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Body & Design

One thing that is immediately apparent when you first see the X10 is the obvious continuation of the X100's 'retro' design language. Everything about the X10 oozes quality, from the leatherette finish to the metal control dials and thick rubber thumb rest on the rear of the camera. But it isn't all about the style - the X10 is undoubtedly intended to echo the timeless design of classic film-era cameras but there is an impressive amount of function beneath the form as well. A mechanical zoom ring around the lens barrel and optical viewfinder will appeal to purists, as will a beautifully-finished metal exposure compensation dial and a hotshoe for adding either an additional flash, or one of countless compatible third-party accessories.

Short of pairing the X10 with a camera strap printed with the words 'I'm serious about photography,' the message couldn't come across more clearly.

Body Elements

The top plate contains a mode dial, exposure compensation dial, programmable function button and the shutter release, which is threaded for a mechanical cable release.
The X10 has a pop-up flash that according to Fujifilm provides coverage of 7m at the lens' widest focal length and ISO 800.
In line with the camera's extensive provision of external controls, there's a dedicated switch for changing focus mode.
There are more direct controls down the left flank of the camera, controlling metering mode, white balance and AF point. You can also see the flash release catch and pleasantly large optical viewfinder.


Then, of course, there's the 'Made in Japan' text, which doesn't appear on many cameras in this class.
The right-hand shoulder of the camera is home to a control dial and configurable AEL/AFL button.
There's a second control dial around the four-way controller and a dedicated Raw button which can be re-assigned (via firmware 1.3) to trigger any one of the options available to the Fn button.

The DISP/Back button can be used to cycle among the available information views on the LCD.
The camera's stereo microphones sit behind tiny openings on the front of the camera and are used for video recording.
The X10 uses the same NP-50 battery found in most of the company's recent F-series cameras. Disappointingly, on the X10 this small capacity 3.7Wh battery is capable of only 270 shots per charge, according to standard CIPA testing.
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Comments

Total comments: 3
BobFoster

Most exciting camera coming out in years. The only thing I would add is a fold out rotating LCD and AA batteries. With those two features this would be the perfect camera. Made in Japan quality which will make this camera last a lifetime, and even future generations would inherit this with pride. Fantastic!

1 upvote
Mikegwoollard

Update on faulty optical viewfinder: Fuji repaired camera for £110 with full service and 1 year guarantee extension. I like the camera so had it repaired but in future I will be buying Canon products as this viewfinder should never have failed in the first place given the gentle use this camera had.

0 upvotes
Mikegwoollard

Nice camera living up to dpreviews comments BUT optical view finder stopped functioning correctly in the first 9 months of use only in focus at full zoom. This despite it being looked after like cut glassware. I have sent to Fuju for repair estimate after guarantee ran out. No doubt a hefty repair estimate will result. We will see.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
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Total comments: 3