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Nikon D5300 Review

February 2014 | By Allison Johnson, Barney Britton
Buy on GearShopFrom $796.9514 deals

 

 

Nikon's 'advanced beginner' DSLR, the D5300 takes the D5200's place between the entry-level D3200 and the enthusiast-targeted D7100 in the company's APS-C lineup. The D5300 offers a 24MP sensor (like its 24MP APS-C stablemates), an articulated rear LCD, and more physical controls than the D3200, but without the twin-dial interface and professional-grade AF system of the decidedly higher-market (and much more customizable) D7100.

Both visually and ergonomically the D5300 is a near-clone of its predecessor (it's fractionally lighter and a tiny bit smaller), but under the hood it is a stronger camera in a couple of important ways. The D5300's 24MP sensor lacks an anti-aliasing filter, which - consistent with our experiences testing the D7100 and D800E - gives it the edge in terms of resolution over the D5200. The difference is subtle (especially with a kit zoom attached), but it's always nice to see improvements to critical image quality potential, especially in mid-range models.

The D5300 also offers a beefed-up video mode, which is now capable of true 1080/60p HD video. This, plus the slightly widened (3.2" compared to 3") fully-articulated 1.04 million-dot LCD screen, should mean that the D5300 will be attractive to videographers as well as stills photographers. Easy to miss, but useful features include built-in Wi-Fi and GPS - both firsts for Nikon's DSLR lineup. Battery life gets a boost too: according to CIPA figures the D5300 offers an endurance of 600 shots, compared to 500 from the D5200. Remember, though, that this figure does not take features like Wi-Fi or GPS into account, and using them will shorten the amount of time you can spend shooting.

The Nikon D5300 can easily be classified as an iterative update, providing only a handful of features that weren't present in its D5200 predecessor. It speaks volumes about the D5200 that adding only a few more things amounts to an APS-C DSLR with 24 megapixels, no optical low pass filter, 1080/60p HD video recording, a fully articulated display and built-in Wi-Fi. In terms of on-paper specifications, the the D5300 looks 'fully loaded.'

The main feature we really wish it offered is a touchscreen LCD. We've come to appreciate being able to perform certain actions by touch on competing cameras, particularly things like exposure compensation and AF point placement in live view mode. We'd also like to see twin control dials - something Nikon has traditionally saved for its more expensive models, but some of its competitors offer at this price point.

Nikon D5300 key features

  • 24.1MP DX format CMOS sensor, without OLPF
  • EXPEED 4 processing
  • ISO 100-12,800 standard, up to 25,600 expanded
  • 5 fps continuous shooting
  • 39-point AF system, 9 sensors cross-type
  • 2016-pixel RGB metering sensor
  • 1080p60 video recording, built-in stereo mic
  • 1.04M dot 3.2" vari-angle LCD monitor

Key specs compared to the Nikon D5200

The table below shows how the major specifications of the D5300 compare against the D5200. As you can see, Nikon has updated a couple of core specifications, but the differences aren't huge.

 
Nikon D5300
Nikon D5200
Sensor resolution (type) 24MP CMOS (no OLPF) 24MP CMOS
Autofocus System
39 AF points (9 cross-type)
ISO sensitivity
100-12,800 (H1 expansion up to 25,600 equiv)
100-6400 (H2 expansion up to 25,600 equiv)
Display size / resolution 3.2", 1.04M-dot vari-angle 3", 921k-dot vari-angle
Maximum framerate (DX mode)
5 fps
Movie Mode 1080 60p/30p 1080 60i/30p
Battery life (CIPA) 600 shots 500 shots
Dimensions 125 × 98 × 76 mm
(4.9 × 3.9 × 3.0 in)
129 x 98 x 78 mm
(5.1 x 3.9 x 3.1 in)
Weight (without battery) 480 g (16.9 oz) 505 g (17.8 oz)

Compared to the Canon EOS Rebel T5i

Compared to its nearest competitor, Canon's EOS Rebel T5i, the Nikon D5300 offers a higher resolution sensor, more AF points, and the ability to shoot 1080/60p video (as opposed to 30p). It also includes built-in Wi-Fi and GPS. The D5300 is slightly smaller than the Canon in all dimensions, and a little lighter.

The Nikon D5300 is slightly smaller than the Canon T5i (the larger kit zoom mounted on the Nikon in this shot makes that a little hard to appreciate) but has a slightly more substantial hand-grip which contributes greatly to its feeling of solidity in the hand. Whereas the Canon's control dial (for exposure adjustment) is on the top-plate, the D5300's dial can be found on the rear of the camera (see below).
From the rear, the D5300 and T5i are both dominated by their 3.2" articulating LCD screens, and you can see the D5300's control dial at the upper right of the body. Button placement isn't exactly the same, as you'd expect, but both are representative of the prevailing trends in modern enthusiast DSLR design. The most important difference, really, is that the T5i's rear screen is touch-sensitive.

The T5i does have a couple of tricks up its sleeve, though - while both cameras have 3.2", 1.04 million-dot LCD screens, the T5i's is touch-sensitive, which we've come to really appreciate, especially when working in movie mode and live view. The T5i also features a 'Hybrid' AF system, which allows for faster and more positive (less hesitant) AF in live view and movie mode, plus AF tracking.

  Nikon D5300 Canon Rebel T5i
Sensor resolution (type) 24MP CMOS (no OLPF) 18MP 'Hybrid CMOS'
Autofocus System 39 AF points (9 cross-type) 9 AF points (all cross-type)
ISO sensitivity 100-12800 (max 25,600 equiv) 100-12800 (max 25,600 equiv)
Display size / resolution 3.2", 1.04M-dot vari-angle 3.0", 921k-dot vari-angle (touch-sensitive)
Maximum framerate (DX mode)
5 fps
Movie Mode 1080 60p/30p 1080 30p
Battery life (CIPA) 600 shots 440 shots
Dimensions 125 × 98 × 76 mm
(49.2 × 3.9 × 3.0 in)
133 x 100 x 79 mm
(5.2 x 3.9 x 3.1in)
Weight (without battery) 480 g (16.9 oz) 580 g (20.4 oz)

Compared to the rest

The D5300 may look good in comparison with its predecessor and Canon's equivalent model, but there are other options worth considering, beyond the two big brands. In terms of DSLRs, Ricoh's Pentax K-50 offers twin control dials, a weather sealed body and a larger viewfinder. If you're willing to look at mirrorless models, the Olympus OM-D E-M10 offers twin dials, a touch-screen, built-in Wi-Fi and an electronic viewfinder, all in a package considerably smaller than the Nikon.

Panasonic, Fujifilm and Samsung also make competitive models for a similar price, so it's worth considering which capabilities you do and don't need, before committing to one of the big two.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 235
12
eventhorizonsurfer
By eventhorizonsurfer (5 days ago)

some test footage at 60FPS for you. Pretty dang nice!

https://vimeo.com/91835724

1 upvote
Sherryann
By Sherryann (5 days ago)

I want to get the Nikon D5300 but I'm not sure what lens to get since its a DX-format camera. I would definitely love if someone can help me chose a good lens to go with the camera. Also, I would love to know if a non-DX lens would work well with the camera. I'm not a fan of DX lens. Thank you in advance!

0 upvotes
Rusdy
By Rusdy (2 days ago)

any af-s lenses, DX or FX, will work fine. AF-only lenses will work but no autofocus
for budget option, 35 f/1.8G will do fine

0 upvotes
Kishore Pratap Sanghvi
By Kishore Pratap Sanghvi (1 week ago)

I am graduating from a bridge camera to a DSLR. Have been a hobby photographer for many years primarily doing landscape photography but I do it only when on a vacation that would be twice a year. I was a little confused whether to buy a Canon 700D or a Nikon D5300. I have always used Canon cameras before and after going thru many reviews comparing the two cameras I am not wiser. I also understand that once one buys a DSLR one continues to buy cameras of that family so that it can save money on lenses. Assuming that the quality of photos is not much different in the two cameras is the touch screen in 700D so useful that I should buy a Canon or the WIFI-GPS so important in the Nikon. As there anything else that help me decide between the two. Your advice would be most helpful.Tx. You can reply directly on my mail - drkpsanghvi@gmail.com

0 upvotes
Rod0164
By Rod0164 (3 weeks ago)

If buyers will rely mostly on the reviews they will end up to buy nothing. Whether you agree or not reviewers are human too and tend to be subjective.

0 upvotes
Galbertson
By Galbertson (4 weeks ago)

Another question...if connected via NFC to iPad, will Voice Over speak data that would show on LCD/iPad???

0 upvotes
Galbertson
By Galbertson (1 month ago)

Is there live exposure preview in manual mode? I have very limited eyesight and have difficulty dependinding upon metering, but can see enough to see changes in light and adjusting dof, shutter and iso to specific needs of image.
Thanks much.

0 upvotes
cdmiii37
By cdmiii37 (1 month ago)

Just received my D5300 after damaging my D5100. The GPS and WiFi were two features as well as the increase of almost 8 mgp I get. The price of buying it was also a plus since I am a student and short funds to really invest in other professional models. SO far after spending two hours with it are really pleased. I chose the grey so I could easily tell the two apart quickly. I love the grip.

My first question was whether in Lr the GPS information will be in the detail of the meta data, I won't know until I get to that point. The display on the screen was very impressive and getting the settings the same as my D5100, which makes me comfortable is my first hurdle. I prefer outdoor photography and look forward to comparing it to my D5100 once I get it fixed. In the last 2 1/2 years I have taken over 260K images and I need reliable camera gear, so far I am very pleased with the D5300. I just need better lens.

Now I need a battery grip for easier control and feel.

1 upvote
Cgoor
By Cgoor (1 month ago)

This review was good, but the D5300 should have received the Gold award.Almost no other camera body for under $1,000 gives you more. In addition, I'm tired of reviewers criticizing Nikon ergonomics/handling. Nikon ergonomics/handling are excellent.

Noted above in your conclusion you stated- "warm and fuzzy connection with the camera that we'd like to feel..." I'm in the market looking for a new DSLR and I've been trying out various cameras and I literally picked up a D5300 and started to play with it and it was a joy to use. I found the ergonomics/handling as good as the Canon T5i if not better and you gave the T5i a higher rating in handling/ergonomics. Your objectivity needs improvement. In addition, a touch screen is not such a big deal. I owned a Canon S120 (I returned my S120 due to a problem with the battery in video mode) with a touch screen and the touch screen added a very minor handling/ergonomic improvement over my S95.

1 upvote
Average User
By Average User (1 month ago)

I agree with every statement in this comment. I love my 5300. In fact I like shooting with it better than with my D600, which is much bigger especially when you add the larger ff lenses. And the image quality is just as good, except in super low light.
Most of the reviewers complaints about ergonomics are just what you get used to...don't impact image quality. With one exception:
The live view slow magnification makes close focus a chore, and if you don't have plenty of time you just lose the shot.
On this, I am not complaining about the features that Nikon has chosen not to add. I am complaining about the sub par function of an important feature they did include. They should fix it.
The good news is that the available image quality is just unequalled in an APS-c camera, and the excellent 39 point autofocus the flip screen and other features provide you the ability to achieve it(with better lenses). Nikon has done itself proud.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Brian Leser
By Brian Leser (1 month ago)

On the specification page the D5300 is listed as having an optical viewfinder magnification of 0.82x while on page 3. Body and Design it says it has an optical viewfinder magnification of only 0.52x. The illustration on page three also seems to illustrate a magnification of 0.52x. Am I missing something?

0 upvotes
Brian Leser
By Brian Leser (1 month ago)

Many thanks to Allison Johnson for explaining to me that manufacturers use a 50 mm lens on their crop sensor cameras to calculate viewfinder magnification. In order to compare cameras with different size sensors DP Review takes sensor size into account and therefore provides a different number. The number is approximately equal to the manufacturer's viewfinder magnification divided by the crop factor.

0 upvotes
NorCalAl
By NorCalAl (1 month ago)

For a review that rates the camera so highly, the wording is such that virtually every statement is "it does this well BUT" and then a demerit of some type. Reading it, I get the distinct impression the reviewer didn't like the camera. I've owned a number of Nikons and just added this to my group. I find it to be an excellent choice!

Perhaps the reviewer is like so many people on the Internet - even the slightest difference is rated as something barely tolerable. His comment about not being able to use the command dial in menus is a perfect example. Is it really that much more trouble to use the cursor?

Every single feature is treated this way. It works BUT it could have been better. It makes the review seem very negative and had I read it before purchasing, it might have influenced me to look at another body. I have a good amount of money in Nikon mount lenses, so that helps me make decisions. I don't want fanboy reviews but this sort of thing is the worst.

Were you happy with anything? Anything?

1 upvote
Hobbyphotography
By Hobbyphotography (1 month ago)

Would welcome your thoughts on buying a new body. Have been an amateur. Now going on a safari this summer.

Want to upgrade from d5100. Have sigma 12-24, Nikon 18-80, Nikon 55-300.

?d7100 or d5300

Also would welcome thoughts in a zoom lens. Thinking of sigma 150-500.

1 upvote
The Gooze
By The Gooze (1 month ago)

I went with the D7100. I jumped from a Canon T3i and its a huge learning curve and well worth it. In my opinion. If you plan on going pro and you have the money for the D7100, go for it. Just shop around until you find the deal you want.
The D7100 is a whole different animal when it comes to how it performs and how you use it. But if you have the basics down and you understand what you need to do to get the shots you want then all you will have to learn is how to get to those functions on the camera.
In the end, i have a lot to learn but in my mind it is well worth it because I will be training myself on a damn good camera.

1 upvote
Average User
By Average User (1 month ago)

I went with the D5300 because of the articulating LCD. you can adjust the screen to avoid glare, and use objects to stabilze for better pictures. But the d7100 focus motor in the body is faster and it has lens fine tuning: better for a pro.
Starting new and going on a safari, take the Nikor 18-300. Nailing the zoom will usually yield better pictures than cropping. Changing lenses in the dusty savanna not good for camera and you may miss the shot. Take also one good 1.8 or better, prime for low light. The Nikor 1.8 35mm is the obvious choice, but for more money the Sigma 18-35 is a 1.8 with prime clarity that I now use every day.

2 upvotes
cdmiii37
By cdmiii37 (1 month ago)

I agree that the ability to rotate the LCD was a reason for buying the D5300 after having the D5100. Your observation about lenses is dead on but I still prefer a fixed lens and another reason I now have three camera bodies with my three favorite lenses. I also like what Sigma has to offer as for quality lenses.

0 upvotes
garryf1960
By garryf1960 (1 month ago)

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 300mm F4 D ED SWM IF Lens 300/4 AFS, Will this lens fit a Nikon D5300?

0 upvotes
larrewl
By larrewl (1 month ago)

Yes. I have a D5300 with Nikon Nikkor AF-S 300mm F4 D ED SWM IF Lens. Everything works fantastic.

0 upvotes
Pepe Le Pew
By Pepe Le Pew (2 months ago)

I'll stick to my Pentax K-30

0 upvotes
tbcass
By tbcass (2 months ago)

Given the choice of a Canon 60D, a Sony A77, a Nikon D7000 or a D5300 for the same price the older cameras are clear winners IMO. I'd rather buy older higher end technology than brand new lower end. Cameras today aren't any better than those from 2-3 years ago. It's all hype from the manufacturers to get you to waste your money.

1 upvote
BarnET
By BarnET (1 month ago)

besides the 60D yes they are all winners.

0 upvotes
brownie314
By brownie314 (1 month ago)

Yup, agree. The D7100 is not light years ahead of my D7000. In fact, I see no reason to update my body to a D7100 - I don't think it offers anything that would change the way I photograph things. Nice glass - that would definitely change how I photograph things.

1 upvote
Tootsall
By Tootsall (2 months ago)

I'm in the process of moving up to DSLR from Bridge and what I don't see is folks commenting on the advantages of the swivel/tilt LCD. The availability of that feature on the D5300 is almost enough to make me consider it in lieu of the D7100. Once you've used that feature you'll never want to go back to a fixed LCD for high/low/around-the-corner shots! Really nice when you've got the camera on a low tripod and don't want to lay down in the dirt to line the shot up too! Sure wish it was on the 7100 and that would be a slam-dunk.

2 upvotes
Average User
By Average User (2 months ago)

Couldn't agree more. Especially for "fence post shooters" like me who don't carry a tripod but who anchor the camera on something to get a clear shot, it's critical. Also angling the screen frequently helps to see the LCD where glare otherwise make it unusable. I also like the right thumb position of the the plus and minus keys for close focus and the review key for quickly reviewing images.

1 upvote
brownie314
By brownie314 (1 month ago)

IMO, the tilt/swivel thing is nice, but rendered not very effective because of poor live view performance. If live view had better AF performance - it might be worth it. Honestly, I hate to say it, but if you want a body that has tilt/swivel and good all around live view performance - you might have to go with another brand - like a Canon 70D, or something from m4/3.

1 upvote
Average User
By Average User (2 months ago)

True. On the other hand, The Sigma 1.8 18-35 zoom works great with the camera, and in fact when you get the extra lens optimization kit, you can fine tune the lens to the camera, as you can a number of the other recent Sigma lenses. That makes the lens more compatible with this camera than the Nikon lenses, since the fine tune feature for Nikon cameras/lenses is not included in the D5XXX cameras.

0 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (2 months ago)

This camera doesn't support some Sigma lenses.

4 upvotes
Mike Toy
By Mike Toy (2 months ago)

Reading the review of the D5300 it appears that the camera does not adjust changes in aperture if you shoot manually in Live View mode. At least not until you take a shot.

Can anyone tell me (perhaps someone that has this camera) what happens when you use Live View in Shutter Priority mode? The review is a little grey here and you could be forgiven for thinking that you can't actually use it - if the camera lacks a separate aperture motor how does it then compensate for changes in light when in SP mode?

The D3100 does it, as does the D800 so surely I am reading this the wrong way?

Thanks.

0 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (2 months ago)

The motor is for focus, not aperture. An "AF" (AF-D) lens will set exposure, including aperture, on a non-motor D40 to D5300 body. Just not focus. Now that AF-S lenses probably offer what you need, and are the best value in all lenses, it's only an issue with not having AF with the fine old "AF" lenses. That, and it puts you with G lenses. Those have no manual aperture ring, requiring clumsy menu setting, of pro manual work.

Nikon really should make a D610 type camera, the size of a D5300, or smaller. Smaller motor included. After all, this is 2014. This would answer the size question, with mirror-less.

Nikon desperately needs to do two things. Fix rolling shutter, and manual control with HD video, on their better still photo centric DSLR's, *and* they need to develop a better full frame mirror-less system, with an adapter, for F-Mount lens owners. That absolutely must include better, faster, bigger EVF only, and phase detect beating AF-C tracking improvement.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Neodp
By Neodp (2 months ago)

Not to mention, they desperately need to make an open specification, for user groups reprogramming, and customization of the camera, before they get left behind.

1 upvote
BarnET
By BarnET (2 months ago)

Not for sports and action they say.......
Which DSLR at this price point does a better job at sports an action.

Sony slt's may have faster bursts but evf refresh rates can cause issues with fast action. Especially when the scene has some high contrast.

Pentax don't have an as advanced af system in the very good k30/50.
Nor does canon. So which is better. It ain't an D7100 at that price one might expect more with buffer size.

2 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (2 months ago)

I'm not sure why everyone thinks that you need 1000fps second to shoot sports. I brought a D5300 and D3300 to a paid sporting event tonight. Worked fine, as I expected it to.

These entry-level cameras offer more features than the pro cameras of less than 10 years ago.

I have faster pro cameras, but these little DX things are so good I end up grabbing them a lot of the time. I shot pro wrasslin' tonight and I had complete faith in these two cheap cameras that I was willing to bring them to a corporate shoot.

Any DLSR in Nikon's current line-up is more than enough to tackle sports for any photographer worth his salt.

FWIW, the D3300 IQ actually seemed to have an edge over the 5300.

3 upvotes
Average User
By Average User (2 months ago)

This is a great report. Truth is, the various shortcomings people describe are small compared to the wonderful capacity of this as well as other cameras. What lenses did you use to shoot your even?

1 upvote
jango
By jango (2 months ago)

i don't understand: if " the D5300 presents D7100-level image quality" as said in the review, way the score of the image quality of the d5300 is less then the d7100 when compared?

4 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (2 months ago)

Scoring is based on more than image quality...

1 upvote
jango
By jango (2 months ago)

i ment on the picture quality section the d7100 score more then the d5300 even " the D5300 presents D7100-level image quality" as said in the review

2 upvotes
EthanX
By EthanX (2 months ago)

Guess they just can't give the 5300 a better score on IQ than the 7100 got.

Matters of "politics", I assume...

3 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (2 months ago)

The biggest news seems to be that Nikon seems to finally fix its JPEG engine which was so badly broken it made their cameras practically unusable for JPEG shooters. Now their high-ISO JPEGs look as good or better as Canon's.

4 upvotes
toomanycanons
By toomanycanons (2 months ago)

What a ridiculous comment. Nikon's JPEG engine has always been great for JPEG shooters (I'm one). What the heck are you talking about?

1 upvote
BarnET
By BarnET (1 month ago)

There was a good and solid article about the D5100 Jpeg engine.
It really turned all the great qualities of the 16mp Sony to complete and utter crap.

this had already been fixed with other Nikon's before this one though.

0 upvotes
OceanFroggie
By OceanFroggie (2 months ago)

Technically Sony have some interesting innovations BUT boy the bodies look ugly to the eye.

The D5300 performs as well as it looks. I get WIFI but what is with this GPS rubbish?

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (2 months ago)

I love the GPS. It's great for traveling. It's also provides an easy way to find images from a specific locations using the LR5 Map module.

2 upvotes
RadPhoto
By RadPhoto (2 months ago)

You'd DON'T have to you use the GPS! Why does it bother you? I love having GPS. You probably don't travel, so GPS will be useless!

0 upvotes
PedagangAsongan
By PedagangAsongan (2 months ago)

no front dial is a minus for ergonomic

2 upvotes
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (2 months ago)

I am getting bored of Nikon and Canon - Why can't they innovate?
Although I am not a big fan of Sony at least they shake the community up and try to do something different...

4 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (1 month ago)

1

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Allen Yang
By Allen Yang (2 months ago)

Some keep mentioning Sony's mirrorless cameras. However, they have neglected the fact that almost all the E-mount lens have no price/performance advantage over Nikon's lens. Most of Sony's E-mount lens are ridiculously overpriced. In addition, yes, one can get adapters and use other companies' lens, but what about auto focus?

4 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (2 months ago)

Metabones have adapters that will give full autofocus.

0 upvotes
quiquae
By quiquae (2 months ago)

@BarnET
>Metabones have adapters that will give full autofocus.

...yes...but...vewwwwwwwwy sloooowwwwlyyyyy....

0 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (1 month ago)

quiquae. that is also an body problem.
The A7R has NO pdaf on the sensor. These lenses are made for Pdaf so the performance will indeed be slow. in most cases it's pretty accurate though.

0 upvotes
andry r
By andry r (2 months ago)

Nikon D5300 uses a Sony sensor,
http://chipworks.force.com/catalog/ProductDetails?sku=NIK-D5300_Pri-Camera

0 upvotes
Zoron
By Zoron (2 months ago)

with panasonic, olympus and fuji going full steam....Nikon better come up with an explosive D900 to woo us.....

0 upvotes
BarnET
By BarnET (2 months ago)

Those 3 brands make some stellar mirrorless options.
However they still can't touch the D800

Nikon still makes some solid Dslr's unlike the entry Canon's

2 upvotes
Average User
By Average User (2 months ago)

I have had both of these lenses. The quality of the two lenses you list is not sufficiently different to buy the new one and neither one of them is sufficient to really utilize the 24 megapixels.
The Sigma 18-35 for $799 is the game changer and would be a huge improvement because the image quality is so much better, but also because you can open it to 1.8 f so you can get a lot of indoor shots that the others can only handle at much higher ISO's that really degrade the images. In fact this zoom gives me better images than the Nikons f1.8 35 mm prime. You will use that lens constantly. Keep your 18-200 for longer distance shots. If it's too much money then get the 5200 which is very nearly the same camera, plus that lens instead of the 5300.

1 upvote
Robert Eckerlin
By Robert Eckerlin (2 months ago)

Question about a Zoom lense for the D5300

As a follow on to my D5000, I am considering to buy the D5300 and will use it with just one (Zoom) lense. That one Zoom lense will probably be either:

- the NIKKOR AF-S DX 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED VR (that I already own)
- or the new NIKKOR AF-S DX 18–140mm 1:3,5-5,6 G ED VR

If abstracting from the difference in the zoom range and the slight difference in the weight/dimenson: could an expert please tell me if one of the two above lense is for use on the D5300 substantially superior (for which reasons?) to the other one?

Thanks a lot in advance for your answer

0 upvotes
select
By select (2 months ago)

I have the 18-140mm VR lens.
It's a good lens but Idk how good is the 18-200 vr II
what I can say is: If I already had the 18-200 why I should change it with the 18-140? to me this makes no sense

1 upvote
ezyernie
By ezyernie (2 months ago)

Try the sigma 18-250- yeru good lens priced very well.

1 upvote
ezyernie
By ezyernie (2 months ago)

Very good.

0 upvotes
Robert Eckerlin
By Robert Eckerlin (2 months ago)

Thank You very much to select and to ezyernie for your answers.

select: I was believing to have read (or extrapolated?) that for some of the new Nikon DSLRs coming without anti-aliasing filter, the new NIKON 18-140mm zoom was superior to older somehow similar lenses. From your answer, I get the impression that the quality difference between the two zooms ist not sufficiently large, that its worth for me to bother.

ezyernie: I will take a look at the sigma 18-250

Thanks again to both of you.

0 upvotes
Average User
By Average User (2 months ago)

Robert:
You have the 18-200. I had it, but gave it to my daughter, so then I got the 18-140 as part of the kit deal with the 5300. It is no better than the 18-200 and of course it's missing a lot of range.
On a tight budget, the next lens you should have is a prime that will give you low light capability, and much sharper images in much lower light. (A 1.8 lens lets in almost four times more light than a 3.5 lens.) The clear choice is the 35mm Nikon 1.8g. It is also light, small, and quick.
I highly recommend that you spend some time with the lens comparison tool on the site DXOMARK.com. They are the industry standard for testing capabilities of lenses and they do it with different cameras, so you could see how the lenses you are considering, compare, both on your present D5000 and on the D5300.
The bottom line is that on the 12 mp d5000 these lenses are not too different, but on the D5300 the 35mm 1.8 delivers almost twice the image clarity.

1 upvote
Robert Eckerlin
By Robert Eckerlin (2 months ago)

Average User: Thank You a lot for your detailed und useful explanations.

Robert

0 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (2 months ago)

This camera break support for 3rd party lenses, batteries and battery grips.

Please think twice.

2 upvotes
Eyeglass10101
By Eyeglass10101 (2 months ago)

What are you talking about? Batteries and grips yes, but it does work with 3rd party lenses. I have tried Tamron and Sigma and all have worked here in the shop. Please verify your info before spouting incorrect info.

6 upvotes
RyanBoston
By RyanBoston (2 months ago)

The Sigma 17-50 works great on this camera. They now sell it compatible with D5300. It will have a sticker on the box. Incredibly sharp lens with lots of detail from this sensor.

0 upvotes
Pietro N Romano
By Pietro N Romano (2 months ago)

Great picture quality from a great little camera.
The review captures accurately the stronger and weaker points of this camera. I bought this as a substitute for my D90. Why didn't I buy a D7100? Well the spec. on the D5300 is more than I need for hobby portrait photography, and I appreciate that it's smaller, lighter and also the protection afforded by the flip-out (and in) rear screen.
Great picture quality with my hobbyist glass (18-200, 70-300) and obviously better still with my 50mm 1.4G.
Being smaller obviously brings the usabiilty quirks - but if it didn't have any of those it would probably be larger, heavier, more expensive and called the D7200...

5 upvotes
Average User
By Average User (2 months ago)

Great review, and on the money.
This camera has the capability of producing really great shots for a photographer with the time and patience to use it, but focus is the issue.
Now that there are 24 mp with no anti aliasing filter, the image clarity can be amazing. And this is the model I want because of the articulating screen.
I use it almost exclusively with the new Sigma 18-35, and when it does get the focus right, it's amazing. But that's not nearly often enough. In fact, whatever lens you use with this camera, and I have tried a lot, focus is an issue.
Clarity is great, but if the capability of the camera to utilize the clarity is compromised by a dysfunctional live view, What's the point? This camera needs a major software fix.

1 upvote
KInfinity
By KInfinity (2 months ago)

What camera do you use with the Sigma 18-35? This D5300? How do you think it, and do you think the AF is improved on another camera?

0 upvotes
RyanBoston
By RyanBoston (2 months ago)

I don't have a focus issue with my 5300. It actually focuses very good unless it's pitch dark. Have you tried other lenses on it?

1 upvote
DDWD
By DDWD (2 months ago)

its your sigma lens. not the camera.

2 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (2 months ago)

My Sigma 18-35 practically lives on my D5300 and I have no problems focusing at all.

3 upvotes
Pietro N Romano
By Pietro N Romano (2 months ago)

I have no problems focusing with my Nikon 18-200, 70-300 or 50mm 1.4

0 upvotes
JEROME NOLAS
By JEROME NOLAS (2 months ago)

I don't have a Nikon camera but this one seems right on the money. I don't understand you "photographers"...kit lens is just fine, sharp in the middle, less in corners. Features, performance are enough for the targeted audience...
I don't buy DSLR because of bulk and weight, otherwise I'd jump in! Great review!!!

3 upvotes
KInfinity
By KInfinity (2 months ago)

I'm seeing a lot of comments putting this camera down simply because it's smaller and less expensive. I want to point something out. You don't need every feature, and you don't need to spend a large sum to take great photos.

Part of what I do to evaluate a camera and a lens is to simply google flickr, like "D5300 flickr". It's fast and I can learn a lot about what a lens/camera is capable of by seeing how others were able to use it in real (non-nikon sources) samples.

From what I can gather from Flickr, on average, more serious photographers use the D7000/7100 than the D3NNN and D5NNN models. But, I see plenty of great shots from the latter. Although I don't own the kit 18-55 VR lens (I got the 16-85MM VR instead), I see plenty of great shots with the kit. I like that it has closer working distance, and it's small. Although I like my16-85mm, I think the (typically $100) add-on price for the 18-55mm is a great value. I can see the D3300, with it's smaller lens, as a great value.

3 upvotes
pacnwhobbyist
By pacnwhobbyist (2 months ago)

In looking at the test results for things such as dynamic range and noise, it's apparent to me that the sampling of cameras are all pretty close and any difference between them is mostly academic. The T5i and its older sensor show a bit more noise at higher ISOs than the D5300 but it's not night and day between the two. The D5300 is a great camera, but so are the cameras from the competition. The camera industry is like the car industry, there are subtle differences between the models and some are slightly better than others at some things, but at the end of the day, no one is making a bad camera right now.

2 upvotes
Allison Johnson
By Allison Johnson (2 months ago)

Exactly, and that's why sometimes it comes down to things like handling and interface quirks for us. A camera that's more enjoyable to use is less likely to be left at home.

2 upvotes
Artifact
By Artifact (2 months ago)

Compared to my old canon rebel XT this camera captures unbelievable amount of details in shadows and highlights. If such things are not important then yeah, you can look at menus and buttons but purely from image quality perspective d5300 has no competition from canon.

1 upvote
Allison Johnson
By Allison Johnson (2 months ago)

Comparing the 24MP D5300 to the 8MP Canon XT is not all that fair of a comparison. And nobody said image quality wasn't important, it's just that the subtleties of usability can make a bigger difference than it seems.

1 upvote
Don Kiyoti
By Don Kiyoti (2 months ago)

Consumer grade camera, consumer grade lens, consumer grade photos - then why bother with a professional grade review? As pointed out by Richard Butler below, most folks who buy this camera will never buy another lens. My guess is they'll walk out of Best Buy with it after hearing "Nikons are good."

Given how glacially slow DPReview is at reviewing cameras, and given that there are other cameras waiting for a review that actually merit such a detailed review <cough-K-3-cough> I just don't understand spending so much time and effort on this kind of camera.

(Not that there's anything wrong with consumer grade by the way.)

Comment edited 57 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
KInfinity
By KInfinity (2 months ago)

I know what you are trying to say, but I disagree. To be constructive, I'll explain. I have a D5200 and 6 lenses. I'm an amateur hobbyist, and I love the D5XXX form factor and price.

FYI, I have friends with D3100's, D5100's and D7100's. I like the D7100 a lot. It has a big, high res screen, autofocus motor, better viewfinder and external flash control. I like that my D5200 has interval mode (time lapse) and support for IR remotes, which the D3100 does not. I also like that the money that I saved with the D5200 went towards lenses.

I like that this D5300 has a 3.2 screen, which is flippable. Sounds like a winner to me. In case your wondering, I can see my next SLR as a D600, so that I can use a 50mm prime and get as much photo real estate as I currently do with my 35mm prime.

Kevin

0 upvotes
Eric Glam
By Eric Glam (2 months ago)

I've had the D5300 with Nikon 35mm f/1.8G lens for a few months now.
I agree with every word in this review.

The still & video quality is very good.
But the camera is so frustrating to use and handle, that it takes away the fun and joy of shooting photos. The lack of touch capability, the lack of real aperture control in LiveView, the sluggishness of the LCD when zooming to check focus, the complicated menu, the missing dial - all of these make the camera very hard to use.

One other thing that this review neglected to mention is the fact that the D5300 is almost useless with fast glass, when using the viewfinder. In this review they mainly used the kit lenses which go to f/3.5 max. My lens opens up to f/1.8, and let me tell you - the focus point is never where I intended it to be when I use the viewfinder, even stopped down to f/4.0.

0 upvotes
Eric Glam
By Eric Glam (2 months ago)

Focus point is OK with the LCD screen (LiveView) - that's when the camera uses CDAF, slow as snails but works. With the viewfinder, it uses PDAF, which is faster of course, but completely misses the target I focus on. I even went to the store to replace the lens, thinking I might get a lens that better matches my camera, but to no avail. Focusing using the viewfinder still misses the target.

And Nikon chose to NOT include AF Fine-Tune with this model, so I'm stuck with a Nikon lens that can't focus properly with the D5300's viewfinder.
Also, Nikon included a faster processor in the D5300 than the D7100, yet they made it slower so it doesn't cannibalize the sales of its older brother. What the hell?

1 upvote
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (2 months ago)

You're just the latest victim of the 351.8. AF On, AFC 9points, menu a3 to off, that's the way to shoot a Nikon.

1 upvote
Eric Glam
By Eric Glam (2 months ago)

Well, I can understand the selection of 9 points AF.
But why AF-C? I don't want the camera to continuously focus.

Also, in AF-C mode, the AF illuminator cannot be enabled (menu a3), and I do want to use it, otherwise the camera cannot auto-focus in dark environments.

1 upvote
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (2 months ago)

Eric, you need to use AF On to get the best out of just about any Nikon DSLR: The thumb controls when you focus. It takes a little practice. You cannot expect to shoot wafer-thin depth of field with any camera without a lot of practice any more than I could play "Steppin' Out" like Eric Clapton the first week I picked up a Les Paul.
http://www.luminescentphoto.com/blog/2010/11/05/nikon-af-on-technique/
The folks in the FX forum use AF On/ AFC to the tune of about 90% because it flat out works better for sports, BIFS, portraits, you name it.
Switch mode when you need the assist.

1 upvote
RyanBoston
By RyanBoston (2 months ago)

The 35 1.8 can have those issues. It's not the camera.

1 upvote
MrMojo
By MrMojo (2 months ago)

Eric, if you haven't used AF-ON then I think that you will be pleasantly surprised at how well it works. AF-ON combined with AF-C is used by many pro photographers because it gets the job done.

I'm a long-time pro who started out with film and manual focus lenses. I have always disliked the shutter release engaging auto focus. Frankly, I want a DSLR that operates more like a manual focus camera; using AF-ON gives me what I want. All I need the shutter release to do is turn on the camera meter and release the shutter. And using AF-ON replaces the clumsy AF-L button "feature", which is as counter-intuitive as camera controls get...

My main user-interface complaint with the D5300 and similar DXXXX bodies is the lack of a dedicated AF-ON button and the location of the user-mappable AE/AF-L button. It is simply not in the ideal location for my thumb while the AF-ON button is spot-on.

0 upvotes
select
By select (2 months ago)

I have this camera and I love it!
It produces such high quality images... for sure it's the best camera in this segment, but Nikon should advertise a lot more.
This camera destroy the Canon 650D/700D

6 upvotes
Gazeomon
By Gazeomon (2 months ago)

Nikon destroys the Canon's. Does that make You feel better?
Long live photography.

9 upvotes
mimot13
By mimot13 (2 months ago)

A camera must be good not only with technical specs on paper but during shooting too..! Do you tried a Canon 700D or 70D ? Try and then tell me what you think about, still and video. Yes the D5300 could be a good camera but guys who own a 70D are also very happy with. Actually Canon is not destroyed at all.

2 upvotes
pacnwhobbyist
By pacnwhobbyist (2 months ago)

The test results do not show that the D5300 "destroys" the T5i. Only area where T5i lags just a bit behind is noise at high ISO but it's still not terrible.

0 upvotes
vagtanklan
By vagtanklan (2 months ago)

The T5i lags pretty noticeably behind the D5300 in terms of dynamic range ... at any ISO.

9 upvotes
select
By select (2 months ago)

yes I use also (sometimes) a Canon 650D (is the same of 700D) and there's no comparison... D5300 is a way better in any sense...

0 upvotes
Gazeomon
By Gazeomon (2 months ago)

Another predictable review of another boring middle of the road camera. What about the more exciting gear like Pentax K3 and their 'limited' lenses? 'Imaging Resource' is now my favourite review site.

16 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (2 months ago)

Gazeomon, please elaborate why the K-3 is so exciting? And if you already know that, what would a full review add?

2 upvotes
fakuryu
By fakuryu (2 months ago)

MikeF4Black, it is simply and currently the best APSC DSLR made that's why

7 upvotes
Gazeomon
By Gazeomon (2 months ago)

MikeF4Black, You don't need me to elaborate. There are numerous credible reviews and YouTube clips out there. DPREVIEW has it's own 'review culture' which shows that interesting products do not necessarily get prominent review exposure on this site. It's the 'bread and butter' stuff from the big volume players which come first.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
pew pew
By pew pew (2 months ago)

why no live preview of aperture changes in live view
Can´t i see the bokeh before i take a shot ?

1 upvote
Artifact
By Artifact (2 months ago)

Bought d5300 to replace my old canon rebel XT. Sensor on this nikon is unbelievable. RAW is so good that I think I do not need to bracket anymore. ISO 3200 from this camera is more usable than ISO 400 from the old rebel.

7 upvotes
Eigenmeat
By Eigenmeat (2 months ago)

Hmm... DPR wrote:
"Autofocus with the 18-140mm is speedy and accurate enough for most purposes."

"Accurate enough for most purposes" does really inspire confidence. That also implies that you are unlikely to get the most of your lens. The PDAF will only be good enough if you don't look closely...

That is one thing that really keep me some current SLR. These PDAF sensors are simply not enough to keep out with high resolution main sensor. If I am not shooting action, I pick CDAF over PDAF any day.

2 upvotes
Zerixos
By Zerixos (2 months ago)

With a 140mm you probably have a aperture of 5.6, what might bring some problems in PD, they focus better with bigger apertures like 2.8. That being sad. CD will always work, because the mirror doesn’t have to be down. A lens like 18-140 isn’t for the purposes of fast focussing, so your lens also determents how quick your PDAF is. So picking up a new camera with a PDAF might also have a CDAF and you will have to invest in some better glass.

0 upvotes
RichRMA
By RichRMA (2 months ago)

Boring. Utilitarian. Did they put a metal weight in the bottom? I know how the N. American target market equates bulk with value.

2 upvotes
elt
By elt (2 months ago)

The model upgrade or change from D5200 to D 5300 so quickly is confusing not to mention disappointing. When would D5400 come out? Probably within a few months.

1 upvote
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (2 months ago)

Wouldn't be surprised if it comes out on Monday :)

2 upvotes
BorisAkunin
By BorisAkunin (2 months ago)

And the review will be done before that of the K-3 is published...

3 upvotes
RyanBoston
By RyanBoston (2 months ago)

This is not made out of ordinary plastic.. No mention of the new Sereebo Carbon this is made out of. This is the first commercial product made with this stuff.

Looks like very impressive stuff.

7 upvotes
gartblaum
By gartblaum (2 months ago)

Yes, i wonder why Nikon is quiet about the new carbon fiber reinforced plastics. But it seems to have a better strength and durability.

2 upvotes
RichRMA
By RichRMA (2 months ago)

http://www.teijin.com/news/2013/ebd131017_13.html

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
newe
By newe (2 months ago)

I'll get a one for $500. Have tons lenses. Including sigma. No lens snobbery on my end

0 upvotes
maxnimo
By maxnimo (2 months ago)

From the sample pics I saw, that nikon zoom lens belongs in a toy store. To use such a lens in a test simply destroys the credibility of this site.

2 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (2 months ago)

The majority of our real-world images were indeed shot with the 18-140mm lens (though we also shot some with the 50mm F1.8 and 35mm F1.8 DX).

Given the vast majority (we've been told over 90%) of consumer-grade DSLR users never buy a second lens, it would seem pretty incredible if we'd used high-end glass and shown performance most users won't ever see.

Our formal tests are conducted with the 50mm F1.4G, which is exceedingly sharp at the apertures we use.

24 upvotes
maxnimo
By maxnimo (2 months ago)

I see your reasoning, but it's still beyond my comprehension how any hobby photographer would buy a relatively high-quality camera such as this and use it with such an awful lens.

0 upvotes
brycesteiner
By brycesteiner (2 months ago)

There are a lot of soccer moms out there who believe they will get better pictures with having a bigger camera, albeit all set on auto.

4 upvotes
ishu
By ishu (2 months ago)

brycesteiner--a lot of the soccer moms are right. A D5300 or other DSLR will get them better pictures than their smartphones or compact cameras.

The AF and shutter response alone will help, never mind the optics. And a 55mm=80mm equiv. zoom is better than the 24-35mm equiv on the camera phones. Sure they could get even better pictures with additional know-how, or a 70-200 f/2.8 zoom. But if you've been on a soccer field, you ought to know that most any DSLR in auto mode will be a serious upgrade for most of the "soccer moms."

3 upvotes
brycesteiner
By brycesteiner (2 months ago)

ishu - A nice compact camera with a good built in zoom in auto will probably take just as good of pictures as this.
I shoot lots of sports, including soccer, and one of the things I hear over and over is people want to know how I get the pictures I do.
They bought a nice nikon or canon because it has 20 MP and they believed it would make their pictures better. What some have told me is they got better pictures on their previous camera.
Why? I believe because the auto on nice compacts understands these want nice pictures but don't want to learn how to take them. Where auto on a DSLR just doesn't work as well. Sports mode helps, but still doesn't do the job. To get the best pictures it takes knowledge and experience. A good photographer can get good pics on anything. The opposite is also true.

0 upvotes
ishu
By ishu (2 months ago)

I don't think we disagree too much, to the extent it's a matter of degrees and not extremes. Since you shoot a lot, and since you recognize the value of technique, it's going to take a lot for the people who consult with you to "get the pictures you do."

FWIW, I was responding to the statement that
"soccer moms ... believe they will get better pictures with having a bigger camera." They may not get the pictures you do (or the ones in magazines, etc.), but I believe they will get better pictures than they do today, since most of the folks I see use smartphones and pocket cams. I've heard and seen folks get better pictures than their "smaller" cameras with a beginner DSLR.

Whether people are *happy* with the results is a wholly different matter. And buying a camera that someone else has doesn't guarantee the same result.

Most of my friends are just happy to accept my photos, since they didn't have to shoot and my one keeper is better than theirs.

1 upvote
brycesteiner
By brycesteiner (2 months ago)

I don't think we disagree either. It's funny because I shoot with an E-M5 now. I used to shoot with a larger camera. I get comments from people saying, "Oh, you didn't bring your big camera this time." Inferring that I wasn't there to shoot professionally, because I had a small camera. Even though that is the camera I was using the whole time at football games they just didn't see what I was carrying.
Everybody wants to be a photographer, artist,musician, etc., but don't want to take the time and learn.

0 upvotes
David Hull
By David Hull (2 months ago)

Approachable yet serious? Sounds like my cat :-)

13 upvotes
Zeisschen
By Zeisschen (2 months ago)

With the a6000 news just prior to this, it's hard to believe both product pictures are made in the same year 2014. Compared to the modern Sony design this camera just looks like a cheap plastic tool from the 90s.

8 upvotes
kewlguy
By kewlguy (2 months ago)

this plastic cheap tool by Nikon has a lot more lenses to choose from. How many E mount Sony lenses are there? LOL, yeah the zeiss ones are good but mostly overpriced.

7 upvotes
Devendra
By Devendra (2 months ago)

got raw?

1 upvote
Zeisschen
By Zeisschen (2 months ago)

Zooms:
10-18 f4 Sony OSS
16-50 f3.5 Sony pancake zoom
16-70 f4 Sony OSS
18-55 f3.5 Sony OSS
18-105 f3.5 Sony PZ OSS
18-200 f3.5 Sony PZ OSS
18-200 f3.5 Sony OSS
18-200 f3.5 Tamron OSS
28-70 f3.5 Sony OSS
24-70 f4 Zeiss OSS
55-210 f3.5 Sony OSS
70-200 F4 Sony G OSS

Primes:
8.5 f2.8 Samyang Fish-eye
10mm f2.8 Samyang
12mm f2.8 Zeiss Touit
16mm f2.0 Samyang
16mm f2.8 Sony
19mm f2.8 Sigma
20mm f2.8 Sony Pancake
24mm f1.8 Zeiss
30mm f2.8 Sigma
30mm f3.5 Sony Macro
32mm f1.8 Zeiss Touit
35mm f1.8 Sony OSS
35mm f2.8 Zeiss
50mm f1.8 Sony OSS
50mm f2.8 Zeiss Macro
55mm 1.8 Zeiss
60mm f2.8 Sigma
300mm f6.3 Samyang

I'm sure you will find a lens on that list that you badly want but never will buy.
By the way I was talking about the looks, I didn't say the Nikon is a bad camera! But I believe it's the end of the DSLR era. Face it!

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (2 months ago)

Zeisschen: end of DSLR era? Seriously? What planet do you live in?

You need to wake up and look at the worldwide sales numbers, or perhaps, just the N.American/European sales numbers. After all these years, mirrorless cameras still represent nothing but a niche market and Sony has yet to capture 20% share of the interchangeable lens camera market, a target they set for themselves when they acquired Minolta many years ago.

16 upvotes
waitformee
By waitformee (2 months ago)

to Zeisschen, 1 like for your post.

Mirrorless today is no lack of lens. There are so many adaptors to choose from. I think it is only correct to say that more than 90% of the lenses in the world will fit an mirrorless camera or E Mount Camera.

3 upvotes
kewlguy
By kewlguy (2 months ago)

I stand corrected. Looks like plenty of lenses to choose from; many would not even be sharp on NEX-7, esp in the corners. Those focal lenghts are also mostly similar. To waitformee - LOL adapters? Yeah you could adapt anything, but I've used Fuji and A7 for a while, I wouldn't call shooting adapted lenses hassle-free! For assignments I'd still take my DSLRs.

1 upvote
pew pew
By pew pew (2 months ago)

ups wrong reply.

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
1 upvote
jtan163
By jtan163 (2 months ago)

I think these days DSLRs and mirroless are niche.
Mainstram cameras are phones.

But I think though the DLSR is not dead, it's on the way out.
North Americans of course live in their own 1 mile per gallon, non metric world, chasing superlative numbers, bv but even there mirrorless will eventually exceed DSLR.

There really is no reason to flap a mirror for most use cases these days- though I'm sure you could make an excellent morse code system with olfd DLSR mechanisms.

2 upvotes
noirdesir
By noirdesir (2 months ago)

One thought I had is whether part of the reason mirrorless has such a small market share (and a non-rising one), is because Nikon and Canon do not offer much if anything at all in the APS-C (or 43) sensor size class in terms of mirrorless cameras. Generally it is thought the other way around (because mirrorless has a small share, Panasonic and Olympus has a small share), but what if the marketing, shelf-space, public awareness and image of Nikon and Canon is so large that most people looking for a larger (aka 'better) camera or an ILC in general decide to go to Canon or Nikon before thinking about mirrorless vs. DSLR?

0 upvotes
Zeisschen
By Zeisschen (2 months ago)

@ photonuts

I live on planet earth. The US are lagging behind in most technology at around 5-20 years and bigger there will always be considered better. So yes, maybe the DSLR will have a long life there.

2 upvotes
SnapHappy32
By SnapHappy32 (2 months ago)

*chen* implies you're German. I just visited Berlin - out of 100's of cameras on display only ONE - yes ONE - was sporting a M43. The rest were DSLRs or small compacts.

What are you talking about?

1 upvote
RyanBoston
By RyanBoston (2 months ago)

I've had this camera since Christmas and love it. The workability in raw is incredible, especially with good glass. Amazing detail and colors! Pulling shadows is amazing.

I've had the D40, D60, D90, D5000, D5100, and T2i. The D5300 is my favorite out of them all and am amazed at the quality of the pics.

Slap a Sigma lens on the D5300 and be prepared to be amazed.

7 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (2 months ago)

You bought the D5000, D5100, D5200 *and* the D5300?

Nikon must love you.

11 upvotes
kewlguy
By kewlguy (2 months ago)

No it won't. He slapped a Sigma lens on the D5300...

10 upvotes
new boyz
By new boyz (2 months ago)

No, he's got love from both Nikon and Sigma.

0 upvotes
AlpCns2
By AlpCns2 (2 months ago)

What Sigma lens, if I may be so bold to inquire?

2 upvotes
Total comments: 235
12