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Nikon D3300 Review

April 2014 | By Allison Johnson
Buy on Amazon.com From $496.95

One of the biggest camera announcements at 2014's Consumer Electronics Show may well have been the little Nikon D3300 and its collapsible 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 VR II lens. It may not shoot 4K video or offer a curved LCD (those shows are all about the tech trends) but it does represent the next generation of Nikon's very popular entry-level DSLR line, and that in itself is noteworthy.

The D3300 sits at the bottom of Nikon's entry-level series, positioned as the friendliest of beginner-friendly DSLRs, just below the D5300. Don't be fooled by their class bearing though, both cameras use a powerful 24MP APS-C sensor. Opting for the D3300 rather than the D5300 means living with a fixed 3.0-inch LCD, rather than one that's fully articulated, and no built-in Wi-Fi.

Nikon D3300 key features

  • 24.2 MP DX format (APS-C) sensor
  • Expeed 4 processor
  • Fixed 3.0" 921k-dot LCD
  • 1080/60p HD video
  • 5 fps continuous shooting
  • 700 shot battery life

The D3300's Expeed 4 branded processor is responsible for many of its gains over the previous model, the D3200. This model gets an upgrade to 1080/60p video recording, an extra frame per second in burst mode, and a higher ISO range up to 12800 (25600 with expansion).

Specs comparison

The table below illustrates the differences between this model, its predecessor, and the step-up model. It should be noted that the D3300 appears to give better battery performance than the D5300, but actually they use the same EN-EL14a battery. The D5300's lower claimed battery life reflects a calculation for use of the camera's built-in Wi-Fi and GPS. By any measure, the D3300 is well above its peers in terms of battery capacity.

  Nikon D3300 Nikon D3200 Nikon D5300
Sensor 24.2 MP DX format CMOS (23.5 x 15.6 mm) 24.2 MP DX format CMOS (23.2 x 15.4 mm) 24.2 MP DX format CMOS (23.5 x 15.6 mm)
Image processing Expeed 4 Expeed 3 Expeed 4
LCD Fixed 3.0" 921k-dot LCD Fixed 3.0" 921k-dot LCD Vari-angle 3.2" 1037k-dot LCD
AF system 11-point (1 cross-type) 11-point (1 cross-type) 39-point (9 cross-type)
Viewfinder 0.85x (95% coverage) 0.80x (95% coverage) 0.82x (95% coverage)
ISO range 100-12800 (expansion to 25600) 100-6400 (expansion to 12800) 100-12800 (expansion to 25600)
Connectivity With optional WU-1a Mobile Adapter With optional WU-1a Mobile Adapter Built-in
Video capture max. resolution 1080 60p 1080 30p 1080 60p
Continuous shooting 5 fps 4 fps 5 fps
Battery life 700 shots 540 shots 600 shots
Dimensions 124 x 98 x 76 mm (4.88 x 3.86 x 2.99″) 125 x 96 x 77 mm (4.92 x 3.78 x 3.03″) 125 x 98 x 76 mm (4.92 x 3.86 x 2.99″)
Weight 460 g (16.23 oz) 505 g (17.81 oz) 530 g (18.70 oz)

Moving up the chain of Nikon's crop-frame DSLR line AF systems get increasingly sophisticated. The D3300 sits at the very bottom with an 11-point system and a single cross-type sensor at the middle - nothing that would tempt a sports photographer, but perfectly capable for its class. Outside of this, Wi-Fi and a vari-angle screen are the only other clear hardware advantages to the D5300 over the entry-level model.

The comparison paints a picture of a nicely specified entry-level model with excellent battery life, a new processor and a whole lot of resolution. Aside from the lack of Wi-Fi, there's not much to complain about here and we don't feel that there's anything that this camera is seriously lacking feature-wise.

However, the days when an entry-level Nikon only really had to worry about its latest rival from Canon have gone. So, although the D3300's specs are very impressive - especially in terms of battery life - it also has to hold its own against the smaller mirrorless cameras that match it for image quality and offer a more compact-camera-like live view shooting experience.

Though a little long in the tooth, the Panasonic Lumix GF6 offers a tilting touch screen, and the Olympus E-PM2 provides a fixed touch screen (and is a steal price-wise compared to the rest of the class). Elsewhere in the category the Pentax K-500 offers a 100% coverage optical viewfinder and 6 fps burst shooting, while the Fujifilm X-A1 offers twin command dials and built-in Wi-Fi.

Kit options and pricing

The Nikon D3300 is available in black, grey and red variants, kitted in the US and UK with a collapsible 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 VR II lens with list prices of $649.95 and £599.99, respectively. In the UK there's also a £499.99 body-only option, not offered in the US.

Without the D5300's built-in Wi-Fi, D3300 owners will need to add Nikon's WU-1a mobile adapter for connectivity features. The adapter dangles from the camera's AV port, making it possible to wirelessly transfer images to an Android or iOS device. Read more about it in our review of the Nikon D3200. It's available separately for $59.95/£54.99.

Nikon's DSLRs aren't by any means the cheapest in their respective classes, and that's true of the D3300. It's about $100 US more than a comparable Canon kit, and costs well over twice as much as the (very aggresively priced) Sony a3000. For that premium, you get one of the highest resolution APS-C sensors on the market, a very good 1080/60p video spec, and exceptional battery life among other things. It's slightly pricier, but does the feature set justify the tag? Or would your entry-level dollars be better spent elsewhere?


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2014 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 242
12
Carlos Loff

Great camera for starters, but Nikon is forgetting the non starters who cry for the D400

4 upvotes
alcaher

+1
Im tired of reading news about FF, dxxxx, Df, coolpix and mirrorless cameras and 18-xxxx lenses

Nikon wake up, we want the D400!!!

0 upvotes
Spectro

read nikon rumors. It will be the D9300 not d400.

2 upvotes
alcaher

mmmh interesting, i wonder why not d4000 :)
anyway i just hope nikon keep the same big heavy and bulky body as it is with the d300

0 upvotes
RichRMA

How can they do a D400 of the same calibre as the D300? The body is far better than the D7100 or the D610 so it'll push the price of a DX camera close to that of the D610. Would anyone pay that today?

0 upvotes
alcaher

wel ithink many people in the wildlife community would pay 1800 dollars for a Pro DX with similar D4s characteristics and features: wheathersealed, 9 fps, a new AF system, fast performance, great buffer, great video and the D7100 or D3300 sensor.

3 upvotes
Carlos Loff

ALCAHER - i would do it right now

0 upvotes
xmeda

1 cross type AF sensor, horrible viewfinder, painful ergonomics.. = just producing more electronic waste

Where is the Pentax K50/500 full review??

17 upvotes
Beat Traveller

Shouldn't you also ask them where the Pentax 645Z review is? That camera has been announced for at least a week.

1 upvote
fakuryu

@ Beat Traveller

Taking the Pentax K3 into account, wait for a Pentax 645Z review in about 6 months to a year.

@xmeda

Yeah, it seems like Pentax holds tons of value with their entry level cameras which could be relevant to first time buyers.

4 upvotes
Beat Traveller

I suggest you find a browser extension that highlights sarcasm...

1 upvote
phoenix15

Yes, where is Pentax K-50 review. That is what I want to know. If DPR has their time to review D3300, why not with K-50, which I am sure is not complicated camera.

6 upvotes
D1N0

K-30 review = K-50 review.

2 upvotes
hydrospanner

K-3 review...Pentax whiners in comments
XT-1 review...Pentax whiners in comments
D3300 review...Pentax whiners in comments

Come on guys, you enjoy pretending to be victims, we get it. Time for some new material, at least.

0 upvotes
D1N0

Well Hydrospanner: Pentax K-50 announced Jun 12, 2013, Nikon D3300 announced Jan 7, 2014. Pentaxians shouldn't whine they should switch to Nikon or Canon. That way their camera's will be reviewed sooner. Dpreview seems to be getting paid not to review Pentax, or much too late. Yes this is whining but it is righteous!

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
1 upvote
BarnET

The k50 is basicly an k30. Which did get an review.
Considering dpreview slow review pace and all those models waiting I can forgive them to overlook the k50.

Still the slow review of the k3 after many promises which was an entire new camera in most regards was quiet an disaster for the reputation of this website.

I hope DPR will get the job done quicker with the 645z which may be an excellent landscape camera.

1 upvote
Richard Murdey

"Rear command dial makes shooting in P, A and S modes easy"

Yeah. Also,

"top-mounted shutter release button makes taking photos easy"

Comment edited 28 seconds after posting
18 upvotes
fdfgdfgdgf

video sample 3 fail to download
others are fine

0 upvotes
marc petzold

i believe the lack of the optical lowpass AA filter into this price range of the D3300 is more a marketing thing, then really a plus. most beginner DSLR buyers would stick to their kit lens a long time, or even never buy another lens.

being myself a Nikon and Sony User, i must admit that the features of the Pentax K-500 are stronger into the pricerange, providing a 100% Viewfinder _and_ two command dials is a huge plus over the competition from Canikon, Sony & others.

apart from that, nikon did a good job with the latest iteration of their D3xxx
DSLR line.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Timbukto

The lack of AA filter is actually better on a low-end camera than it is high-end where the chance of coupling the camera with superbly sharp telephotos or portrait primes is a common occurrence. Kit lens or cheap zooms combined with no AA filter is actually a good idea...the optics serves as the AA filter. Actually many non-MFA capable cameras provide their own AA filter by not being able to critically focus...just *good enough* focus. The #1 advantage of mirrorless at these price points.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
ziarko

I had a Nikon D3100 and the sensor got dirty...took it to the Nikon dealer in my city..no record of me buying the camera...also 70 dollars to clean the sensor..was told the sensor cleaning did not work..therefore put the 70.00 toward another camera>>D3200
Called Nikon ..they said the camera was made 2 years ago...therefore no warranty...I bought this camera less than 1 year ago.. Nikon was difficult to contact and not much help when I finally did..plus I'm not very good at understanding british english from India...so I am out the $ for the Nikon D3100 ..could someone who owns a D3300 tell me what they personally think about their camera?
thanks

0 upvotes
ziarko

almost makes you wonder why I would enquire about another Nikon..but I have heard the D3300 was very good...and I suppose I am used to using them because I had the D40 just before the D3100....plus I have lenses for my Nikon D3100 that I don't want to toss away...it's almost like I have lost enough money ..
I need some honest evaluation from owners of the D3300 so I can make a solid decision...well aware Nikon isn't going to be easy to deal with
thanks once again

0 upvotes
fdfgdfgdgf

Very good review
like the photo samples, just need to clarify if the video samples were taken on tripod. i prefer handheld to test the lens VR

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Allison Johnson

Sample 1 (Elliot Bay) was taken with the camera braced against a rock, so not truly handheld, but no tripod. Sample 2 was taken on a tripod, Sample 3 is handheld with lens VR on.

3 upvotes
PLShutterbug

Someone please tell me the relevance of hh vs. tripod for a CAMERA review. That tests 1) ability to hold still; VR of the LENS.

0 upvotes
locke_fc

Sorry, but... yawn

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
MiraShootsNikon

24MP crop sensor + secondary mirror phase-detect autofocus with no fine tuning = recipe for disappointment.

0 upvotes
Timbukto

The 35mm 1.8G shots did not look to be in critical focus for even the lower ISO shots.

0 upvotes
retro76

People who complain + never have used the product = annoying.

4 upvotes
dynaxx

please, oh please!, can we ban these comments that revolve around the idea that you must not have an opinion about a camera that you have not held in your own hands ? If this comment had any validity whatsoever it would render this website pointless. Who has the time and access necessary ( I live in the provinces and the nearest camera shop is 3 hours away by car/train) to try out every new camera/lens ?

2 upvotes
pacnwhobbyist

Maybe if you don't know what you're doing it is.

0 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach

No one is shooting this camera at f1.4, so no worries. Although we can certainly look forward to the usual number of "my D3300 backfocuses/frontfocuses" posts as well as the requisite rows of batteries, deodorant cans, etc. That will never change.

1 upvote
brendon1000

^^ I would wager there would be plenty of people using this type of cameras with a 50mm f1.4 as its a pretty inexpensive lens.

0 upvotes
BarnET

Well depth of field with the 50mm f1.8g is rather small as well. And that lens is an perfect starter lens for portrait work.
Excellent for beginners experimenting with dof.
And that lens will be hard to use on this camera when compared to the d5200/5300. This is a good con worth mentioning.

0 upvotes
chris_j_l

I liked the Pro: Customizable Fn button allows for direct access to ISO or white balance.

Ahahahaha.

I'm struggling to think of a DSLR that doesn't have direct access to these quite important functions as separate buttons and not as a "will I be wanting to change ISO or WB today?" fn button.

Any other camera and this would be a Con.

14 upvotes
RichRMA

Why do they list (above) "kits" containing third-rate, slow SD cards, junk tripod, ridiculous (you REALLY going to put one of those on a 24mp DSLR???!) tele/wide adapters and no-name camera cases? The SD card alone is a disservice to a modern, fast DSLR.

1 upvote
chlamchowder

I agree about the tele/wide adapters.
However, slow SD cards don't matter if you aren't shooting sports (because you won't be shooting bursts). And even flimsy looking tripods can be made to work if you don't extend them and use a light lens (which most people will do anyways - few people take landscape or group pictures with a 300/2.8).

0 upvotes
justmeMN

This may be the only DSLR made that doesn't include Automatic Exposure Bracketing. Even my 2003 Canon G5 compact camera had AEB.

2 upvotes
BarnET

With your canon 1 out of a dozen 18mp sensor you need 3 exposures to get the exact same dynamic range that the d3300 captures in 1 shot.

11 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach

Yep. With a Nikon late model sensor and Lightroom, you're about done bracketing anyway.

10 upvotes
Timbukto

Basing too much on reputation. Just because the Nikon sensors in the D6x0, D800, D5100, and D7000 are the tops in shadow pulls does not mean *every* sensor afterwards will be better at shadow pulls. Carefully examining and looking at this review would have made that point obvious. The slight exposure pull and +100 shadows is something the D5100/D7000 class of sensors would have done with no visible noise really. The Sony A6000 and this sensor are very good, but not necessarily exactly the same. I've compared the Sony A6000 RAWs and did not find it much different from my Canon 6D. I look forward to doing a exposure pull comparison later with the D3300.

1 upvote
justmeMN

@BarnET: The Nikon D5300 (etc.) has Automatic Exposure Bracketing. By your logic, the D3300 has Nikon's best sensor, and all of Nikon's more expensive DSLRs all have inferior sensors. I don't think so....

1 upvote
BarnET

No justmmn that ain't my logic.
The fullframe Nikon's have better sensors with less noise.
However it's miles better as the current canon's and among the best in apsc world. It's dynamic range is more then enough for it's user base. Just teach the beginners to shoot raw and to use a raw editor.

1 upvote
Retzius

The D3300 is a tidy little camera but I don't think they can keep offering the same thing over and over again anymore. My guess is the D3400 is where we will see the EVF/OVF jump.

At this size and form factor mirrorless is really the best option. The target buyer for this camera really has nothing to gain by purchasing a OVF Dslr. 90% of the folks who buy this camera never even change the lens or print an image. For all the boasting about APS sensor performance and OLPF filter removal these things don't even pertain to most of the images these cameras will ever make.

At this price point, $650, you can get much much more for your money. Heck, you can get the Pentax K500 with lens for $399 and it actually has useful features like a large 100% viewfinder with a high eye point and the ability to use AA batteries if you run out of batteries at Disneyland. 16mp images may actually be better for this target segment as the files are a bit smaller and take up less room on the card.

9 upvotes
BarnET

I agree that pentax is offering more camera for less money. However there is no denying that the d3300 is vastly superior then the canon counterpart in image quality.

6 upvotes
PerL

I think its perfect as a complement to a high end Nikon DSLR. Its small, light and cheap but with great IQ. Perfect for travels, something of an updated Nikon D40.

5 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach

The Pentax is 16MP, which is yesterday's APSC news as far as I'm concerned. The D3300 has one of the best APSC sensors available, second only to the A6000 according to my raw conversions, and by a slim margin.

2 upvotes
BarnET

Reilley the problem is that the Pentax is offering many features of the d7100 in an entry level. Even though the sensor is from
Yesterday it's still good in both dynamic range and high iso performance.

The k500 has
Interval built in
Auto bracket
Ibis
100% prism finder
Dual dials
Aa battery option
9 cross type points.

These all add up to a better total package with unfortunately the wrong lens mount.

3 upvotes
Heie2

As someone that uses both 16 and 24 mpx (K-3 and K-5 IIs/K-30, the latter is identical to the K-50), there are inherent benefits to the 16 mpx sensor over the 24 for those that do not need it (i.e. beginners).

16 is not "yesterday's APS-C news" you fool. Especially when this segment is just looking for a better camera than their iPhone to put on facebook (which, in case you didn't know, is 1.5 mpx at MAX).

Also, don't forget the K-50's offering over the K-500 - full weather sealing.

All canikon entry/mid-entry level cameras are a pathetic joke compared to the K-50/K-500's features. 24 mpx is apparently the only thing 'better' and that's a con imo for this segment.

And what do you mean the wrong mount? You can keep your behemoth lenses and I'll keep my Limiteds and weather sealed lenses ;)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
BarnET

If you have those limiteds it's a fine mount.
I have a k30 and I can't get myself spending so much for so little. Even though they are little gems. Then 3rd party support is getting scarce. You don't have access to a good ultrawide nor to the good 70-300 vc tamron.

An optical stabilised lens is much easier to use on longer focal lengths. Then the nikon 1.8g primes are good and rather cheap. And there is a dirt cheap 40mm macro. Or the 60mm tamron f2 which is not available for pentax as well.

Therefore pentax bodies are great value unfortunately they have the wrong mount.

1 upvote
Retzius

First, I think it is rather laughable to determine if a mount is good based on access to Tamron lenses.
Second, Pentax bodies have image stabilization in the body so you don't need it in the lens... You get image stabilization in EVERY lens.
Third, the limited are actually a good value, especially on the second hand market. There performance is amazing relative to their size and weight.

1 upvote
Heie2

BarnET - the HD 55-300 is much better than the 70-300, while being smaller, much wider (55 vs 70mm), and weather sealed - the only consumer telezoom on the market be sealed. And as Retzius mentioned - every lens is stabilized on your Pentax.

There are some missing lenses, sure. Every mount could argue that. But I entirely disagree with you that the bodies have the wrong mount. The K mount offers the best value for money on the market presently for the beginner through advanced amateur. Only when niche needs are paramount (tilt-shift, super fast tele, both prime and zoom, extreme macro, and FF DOF control) does it presently fall short, and I won't argue that. But I wouldn't trade my K mount (bodies/lenses) for anything Canikon offers because for my needs (travel and documentary photography in lightweight and cost effective manner) the Pentax system as it stands today trumps the hell out of Canikon's offerings. And that's without focusing on features like IBIS and weather sealing.

1 upvote
BarnET

The 70-300mm vc is sharper as 55-300 da that I used. Especially in the corners. The vc on that lens is outstanding. It makes composing at 300mm a LOT easier.
So I really miss that lens in pentax.

Then there is the tokina 11-16mm ultrawide. By far the sharpest UW lens on crop DSLRs. Which is available on all mounts besides Pentax.

Then give me 1 good native macro lens made by Pentax themselves. They all suck every single one of them. And again missing a lot of good 3rd party options.

The 60-250mm f4 is an fantastic lens though. The 50-135 has a better alternative from sigma these days.

Then you go to wildlife. The 150-600mm seems to be awesome. And again no access. Nor does Pentax make anything close themselves. The sigma 150-500 is older and softer.

The limiters are overpriced the 77mm is good but actually not as sharp as the 85mm f1.8g which costs half.
The 35mm and 50mm from Nikon are also cheaper (a bit) as the Pentax counterparts.

0 upvotes
RichRMA

Well, Nikon needs to do something with the sensors that test on the bottom. Be sure to check for dead pixels, as always Nikonians.

0 upvotes
BarnET

Well at least the nikonians can get some details out of the shadows. And correcting pixels is probably the easiest thing to do in post. And can even be automated.

1 upvote
RichRMA

Olympus, I believe preserves more shadow detail (DR) than any current small format sensor cameras. At least that's what the tests here look like.

1 upvote
BarnET

Uhm no the smaller m43 Sony sensor found in most current olympus is good but not that good. The second gen 16mp found in the k5ii seems best in apsc in this regard.

2 upvotes
brycesteiner

@BarnET
>>Uhm no the smaller m43 Sony sensor found in most current olympus is good but not that good. <<
You're a generation behind.
Olympus' latest models (E-M1, E-M10) use a Panasonic mfg sensor. Only the E-M5 used the Sony, which I actually prefer. Both are good though. And Olympus does have the widest DR on the list that I can see.

0 upvotes
BarnET

The em10 is confirmed Sony.
Your right about the em1 though which is why I said most.
The latest Panasonic from the gx7 and the sony are to close to tell apart anyway.

0 upvotes
brycesteiner

I can't believe they are still putting this out? Mirrorless is so far ahead of the game. Nikon, where is your innovation?

4 upvotes
PerL

Hm, lets see. This camera takes better photos than all m43 cameras. It has better battery life than all m43 cameras. It can take many more native lenses than all m43 cameras. It costs less than most m43 cameras with viewfinder. The AF-C is better than most, maybe all, m43 cameras. It is more comfortable to hold than most m43 cameras.

28 upvotes
BarnET

Perl it's also larger as most m43 camera's and has less features and less direct controls. Image quality difference is very small but in favour of the d3300.

You can mount more lenses on the d3300 but most are made for fx which means they are much larger as they could be.

Panasonic video literally wipes the floor with Nikon. So it's about your preferences. Both are great options for different needs.

10 upvotes
retro76

Stick this same sensor in a Olympus body with tiny buttons, horrible grip, poor battery life and people will say it's the best thing ever, funny how marketing works on gear heads.

8 upvotes
brycesteiner

@ WetCoast
>>Hm, lets see. This camera takes better photos than all m43 cameras. << No it doesn't. Look at the details and you how soft the sensor is in this.
>>It has better battery life than all m43 cameras. << I regularly get over 700 pictures out of a charge on the E-M5 or E-M1. Same as what's rated for this. Of course, I don't spend my time chimping all the time, which will drain the batter quickly.

>>It can take many more native lenses than all m43 cameras. <<
This would be a valid argument if you were referring to the very nice Sony A7, since they are so few lenses. Having 10 different 50mm lenses between 1.2 and 1.8 isn't necessarily a plus. The m4/3 system has more than enough lenses to cover everything.

>>It is more comfortable to hold than most m43 cameras.<< That is all in the person holding it. Many of us love smaller sizes and weight, that give the top quality and still being able to put in a small bag or pocket. I switched because I don't care for the weight.

1 upvote
WetCoast

@brycesteiner, you were talking to PerL above, not me. :)

0 upvotes
Bhima78

@PerL
I was about to agree with your statement regarding this camera having better image quality than m4/3. Then I actually decided to look at the image comparison. By your statement, you obviously did not.

0 upvotes
PerL

@Bhima,
I trust DxO Marks more.

2 upvotes
InTheMist

Mirrorless is still lacking in focusing speed, startup speed and battery life.

0 upvotes
rccasgar

Battery life is normally better in Reflex mainly due to 3 things:
- Reflex have more space for a bigger battery
- Reflex have no powerzooms
- Battery duration in a reflex is measured without using live view, so LCD only showing white letters over black background
Those 3 things are some of the consequence/drivers when deciding which camera to go with... so for an EVIL this battle is always lost... but that's part of the deal right? People buy EVIL because they normally like to have smaller cameras, to compose using the LCD and sometimes to have powerzooms (smoother for video).

0 upvotes
Bhima78

@PerL
Fair enough if you choose to look at an arbitrary number on chart for image quality vs. an apples to apples image comparison.

0 upvotes
WetCoast

Quick correction. The Pentax K500, as mentioned earlier, is not weather-sealed, but the K50 is. :)

0 upvotes
Allison Johnson

Fixed, thanks!

2 upvotes
jaykumarr

Half of the 'conclusions - cons' can be addressed by firmware updates.

1 upvote
techmine

Except that Nikon does not believe in firmware updates that address usability improvements. They would only update firmware to fix "real"flaws.

12 upvotes
fakuryu

Or expect a D3310 then

0 upvotes
Jogger

Despite all the mirrorless Evangelicalism on DPR, the DSLR form-factor is still preferred by most people in the world, with notable exceptions like Japan, where even the Nikon 1 sells well.

14 upvotes
BarnET

In most parts of the world ignorance is a blessing.

A lot of salesman in large electronic warehouses know nothing of mirrorless camera's. Nor do they have a good stock here in Europe. Some Sony's and a lost panasonic entry-level at best.

For a lot of people mirrorless is a great option. Yet they don't know what it is.

13 upvotes
Richard Murdey

"with notable exceptions like Japan, where even the Nikon 1 sells well."

Yeah, we smartened up and ditched entry-level dSLRs some years ago. The rationale is simple: if you are in, you are in: most likely FX these days. It's your hobby, size and cost are hardly serious concerns. If you aren't in, you might as well be using a Olympus PEN / Nikon 1 / Sony RX100 / Fuji X: more casual, more fashionable, easier to carry around, easier for the non-enthusiast to use, and great results.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
aandeg

Not enough shutter shake for a gold?

3 upvotes
Siobhan A

What timing! I went the camera store to look at an a6000 and found the D3300 to have snappier focus on people walking around, and the Nikon was a lot more confortable with big lenses. Nikon has a better selection of lenses that autofocus too I found. Now it is down to the D3300 or D5300.

10 upvotes
Cane

'if it's a dslr shaped thing you need'....

Well that pretty much sums up the marketing.

1 upvote
crashpc

Whut is that? LOL banding and noise? Sheesh.
Good review anyway. Pushed my Canon ego higher once again :-P

0 upvotes
Albino_BlacMan

Silver awards don't mean anything if everyone gets one...

0 upvotes
bluevellet

Not the Nikon DF...

7 upvotes
BarnET

Ow the digital frustration.
At least Nikon has the Excellent d610 to cover that gap

0 upvotes
justin23

Maybe , but its not a gold award either, and most dSLRs are good cameras and only start to look deficient when compared to another camera. Reality is any beginner buying a beginners dSLR is going to be overwhelmed initially and not use half the features anyway.

5 upvotes
Zuchov

A lot of talks from people reading a review. I have the D3300, and with 2900 shots with three different lenses, I KNOW what the camera is like: Shooting only RAW, I get the pictures I want, and even underexosure of 2 EV I can get almost fully recovered pictures(!). Easy handling, fast operations, amazing battery life, all the buttons I want/need, lightweight, no wi-fi/gps (thanks! I hate it, drains battery & adds weight). I am actually stunned by the quality of the images. At ISO 6400, using a 50mm 1.8 in very low light, the output is fantastic. Compared to 5D Mark II, the IQ up to ISO 800 is on pair. And don't argue, if You don't have the experience with theese cameras - I have. 'Nuf said!

1 upvote
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