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Shooter's report

The D3300 is a pick-up-and-go DSLR, ready for shooting right out of the box with the kit lens. Its default control configuration assigns the Fn button as a direct access to ISO. Combined with the rear command dial, direct AF point selection via directional buttons and direct exposure compensation button, the D3300 feels as if it has access to the right basic controls in the right places from the very beginning.

Shooting in mostly in aperture priority mode on a couple of outings, I rarely needed to visit the camera's menus to get the shot I wanted. An exception to this is Auto ISO - it can only be activated and de-activated from the shooting menu. In theory auto-only shooters won't need to worry about this since it's always engaged in Auto mode, though there's a problem to watch out for here. Full Auto mode expects the user to be shooting with flash and adjusts its program line accordingly - whether flash is turned on or off. Take a look at the operation section of this review for more on that.

This entry-level kit is also expectedly lightweight and compact, a feature I also appreciated on those day excursions when shooting is a priority, but not necessarily the first reason for the trip. The camera and its collapsed collapsible lens fit neatly into a small compartment of my messenger bag, keeping the whole thing light enough to carry comfortably for a long time. The grip and thumb rest keep the camera feeling steady in my hand, both while shooting as I carry the camera in my right hand.

Processed from Raw. A lightweight, carry-everywhere camera means you can capitalize on those moments when you're not specifically 'out shooting' and spot something interesting.

As camera reviewers, we are spoiled by access. Many of the cameras I've used in the past few months have offered built-in Wi-Fi. Each time I switch from a camera with Wi-Fi to one that doesn't have it, i.e. the D3300, I notice its absence. There are inevitably moments while out shooting I think 'That's a nice shot, I'd like to share it,' and then realize that I will have to wait until I'm back home to do that. It's unfair to fault the D3300 with not offering something that most of its peers don't have either, and it's likely that many potential users won't consider this a vital feature (unless they've used it), but it's one thing that I miss more and more every time I go without it.

Processed from Raw. Without built-in Wi-Fi, I was not able to share this scenery instantly with my friends and instead I had to marvel at its existence without the benefit of any Instagram 'likes'. What a world.

Anyway, let's not dwell on the negative. The D3300 is an entry-level camera that provides an appropriate level of direct access to controls, a perfectly fine, collapsible kit zoom lens and 24 megapixels of resolution. That's a whole lot of pixels to play with. They come in handy when you want to crop for a slightly different composition, as I did with the image above. And though battery life isn't a terribly exciting feature, the D3300 has plenty of it - and that's a very good thing. It's just one more way that the D3300 feels reliable.

For the most part, shooting with the D3300 is a simple and straightforward experience. Everything I need is here, though not necessarily everything I want. There are rarely times when the camera feels like it's getting in my way, but neither is it particularly engaging. Things like a level gauge would make the experience feel a little more pleasant. The ability to use the command dial to scroll through the quick menu would make changing settings a little bit quicker. But especially for a camera at this level, the lack of these features doesn't sting quite as much as it did with the pricier, upper-entry-level D5300.

However, being aimed at those moving up from point-and-shoot cameras, the D3300 might let down an entry-level user in a few notable ways. The camera's slow live view may be a source of disappointment to users moving up from compacts. The camera's behavior in full Auto is another potential problem. On one occasion I set out with the camera at sunset and kept it in full Auto mode. Turning off the flash I snapped away without paying much attention to exposure parameters, discovering later a number of my telephoto images were blurry because the camera had chosen shutter speeds and ISO as if I'd been shooting with the flash turned on.

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Comments

Total comments: 226
12
hondagrl57

The only thing I am not being able to learn is how to use the zoom to get far away shots of my birds like the old cannon I am used to with the pull lever.. any ideas on this one appreciated. ( I mean get far away things up close and personal) Am I needing a special lens for this one?

0 upvotes
billsev8

Can anyone recommend a good inexpensive (under $100) stereo mic to use with the D3300? Or have you found the internal mic is "good enough"?

Thanks

0 upvotes
BobFoster

I’m most interested in the video capabilities of this camera. This site provided the first downloadable raw sample i have seen so far.
I see no bad focus on the video, at 100% zoom (cars passing in london, passing under a bridge).
The quality of the video is also fine, given it’s 50p.
I would rather see a 24fps sample, since it would have much less compression, and that’s what 90% of the people use 90% of the time. 50p is just a low quality feature in case slow-motion is needed.

1 upvote
rickfinn2014

I realize that this came about 7 months ago.
I was once a full blown Nikon supporter use Nikon.
As it was stated earlier the Nikon quality has gone down to pot.
I bought the all mighty d7100 after a year....one year there are now oil spots on the sensor. Spots that I can not afford to pay to remove .It will cost me up to 400.00 to fix the problem because no longer under warranty.
I will no longer recommend a Nikon to anyone!!
Better going with the Canon. There are two cameras as soon as I can afford one of the 2 . One Fuji x10-1 And the a6000.
The nay Sayers will get on their soap boxes. But ask why are most of the pros going to these cameras? not the ones that hold workshops to make money but the real pros out making taking real photos. Not the armchair expert wanabes.
Enough Never ever buy a Nikon!
I cant even trade for a different ca,mera!

0 upvotes
philharris

Yet another person with one comment making up a problem with a camera he claims to own.
I don't believe he even has a D7100, let alone been quoted 400 (anythings?) to clean the sensor. My guess would be Rupees.
Scattered through every thread on this site are these names which just appear for one or two posts, make up some story about how they bought a Nikon/Canon/Pentax something and it killed their dog and burnt the house down.
Most sensible realise the true value of these posts is precisely nothing.

5 upvotes
Jessjett

Phil - That made me laugh - good reply. Rupees!! haha

0 upvotes
Wes Syposz

this CIPA rating for the battery is funny, I get at least 1500 images and battery is still good (about 2/3 charge left)...

Comment edited 28 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Leesa

For the price I would argue that this is the best budget DSLR camera on the market. Excellent photo quality, and the high mega pixel means that you can crop out any unwanted crap without a huge loss in photo quality

3 upvotes
Lightpath48

Another class of photographer for whom this camera might be a very good value, is the older person looking for an easy carry, and minimalist quality imaging. I've yet to take an image that can't give everything I want through a few steps in raw processing. And I'm using the scene and Auto modes almost exclusively for family and travel. The older generation digital cameras I sold off to pay for the D3300 kit and second lens, were much more fiddly.

1 upvote
ibrahimbeno

Nice review, i realy love Nikon D3300, D3XXX is a very successful series from Nikon, easy to use while provide great image quality.
i even write an article where i compare Nikon D3200 to all other cameras under 700$, you can learn much information about it:
http://nikond3200news.blogspot.com/2014/06/nikon-d3200-is-it-best-dslr-camera-for-beginner.html

0 upvotes
SawStory

Can you please tell me how you know the bitrate of video recording , i can not find it anywhere in camera manual or nikon website?

0 upvotes
John pro photo

If you can buy a $600 camera that delivers images only a pro can tell the difference from a $3,000 camera why not Then in two years when the next Nikon problem surfaces instead of being out thousands of dollars you throw away the $600 one We paid $1350 for a D70 Three years later card reader error rendering camera useless. Years later find out this was common to every D7O and Nikon would not stand behind. D600 people pay thousands for and find oil spots on lens causing picture anomalies. Buy a D800e might as well place 3k on the back porch and burn it, get it over with instead of waiting for the camera to fail just when you need it most and Nikon do nothing. So the idea of a low priced Camera delivering Nikon quality shots at a price you can just throw them in the garbage every couple years aligns better with Nikon's inability to deliver reliable performance and stand behind their known issues. Nikon should sell just the body and maybe even in a three pack in a dixie cup dispenser?

1 upvote
FSalema

You talk about Fuji X-A1...but tell me! How much cost the (excellent) Fuji lenses??? If you are reviewing Interchangeable lenses cameras you must take into account the price of the lenses. Fuji lenses are all +400€ lenses. So much for the cheap body...

1 upvote
sapot

Nikon D3300 or Canon 100D(SL1) ? In my country the 100D is about $70 cheaper. In terms of image quality and video what's the better one?

0 upvotes
Atget2

My comments apply to both the D3300 and D3200. Nikon USA is, I think, underrating these cameras by marketing them as "entry level" only and refusing to sell them without kit lenses. I started in serious photography in 1955 and have been satisfied with the feature set of the D3100, but wanted the higher resolution and ISO levels now available. I shoot RAW with a specified ISO and don't care about jpeg in camera processing. I have 2 "CPU" lenses which replace the kit lens, as well as 4 excellent older prime lenses which can take advantage of a higher resolution sensor. Why on earth would I want to pay for another lens I don't use.

Nikon sells these cameras abroad with a body only option. Why not here?

I just bought a refurbished D3200 body to bypass this problem. Had a new D3300 body with a USA warranty been available I might have gone for it.

3 upvotes
martindpr

Check RAWs ISO100 to ISO400 in comparison to ISO800. They are not focused right, cause ISO800 appears sharper than the lower ISO settings. This little camera has an excellent potential to produce a class leading output paired with something really sharp like Nikkor 40mm f/2.8 micro or some other good prime. And why did it miss-focuss at those settings, well AF matrix also matters...

0 upvotes
NewsView

Good observations. Anyone care to comment?

As a recent D3300 owner, this camera would appear to have a mind of its own.

1) Under full sun it will "decide" to use flash whereas I shot an entire event in deep mid afternoon shadow and found it frustrating that the flash would not activate in many auto/scene modes. (Also, am I correct in that there is no manual override — that is, "force on" — for fill flash use? Or am I missing something?)

2) In my own tests, ISO 400 images will instead be shot at 3200 and so on --- even when the camera is NOT in a default auto ISO setting. Consequently, I have begun to question if my D3300 is defective?

3) The sample images in this review contain very little in the way of architecture. My fist trip out with this camera did, and the "modest" distortion at wide angle using the kit lens seemed rather severe to me, in spite of distortion control enabled. Toggling the Distortion Control on vs. off is of no apparent benefit.

Thoughts?

0 upvotes
NewsView

I should add:

4) My D3300 seems to struggle in conditions where my P&S Nikon L610 doesn't. In low indoor light colors that should be teal green are royal blue. Outdoors, reds/yellows are exaggerated. Attempts to set a manual white balance indoors produced severe magenta or blue casts whereas I had no issues setting manual white balance with my old DSLR.

5) Default JPEG color is too punchy/contrasty, requiring Gamma Correction in Photoshop. Subjects shot outdoors under shadow have a bluish or magenta cast, while under bright sun there is a pronounced orange/yellow cast, which dulls the blue of the sky, makes foliage look brown and fair skin-tones look Sunkist Orange.

6) When I run auto levels and auto color under Photoshop, PS wants to shift JPEG images captured under direct sun to a drastic Cyan or Yellow.

I'd like the option to go from "Standard" to "Neutral" color capture but those choices are locked out of most of the scene/auto modes, available only in the PSAM settings.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
NewsView

Looking for input… From the sound of things, do I just need to spend more time learning the ins-and-outs of the D3300 or does it appear to have "issues" above and beyond the fact that it is new to me? My previous DSLR was an Olympus E-300; it's been awhile since I've ventured into the DSLR market. Hence, I'm wondering how much of this is an acclimation issue vs. camera malfunction?

0 upvotes
nikoninmybag

For the ISO changing even when you set the ISO this is probably due to "Auto ISO" in the menu being on. It drove me up the wall on my D40 shooting in full manual mode and the camera was still overriding what I set by changing the iso. Setting this to off in the menu fixed it.

I guess it would be best to learn to shoot in a PASM mode so that you can set the picture control. You should be able to adjust things like contrast, saturation etc... to your liking. White balance is harder if you shoot jpegs. I shoot raw so I always readjust white balance later if I need to. You should be able to choose white balance presets and see how that works out

1 upvote
NewsView

Thank you for the info. Very helpful!

0 upvotes
Kostis

I was considering buying a Nikon D3300. My background is very much an enthusiast photographer, coming from the film days.

Nikon D3300: looks good, the 24mp is of course attractive, but the menu driven system mostly is a put-off for me (I would have liked some more physical controls). The 95% viewfinder coverage is also not good and the so many auto settings not good for me either. You need to question whether you really need the 24mp (I personally do not print large photos and do not either crop a lot).

I went the extra mile of adding £200 to my budget and ordered the Nikon D7000 with 18-105 lens. With 16mp (enough for my needs), 100% viewfinder coverage, good AF, LCD screen on the top, tilting 3in screen, weather-proof body, and good build quality (still quite far of my Nikon FM3a though) I am happy.

Any comments welcome.

1 upvote
Cyrus A

I had the D7000 with 18-105 and liked it very much. I tried the 18-200 for extra reach but preferred the 18-105 as lighter and provided good enough photos for me.

0 upvotes
Geoliebert

I.m sure you've found out by now, D7000 has a fixed screen, not tilting.

0 upvotes
Cope

Kostis, The D33/53 series bodies are marketed at those who don't use/need the settings you want to access easily. You made a wise choice with the D7000, and would have been fine with the D7100 as well.

0 upvotes
Timmbits

Does it really cost hundred$ of dollar$ to add a tilting screen and to unblock bracketing in it's internal software?
Meet the D5300.
This is why I no longer buy Nikon.
You KNOW the D5300 could sell for the price of a D3300, because they have identical production costs, but you can't have it for that price. Pay a couple hundred extra if you want the $1 in extra hardware and the unlocking of the software.

5 upvotes
Kryz11

Not to mention WiFI and GPS build in, its much more convenient.

0 upvotes
ChapelThrill23

How is that different than what you see from any number of companies? Everyone does that sort of thing from computer to camera to car companies.

6 upvotes
PerL

Buy a Leica T and get your moneys worth. Seriously, why complain about some of the best perfomance/money compromise you could buy? I am thinking of getting a D3300 or an even cheaper D3200, as a complement to my serious DSLR, and pair it with some of my better lenses, like 70-200 VR which will produce some serious IQ that will rival anything on the market short of FF.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
PLAMBERT

Value for money? When I saw the prices for Leica T with its Japanese lenses I thought it was a rip-off. A used Leica M9 makes much more sense. Not that I have handled the T. The price of M240s seem to be falling. Now there's a camera.............
Philip

2 upvotes
Timmbits

MY POINT WAS...
usually (even with the others) you get more resolution, or a better or bigger sensor, faster engine (processing), better stuff like that... not just an extra HINGE and not having some lines of code left out! that is just an insult!

@Kryz... ok, d5200 vs d3200 then.
I don't care for wifi or gps anyways. I have wifi in my nx20 and never use it. and I'm seeing news reports that people are getting tracked online via their photos now, because of that gps feature. I can do without the gimmicks and invasion of privacy thank you.

Comment edited 38 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Kryz11

Yes, you do not have to have it on for all the pictures taken.
WiFi is a big gimick, but for me GPS is great for traveling :)

But at the end I seem to choose a camera that does not have GPS, I will survive :)

0 upvotes
zaffry

Just pair it with a good lens, even the older D3100 produced a good result for enthusiasts

0 upvotes
Richard Murdey

The D3300 is a solid camera. As the review states, though, times they are a-changin'. Is it better than, or does it even have a reason to exist next to, mirrorless cameras carrying a similar price and feature set? That is the question...

With each generation, the entry level dSLR becomes harder and harder to recommend to people just looking for a casual camera with good image quality.

Once it was a no-brainer: "Yeah, get a D40. Sure, the D60. The D3000, definitely." Today... no. I wouldn't. I can't even in all honesty imagine what kind of person I would recommend the D3300, or even its discounted predecessor, the D3200, to.

3 upvotes
leno

Agree, casual camera users would not be best surved by this. Mirrorless would make most people happy. But people very rarely look to logic.

1 upvote
PerL

"Does it even have the right to exist next to mirrorless?" Please, this gadget fetischism is going to far.

3 upvotes
InTheMist

I bet ten rolls of Ilford that it focuses faster and the battery lasts longer than any mirrorless. Cheaper than most too.

A mirror is a feature.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
9 upvotes
BarnET

it's also larger you don't see what your doing through the viewfinder. the viewfinder is smaller and dim in this case.
It has less features as the em-10 less direct controls.

The d3300 does have cheaper good primes and other lenses. Also a better larger sensor. It's a solid choice just like the mirrorless em-10. choice is good.

1 upvote
FSalema

Like I said in another post. And what's the price of lenses of mirrorless cameras? Not to mention you get less quality of lenses for a higher price. You re saying that people will buy only one body one lens? But that's not what you're supposed to do with an interchangeable lens camera. Show me a quality 50mm for 150/200€ and I'll buy a mirrorless...

1 upvote
John pro photo

If you can buy a $600 camera that delivers images only a pro can tell the difference from a $3,000 camera why not Then in two years when the next Nikon problem surfaces instead of being out thousands of dollars you throw away the $600 one We paid $1350 for a D70 Three years later card reader error rendering camera useless. Years later find out this was common to every D7O and Nikon would not stand behind. D600 people pay thousands for and find oil spots on lens causing picture anomalies. Buy a D800e might as well place 3k on the back porch and burn it, get it over with instead of waiting for the camera to fail just when you need it most and Nikon do nothing. So the idea of a low priced Camera delivering Nikon quality shots at a price you can just throw them in the garbage every couple years aligns better with Nikon's inability to deliver reliable performance and stand behind their known issues. Nikon should sell just the body and maybe even in a three pack in a dixie cup dispenser?

0 upvotes
zaffry

Nikon's 50mm 1.8g just cost as my beer budget, lol serious

0 upvotes
EJPB

TRULY A MASTERPIECE!

1 upvote
leno

I would not go that far, its only a new camera.

0 upvotes
EJPB

Haha when you work at a Camera Store and you leave your DPreview logged in on your day off. Your coworkers WILL mess with your account and make comments on articles. I'm keeping the dog with the mustache display photo though. I think it's fantastic.

3 upvotes
Zuchov

And to You talkin' about incremental upates, the 3300 is a leap: New high resoulotion sensor (same as the 5300/7100), new processor, and new kit lens (good one). That's 3 outta 3 in my book.

7 upvotes
socaltrevor

unfortunately, the new high resolution sensor further limits the apertures available before diffraction sets in. This is assmuing a diffraction limited system however, which is somewhat debatable.

0 upvotes
Zuchov

A lot of talks from people reading a review. I have the D3300, and with 2900 shots with three different lenses, I KNOW what the camera is like: Shooting only RAW, I get the pictures I want, and even underexosure of 2 EV I can get almost fully recovered pictures(!). Easy handling, fast operations, amazing battery life, all the buttons I want/need, lightweight, no wi-fi/gps (thanks! I hate it, drains battery & adds weight). I am actually stunned by the quality of the images. At ISO 6400, using a 50mm 1.8 in very low light, the output is fantastic. Compared to 5D Mark II, the IQ up to ISO 800 is on pair. And don't argue, if You don't have the experience with theese cameras - I do. 'Nuf said!

12 upvotes
rfsIII

This camera plus the Sigma 35mm 1.4 would be an unbelievable combination for street shooting or events. Why would you need anything else

1 upvote
PerL

Or pair it with a Nikon 35 1.8G DX and get some of the most outstanding value/performance ratios on the market. And light weight and compactness.

Comment edited 55 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
BarnET

I wish I could like that reply more.
Too bad that there is no 23mm f1.8 DX.

3 upvotes
kadardr

High IQ doesn't satisfy me. I would never buy such a camera because I am a status obsessed snob and spec loving geek.

5 upvotes
agentul

so... Leica then?

2 upvotes
martindpr

The Hasselblad Lunar with the wooden handgrip! :) I would love one of those, to replace my Nikon Df! Complements my 30 meters yacht better...

0 upvotes
zaffry

and shooting with cigar between the fingers,by then I should hire a pro photographer or i just clowning around?

0 upvotes
mrkarisma

I really hope that you can turn the screen off on this model. I look at my images when I get home. Dont want that screen glowing like a torch in the night when trying to be discreet.

1 upvote
pfzt

USB2? No WiFi? No GPS?

They still don't understand their competition and market.

4 upvotes
justmeMN

Nikon understands product differentiation. You don't put every available feature in your bottom-of-the-line DSLR.

5 upvotes
MichaelKJ

People who are used to these features on their phones are likely to want them on an entry level DSLR.

0 upvotes
agentul

what, no HTML 5 web browser? how can they sell this thing?

4 upvotes
Rusdy

no built-in instagram, no autoselfie-mode, no iOS. boo

1 upvote
Josh152

Not to mention no kitchen sink. I mean what is Nikon thinking!? They're sure to be bankrupt in a week.

0 upvotes
NewsView

You get better battery life without the GPS. To me, the GPS and the WiFi aren't critical, maybe even detrimental.

I recently purchased the D3300 and it focuses fast and takes great photos. You don't have to keep Live View on (saves battery to use the view finder). I obtained ~650 photos on the first charge.

I wasn't planning on buying this model until I saw it side-by-side with the competition in a display. The D3300 is a standout in terms of form factor/handling — not just the body but with respect to lenses, too. The D3300 is among the lightest and most compact DSLR out there. The D3300, compared to Canon's compact DSLR, has an improved lens design that makes the overall size smaller (with newly designed kit lens, that is). While the size/weight of this camera may be of little consequence to some, that was a deciding factor for me because I have issues with pinched nerves in the spine and don't need any unnecessary bulk/weight in a camera.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 12 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
tmurph

I like the comment..."Though a little long in the tooth, the Panasonic Lumix GF6"
This camera only came out last year ( about September? ) and its already being classed as long in the tooth.
You can see why manufacturers keep updating their line ups for no apparent reason when you get reviews like this.
The " I must have the latest gear" brigade must be throwing out their G6s in droves because its a bit long in the tooth after reading this.
Dear life....whats the world coming to??

8 upvotes
David Myers

What is wrong with the lighting in the test scene?
It is uneven with edge of scene reflections in the flash lit set and the left lamp/s seems to be off in the tungsten lit set!
This is hopeless for any decent evaluations!

0 upvotes
chillgreg

I don't even read most of these reviews anymore. Blimey, talk about dry reading.Even the conclusion page is (yawn) boring. Weren't DPR going to shake things up in their reviews, what, last year?

1 upvote
chillgreg
0 upvotes
RedFox88

So few comments. Guess the thrill is lost with the entry level dSLR.

2 upvotes
Revenant

These cameras don't need to be exciting, they just sell anyway. Entry- and mid-level DSLRs from Canon and Nikon are by far the bestsellers in the system camera market, but they rarely stir up any excitement in internet forums. The target users for these cameras generally don't care about the same things as enthusiasts and gearheads do.

7 upvotes
BarnET

Since the 1100d sold so well my best guess is that these people only care about the name of the badge.

0 upvotes
RedorBlack

Is it also crippled like the rest of the D3xxx series when it comes to remote useage? Is it missing auto bracket options like the D3200?

0 upvotes
Richard Murdey

It works with the IR shutter release, but does not support off camera flash natively. The D40~3300 line has never had bracketing.

Of the two, not having wireless commander is by far the more significant omission, though perfectly justifiable in terms of product segmentation.

0 upvotes
Slouch Hooligan

Richard, the D40 had several kinds of bracketing including white balance. Mine did anyway.

0 upvotes
KnightPhoto2

77% and Silver, seems a bit low. I would've expected 80% and Gold...

And how about mention of the new collapsible kit lens...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
DaytonR

What an interesting camera , Nikon has raised the bar for entry level SLR`s. Its amazing how much cameras have come in a few years !

7 upvotes
Heie2

Rofl - nice one.

1 upvote
jtan163

Very true cameras have come a long way in the last few years.
Olympus, Fuji, Panasonic and Sony are really innovating.

Oh look, another Canikon product increment.
More megapixels you say? How nice.
Oh, you've switched back on a feature you crippled to artificially create a distinction in your product line.
Stellar.

1 upvote
raztec

Who cares?

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Did anyone force you to click the article link?

9 upvotes
Gesture

Excellent review, Allison. Undoubtedly a fine camera. But where Nikon loses me is in the way products are crippled. As you pay more, sure, better viewfinder coverage, brighter viewfinder, faster AF, more AF points, better weathersealing, etc. but there is no reason this model shouldn't have the full Adaptive Lighting implementation. Back to Pentax for me should I buy a new DSLR.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
Richard Murdey

Nikon removes some features for reasons of cost, obviously, and others for reasons of simplification.

There was a setting on my old D200 for changing the diameter of the CW metering circle. I mean - do you really think that feature belongs on an entry level dSLR, even it was a simple firmware edit to enable it?

Nikon fine tunes the settings to match the level of what it thinks the user needs. (not what will most excite dpreview readers) So Adaptive Lighting in JPEG mode is off/auto. Most people who buy the camera will be happy with that - the review suggests it works well - and the full setting are available under ViewNX2 if you need to adjust them later anyway.

0 upvotes
waxwaine

"But if it's a DSLR-shaped thing that you need..."

LOL, DSLR-shaped!

Traduction: If you want to waste 600usd, don´t know what you want as a camera except that is something to hang on you neck to convince yourself and other fools you know photography, run to this cr6p. If you it´s not your case, runaway from this cr6p.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach

Blows away any Pentax short of the K3, that's for sure :^)

7 upvotes
Heie2

Clearly you are smoking something phenomenal.

5 upvotes
BarnET

Yeah this blows the Pentax 645z and the 645d away.
I guess he is living 100km north from me in Amsterdam.

0 upvotes
NSparkles10

A very nice camera but significant changes could have / should have been made. Why come out with a new camera with very subtle changes? The incentives to upgrade are extremely low

0 upvotes
Sonyshine

These entry level DSLR's from Nikon are cracking good value and great cameras. As an experienced photographer I actually prefer the entry level set up with less buttons, knobs and tweaking options. I enjoy the challenge of just using a simple yet effective camera.

I don't see this as being a worthwhile upgrade from my D3200 - I wonder why Nikon just make small incremental changes instead of big leaps?

Its still a nice camera for someone who does not want complication or who is on a limited budget.

10 upvotes
digiart

"I wonder why Nikon just make small incremental changes instead of big leaps?"

Simple. The changes are small because they want to sell the more expensive models too. This way, in a few months time, they launch the D3400 with just enough improvements so that many that bought the D3300 will upgrade to the D3400. And so on...

1 upvote
RedorBlack

I disagree... I think they figure this is it for a beginner, or you are going to use it until you realize what is missing and step up to a higher series camera, not the same camera with a thing or two slightly improved. More likely to step to the D7xxx series to get the lens drive motor so you can use something like the 50mm F/1.4 or 1.8 AF-D , to get auto bracketing and HDR settings, to get real time lapse control without needing a remote, and the ability to fully control the camera remotely. So I see the jump from this being to the D7xxx bodies or the D8xx. For someone that is buying their first DSLR, that 24Mp and the Nikon name are the big things in it's favor. I suspect most buyers have no clue what lens would best suit them and will be happy or blame themselves for what the 18-55mm kit lens provides.

1 upvote
zaffry

It's make me wounder how can Adrian Sommelling say he use D3100 for his shots, and travel the globe to give master class on photography, Behind the Lens University ?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
KW Phua

Half cooked RAW resulted in poor jpeg. You can't find detail in hi ISO jpeg, except Canon.

4 upvotes
InTheMist

What? Canon ruins details more than any manufacturer except maybe Fuji with waaay too aggressive noise reduction.

12 upvotes
justmeMN

DPR: "Each of these cameras is smaller too, which is a major criteria we hear from camera shoppers again and again."

Again and again, camera shoppers in North America and Europe choose DSLRs, rather than smaller (poor selling) mirrorless cameras. Most people aren't infatuated by a camera's small size. Other factors are much more important. Nikon estimates that they are going to sell 6 million DSLRs this fiscal year.

5 upvotes
Josh152

Yeah the only people obsessed with cameras size are the m4/3s and mirroless fanboys on this site. For most people once a camera wont fit in a pocket the size basically becomes irrelevant. It's either the cell phone or lugging a camera around so you might as well take the one that's easier to hang on to, hold steady, and looks like a "real" camera.

2 upvotes
aandeg

Honestly Dpreview is going off the rails. Getting to be more and more like the Fox News of the camera world.

1 upvote
PLAMBERT

"For most people once a camera wont fit in a pocket the size basically becomes irrelevant."
I used Nikon equipment for 30+ years and was intending to buy a used D3 until I tried one in Calumet. I was put off by the weight of the camera and three lenses so I bought a used M9, which is much easier to carry with extras. It has its drawbacks of course but it's easy to use and the results are sharp (if I remember to focus!).
Phil

0 upvotes
Heaven is for real

So boring, another incremental upgrade. Nothing new, nothing innovative!

1 upvote
sandy b

Lets see, best 24 mp sensor, class leading AF, advanced carbon fibre build, a real optical viewfinder, Excellent FPS for its class, access to the best lens lineup, upgrade possibilty to the best FF camera lineup.

Nothing exciting here, it must suck because its a Nikon.

9 upvotes
Heaven is for real

It is one of the best! "24 megapixel APS-C sensor is one of the best in its class"

0 upvotes
brendon1000

How is 11 point AF system with 1 single AF point which was first used 7 years ago be considered class leading ? :P

Pentax and Sony offers have better AF systems here.

Excellent FPS ? The K50 has 30 JPEG buffer vs a class leading 6 frame JPEG buffer on the Nikon ! :P

No AF support for Nikon AF-D and AF lenses (a first for any system where an AF first party lens won't AF on their own camera).

I agree sensor is good but this camera is nowhere near class leading.

14 upvotes
sandy b

The Nikon has a 100 shot buffer burst rate in jpg. And I bet it still focus tracks better than any of the others, one point or not. And the Nikon takes all Nikon lens other than screw drive, a minor point in a entry level camera, IMO.

4 upvotes
brendon1000

Please read the review. The buffer has 6 JPEG files. If you have any different info please post the links.

Yes it probably tracks focus better but not by much. And the no of screw drive lenses is not insignificant.

0 upvotes
sandy b

No Nikon has ever had a 6 shot burst limitation. They are universealy 100 shot. http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Nikon_D3300/verdict.shtml
"The D3300 offers slightly faster 5fps continuous shooting, compared with 4fps on the EOS SL1 / 100D, but offers a longer JPEG burst rate of 100 frames ( though in practice I found the D3300 slowed significantly after around 70 frames) compared with 28 on the EOS SL1 / 100D. And with a battery that delivers enough power for 700 shots the D3300 will outlast the 380-shot EOS SL1 / 100D between charges."

2 upvotes
steelhead3

I think it may be the nikon top of line, 7100 that is limited in the buffer.

1 upvote
brendon1000

@Sandy_b - Point accepted. Dpreview's test is dead wrong it seems.

1 upvote
mosc

DPR, did you miss that optical viewfinder thing on the top? All the mirrorless cameras you list don't have viewfinders! The D3300 is an APS-C sensor (a good one at that) with a viewfinder. Compared to an A6000, it's priced pretty well (D3300 is $150 cheaper). If you're going to compare it against mirrorless cameras at least note that an mirrorless with a viewfinder will set you back at least as much.

You really want a reason not to get this camera, talk to people about the old A65. Same sensor, cheaper, built in wifi (and GPS if you're into that), full coverage viewfinder, faster shooting, etc

6 upvotes
marc petzold

It's a really great (beginners) DSLR for the given price - but i'd like to see a 100% viewfinder, like on Pentax Entrylevel DSLRs, and perhaps 2 command dials, like Pentax, too. I say this, but being onto the Nikon & Sony Waggon...anyway, i still have my beloved K10D from some couple years ago. ;)

The A6000 have a much higher FPS rate (10 FPS) and a sophisticated AF System, also a Magnesium Chassis, you can't compare this with the D3300,
these are different worlds.

But you can compare the A3000 with the D3300 - in which ways the D3300 wins in terms of viewfinder and resolution...but a big plus for the A3000: because of the E-mount, you can virtually adapt every lens via adapter.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
brendon1000

Lets not forget that at $348 you can buy 2 of them for a little more than the price of 1 D3300. :P

0 upvotes
jim stirling

@Mark , to be fair the A3000 has very poor build quality a 230k-dots LCD { seriously !} , poor ergonomics. Unfortunately you can easily see were every single penny was saved on the A3000

2 upvotes
john Clinch

I expect Sont Nex ownership looks less exciting and cheap when you start choosing more lenses

One tele zoom and its f6.7 and how much?

How much for an f1.8 35mm?

How much for an ultra wide?

How much for a nifty 50mm?

Comment edited 31 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
keeponkeepingon

The sony 35mm F1.8 iand 50mm F1.8 is cheaper than any Canon or Nikon prime with IS.

The 16mm prime is cheaper than anything in that range offered by canon/nikon.

0 upvotes
BarnET

Indeed the 35mm and especially the 50mm oss are good enough value. The 50mm is actually an great low light portrait lens. He has a solid point with the mediocre at best telephoto though. That lens is a reason to go to a different mount. Fujfilm has 1 very good and 1 good option in this range. And m43 has plenty of solid option.

0 upvotes
abolit66

another piece of crap. Nikon gets worse every day.

7 upvotes
dougster1979

A camera with a leading sensor, produces great images. A piece of crap! Everybody's entitled to their opinion I guess.

4 upvotes
BarnET

Jealous I guess. The canon counterpart is beyond pathetic.

4 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach

Three blind mice :^)

2 upvotes
Stollen1234

Not > fan of Nikon at all.. but what is going on at Nikon first dust on sensors then the oil leak or what ever now this entry level camera which can not focus..

Is Nikon now facing the worst crisis since the its foundation?

0 upvotes
sandy b

Of course you don't like them, you pile on them every chance you can get. As far as focus, it can focus as well or better than any camera in its class, with better IQ.

0 upvotes
Tony Nhat

it was wonderful

0 upvotes
Reinhard136

just about class leading sensor ? so which apsc sensor is better ???? I am not a Nikon fan, but aren't you getting a camera that with the same lens will take the same photo as any of its 24 mp "big" Nikon brothers ? in a very compact size - at a fraction of the price - from a brand which automatically gets all the nice independent lenses, like the new 16-300 ? and giving away a handful of rare to use features ? Sounds like gold material to me ????

2 upvotes
brendon1000

Well for starters it cannot focus will all Nikon lenses out there which is a pretty poor point.

Second Nikon has been screwing around with 3rd party compatibility for some time now. Its possible in future they may find a way to make 3rd party lenses completely incompatible. (Extreme case but seeing what they are doing now its not impossible).

And lastly Nikon seems to be pretty dead when it comes to innovation. They haven't come out with any really new feature in the last couple of years. Canon was in the same boat but they were the first to come out with some very useful Wifi implementation in their 6D. And their dual pixel tech is also very very useful for those upgrading from P&S cameras.

I think a Silver award is justified given the high IQ of this camera but not a Gold.

2 upvotes
Richard Murdey

It is, especially once the price falls into clearance territory. Is the image quality the same as the D7100? Squinting at the dpreview Komparator(tm) suggests not quite, but isn't it better instead to ask: "Will the D3300's restricted feature set prevent me from taking the photos I want to take?"

2 upvotes
Markol

Why do the studio shots look so bad? Terribly soft corners. What lens was used?

1 upvote
naththo

JPEG processing is the problem as what they described in review for the studio shooting comparison.

<Snip>

At low ISOs the D3300's image processing fails to get the best out of its images, obscuring some very fine detail in JPEG processing that's preserved in Raw.

</Snip>

It looks sharper at higher ISO than ISO 100 I noticed.

Nathan.

0 upvotes
DaPonti

Out of the 5 cameras used for comparison in the conclusion, the k-50 is the only one to exceed 500$ with the kit lens, compared to 650$ for the D3300. Maybe you could have used higher models (e.g. X-M1, a58 or a65...).
Comparing the D3300 to those makes it look like it isn't worth more than that... and yet it gets a silver award.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Simon Joinson

well to be fair the K50 started at almost $800 - it's about 6 months older. We do not base comparison groups on price (for many reasons). You wouldn't compare a Chevrolet Corvette convertible with an Audi Q7 Diesel SUV, despite them being exactly the same price....

7 upvotes
DaPonti

I understand the point, but would you compare the Corvette to a Q5?

0 upvotes
Gazeomon

I think there are more exciting 'entry level' cameras available than this lame plastic 'iteration of an iteration'. Look @ Fuji, Sony, Olympus, Panasonic, Samsung and Pentax.

24 upvotes
Richard Murdey

Not everyone wants to be excited by their camera.

8 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach

Image quality of this caliber used to be called a D3x and cost eight grand. Pretty damn exciting if you ask me.
Lenses! If the impecunious step up shooter wants to shoot a soccer game or some birds, he or she can rent an 80-400VR for 30 bucks a day and get absolutely world class results, which they would not be able to do with the above list except Canon. Advantage D3300!

17 upvotes
Mike99999

Lenses LOL! If a person would want a nice (native) 35mm eq. walk around prime on Nikon DX, you can forget about it.

And that's quite a fundamental lens missing in this system.

1 upvote
Richard Murdey

@Mike99999

Just turn the zoom ring to "23 mm". Geez, some people have to be hand-held through everything!

6 upvotes
Stu 5

If you bothered to read up on the Nikon D3300 fully you would know the camera body material used on this camera model is ground breaking for this type of camera... why? It's a carbon fibre composite monocoque body. This is a construction type that will probably find it's way into professional cameras in the future as it is strong, rigid but lightweight. The last thing the D3300 is, is a lame plastic 'iteration of an iteration'.

7 upvotes
riskinhos

who cares!? it's not weather sealed or waterproof neither rugged.
it has the same specs as the predecessor and weights less 100gr. really, how is that going to make any difference? specially in image quality. oh wait, it will not whatsoever.
just bs marketing.

4 upvotes
Gazeomon

Yes, I can see a lot of soccer mums hiring 80 to 4oo mm semi pro zooms for their 24mp entry level cams with that superb AF system to print super size piccies of their ball kicking kids chasing birds. Yeah, totally forgot that aspect of entry level photography.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
sandy b

And none of them have better IQ or AF or build. But that doesn't seem to matter around here anymore if it's not "exciting".
Nikon will sell more D3300's than Fuji, Oly, sony and pentax comparable cameras combined.

3 upvotes
steelhead3

Overstock dot com will be pushing them out the door.

1 upvote
Michael Ma

This is a good article showing Canon and Nikon perform the worst at ISO6400 and higher.

0 upvotes
naththo

Not correct, in the last few years on average Nikon still rank top for sensor according to graphs.

6 upvotes
budi0251

Wondering what lens did they use for studio image quality test, it doesn't show.
However it seems so badly out of focus, ie. same 24MP without AA filter Nikon D7100 does produce wayyy much sharper picture (RAW).

1 CrossType PDAF? I suppose they should use same lenses across Nikon crop model with LiveView AF shouldn't they?

0 upvotes
Total comments: 226
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