly on the skill of the photographer, subject matter, time of day/night, etc. However, the Canon 60D and other Canon products are quick, but they have far less keepers as the AF module is not as accurate as the Nikon family of DSLR’s.

2 upvotes
reanim888

I think that this camera takes exceptional photos, I chose this model over the newer D3200 just for the additional photo taking features rather than the new user features. Kit lens is great for beginners and takes decent photos.

1 upvote
GEDERA GUY

As an upgrade to the D80 , the D7000 is a definite improvement , but build quality is still lacking , next to say, the D300S .

That being sad , the camera handles well ,even if the video function is still an option I scorn .

The main problem I have, is the slow flash sync speed with my SB 600 flashgun - a pathetic 1/60 sec .To utilise the full potential of the D7000 , I need to upgrade my flash gun - not easy when finances are tight .

0 upvotes
Deliverator

You should be able to sync at up to 1/320 (FP mode) with your SB600.

0 upvotes
Duncan Dimanche

You never tell us what ISO settings you shoot at in low light mode so how is that helpful ?

0 upvotes
Total comments: 8