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Nikon 1 V3 Review

July 2014 | By Eugene Lee
Buy on GearShop$1,196.95

Since the original 1 V1, AF and continuous shooting speed have been a standout feature in Nikon's mirrorless offering for users who want interchangeable lens versatility in a small form factor. The 1 V3 makes a large step toward being a true enthusiast-oriented camera with the addition of features such as twin control dials, two customizable function buttons (a third if using the add-on grip) and a new 18MP 1"-type sensor with no AA filter. Add to that a high-performance hybrid contrast and phase detect AF system, a new Expeed 4A processor, and you have a very capable camera for most shooting situations.

The obvious change from last year's 1 V2 is the loss of the built-in electronic viewfinder, which is now an optional extra. Also available as add-ons are a DSLR-like grip and an adapter ring to attach any F-mount lens. This modular approach allows users to build-up or strip down the V3 to their liking - this should boost its appeal to enthusiasts (although for U.S. buyers, the only option is to buy the kit with EVF and grip). However, at the same time, the V3 still has many 'creative' modes that simulate various art filters and a 'live preview' scene control mode for beginners to blur background or stop action without having to learn aperture or shutter speed numbers.

The V1's cumbersome access to key settings annoyed many enthusiasts. While the V2 addressed some of those issues, it still felt like Nikon could do better with the V-series for serious shooters given the J- and S-series cameras were clearly aimed at people stepping up from smartphones and compacts. The question for the V3 is: Does it now provide enough direct control, customization and image quality to make advanced users give the 1-series a second look?

Nikon 1 V3 key features

  • 18.4MP 1"-type CMOS sensor, no AA filter
  • Hybrid AF with 171 contrast-detect and 105 phase-detect points
  • 20 fps with continuous AF and subject tracking
  • Raw file capture
  • 3" tilting touchscreen with 1.04M dots
  • 1080/60p video capture
  • Wi-Fi connectivity with remote control via app

The new sensor and AF system are the headline features of the V3. The V3's 18.4MP CX-format CMOS sensor is a bump up from the 14.2MP found in the V2. It also lacks an anti-aliasing (low-pass) filter that potentially gives the V3 sharper, more detailed images. Along with the sensor, the new Expeed 4A processor enables the V3 to shoot 20 fps in full-time continuous autofocus mode - even when shooting Raw files - and an astounding 60 fps in single focus mode.

Nikon's 1-series from the beginning had one of the fastest AF systems found in mirrorless cameras. The V3 is no different. It uses a hybrid system, combining 171 contrast and 105 phase detection areas. In comparison, the V2 had 135 and 73 respective areas. The phase-detect areas cover almost 100% of the frame, making the Sony a6000 with its hybrid AF system the V3's only serious competitor in this respect. With high fps and quick AF speed, the V3 has the chops for shooting fast action, whether it be sports or a spontaneous moments with kids.

The V3 can now shoot 1080/60p full-HD video with the ability to capture full resolution still images during recording. There's also a high-speed option and slow-motion capture ability at 120 fps at 720p.

And in what is becoming a standard feature on many new cameras, Wi-Fi is now built-in (no NFC). You can transfer images to your smartphone or control the camera remotely using Nikon's Wireless Mobile Utility app.

Key specs compared

Finding a direct rival to the V3 is tough. The Sony a6000 is the nearest competitor in terms of AF performance. The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1 and Samsung NX Mini are some interchangeable lens cameras that are physically smaller than the V3. Meanwhile the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1000 III is the benchmark 1"-type sensor camera for image quality and its built-in lens is brighter than the Nikon's kit zoom.

 
Nikon 1 V3
Sony a6000
Panasonic GM1
Sony RX100 III
Effective Pixels  • 18MP • 24 MP  • 16MP  • 21MP
ISO Range  • 160-12800

• 100-25600

 • 200-25600  • 125-12800
AF System

• Hybrid contrast and phase detect

• Hybrid contrast and phase detect

 • Contrast detect  • Contrast detect
Screen • 3"
• 1,037,000 dots
• 3"
• 921,600 dots
 • 3"
 • 1,036,800 dots
 • 3"
 • 1,228,800 dots
Sensor Size • 1"-type
• (13.2 x 8.8 mm)

• APS-C
• (23.5 x 15.6 mm)

• Four Thirds
• (17.3 x 13 mm)
• 1"-type
• (13.2 x 8.8 mm)
Built-in flash • Yes • Yes •  Yes •  Yes
Continuous drive • 20 fps continuous AF
• 60 fps single AF
• 11 fps continuous AF • 5 fps • 10 fps
Storage • microSD
• SD  • SD  • SD
Weight (inc batteries) • 381 g (0.84 lb) • 344 g (0.76 lb)  • 204 g (0.45 lb)  • 290 g (0.64 lb)
Dimensions • 111 x 65 x 33 mm
(4.37 x 2.56 x 1.3")
• 120 x 67 x 45 mm (4.72 x 2.64 x 1.77")

• 99 x 55 x 30 mm (3.88 x 2.16 x 1.2")

• 102 x 58 x 41 mm (4.02 x 2.28 x 1.61")

Wi-Fi • Built-in • Built-in • Built-in • Built-in

Optional accessories

When the grip is attached to the camera it adds a shutter button, another front command dial, and third custom function button.

The GR-N1010 grip and DF-N1000 electronic viewfinder are included in the US V3 kit. They are sold separately in the UK and Europe.

Kit options and pricing

In the US, a V3 kit with the 1 Nikkor VR 10-30mm F3.5-5.6 PD-Zoom lens, DF-N1000 electronic viewfinder and the GR-N1010 grip is available for $1,199.95. The 1 Nikkor VR 10-30mm F3.5-5.6 PD-Zoom and the 1 Nikkor VR 70-300mm F4.5-5.6 lenses are also available for $299.95 and $999.95 respectively. An FT-1 mount adapter is also available for $239.95.

In the UK and Europe the V3 will sell for £799.99/€949 with the 10-30mm lens only. The kit with 10-30mm lens, EVF and grip will be available for £1049.99/€1249. The FT-1 mount adapter will sell for £229.99/€279.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2014 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 643
1234
elf kerben

Every new N1 have new limitations, this sucks Nikon. Yes you would like to have 2000$ or 2000€ for this system, but then make it right, you know all the stuff, first update v1 picture review firmware, as a sign of your good will, then give v2 and v3 the battery status.

Yes the battery fail on the v1 had you cost money, but a "pro" user or a normal user would like to know if the camera crashs your original-retail-cost a lot-battery and will now longer working in v1.

Go on nikon - the heart of the image? or?

2 upvotes
radissimo

One step BEHIND: Nikon 1 V3 Review

9 upvotes
aandeg

Well dpreview does better at hosting trolls than reviewing cameras. At least your good at something!

Camera is not for me and I am a N1 user. Missed the mark as does those fiddly and over priced MFT cameras. Though for them it seems being overpriced is a positive.

0 upvotes
wlad

the problem is that a 5 generations old MFT camera still outperforms the latest generation Nikon 1 sensor...

4 upvotes
aandeg

And much cheaper Nikon aspc camera's 5 generations old outperform all MFT cameras. Your point?

0 upvotes
wlad

which 5 generations old APS-C Nikon outperforms the OMD EM1 ?

2 upvotes
Andy Crowe

Both those claims are bunk, tho comparing the Nikon to other 1" sensors the IQ should be better

0 upvotes
gsum

This is the worst set of samples that DPR has posted in a long time. They do not convey the capabilities of the camera or its lenses in any way. There are no examples of the essence of the 1 series cameras - the 60fps burst capability and super-fast autofocus nor of the edge/corner performance of the lenses.

2 upvotes
geo444

.

now, there is 10 NiKon 1 models in the lineup...
... and 10 Times the word " Noise " in this Conclusion page !

$1200 = for such a high price, NiKon could have worked with Sony
even the old Non-BSI CMos from the first Sony RX-100...
has 1,5 Stop better DR at ISO 80, 100, 200
1 Stop better at ISO 400, 800

let's see 1 V4...

;)

5 upvotes
malabraxis

I thought I was the only one who noticed the recurring mention of noise. And the price?

0 upvotes
geo444

.

now, 10 NiKon One models in the lineup...
... 10 times the word " Noise " in the Conclusion page #14
+ 14 times the word " Noise " in the IQ page #10

{:^,(

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
glenn capers

What I never understand is the mentality of people that submit samples ov the Nikon1 v3. You spend 2000 dollars plus and shoot a a kid on a bike, a person walking up the stairs, an escalator, and a memorable aspirin box.

Nothing about pictures figure out. Or maybe it is the writers that fire off a few frames. If I was Nikon I would stop sending you cameras to review. The pictures are embarrassing. http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/reviewsamples/albums/nikon-1-v3-real-world-samples

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
halfwaythere

It's a technical website not a photography one. They are trying to cover the most usual shooting situations and of course they will jump over the artsy stuff.

A site like dpreview.com doesn't buy cameras, cameras are sent to them for review purposes.

6 upvotes
_sem_

If I was Nikon I would stop sending DPR cameras to review if I didn't intend selling many of them in the first place. Can't blame Nikon if V1 missed the target, but the third iteration, hehe
DPR could've mentioned the possible appeal to rich birders.

0 upvotes
halfwaythere

Being amazon owned I'm pretty sure they have no problem getting cameras.

Its a niche product of a niche system and it's very hard to please everybody. Unfortunately nikon 1 users have replaced the m43 crowd as the most defensive bunch of photogeeks.

0 upvotes
Sixpm

Instead of accepting the merit of each camera's unique design and character, people always compare to another and it's not that wise IMHO. I have used almost every camera that there is and still own enough to write this comment, I see that each camera (and lens) are synergies formed by each particular company's and designer's philosophy, this camera is intended for street, sports or action photograph and we should be viewed it as such.

Personally, having used the V3 and made prints to 60' x 40" (inches) have confirmed the print from this 'little' camera has the look and feel of the tradition film camera and when printed on the fibre material, one can hardly see any digital artefact (with all noise reduction switched off - from the untouched jpeg files).

I thought the V1 was good but the V3 is every way better in both handling and image quality (with film like grain noise) taken into account. I'm not a brand follower as to me all camera/lenses are just tools for me to express myself.

1 upvote
Sixpm

To me this is an exercise to enrich my mind and it's up to anyone to interpret anyway one wishes.

0 upvotes
Smeggypants

""I have used almost every camera that there is " - I'm stunned anyone is stupid enough to even makes such a comment

9 upvotes
Sixpm

There are lots of angry birds here and everywhere... :)

5 upvotes
Sixpm

A camera is like a tool, any passionate craftsman would wish to learn as much from the tool in order to choose which tool is best to suit their needs, what's the big deal guys.

1 upvote
malabraxis

It may be very difficult for the diaper generation to comprehend, but some of us HAVE been around for a while, and have used cameras few even heard of. The real trolls are the ones who fail to understand a little thing called experience. Maybe thats why Adobe is doing so well. The issue is the Nikon1 V3, not the uneducated ramblings about what someone did or did not do with what camera in the past. And on that point, it may look aesthetic, but it does not work for me. Sorry, Nikon.
And now, let the trolling begin.........

1 upvote
sandy b

Henry and Smeggy, two of the biggest trolls on the site, what a surprise.

1 upvote
zettlers

This one is not for me so I hate it and expect everyone else to do the same!

13 upvotes
wetsleet

"alone that it use MICRO SD cards shows that the engineers have not the user in mind"
You really do have to be quite arrogant to make comments like that. I'm quite confident that the engineers thought through every aspect of the camera. Clearly you, in 2 seconds, are able to outsmart them and come up with better solutions. The shame of it is that your talent is wasted.
Did you consider that many users might never even remove the microSD card from the camera?
"only morons would buy this" - more arrogance.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
5 upvotes
wlad

Those users who would never take the card out of the camera are exactly those clueless newbies who bought the wrong camera.

This is supossed to be an "enthusiast" camera. Meaning RAW. And since the high FPS/fast AF is the only selling point of this camera, that means LOTS of RAWs. And 200-300 MB per minute of video footage.

Not many users will want to waste the camera battery transferring photos/videos over the slow USB2 connection.

0 upvotes
wetsleet

"This is supossed to be an "enthusiast" camera. Meaning RAW. "

Maybe it is a camera for people who like to take and show pictures.

I'd bet that if you took 100 pictures, randomly assigned 50% to be taken as RAW, the other 50% to be taken as in-camera jpeg, then printed them all out and asked people to choose their favourites, that you would find zero correlation to RAW/jpeg.

It is the picture that matters to most people, get over the measurebating.

What I really don't get, however, is your logic. You dictate which people this camera is for, despite knowing features which you suppose won't appeal to those very people, on which basis you declare that they won't actually want the camera. Circular genius.

2 upvotes
wlad

Every photographer likes to take and show pictures, that's actually the definition of a photographer. People who don't care about RAW, also don't care about spending 3 times the money over a J1/J2/J3/S1/S2/etc, since they don't get anything significant in return.

I don't dictate anything. It's pretty much common sense that less buttons and controls = camera for beginners, more control options = camera aimed for more advanced shooters.

But you are right about one thing - this POS does not appeal even to those very shooters, that Nikon tried to target with it.

0 upvotes
Polariser

I agree .. Micro SD cards are too small and fiddly. Ok in a phone / tablet but pita in a camera.. Ever seen a computer that accepts micro SD cards?

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
wlad

a microSD -> SD card adapter is usually bundled together with a microSD card, that's not the issue here. The problem is that microSD cards are very awkward to remove and reinsert - because of their size, you often have to use the tip of your nail to push the card deep enough into the slot.
MicroSD cards were never meant to be removed from their slot that often.

0 upvotes
Polariser

Agree ..they are fiddly as hell so shouldn't be used in cameras where you need to swop them out in the wild when one gets full

0 upvotes
Sonyshine

A brilliant little action and wildlife camera from Nikon.
I really , really want one!

BUT....

Why is the EVF a separate extra?
What on earth were they thinking of with Micro SD cards?

The retail price is hysterically funny - no way will I pay anything near what they want for this camera when my V1 can do most of the things the V3 can do.

I still think this camera is a (potential) winner but Nikon's marketing department need to take a long walk off a short pier...

7 upvotes
thx1138

Brilliant if you only shoot in good light. Wouldn't be using this past ISO 400/800. Shadow noise even at base ISO!

0 upvotes
Mike FL

V1 has no HDR.

IMHO: Nikon never gives people a winner "1" system as it is ALWAYS:
1. Missing some basic feature, or
2. Some thing is wrongly implemented.

V4 may be better. We'll see.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
Wu Jiaqiu

don't buy it if it doesn't suit you, and when you bought your first digital camera did you moan about being "forced" to buy a memory card for it?

3 upvotes
_sem_

I don't care about micro SD at all.
But the pricing, the external EVF, the flash incompatibility, the limited compatibilty with F-mount lenses (central AF only), the relatively large size considering the sensor size...
If the rest was done right, N1 could live with the limitations of the small sensor, catering to those preferring small sizes (though I think Nikon should consider a APS-C mirrorless N2 line to replace their smaller DSLRs over the next decade).

1 upvote
Wu Jiaqiu

the pricing is crazy, but after having held one how anyone can call this camera large is beyond me, it's a usable size. Only had one old sigma lens not work with the FT-1 adaptor, the results are rather good for a 1" sensor and for shooting long telephoto the system is fantastic. It's not for everyone and there are plenty of fantastic cameras out there.

1 upvote
wlad

My J1 is large, that's why I'm selling my Nikon 1 gear (10-30mm, 30-110mm and 18.5) and moving to RX100 mark3 - as soon as the price drops

1 upvote
Wu Jiaqiu

please define what makes a camera large?

0 upvotes
_sem_

> after having held one how anyone can call this camera large is beyond me, it's a usable size.

It is not large in absolute terms. But, with the lenses, it is not as much smaller than m43 offerings as one might expect. Not to mention the size and kit lens aperture comparison to same-sensor-sized Sony RX. I do believe that Nikon 1 lens design standards are above those of compacts, eventhough the image comparison doesn't show obvious superiority... but I think Nikon 1 might be much more successful if they offered similar compact and fast lenses.

0 upvotes
wlad

@Wu Jiaqiu - in my case - "pocketability" - if a camera doesn't fit in my jacket pocket without impairing my comfort, it's too big to be considered a carry everywhere camera. If I need to take a camera bag with a shoulder strap, I might as well take my DSLR instead.
I only take my J1 to the beach or areas with higher risk of damage/theft.

0 upvotes
Langusta

I'm having a hard time finding worse camera in this price range.

39 upvotes
Studor13

How many cameras in this price range do you (and all the people giving you a thumbs up) actually own?

I'd bet the answer is zero.

0 upvotes
Langusta

If that's what you would bet then I'd say don't try gambling ;)

2 upvotes
Jorginho

COMpare the GM1 in RAW in the lightbulb mode in the comparison tool. Set it to ISO3200 and set the V3 at ISO 800. They look the same. That is a 2 stop difference! No reward given. If it had Sony RX100II IQ, things would be a lot different. I think a silver award would be in place then and if they could drop the price to 800 dollar a gold would be close. So yes: too expensive for too poor IQ and, without the EVF, also to expensive for the featureset.

9 upvotes
Alexis D

A few people are saying this Nikon is justified for sports and action. I wonder how it compares with the Sony A77 II, which costs the same.
;-)

7 upvotes
Zeisschen

So basically a 3 year old Sony NEX-7 still beats it. Way to go Nikon!

13 upvotes
grumpycat

who will buy this thing???

3 upvotes
Lin Evans

Lots of people - they are back-ordered. Want to do some time lapse photos without exceeding the shutter life of your dSLR? How about a selectable mechanical or electronic shutter? Want to get some great telephoto shots without spending 8K on an 800mm lens for your super expensive FF body? I have lots of super expensive gear and I absolutely LOVE my 1V1..

6 upvotes
grumpycat

There's a sucker born every minute.

14 upvotes
Lin Evans

Is that the best you've got, or were you just looking in a mirror and admiring your reflection?

5 upvotes
grumpycat

This thing is DOA... Firesale soon for $300!

10 upvotes
Menneisyys

"Want to do some time lapse photos without exceeding the shutter life of your dSLR? How about a selectable mechanical or electronic shutter? "

You can do the same (full electronic shutter) on several other, cheaper and/or more versatile and, in all cases, significantly better-IQ cameras: GX7, GM1, GH3, GH4 etc.

2 upvotes
_sem_

V3's full electronic shutter is indeed much faster than most of the alternatives. But it still a rolling one, no EFCS afaik, and with scan time (0.012s?) not fast enough for everything.
And there's a bit of IQ penalty compared to the Sony 1" sensors.

0 upvotes
Lin Evans

The point is you are not "limited" to either a mechanical or electronic shutter, you can choose with the 1 series. I have to smile when I hear comments such as the one from Menneisyys about the "more versatile" other cameras. I've yet to see more versatile cameras than the V1,2,3 series. There is an amazing number of people who have strong opinions about the Nikon 1 cameras who have never held one in their hands. I find that quite amusing. I try not to form opinions about equipment I've not even seen myself. I love my 1V and it has a place in my bag beside my most expensive pro gear and lenses.

2 upvotes
Menneisyys

"The point is you are not "limited" to either a mechanical or electronic shutter, you can choose with the 1 series."

So can you with the Pana cameras I've listed even between every single shot.

" I have to smile when I hear comments such as the one from Menneisyys about the "more versatile" other cameras. I've yet to see more versatile cameras than the V1,2,3 series."

Let's see. Where are the UWA lenses for the Nikon 1 mount? UWA is one aspect of being versatile. _ALL_ other systems have decent UWA lenses (sometimes even more than one native lens) starting at 15mm equiv or less. The Nikon 1 system?

And what about the IQ? Every single current large-sensor camera beats the Nikon 1 WRT noise performance.

Don't take me wrong: I am more than aware of the strengths (most importantly, AF speed) of this system. I just consider it waaay overpriced and I can put up with far slower AF in exchange for vastly(!!) better IQ in every single respect. This is why I've gone for a Fuji X-E1...

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Lin Evans

I don't think having wider than 27mm is really all that important. The wider you get the more peripheral distortion. I've yet to see "noise" in a single print from virtually "any" of my 40 plus digital cameras. It's highly over emphasized by pixel peepers IMHO. If I need wider than 27mm I take multiple frames and stitch. If the subject isn't amenable to stitching (rare) I don't bother with the shot. Autofocus, ultra high speed video, zoom equivalent to 1350mm, ability to use nearly any Nikon lens, built-in intervalometer, incredible full resolution frame burst, etc., etc. That's what I call versatility. How many shots do you actually take at ultra wide angle? I can count on my fingers and toes the number I've taken as a professional in over 50 years of shooting everything from landscape to wildlife to fine art to portrait and weddings. It's just not a big feature IMHO...

2 upvotes
Fotogeneticist

Hertz,

Changing this discussion from the apparent limitations of the V3 into a string of comments like "dumb people buy dumb things", or "this camera is for no-one with more then 4 functional braincells" is immature. I am a competent photographer and the Nikon 1 series has a place in my arsenal. I don't think I'll be buying the V3 (possibly the J4) due to the price, but if I did have a V3, I guarantee I could get over every one of its limitations, which I would be willing to do in order to reap the advantages of its fast AF and reach. I assure you, I have more than 4 functional braincells and I know how to use a camera.

2 upvotes
Fotogeneticist

Lin,

I do the same, I often stitch photographs together, however, from my DSLR days, I wouldn't completely discount the advantages of ultra wide angle. I've made use of the 14mm FOV with an FX sensor in many of my photographs and I will say that I pretty much solely shoot in the 14mm-24mm range nowadays. I would welcome a Nikon CX lens with an equivalent FOV and wider constant aperture... the CX equivalent of the legendary 14-24mm f/2.8, which I still keep even though I don't have a DSLR anymore.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

"I don't think having wider than 27mm is really all that important. "

YOU don't think. A lot of happy UWA users think otherwise. Even the mount system-specific DPR forums are full of discussions of UWA lens. Just an example: "How to convince my partner about the benefits of SEL 10-18mm compared to kit 16-50mm? " at http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3684944 , full of examples of UWA goodies.

0 upvotes
Lin Evans

Like I said, If you like peripheral distortion and don't care about vertical being vertical then there's nothing wrong with an UWA. It doesn't make sense to try to shoot UWA with a 2.7 crop-factor camera so use a tool suitable for the task at hand if it floats your boat. Not having UWA hasn't hurt consumer camera sales that I can see.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

"Like I said, If you like peripheral distortion and don't care about vertical being vertical then there's nothing wrong with an UWA."

A lot of people shoot with UWA lens just to make use of this distortion. It lets for some very attractive / strange shots. (The above-linked E-mount thread also have a lot of shots emphasizing / based on the distortion itself.)

"Not having UWA hasn't hurt consumer camera sales that I can see."

Let me disagree. A month ago, I had to select a mount system. (Finaly, I've gone for Fuji X because of the excellent IQ of both the body and the lenses.) I've seriously considered all systems (even those of Samsung) except for Canon's because of the, currently, substandard crop sensor tech. The system's having UWA lens was one of my main points (Fuji has the native 10-24 and, via adapters, can make use of all the others, most importantly, the Sigma 8-16, which, with the Nikon mount, allows for setting the aperture via the adapter.)

0 upvotes
AEY

Sound like DP preferred Nikon in-general. WTF 'One step ahead or so much potential' LoL! AND no A7s 'new king of darkness' at all but had 3 or more on D810.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
MartinsB

"But nothing else offers the same balance of size, autofocus, and interchangeable lenses." - how about Pentax Q7?

2 upvotes
Menneisyys

The automatic DR is really poor. I'd, for quick shooting, prefer it to work the same way as does the one in Pana's GM1 or Fuji's all X-system cameras - that is, intelligent scene examination and using the most suitable one.

I guarantee both the GM1 and the Fuji cameras would have chosen the, in that scene, best DR increase approach (that of very high, in this case).

This is a nuisance as you'll always end up having to manually choose this before shooting and can't really trust the body to make the right, most optimal decision.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys

Excerpt from the article: "you start to expect more from the 1" sensor when larger sensor cameras with better lens options are available for less money (Sony a6000, Olympus OM-D E-M10)"

I would definitely put it in another way: "even the (otherwise, lens-wise, not very good) A6000 has (generally) better lens selection, let alone the, in this regard, much superior systems like m43 (or Fuji X, for that matter)."

The biggest problem with Sony's cameras is the lack of decent, moderately-priced zooms. Absolutely no direct equivalents of the Pana 12-32 kit zoom or any of Fuji's cheap-but-great kit lens (16-50, 18-55).

1 upvote
zodiacfml

Some images feel weird because of little DOF but has the image quality of small sensor camera or an APSC camera 6 to 8 years ago. Looking at the price, way too expensive versus an a6000.

I don't know what Nikon is up to. It feels that this is just a science project to Nikon, building technology in preparation for a mirrorless PRO camera in the future.

7 upvotes
Dano62

The thing that bothers me most about this camera is that it shows what Nikon could do if they actually took mirrorless seriously. If they put their auto focus and burst rate onto a camera with a decent sized sensor then they could really do something great. Instead, they seem to be committed to setting themselves up for failure and mediocre image quality. It's very frustrating.

4 upvotes
lorenzo de medici

Well stated and I second your comments. Nikon has shown that they are capable of engineering an excellent small mirrorless ILC. They have all the expertise and all the components they need. They just won't do it. Yet. In a few years they will stop forcing us to buy these overpriced little toys, and give us some good mirrorless cameras with larger sensors and better image quality.

1 upvote
techmine

I kept searching for "Excellent/Very Good Image Quality" amongst top 12 Pros.

0 upvotes
RStyga

Why do we prefer this system over MFT, Fuijifilm X, or Samsung NX, again?

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW

Well the frame rate is a lot faster than the Samsung NX APSC system.

Also faster than Fuji X cameras.

Better and faster AF, nearly inaudible. Smaller, lighter.

Okay, expensive, and even the best Nikon lenses don't come close to the optically best lenses from Samsung or Fuji.

3 upvotes
Kund

So, in other words, we prefer this system mainly because it says "NIKON" on it...right?

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW

Kund:

This has features the Fuji and Samsung systems don't, and then the Fuji and Samsung systems have features this doesn't.

It depends on what you're trying to do, and what your budget is.

And I write this as someone who knows about the staggering optical quality of good Samsung NX lenses. And I really like the Fuji XT1 body.

0 upvotes
RStyga

I thought image quality was somewhat important too... and MFT seems to have fast AF to say the least. My question was almost rhetoric.

0 upvotes
beavertown

1200 bucks for this IQ?

Why don't they just put a smartphone sensor in it?

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW

Because it has excellent image quality. And takes several lenses.

Try looking at raws. And don't look at raws shot with the kitzoom.

1 upvote
mumintroll

@HowaboutRAW
You kidding? Excellent IQ? LOOOOOOL For this price? LOOOOOOL

4 upvotes
beavertown

@HowaboutRAW

The 900 bucks 32mm f1.2 + 1200 bucks V3 = this so called excellent image quality?

Are you sure?

11 upvotes
badi

well... you must admit that yes, at 2100$ you have a very nice, very small and very capable camera... it starts to be kind of Leica expensive for what you get, but if you (can) ignore the price, it is an interesting, and enjoyable piece of gear.

1 upvote
beavertown

@badi

So ignore the price and also ignore the IQ?

5 upvotes
Gazeomon

@ Badi. Enjoyable piece of gear with that image quality? FOR THAT PRICE? What are You inhaling?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
badi

:)) I just said "If you ignore the price" ... like in you have some $millions that you don't know how to spend.
I know that there are not too many people in that category... but there are more than nikon anticipated, remember the "production shortage".

About the IQ, if you use the mentioned 32/1.2 lens, not use ISO above 800 and print smaller than 10-12", it is great, not only good.

0 upvotes
beavertown

@badi

Like your humor.

0 upvotes
_sem_

> And don't look at raws shot with the kitzoom.

Kitzoom alternatives in the lens lineup are one problem here.
- No better & faster one available
- Nothing comparable to the lenses of the RX100 series available.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW

mumintroll:

No, I'm not joking. The raws I've seen and extracted shot with decent lenses are very good through ISO 6400.

beavertown:

I didn't say anything about price.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW

_sem_:

Don't delude yourself into thinking you can use a lens of fixed focal length.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW

Henry M. Hertz:

I usually resist this kind of thing, having posted some oddities myself, but you mean "goggles" and "you're".

My vision is good, as is my monitor, going by the raws shot with the 18.5mm lens at Imaging Resource, this camera has excellent IQ. And the PhotographyBlog raws aren't bad--even with the not great kitzoom. (Extracting in ACR 8.5)

0 upvotes
Photoman

"For less money, there are larger sensor options that deliver better images in a body that is still relatively small (Sony a6000). The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III, one of the V3's competitors in terms of sensor size, is cheaper and smaller with less shadow noise at all ISOs."

7 upvotes
HowaboutRAW

You're quoting this because you agree? Or think the A6000 has a bunch of crappy lenses? Or isn't really that small?

Or doesn't take interchangeable lenses? (Referring to the RX100III.)

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW

Henry M. Hertz:

That's a simplistic reaction. And the fact remains that many of the raws I've extracted in ACR 8 look excellent thru ISO 6400. The better raws come from shooting with optically better lenses.

(And when there's a display copy at my local retailer, I'll get some of my own raws, perhaps only with the not great kitzoom though.)

This system is expensive, but it's far from a piece of dung.

0 upvotes
Photoman

High price / low IQ. Yer, sounds like a REAL winner, plus you got to pay for the VF, were the E-M5/E-M1/GX7 at least you get a VF with the camera. The 1 series is the Edsel of cameras and no matter how you market it, it is 1 big failure. Love Nikon FF/APS-C cameras (have one), but this has been made wrong, marketed wrong and priced wrong.

0 upvotes
Fotogeneticist

Here's my takeaway from this camera: Don't shoot JPEGs with this thing. For me that's fine as I shoot solely RAW. But for those who would like to shoot JPEG, this is not good news. It's unfortunate they have no setting for no NR in JPEG. Even during the early years of digital, I've always been a proponent of not having aggressive NR. It's the measurbators who have driven companies to this.

Still, I may get this camera or the J4 once I am able to liquidate some of my old FF gear.

2 upvotes
Zoran K

"The V3's image is a lot better than a smartphone, but when comparing it to peers such as the RX100 III, it still falls short."

17 upvotes
Fstop85

I have mixed feelings about this camera. There's definitely a lot to like about the 1 system. I think the 2 main problems with it are:

1. It doesn't have enough features for it to be worth as much as a d7100
2. Nikon needs an APS-C mirrorless system that sits about the 1 series system (which could justifiably be priced similarly to the d7100).

4 upvotes
Simon97

Nikon N1 system. I like the cameras but not completely satisfied with the image quality, especially with what can be had with the Sony 1" sensor.

I like the growing N1 lens system. The lenses are fantastic and make up for what the sensor lacks. The original kit lens is the weakest one and it is still better than most other kit zooms. Perhaps the lenses are the N1's saving grace.

1 upvote
Fotogeneticist

For me, ISO below 1600 looks great. It's only when it gets above that where I have problems with the image quality. If I had the funds, I'd get this camera in a heartbeat! Image quality is slightly behind the Sony 1" sensor, but within range of skill/post processing to level any differences.

2 upvotes
intruder61

D7100 cheaper...no?

2 upvotes
HomoSapiensWannaBe

Fail! Too many compromises and ergonomic mistakes.

2 upvotes
RichRMA

The really bad thing about this is that Nikon has poured resources into a mirror-less that should have had the same sensor as the DX DSLR's.

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
8 upvotes
Kodachrome200
0 upvotes
justmeMN

Mirrorless enthusiasts contend that it's costs less to manufacture a mirrorless camera than it does a DSLR. That doesn't seem to be reflected in the "launch prices" of mirrorless cameras, certainly not this one.

3 upvotes
yslee1

It is cheaper - the fire sale prices showed the crazy profit margin Nikon were trying to get away with.

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Nick8

The cheaper Nikon 1 J4 is sharing many specifications with V3, including the autofocus:
http://www.dpreview.com/products/nikon/slrs/nikon_j4/specifications

5 upvotes
RichRMA

m4/3rds it ain't. Are we sure the effective C-AF isn't just huge, inherent DOF?

0 upvotes
Fotogeneticist

LOL it's either ingenious or disingenuous! I do know that I've put to good use the amazing DOF in my old V1 for landscapes at night at f/1.8. I also know that the C-AF even in my V1 is pretty impressive, so at least from my end, I believe the hype.

2 upvotes
vFunct

Too bad only engineering geeks care about image quality.

REAL photographers don't care about image quality at all. Image quality is only for measurebators, and they do not matter.

If clients won't even notice any low-ISO noise, why would the photographer care?

1 upvote
Fotogeneticist

I kind of agree with you. Given equal skill and composition, the better photograph is going to come from the camera producing higher image quality.
That being said, most of the comments here are from measurbators who have taken nothing but photographs of walls, backyards, etc, and thus, would never be able to realize the full potential of a good camera anyways. There are other things more important than image quality, such as handling, once you reach a minimum baseline of image quality, which the Nikon 1 (even with the V1) achieved.

3 upvotes
justmeMN

@vFunct: If you don't care about image quality, buy a low-end camera, that costs less than the (US bundle) $1,199.95 Nikon 1 V3. If you want to stick with the Nikon 1 line, there are many models cheaper than this one. If you want to look elsewhere, there are even more alternatives.

1 upvote
vFunct

Why would you buy a low-end camera when you can buy a high-end camera?

What makes you think image quality is what defines a high-end camera, instead of frame-rate?

Which camera has a faster frame rate and auto-focus speed than this camera?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 43 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
BJN

What do we call a measurebator who thinks frame rate is the way to become a "real" photographer? $1200 is a poor value for what this camera delivers.

3 upvotes
yslee1

Because clients do? With the V2 I have to be careful, and thus use it only in specific situations.

0 upvotes
vFunct

The V series should ONLY be used as a secondary camera.

Nikon even states this is a secondary camera.

For $1,200, it fills that void.

0 upvotes
Lin Evans

Why ping on the camera in the review conclusions for having an LED hard to see in sunlight when Nikon provides an EVF?

0 upvotes
Zeisschen

maybe because the EVF is not included? It should, for this pricetag

5 upvotes
Lin Evans

According to B&H the electronic viewfinder and a lens comes with the 1V3 - link: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1038908-REG/nikon_27695_1_v3_mirrorless_digital.html?gclid=Cj0KEQjwopOeBRC1ndXgnuvx8JYBEiQAq4RPt_qz657h0eWYAb53iF9tZnxeT6K2R6prdEPPItW4GHYaAieC8P8HAQ

0 upvotes
Lin Evans

Double checked - comes with lens, grip and EVF...

Comment edited 47 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Eugene Lee

The EVF comes bundled with the V3 kit only in the US. Elsewhere, you can get the body only and EVF separately. Plus, there might be times when you want to compose high or low angles using tilting LCD instead of the EVF.

0 upvotes
Maklike Tier

I'm not sure including an EVF and Functional Grip in the package is such a great idea. Aftermarket, together those things are worth $450-550, so why not offer a couple of different packages so you don't force people to pay 500 bucks for two things they might not want or need?

Still, the idea of a better integrated 'modular' camera is a good one, and one that other companies should take a closer look at. Most grips and EVFs don't integrate as seamlessly as they should.

0 upvotes
MicekyVee

Quote: We were disappointed we couldn't directly set exposure compensation changes to one of the command dials - a feature found on Nikon DSLRs.

Umm. Set Fn2 to Exposure Compensation.. press on the rear control dial bring it up and turn to adjust.. press again and done. Couldn't be simpler.

I'm probably the only owner of the two most bashed cameras on DPReview.. the Nikon V3 and the Canon G1X MkII. Nikon for daylight and lens selection.. have the trifecta 6.7-13VR, 10-100VR and 70-300VR and the Canon for low light and when I need flash.
From an handling POV and my uses (rarely print large), I'm not missing my DSLRs at all. For me, it's fit for purpose with some niggles mostly with the flash system. YMMV.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
yslee1

If you use a Nikon DSLR, easy exposure compensation lets you adjust that without pressing a button. Also you can put aperture control to the rear dial - I'm sure I'm not the only Nikon shooter who does this.

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
1 upvote
MarkInSF

True, but what he's noting is that the rear dial also presses in. That's Fn2. So you don't have to move your thumb at all. Just click in on the dial, turn it one way or the other, and click again to return the dial to its primary function. It's not quite as simple as assigning the function to the dial as its primary function for that mode, and it does use the Fn2 button, but it is quite easy and only uses one dial and its built-in button.

0 upvotes
Eugene Lee

You're right you can set Fn2 to exposure compensation, but as yslee1 points out, on Nikon DSLRs you can adjust it without pressing a button. For many Nikon users, it's a convenient, often used feature, so we were hoping to use the V3 in the same manner since it handles very much like a DSLR.

0 upvotes
John Driggers

Looking at the specifications page:

1. What's the shutter speed range? Is there Bulb mode? Can it be triggered with self timer?

2. Has bracketing been added to the V3?

3. Dots as a measure for viewfinder and LCD resolution/quality has no meaning and is marketing speak. Some cameras have 4 dots per pixel others have 3. Include dot info if you must, but the real required information for judgement is pixel density. (You know--it's like DPI vs PPI in printing).

4. Your use of "remote control" in the wireless info has no meaning because you use it interchangeably with remote release, which is significantly different. Could you please start differentiating between the two? Remote control should--at a minimum--live preview, trigger AF, program shift, shutter, aperture, exposure compensation and WB control (along with remote release). That's enough to qualify for a "remote control" feature.

I'll sift through the review for answers to my questions, but your specs page is a fail.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Kodachrome200

Nikon really needs to start pver in mirrorless. Its become clear that ergonomics eliminate most size advantage to sup aps - c camera. If nikon put the technology of this camera into an aps-c sensor and made a factory adapter that offered full compatibility to f mount what a camera it would b

1 upvote
CameraLabTester

You can buy 2 new Nikon D3200 DSLRs for the price of one V3.

"Come on down! The price is fright!"

.

10 upvotes
Sangster

The Japanese expect you to pay a premium for compactness.

0 upvotes
Valiant Thor

You can buy about 1598 Hershey Bars for the price of one V3.
You can buy about 72 boxes of plastic forks for the price of one V3.
You can (oh wait, the dog needs to go for a walk. I'll finish the rest later).

5 upvotes
Sangster

Yep, if it was priced $300-400 for the body nobody would be complaining so much.

2 upvotes
jambalawa

If you value action and/or reach albeit in only good light this camera is pretty awesome. I'd love one.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Gary Martin

Weird, this camera gets a 76% score (pretty good) but has a very low value score. I guess "value" doesn't weigh in as much here as it does in my life.

2 upvotes
Photoman

11 Pros / 14 Cons / 1 Big Con!

Expensive for just a sports camera. Better value with a CanNik DSLR and a Sony RX100 or a 4/3's camera.

5 upvotes
istreetshooter

This is really making me think of selling my V1 and gear, because I have little confidence in Nikon growing the system that I will satisfy me. I bought into the V1 with the hope that Nikon would ramp up the entire system, which it hasn't.

3 upvotes
Alexis D

Thank you Nikon for these "1" cameras. Big sigh of relief for Olympus, Panasonic, Sony and Fuji each time Canikon release their sub par mirrorless cameras. These small makers are given more time to establish a stronger base and better chance of survival. Viva la competition, et aussi la diversité!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
27 upvotes
CameraLabTester

Thank you also for making a USB charger! Now we have to find the nearest USB socket anywhere and everywhere! Or we could further be gouged in our pockets buying a real charger at extra cost! Whooppe Doo!

4 upvotes
CameraLabTester

...and thank you very much also for using tiny wafers called Micro SD cards for memory storage! Wow! It just mimics the brain size of the camera designers! So cool!

2 upvotes
zkz5

"Now we have to find the nearest USB socket anywhere and everywhere!"

Which takes all of 5 seconds in the current decade, especially compared with finding a proprietary AC adapter anywhere and everywhere. Even some airline seats have them built-in.

I wish more camera makers would charge via a USB port so I'd only need to carry one kind of AC adapter and cable for everything.

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
yslee1

zkz5, you'd be surprised at the number of people resistant to changes in tech, so belly aching over USB chargers (a common thing) and microSD cards (also ubiquitous, inexpensive, and easily adapted) shouldn't come as a shock to you.

0 upvotes
MarkInSF

I love having USB charging as an option. Third-party chargers can typically be had for a few dollars, though it would be nice to include one. Get one and you have the best of both worlds. You can even charge two batteries simultaneously overnight if you have access to USB, which you probably do if you travel with a laptop.

0 upvotes
Bobby Handal

meanwhile in real life, owners of the V1 , V2 or V3 series know exactly how good these cameras really are, even though Nikon is not doing a good job in Marketing and some issues (like auto bracketing, Auto ISO WTF?, ITTL Wireless) - but Pricing Specially . This is the only compact mirrorless system that allows you to go over 800mm natively , that alone is a major selling point, if you add the silent shutter, and the good optics available, it is a no brainer.

9 upvotes
daddyo

I hate to burst your bubble, but the issue of going over 800mm natively is purely a cropped FOV -- and I'm not arguing that that is a nice aspect.
However all three Olympus OMD cameras have a built in 2X Digital Teleconverter Function, which when engaged using a 300mm lens gives a FF equivalent FOV of 1200mm. :-)
After all 300mm is still 300mm.

1 upvote
kchen88

Why do you think it can reach 800mm. I guess it got tiny little sensor. In that case just get any s&p 1200mm camera and be it

2 upvotes
Lin Evans

To Daddyo - you have a misconception here. It never ceases to amaze me how many people are, after all these years, still confused by smaller sensors and persist in calling it a "crop." It's not a crop in any conventional sense. The entire optical resolution is vested in the FOV. There is no "crop" - that's a very old and tired argument. A "crop" would be shooting at the FOV of the lens in this specific case on an FX camera then losing pixels by "cropping" to the FOV of the 1V3. This isn't happening, the 1V3 is filling the sensor with the full 18 megapixels of data. You may argue that the data isn't as good as an FX camera with an 800mm optical lens - that's a different argument, but there is no "crop" here. This is misapplying the meaning of the term.

9 upvotes
BarnET

The problem is that a 1 inch sensor will never get 18mp of data.
Look at the rx100 it only has about 8mp of true resolution.

Still good for a compact but nor for a 1200 mirrorless

1 upvote
Lin Evans

Resolution is not measured in megapixels, it's measured in line pairs per mm. There is a theoretical Nyquist limit which is usually the smaller of the two pixel matrix numbers. How close a camera gets doesn't depend on sensor size. It's only one of a number of factors.

1 upvote
Lin Evans

Continuation of above. Only one sensor type that I'm aware of actually achieves Nyquist resolution and that's the Foveon. CFA sensors without AA filters are improving, but do not yet come close to the theoretical limit. The little Nikon 1 series actually produce very good images. I have plenty of high-end dSLR's including Nikon, Canon and Olympus pro models. I love what I get from my Nikon 1V1. I carry it and a 55-300 VR and a couple 1 series lenses along with my expensive gear and I get great results with wildlife. These little cameras are dandy for time-lapse and telephoto reach with out breaking the bank or breaking your back to carry in the back high altitude country. They are extremely versatile. No, they are not resolution champs like the D800/E/808 but they have a definite place in my bag. If I could afford another camera right now the 1V3 would be near the top of my list.

2 upvotes
Reality Check

@LinEvans - Actually you are the one being confused by misconception..
When one refers to smaller size sensor as having the equivalency of xxmm (800mm in this case) when using a 300mm lens - the reference is to the fov achievable by digitally zooming (cropping) an area (18mp) of a larger sensor (~48mp) using the same 300mm lens from the same camera/subject distance. As the objective length of the lens being used is not 800mm, it will not produce 800mm of magnification at the same fov, it can/does however produce a digitally zoomed area (18mp cropped) of the ~48mp+300mm's wider fov image.

The only way one could drop the 'crop' reference is to never use/refer to the equivalent digital zoom (crop) objective fov. Simply say it is 300mm - because that is what it is.
Saying anything else introduces the 'crop' factor into the equation.

4 upvotes
Sonyshine

Good to see your comments Bobby after the utterly amazing wildlife shots you have taken with the V3 - if the nay-sayers just saw your work they would rush out in droves and buy this camera ( silly retail price excepting ) !

2 upvotes
badi

@Lin Evans
Indeed, Daddyo used some technically incorrect terms (and some wrong numbers), but the idea remains true: And 300mm lens on a 1.5 sensor, covers the 1" center part of the sensor with a "equivalent" of 810mm. Which is perfectly equal (of course) with what the 1" sensor image shots with the 300mm lens.
Now, in terms of pure specs, for the "crop" of the 1.5crop sensor to match the pixel count of the 1" sensor (2.7crop), would require that the APSC sensor to be at ~32MPx.

But the reality is a bit different, and i think only some real life tests done side by side will hold reasonable arguments, but i think that 8-9MPx center of an 16MPx APSC will be marginally better or worse (depending on the scenario) than the 1" sensor image. So that is not really that big of an advantage. However it remains the size advantage.

0 upvotes
SeeRoy

Lin Evans:
You're bashing your head against a brick wall - trying to apply rationality to a case of mass psychosis. This series of cameras, overpriced as they are, seems to induce it.

1 upvote
daddyo

badi:
'Reality Check' clarified my point very well -- and accurately.
Please explain your "and some wrong numbers" comment.
The only numbers I used were "over 800mm" for the Nikon, "FF equivalent FOV of 1200mm" -- both of those statements are accurate, given that most people would take 'FF' to mean 35mm.
I assume you are not contesting that 300mm = 300mm. :-)

0 upvotes
Lin Evans

Badi, it's a "test" that I do frequently, and I use the identical lens (55-300 VR) on my 16mp D7000 and on my 1V1. I get visibly better results at 300mm (810 mm equivalency) with my 1V1 than cropping the 300mm (450 mm equivalency) from my D7000. I also use the same lens on my D5300 and D7100. The convenience of having an extremely versatile and relatively tiny footprint is worth the price for me.

0 upvotes
Kipplemaster

I like the idea of the Nikon 1 series. Most of the negative points here are the usual Digital Luddite Review classics based on the irrelevancies of the past. I would like to try the 70-300 lens in particular and may well consider one when I go on safari next year (especially as I hope the price will have reduced by then). Fast autofocus is, for things which need fast autofocus, more important than most other factors. (USB charging would also be good!)

5 upvotes
yslee1

I like the idea too (I have a V2) but I don't like the price!

1 upvote
guyfawkes

Quite right.

No camera is perfect, and if we are sensible we buy the one that most meets our needs and requirements and is within our budget.

Recently, I was looking for a worthwhile replacement for my Panasonic LX3, which is my "casual snapshot" camera, and the new Sony RX100 Mk III took my fancy. However at around £700 sterling it raised serious personal questions about its performance related to cost. Could this be justified, especially as I already use a Sony A7 and Nex 5N?

In the end, I decided it couldn't be so I bought the LX7 instead. In every respect it is an improvement over the LX3, so I was satisfied. And the cost? Just £213 sterling.

But the point I wish to make is my decision was based on an actual appraisal of both cameras related to my needs. And in this respect the "older" technology camera got the vote as it gave me the IQ I was happy with for the purpose to which I would put it.

0 upvotes
Stanny1

Nikon makes me real happy with my Sony NEX-3.

17 upvotes
misha marinsky4

Yeah, me too. And the Sony is a fraction of the price, with a quantum improvement in performance.

Nikon is afraid of cannibalizing their SLRs, so they came out with a fifth rate product. They didn't learn Kodak's lesson. Sony will teach them, since they didn't get the memo.

7 upvotes
kadardr

I used to have a NEX-C3.Dreadful UX. Used occasionally. I got a good APS-C DSLR, what I use well more than the SONY. But I always have a V1 or V2 with me, and love to shoot with them every day.. Nexes are for all automatic (iA) users. The worst UI ever. And I also used to have an R1. Was fractionally better in use than NEXes.

3 upvotes
justmeMN

Oh no, the dreaded Participation Ribbon rather than an Award. :-)

0 upvotes
Total comments: 643
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