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Canon EOS 70D Review

October 2013 | By Andy Westlake, Richard Butler


Review based on a production Canon EOS 70D

During the early days of digital SLRs, Canon was pretty much the undisputed leader in CMOS image sensor technology. Almost every new EOS model came with an increase in resolution and high ISO range, and when the EOS 7D appeared in late 2009, the company had progressed from 3MP to 18MP, and ISO 1600 to ISO 12800, in just over nine years. But since then Canon's APS-C cameras have all sported variants on the same basic sensor design, to the extent that you could be forgiven for wondering what on earth their engineers were doing all day. Now we know.

The EOS 70D is a mid-range SLR for enthusiast photographers that from the outside looks like a sensible, indeed desirable upgrade to the EOS 60D. It borrows many of the best bits from Canon's existing SLRs, including the autofocus sensor from the EOS 7D, the fully articulated touchscreen from the EOS 700D (Rebel T5i), and built-in Wi-Fi from the EOS 6D. But on the inside it sports an entirely new sensor that is, potentially, revolutionary. It offers 20.2MP resolution, but uses a 'Dual Pixel CMOS AF' design in which every single pixel is split into two separately-readable photodiodes, facing left and right. This means that in principle they are all capable of phase detection autofocus in live view and movie mode.

On-chip phase detection is nothing new - we first saw it in the Fujifilm F300EXR back in 2010. Since then it's been adopted in one form or another by most manufacturers, with arguably its most successful implementation coming in Nikon's 1 System mirrorless models. But because until now it's used relatively few active pixels scattered sparsely across the sensor, it's had practical limitations, often only covering a restricted area of the frame and struggling once the light drops below outdoor daylight levels. Canon says that its Dual Pixel AF system, in contrast, works across an area 80% of the frame width and height, in light levels as low as 0 EV, and at apertures down to F11. This means it could well be the most capable live view autofocus system we've yet seen on any type of camera.

We'll look at the technology behind the EOS 70D's live view AF in more detail later, but let's not forget that it has to work as a conventional SLR too. To this end it uses the same 19-point AF sensor as the EOS 7D for viewfinder shooting, but with slightly simplified control options in firmware. It can rattle shots off at 7fps for up to 65 frames in JPEG or 16 in Raw, and its standard ISO range covers 100-12800, with ISO 25600 as an expanded option. Image processing is via the DIGIC 5+ processor first seen in the EOS 5D Mark III.

In terms of control layout the EOS 70D is a logical evolution of the EOS 60D, adopting many of Canon's intervening updates and improvements. So it offers a full set of external controls to operate most key functions, and Canon's well-designed Quick Control screen to cover pretty much everything else. It also adopts the superb touchscreen interface that debuted on the EOS 650D (Rebel T4i), which we've found to be more useful than you might at first think. The 70D also regains an array of features that disappeared between the EOS 50D and 60D, such as AF microadjustment.

Canon EOS 70D key features

  • 20.2MP APS-C 'Dual Pixel CMOS AF' sensor
  • DIGIC 5+ image processor
  • ISO 100-12800 standard, 25600 expanded
  • 7fps continuous shooting, burst depth 65 JPEG / 16 Raw
  • 'Silent' shutter mode
  • 1080p30 video recording, stereo sound via external mic
  • 19-point AF system, all points cross-type, sensitive to -0.5 EV
  • 63-zone iFCL metering system
  • 98% viewfinder coverage, 0.95x magnification, switchable gridlines and electronic level display
  • Fully-articulated touchscreen, 1040k dot 3" ClearView II LCD, 3:2 aspect ratio
  • Single SD/SDHC/SDXC card slot
  • Built-in Wi-Fi
  • Single-axis electronic level
  • Built-in flash works as off-camera remote flash controller
  • AF microadjustment (can be set individually for up to 40 lenses, remembered by lens serial number)
  • In-camera High Dynamic Range and Multiple Exposure modes (JPEG-only)
  • 'Creative Filter' image processing styles, previewed in live view

Key specs compared

In the table below we see how some of the EOS 70D's key specs measure up against its more expensive big brother, the EOS 7D, and its main rival, the Nikon D7100. What's interesting here is just how close the 70D is to the 7D in terms of spec - in much the same way as Nikon's D7000 made the D300S look almost redundant, it's quite difficult to see why most Canon users would now choose the top-end APS-C model.

 
Canon EOS 70D
Canon EOS 7D
Nikon D7100
 Effective Pixels  • 20.2 MP  • 18.0 MP  • 24.1 MP
 ISO Range  • 100-12800 standard
 • 25600 expanded
 • 100-6400 standard
 • 12800 expanded
 • 100-6400 standard
 • 50-25600 expanded
 No of AF points  • 19  • 19  • 51
 AF in live view  • Phase detection  • Contrast detection  • Contrast detection
 Screen  • 3.0" 3:2
 • 1,040,000 dots
 • Fully-articulated
 • Touch sensitive
 • 3.0" 4:3
 • 920,000 dots
 • Fixed
 • 3.2" 4:3
 • 1,228,800 dots
 • Fixed
 Viewfinder  • 98% coverage
 • 0.95x magnification
 • 100% coverage
 • 1.0x magnification
 • 100% coverage
 • 0.94x magnification
 Continuous drive  • 7 fps  • 8 fps  • 6 fps
 Storage  • SD/SDHC/SDXC  • Compact flash  • SD/SDHC/SDXC
 • 2 slots
 Weight
 (inc batteries)
 • 755g (1.7 lb)  • 860g (1.9 lb)  • 765g (1.7 lb)
 Dimensions  • 139 x 104 x 79 mm
   (5.5 x 4.1 x 3.1")
 • 148 x 111 x 74 mm
   (5.8 x 4.4 x 2.9")
 • 136 x 107 x 76 mm
   (5.4 x 4.2 x 3.0")
 Wi-Fi  •  Built-in  •  Optional  •  Optional

Size and design compared to the EOS 60D

The EOS 70D directly replaces the EOS 60D in Canon's range, and is very similar in terms of size and design. It's a bit smaller though, and has a sensibly-updated control layout. Here we take a more-detailed look at the two cameras side-by-side.

From the front the EOS 70D looks almost identical to the 60D. But it's slimmed down a bit, being fractionally narrower. Look a little closer and you can also see that the 60D's front-facing mono microphone has gone (replaced by stereo mics on the top plate).
The two cameras are pretty similar from the back too, with the 70D retaining the same basic layout. It gains Canon's improved live view/movie mode controller, and has a physical switch to lock the rear dial against accidental operation rather than a button. Other than that it uses all the same buttons, just not necessarily in the same order.
From the top, again the 70D is very much a sensible evolution. The mode dial is simplified and now rotates continuously rather than having hard end stops, and there's a new AF area expansion button next to the shutter release. But the rest of the controls are all essentially the same.

Kit options and pricing

The EOS 70D will be sold body-only for £1079 / $1199 / €1099, as a kit with the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM for £1199.99 / $1340 / €1249, or with the EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens for £1399.99 $1549 / €1499. The BG-E14 battery grip will cost £229.99 / $270 / €215.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 627
1234
wakaba
By wakaba (9 months ago)

So it sucks and sticking tailfins (WiFi and strange sensor) on that Olds is not going to make it better.

Canon is dead, check the data on dxo, 30-100% worse than a D600.

0 upvotes
AkinaC
By AkinaC (9 months ago)

DXO isn't everything

10 upvotes
wakaba
By wakaba (9 months ago)

dxo is very good, scientific method or theism. Your choice.

1 upvote
photofan1986
By photofan1986 (9 months ago)

Go out, shoot and get a life instead of spending your free time reading DXO graphs.

25 upvotes
wakaba
By wakaba (9 months ago)

Dxo data is good. Way better than the pr-blurbs that you consider for your buying decisions. Nothing wrong with solid math.

1 upvote
Catalin Stavaru
By Catalin Stavaru (9 months ago)

Doesn't the D600 have a full-frame sensor compared to 70D's APS-C size sensor ? Why would you compare these ? Compare the D600 with the 6D, please. And if you really want to compare them, how about taking some videos...you will then see what the dual pixel is about.

PS: How could DxO Mark measure the D600 with those oil patches on sensor ? :)

19 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (9 months ago)

I'm sorry, but how can something be 100% worse than something else? Does that mean it doesn't exist? By the way, the scores on DxO are not percentages. They aren't even on a scale of 0 to 100. What a moronic comment. "Canon is dead! Once they're done selling millions of cameras every year and making huge profits I'm sure they'll suddenly evaporate."

4 upvotes
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (9 months ago)

DxO tells you the best you can get with careful raw processing. But you need to map those numbers into visible results and factor in the raw processing you will do. I assume you have a gallery of images that are visibly better because you were able to exploit the sensor differences?

0 upvotes
Lea5
By Lea5 (9 months ago)

Who cares about DXO numbers? I don't. And my D4 and D800E has no oil spots on the sensor ;-)

4 upvotes
Rbrt
By Rbrt (9 months ago)

Yeah and the D600 (D610) is, what, $900 more LOL?

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (9 months ago)

I haven't found DxO results to be relevant in real world situations (like taking pictures) but even if they are spot-on, by now, people would have noticed the obvious quality differences and stopped buying the "inferior" brands.

DxO software is something else. I love their user-friendly interface and great, simple documentation (just kidding!) Well, at least they don't make you subscribe.

Comment edited 12 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
srados
By srados (9 months ago)

Good one Catalin good one! ;-)

0 upvotes
zodiacfml
By zodiacfml (9 months ago)

Nice technology but it doesn't make any DSLR far better, maybe, making it a little more versatile.
Anyway, I could see this technology used on Canon's mirrorless future product line.

1 upvote
williams359
By williams359 (9 months ago)

Please canon or a third party maker is there any way of making a grip with a extra memory card slot

0 upvotes
dccdp
By dccdp (9 months ago)

In general, no. And it's because of some of those funny things only us nerds know.

1 upvote
fz750
By fz750 (9 months ago)

Surely it would depend on what interfaces were available to the grip? Everything is possible, whether it's desirable ir advisable is another question..

How about a grip connected by radio (Bluetooth, wifi, whatever) that mirrors the built-in card? Can't be that difficult...

0 upvotes
MisterBG
By MisterBG (9 months ago)

Conclusion - Cons:

"◾HDR mode unavailable if Raw is active (rather than disengaging Raw)"

Is there ANY camera that allows HDR raw shooting? (than than by multiple bracketed exposures).
HDR is an output image (jpg) function.
This can hardly be a "Con" since all cameras behave the same way.

8 upvotes
YashicaFX2
By YashicaFX2 (9 months ago)

Yes, there is a camera that can shoot HDR and save the raw files: CANON EOS 5D Mark III.

1 upvote
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (9 months ago)

Let's look at how other recent cameras do it:
* Nikon D7100 - HDR only in JPEG, disabled in raw
* Pentax K5-II - HDR only in JPEG, disabled in raw
* Sony NEX-6 - HDR only in JPEG, disabled in raw
* Olympus E-M5: no-in camera HDR
* Olympus E-M1 - HDR available in raw, raw files saves only the "normal" exposure

So yes, it is a strange con.

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

I know of no one who ever developed film in the camera.

0 upvotes
AstroStan
By AstroStan (9 months ago)

"Is there ANY camera that allows HDR raw shooting?"

Raw data consist of Bayer matrix pixel readings.
HDR is a technique of combining multiple exps to produce increased dynamic range. This combine requires de-Bayering, aligning and resampling each component exps. This cannot be done on an actual (Bayer) pixel basis without omitting the aligning/resampling. To simply stack the Bayer pixels requires no camera movement between exps, which is unrealistic though might be marginally possible via image stabalization.

It would be possible to create semi-raw HDR by de-Bayering/align/resample in 16 bit number space. The output would be 16 bit/color (not Bayer). That's not really "raw" but not really a picture either.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
AstroStan
By AstroStan (9 months ago)

P.S. The raw Bayer matrix could be preserved via positional aware align/resampling. That would result in a small amount of blur but it would be minor for deca-mega-pixel cameras. The in-camera processing would be substantial but seems like it could be done. And maybe will be done someday if the manufacturers think there is enough consumer interest in raw.

1 upvote
Flommer
By Flommer (9 months ago)

I think you are all trying to read between the lines when the complaint is right there: If raw is your chosen image format, then you cannot choose HDR shooting. The reviewer would prefer that when raw is the chosen image format, choosing HDR would disable raw...

0 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (9 months ago)

While AstroStan have explained it carefully and correct, maybe the CON was not about having RAW HDR. IT was about allowing to take HDR jpegs when the camera was set to RAW.

I can see good reasons for both. Having the camera in RAW mode, but still allow for HDR shots when called for, would be convenient.

But is probably disengaged because some would scream about the HDR not being RAW. This way they reduce the number of complaints.

0 upvotes
capanikon
By capanikon (9 months ago)

I'd rather they didn't put touch screens on cameras.

3 upvotes
photofan1986
By photofan1986 (9 months ago)

You don't have to use it. What's the problem? Capacitive touch screens have a tougher surface than usual displays.

6 upvotes
YashicaFX2
By YashicaFX2 (9 months ago)

You can turn it off in the menus.

5 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (9 months ago)

I used to think like you, because touch screens are generally worse than tactile controls, and I steered my mom away from any touchscreen P&Ss because so many functions were buried under touchscreen menus.

But then I saw how one camera uses the touchscreen to give you a simpler video rack focus than any tactile control ever has (you tap the two spots on the screen you want to rack between). That's when I realized that touch screens are OK as long as only appropriate and workflow-enhancing functions are assigned to them.

Don't pre-judge any camera UI. It's like criticizing people for taking pictures with those 8x10 slabs called iPads; the perception of the activity would be completely different if only those 8x10 slabs were view cameras...

4 upvotes
Greg VdB
By Greg VdB (9 months ago)

Put your camera on a tripod (as you should whenever feasible if you care about image quality) and that articulated touch screen becomes the single best feature for increased handling comfort. Try it out in your local shop, you'll be amazed.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
white shadow
By white shadow (9 months ago)

A reasonably good compromise for those who cannot afford a Canon 1DX or 5D Mk3.

Good God it does not have a built-in GPS.

0 upvotes
Rbrt
By Rbrt (9 months ago)

Yeah, but that articulated LCD would be very useful.

0 upvotes
srados
By srados (9 months ago)

Why is sneaky GPS such a deal breaker for some?Are you working for Google maps?I do not get it...

0 upvotes
Dougbm_2
By Dougbm_2 (8 months ago)

I would like GPS just so I could remember the exact spot I took the photo. Even better would be voice annotation as on Pro level SLRs (and as I had on my Fuji S2 Pro). This allow you to make a small voice note about what you are photographing. Very handy when you are shooting for calendars.

1 upvote
vadims
By vadims (9 months ago)

I don't think anything with a mirror can be considered a "radical departure" these days...

8 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (9 months ago)

.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (9 months ago)

So does a car have to be electric to be a radical departure? Does a sandwich have to be made without bread to be a radical departure? Does a building have to be built down instead of up to be a radical departure? What is it about a mirror that the mirrorless folks find so unsettling? "Mirrorless" has been done long before ILC was born because a fixed-lens camera doesn't have a mirror. The image quality from my G1 X challenges every ILC crop body on the market. Jeez, changing lenses is so last century! Anything without a lens permanently attached is old school.

2 upvotes
budi0251
By budi0251 (9 months ago)

Nice 70D, sounds similarly as revolution in IQ as my old D70 :D

Anyway, not really excited with DSLR (canon especially), the only thing keeps me using canon were Magic Lantern does support canon DSLR only.

Now, can Canon makes a rival for likely say Sony RX10 or Oly Stylus 1? :)

2 upvotes
MicekyVee
By MicekyVee (9 months ago)

Preface: I've been using Canon since the 10D and have had every camera in the series except the 60D and now have the 70D (sold my 7D). I've spent the last couple of hours processing some 70D pics and looking at some of the work I've done with the 40D, 50D and 7D.

I can honestly say, IMO, that the IQ difference amongst the cameras it's evolutionary/incremental at best. I tend to shoot landscape and architecture on a tripod and from an interface ease of use perspective, the 70D is by far the best of the series for my particular use cases. Live view shooting is simply fabulous and I enjoy it as a walk around camera.

WRT the review and as a 70D owner, I was thrilled to see the 70D get a Gold Award but I find it a little hard to swallow from an IQ perspective due to the incremental changes. Love the better Hi ISO but in no way this is a revolutionary IQ camera even relative to the 40D.
Anyway, for me, it suits my style. For better IQ, it's time for a 5D3.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (9 months ago)

Interesting comment! So the 5D II wins again!

0 upvotes
Lucas_
By Lucas_ (9 months ago)

This camera has many bells & whistles, including the OSPDAF, from which I expected a more. Looks like that new tech is not up to the task yet, maybe just for video at this point? Anyway, there are other manufacturers offering similar tech like the new Sonys A7/7R, but since they're mirrorless and perhaps Mr. Buttler won't like them. AFAIK this new DPR comparison test board is still lacking a lot of cameras ( mainly Sony ), which makes it difficult to make good comparisons. I ended upcomparinng the 70D to the NEX6 and was surprised at how good the NEX is...!

1 upvote
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

no one else has the same technology at the moment.
hope Canon could license it to Sony and everyone.

0 upvotes
57even
By 57even (9 months ago)

Yawn.

Sorry, I mean there is nothing in this camera in which I am remotely interested. Your mileage may differ.

2 upvotes
Vignes
By Vignes (9 months ago)

Not interested, then why bother writing?

23 upvotes
57even
By 57even (9 months ago)

Because Canon seem to be relying entirely on existing customer loyalty to sell new cameras. This is not a good strategy IMO.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (9 months ago)

No, it's just me. I buy 20 million Canon cameras every year just to keep them in business. All of the forum members that talk about owning Canon cameras are just my aliases. I hand them out for free but people just throw them in the trash. The "Canon" cameras you see all over the old Canon shells stuffed with Nikon and Sony parts.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
57even
By 57even (9 months ago)

Shame they can't use all that profit to make something interesting.

0 upvotes
Rbrt
By Rbrt (9 months ago)

I'd say the new focusing technology is pretty interesting. I'd also say you're just trolling.

1 upvote
rickyred
By rickyred (9 months ago)

What I see about this camera is that it really makes the rebel series a non player. I think Canon really hit a home run with the 70D. This would be the camera I would choose if I was looking for my first DLSR.

0 upvotes
dual12
By dual12 (9 months ago)

I'd give that camera a 53, not an 83. Who cares about fancy new gimmicks if it's the same old mediocre, noisy, low dynamic range Canon that we've seen for the past 5-10 years? And it clearly is the same.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
naththo
By naththo (9 months ago)

I can smell Maxeyesore is back again. *Sniff Sniff* Yup, it is!

1 upvote
kai liu
By kai liu (9 months ago)

for consumer they may not care about that image quality difference. let say between 70d and d7100. majorty of people buy dlsr for fun not for professional work. so features can enhance people experience of taking picture perheps can attract more customers at end. I think the new AF definately make taking picture and video more fun. Let us see how the sell is several month later.

0 upvotes
Segaman
By Segaman (9 months ago)

You guys at Dpreview must have a lot of fun reading these comments...

6 upvotes
audiobomber
By audiobomber (9 months ago)

DPR needs to change their dynamic range measurements. The current system favours manufacturers who apply heavy tone curves to boost jpeg DR. You can't compare DPR measurements fairly between say an Olympus EM-1 or Canon 70D vs. a Nikon D7100 or Pentax K-5 II, because the first two manipulate the tone curve, and DPR measurements hide the manipulation.

DXOMark results are the only accurate measure of dynamic range, and DPR staff know it. What they are showing as DR on this site is deceiptful. At least report on both, especially since DXO is now affiliated, and proper (accurate) raw results are readily available.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
5 upvotes
JOrmsby
By JOrmsby (9 months ago)

I agree, and was surprised looking at DPR's charts showing the D7100 having wider Dynamic Range than my D600. Also seems to favor this 70D in the highlights. No way that's correct. I'll believe DxO's charts first. DPR's is oddly skewed, and by judging from many of the comments here, readers know it...

4 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (9 months ago)

Sad but not surprising anymore...

Thank you for your precious comments, audiobomber and JOrmsby.

0 upvotes
FrankS009
By FrankS009 (10 months ago)

R Butler wrote. "As a generalised statement, mirrorless cameras are still in development, whereas DSLRs (regardless of brand) have been around long enough that they get most of the basics right - it's the stuff 'round the edges that distinguishes them."

I find it quite hard to believe that after five years, M4/3rds for one has not got BOTH the "basics" AND the "stuff 'round the edges" right in several camera bodies by both Panasonic and Olympus. Furthermore they seem to have both right in different sized bodies in a truely versatile and lightweight system of bodies and lenses.

Changes are here for the camera industry, and the polishing of old practices is not enough any more.

12 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (9 months ago)

As I acknowledged, it's a generalisation but there are still plenty of mirrorless models with plenty of quirks, whether that's in terms of user interface or, for instance, continuous focus performance.

There are stand-out cameras, to the point I can't personally imagine myself ever buying another DSLR but, no, I wouldn't say that the majority of mirrorless cameras are as polished as the 70D, which is an evolution of the (now 13-year-old) EOS 30D and plenty of film SLRs before that.

3 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (9 months ago)

D30? 30D was four steps later! Confusing nomenclature change.

I had an EOS30 and find my 60D quite familiar. I REALLY miss the eye control autofocus though.

Comment edited 54 seconds after posting
1 upvote
FrankS009
By FrankS009 (9 months ago)

R Butler: You are changing the rules on me!

Your generalized statement was about both mirrorless and DSLR cameras, "regardless of brand." Now you are comparing plenty of mirrorless cameras with one specific model.

If you are now being specific about particular cameras, to be fair it would be better to compare the mirrorless stand-out cameras you mention with the 70D. Or to continue to generalize, you might compare the "quirks" of many mirrorless cameras with the flaws of APS-C or FF DSLRs broadly speaking.

I would still suggest that M4/3rds get the "stuff 'round the edges" right enough that your defense of DSLRs rings a bit hollow. On the other hand, you put your own purchasing decisions on the line, and might be commended for that.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 15 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (9 months ago)

@FrankS009 - I think we may be talking at crossed purposes - I'm not defending the concept of DSLRs (I'd like to think of myself as mirror-neutral). Instead I was trying to explain why DSLRs (in general) have tended to score higher than mirrorless so far. And, of course, I'm commenting within the context of the 70D review comments section.

If it comes to specifics of mirrorless cameras - the E-M1 is a very well worked-out camera and it deserved the higher score it got, compared with the 70D.

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

a rule in highway design is not to make long straight sections for people need to do some tasks, have hurdles to perform better.

current mirrorless cameras are those hurdles though I do like the fast readout CDAF and the new E-M1 for some practical use.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (10 months ago)

Canon must be doing something right if the fanboys of other systems get this riled up.

22 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (10 months ago)

Yep, and it was about time. Cheers! :)

0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (10 months ago)

If you think they're mad now, just wait until they start comparing the holiday sales figures for the 70D against those of their favorite brands. Heads will explode!

Ok, the pretty lady has just refreshed my rum toddy, so I'm all better now. :)

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Segaman
By Segaman (9 months ago)

Most salesman in the place i go are nikon friendly, and they said that the 70D is really great, maybe better than the D7100,
So i guess its a great camera Digic 5+

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
6 upvotes
Jimmy jang Boo
By Jimmy jang Boo (10 months ago)

If the $1200 70D is a cutting edge stalwart, it's a seriously dull cutting edge.

Wouldn't be better to call it what it really is? According to dpr, image quality isn't really any better than the NEX-5N, which also meters and focuses better than the 70D. And in terms of low light and high ISO performance, the 70D lags a good distance behind the 5N. Gold must be pretty cheap to be so freely given away.

15 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (10 months ago)

A camera is about more than image quality - the Olympus E-M5 offers the same image quality as the much cheaper E-PM2 but that doesn't stop it being an excellent camera (better controls and an electronic viewfinder being just the most obvious differences).

The idea that the 5N focuses better than the 70D is an odd one, while the inclusion of a viewfinder and a well-worked-out twin-dial control interface (something conspicuously missing from the NEX-5N) make the 70D a more attractive camera to many people - rather undermining your comparison.

18 upvotes
zigi_S
By zigi_S (9 months ago)

What good does the sony sensor bring if it's equiped with subpar optics and slow AF?

9 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (9 months ago)

Lags a good distance behind the 5N??? Someone is wearing Sony colored glasses. My four year old 7D holds its own against the 5N.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

a martyr's vest may be more powerful than the explosives in a hellfire missile. then which will you choose?

0 upvotes
senn_b
By senn_b (9 months ago)

" Gold must be pretty cheap to be so freely given away. "
.. so well put !

1 upvote
Tord S Eriksson
By Tord S Eriksson (9 months ago)

@R Butler, when did the 5N's viewfinder disappear?! Mine has one, and so does my wife's!

As that is an original piece of hardware, although an optional item, designed for the 5N, by Olympus I think you shouldn't disregard it as a mere trifle.

There is other problems with the 5N, sure, but viewfinder is not a missing item!

0 upvotes
DaddyG
By DaddyG (10 months ago)

This review is not as thorough as we're used to seeing from DPR. For example, no comment about OVF Autofocus tracking performance (is it the same as the 7D minus the two modes?)
How about the movie resolution quality. I heard it's majorly lacking compared to, say, a GH3. No mention from DPR.
Too highly focused on the new DP AF I feel.

(However, it's great how you can click on the IQ commentary and the widgets then display accordingly).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
Mike Sandman
By Mike Sandman (10 months ago)

Clarification, please:

The review says, "The remote shooting section of the app gives a reasonable degree of control over the camera. You can set the camera's focus point and get it to focus..." and trigger the shutter.

It's not clear (at least to me) from the screen captures whether you can use the WiFi link to see the live view image on a remote smart device like an iPhone/iPad, and fully control it from that device, like you can with a CamRanger.

Can you clarify that point?

Thanks.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (10 months ago)

Yes, you can.

Those screen captures are from a smartphone, showing the live view from the camera.

5 upvotes
AlaskaDave
By AlaskaDave (9 months ago)

A note, I would not compare to CamRanger. With CamRanger there is pretty much complete control on both iPhone and iPad. I used Canon's app for WIFI connection and although nice to get to images, focus and trigger the release there's lots of room for improvement in order to be compared to CamRanger. The ultimate solution would be to have CamRanger software being able to communicate with internal wifi and not a suspended dongle plugged into the USB port.

0 upvotes
Dylthedog
By Dylthedog (10 months ago)

When I bought into Canon their sensors were the only game in town. Since then I've purchased a bag full of lenses and five bodies over the years but, like many, I feel that Canon have failed to innovate since that initial lead.

This is the first camera in a while that looks like they have done something attractive. The trouble is I find myself reaching for my M43 Oly kit before my 5D3 on many occasions and having truly compact system (more so than APS-C anyway) with a FF option means I'll never look at this camera.

Canon need this kind of tech with a competitive DR sensor across the range. Here's hoping for 2014.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
7 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (10 months ago)

Same story here...

4 upvotes
Segaman
By Segaman (10 months ago)

they will, give em a chance for 2104, before selling anything, we all got GAS

0 upvotes
dccdp
By dccdp (10 months ago)

@Segaman: Let's hope you're not right. 2104 will be too late even for Canon. ;-)

1 upvote
Segaman
By Segaman (10 months ago)

nah, the only thing Canon needs is a little more mojo, and that i'm sure it will happen, they got the dough!!!!!!
If not, i would be the first surprised!

I'm buying a mirrorless real soon, not a canon and not a nikon...... FUJI baby

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Dylthedog
By Dylthedog (10 months ago)

But their dough is shrinking for the reasons I mentioned. Their M series has tanked compared to Sony and M43. The dough they have now needs to be spent wisely - believe me I hope they get it right!

2 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (10 months ago)

Any company that has to rely solely on cameras for profits is headed for big trouble. Fortunately, Canon, Olympus and Ricoh are not in this situation. Sony is even more diversified so if they continue to lose money on electronics they have options.

1 upvote
armandino
By armandino (9 months ago)

My guess is Canon investment in the M system is puny, I do not see Canon in trouble yet. Actually, so far they have been the best to do in business.

0 upvotes
Segaman
By Segaman (10 months ago)

hey guys DSLR are going to be a rare breed, the stats are telling us that in the next five years, things will be hard, so lets keep the spirit alive, specially for Nikon, which I love their products!
Christopher Chute from market intelligence firm IDC predicts Nikon may be out of business in 5 years if the trend continues.

“You’re talking about a 10-15% decline in DSLR shipments all over the world. Which is kind of shocking because that market’s been growing double digits for almost ten years. Nikon recently said they have a five year plan to address this. And my view is, that five year plan should have come out five years ago. They’re not going to be around in five years.”
http://www.eoshd.com/content/11409/consumer-dslrs-dead-5-years

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Segaman
By Segaman (10 months ago)

Even I'm thinking of buying the Fuji Xe2, smaller and I don't do prints so its easier for traveling!
But i'm keeping my dslr, i think!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Jim in Hudson
By Jim in Hudson (10 months ago)

Stats don't tell us about the future, only the past.

3 upvotes
robbo d
By robbo d (10 months ago)

.....and because the 2012 stats were unusually high and projected company sales were higher still for 2013 which did not happen. Don't stress it, whilst some of the M4/3 systems are good, so are APC-C, but it'll take a while little while before small sensor tech could ever literally compete with these. 5 years...me thinks not.

0 upvotes
sandy b
By sandy b (10 months ago)

And at least an equally high drop in shipment in mirrorless.

0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (10 months ago)

Hi Segaman,

Don't count on the DSLR disappearing from the marketplace anytime soon. While I have no doubt that smartphones and mirrorless cameras that appeal to the casual shooter, who primarily posts to websites, will completely swallow up the traditional point and shoot market, even a 20% decline in DSLR sales will not make that camera type extinct. Yes, it will force some of the weaker DSLR makers out of the market, but those who survive will actually thrive. Why? Simply because event photographers, like myself, are very aware of the still very strong demand for albums and other print based products people seek and are willing to pay a premium price for are still best produced with a camera of DSLR design. The reason DSLRs have been around so long is because the design is highly reliable, infinitely customizable, and therefore, suited to do almost any job that a working photographer might be asked to do. It's big because it's expected to do big jobs without breaking. :)

Comment edited 49 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
Will Gerrits
By Will Gerrits (10 months ago)

So Donny thanks for your reply. But think about your arguments in favor of a DSLR : nowadays we could state the same arguments for any top mirrorless camera of any brand.

2 upvotes
Will Gerrits
By Will Gerrits (10 months ago)

And maybe you should try one before you will write your next comment, i'm pretty sure you'll be impressed by the usability and quality of the output. Try it.

0 upvotes
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (10 months ago)

I keep reading that DSLRs are dying out but what I see contradicts that. On the contrary, I very often see young people - women especially - wielding Canon DSLRS. This leads me to think that they are becoming increasingly fashionable (maybe because they are considered "retro"). By contrast I very rarely see people using a M4/3 or mirrorless camera. I myself bought a Canon 600D at the wacko price of 399 Euros from MediaMarkt recently. I have to say, I far prefer using it to my Sony NEX5n, even though the latter has a more powerful sensor. Still, the Canon's output is more than good enough for me - and seems noticeably sharper as well (especially with the excellent 40mm pancake).

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (10 months ago)

@Will,

Working photographers tend to be far more conservative when choosing their tools than the typical casual user. They have to be, because their reputations and their livelihoods depends on them sticking with what they know works. So for the working photographer it's good business sense to stick to, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". While the casual shooter risks absolutely nothing when choosing to be the first person to be seen sporting the latest trend in cameras, especially when that choice is more about the status symbol it represents than about choice of tools. That's why it's great to have so many different choices available to so many different folks. If you are happy with your choice, that's great, because I am definitely happy with mine. :)

1 upvote
Will Gerrits
By Will Gerrits (10 months ago)

Thanx for the answer Donny.Clear. Just don't write negative stuff about things you'll never (will) use.

3 upvotes
KZMike
By KZMike (10 months ago)

Donnie. . .Well put. . . I do believe many of us that consider ourselves in or near the 'high end enthusiast' user category will also support the SLR configuration.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 51 seconds after posting
1 upvote
white shadow
By white shadow (9 months ago)

I would agree with Donnie G.

While mirrorless cameras are catching up in image quality, the DSLR is st ill the most reliable if one is serious about capturing quality photos. For the professional photographer, that is all it matters.

For example, if one is going to shoot a MotoGP or even soccer, one need to use a DSLR like the Canon 1DX with a 500mm f/4.0L IS lens on a monopod. Mirrorless cameras just don't have the speed, lenses and capacity to shoot these photos. If one is shooting events, most mirrorless cameras do not handle well and do not have the flash system to support it. DSLR still have the widest choice of lenses from tilt & shift to super telephoto. Even medium format DSLRs (not used by amateurs) will not disappear because commercial photographers need them.

Mirrorless cameras are ideal for the casual user. I use a Micro 4/3 for most of my travel photography but when top image quality is required I would still use a full frame camera.

2 upvotes
armandino
By armandino (9 months ago)

DSLR are not dying, simply the market is finally saturating. For 99% of the people a 5 years old DSLR is much more capable than their skills, no need to change every year or two.

1 upvote
meland
By meland (9 months ago)

Donnie G
What percentage of the DSLR market is taken up by professionals do you think?

0 upvotes
Greg VdB
By Greg VdB (10 months ago)

DPR says they are both very strong, but I'm sure my daddy is stronger than your daddy!!!

2 upvotes
Koemans
By Koemans (10 months ago)

WHAT?! 20 megapixel? Truly outrageous!

Everybody knows you need atleast 40 megapixel and 20 stop DR in 2013. Totally makes the difference between a OK picture and a super picture on your flickr, , facebook and personal website that shows 640x480 images. Canon, how dare you?!

7 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (10 months ago)

there should not be many people print Google Earth often.

1 upvote
Eleson
By Eleson (9 months ago)

Whilst you are 100% correct that to all but very few, the differences will never be noticeable.
But even so, I think that reviews & tests should point (and quantify) out the differences and relate different offers to each other, all to help readers to understand which tool is best for them.

If that is lacking, or even worse, avoided, the whole point of the review becomes void. Then it turns into preaching for the choirs.

Having said that, maybe all cameras have evolved to a stage where todays tests&measurements are obsolete.
Maybe handling is a better way to differentiate, but how to measure?
AF performance against moving targets may also be a new test area to be addressed.

And maybe the reviews should always include all reviewers personal notes, What they like and don't like. That would add more information and not be the down washed as today.
Many car magazines do this.

0 upvotes
Leonard Shepherd
By Leonard Shepherd (10 months ago)

Page 11 says the autofocus target is a good one.
This seems to be a fundamental error. According to Nikon and Canon it is not a first class target for testing phase detect AF.
It is not for me to explain why ephotozine has not followed Nikon/Canon guidance on choosing a good target foresting phase detect AF.
Whether the Canon would show the same front and back phase detect focus issues with a better target is unknown - but probably not.
When AF is not accurate due to a target being unsuitable for consistent reliable AF, recommended work arounds are manual focus or a better AF target at an appropriate distance.
Fine tune is primarily for accuracy issues with good targets - not less than ideal targets where the focus error is usually due to the target and not the equipment.

0 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (10 months ago)

Hi Leonard, preaching your gospel to all peoples everywhere ...

0 upvotes
Martin-C
By Martin-C (10 months ago)

Len, I think you have got confused about which site you are posting on. Surely you meant to say:

It is not for me to explain why *DPReview* has not followed Nikon/Canon guidance on choosing a good target foresting phase detect AF.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (10 months ago)

A camera's AF system is of little use if it can only focus on manufacturer-approved targets, since that's not what most people shoot.

We created a reasonable test target and shot at a reasonable distance and were able to repeatedly get results consistent with real-world shooting.

6 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (9 months ago)

most people are lazy bones.

0 upvotes
bleeboo
By bleeboo (10 months ago)

Bought one, had to return it. IQ: Superb. AutoFocus (movie): For a DSLR, absolutely transformational.

Return reason: Moire', city.

Even at 1920 x 1080 30p, way too much moire'.

At 720 60p? Moire' is so bad, the footage is virtually unusable.

I know. "Buy a dedicated video camera", or "Buy a moire' filter".

Uh uh. Got a Panasonic GH3 instead. Is it perfect? No. Is the 70D better at stills? Yes. But, right now, it's the best still/video hybrid out there at this consumer price point.

I wanted to love and keep the 70D. All Canon had to do, was quell some of the moire', which I believe they could have done. But, for whatever reason, they didn't.

Comment edited 44 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (10 months ago)

> All Canon had to do, was quell some of the moire', which I believe they could have done. But, for whatever reason, they didn't.

That could be the same reason D7100 dropped the anti-aliasing filter altogether - a balance between quality of stills vs. video. It's a fine line to walk.

3 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (10 months ago)

Can you describe what the moire looked like and in what situations it appeared? I have a 7D and never experienced this problem and I don't recall ever hearing others talk about the same problem.

1 upvote
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (10 months ago)

@onlooker

There's an interesting test video of both (70D, D7100) and the 70D was much worse re moiré, even though the camera w/o AA filter is the D7100. Go figure!

2 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (10 months ago)

@rhlpetrus - I saw that, that was from TheCameraStore. I was perplexed and not sure what to think. Just shows you there are factors the engineers are dealing with we may not fully understand.

3 upvotes
bleeboo
By bleeboo (9 months ago)

Yes. The moire' is prevalent mostly on edges of surfaces, contrasting borders in the field of view, and zoomed all of the way out. It's only "disturbing" at 1080 30p, but, it's "Katie, Bar The Door" horrible at 720 60p.

Seriously. The moire' makes the video on the 70D a showstopper. Did everything I could to mitigate it, zero sharpness, shot everything flat, etc...

Even in post, you couldn't resuscitate it. Too bad, really. I think the engineers could have corrected this, especially in light of the stellar stills this beautiful otherwise camera takes. But, I guess to point people towards their higher line, maybe they didn't want to. Just a theory.

If you want a great stills camera, you have a lot of Canon glass, and you like responsiveness, this is your camera. Just don't think you'll be able to use the video for anything other than an emergency.

0 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (9 months ago)

Why perplexed?
AA filters doesn't help on line skipping video.
Or rather, are tuned for the sensors original nmbr of lines.

So, that has to be handled elsewhere, or by not doing line skipping.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (9 months ago)

bleeboo, what do you mean "zoomed all the way out"? Are you viewing this full screen or in a small window? Are you looking at video on a monitor or a large HD television?

Comment edited 49 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
bleeboo
By bleeboo (9 months ago)

I mean, when you're at the lowest amount of zoom, the moire' is at its worst, zooming "in" does mitigate the moire' somewhat, but, not to the point where the video is acceptable to watch. You can even see the moire' in the EVF while you're recording.

And, the moire' is there in every viewing scenario, large HD television, and your monitor, full screen. I have both, and have viewed on both.

As I said, the new focusing scheme is transformational for a DSLR. I have a 60D, and it couldn't really auto-focus to save it's life in live view shooting video. The 70D is lightning fast with auto-focus in live view video mode, similar to a mirrorless camera like the GH3 I bought...so, it's truly a shame that Canon didn't mate this wonderful new technology for focusing, with video that could at least be marginally watchable.

If you don't care about the video, (which I do, very much), this might be a great camera for your needs. But, if you want watchable video, the dream is dead on this baby.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
bleeboo
By bleeboo (9 months ago)

I should say, you can see the moire' on the LCD screen while recording in live view. And of course, the viewfinder is optical.

Too much time having fun with the GH3...it's the one with the EVF.

0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (10 months ago)

Don't knock "above average" and "well-rounded". Some of us don't need "the best out there", merely "the camera that can do what I need it to do".

8 upvotes
Dave Oddie
By Dave Oddie (10 months ago)

I agree. Most modern cameras are more than enough for most amateurs.

However I think when someone such as yourself who clearly likes the camera points out comments like "above average" etc it does call into question how on earth it got a Gold Award.

This would not be such an issue if it were not for the fact people can be influenced by such awards and it will sit alongside it when being promoted in shops and presumably the DPR Gear Shop will link to the review.

3 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (10 months ago)

Awards and scores are absolutely subjective. DPR reviewers have said more than once that their awards are given in context of what is currently on the market, not with what has become obsolete (old stuff may have gotten the same award that the newer, better stuff has). Also, if there is one aspect that is truly remarkable it can change how the whole system is perceived.

0 upvotes
Dave Oddie
By Dave Oddie (9 months ago)

What you say might all be true but that doesn't stop manufacturers listing all the rewards their products get but you won't ever see them put a qualification on them saying "by the way that Gold Award from DPR was subjective".

I am pretty sceptical (and always have been) of DPR's and DXO's and virtually every other popular web sites testing strategies (e.g. Imaging Resource) as I am not convinced any of them are good enough methods from a scientific point of view. They don't seem rigorous or robust enough for me.

I don't think I have ever commented on a cameras award before but this one struck me as quite out of line with the conclusions and while I myself and maybe you will ignore the award when making a decision many won't.

If Amazon (i.e.DPR Gear Shop!) wants to sell cameras and retain credability it needs a bit better editorial checking before they go to "print" to weed out anomalies like this in my opinion.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (9 months ago)

You really think Canon would say anything about getting a DPR Gold Award? I personally highly doubt it and have never noticed any mention of DPR opinions in their press materials.
As for tests, you don't have to believe their conclusions. They post their images for all to see. So do many other sites. I would never use only one site to draw a conclusion, but if you interpret the images from several and see the same pattern I think you can believe what you see. Scores, awards, ratings, stars are all junk. When the picture hits the pixel is where it counts.

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (10 months ago)

I'm sure this is an excellent camera but it doesn't seem to really excel in anything except maybe AF. That's fine, but if this gets the gold, what would a real breakthrough camera get? (This is not a "fan" issue; I own Elphs, Rebels, G1X, EOS-M and 5D3.)

Even if it produces results nearly identical to the D7100--and I'm sure it does, to everyone except Nikon fans--that just means both are above average.

2 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (10 months ago)

What it really means is that by objective standards it is an excellent camera. The fact that most are bored with it says more about us than it says about the camera.

4 upvotes
Jim in Hudson
By Jim in Hudson (10 months ago)

I don't think people are "bored" with the lack of live view during continuous shooting. Instead, they'd be really on their toes trying to figure out where to aim the camera.

1 upvote
SDPharm
By SDPharm (10 months ago)

> I'm sure this is an excellent camera but it doesn't seem to really excel in anything except maybe AF. That's fine, but if this gets the gold, what would a real breakthrough camera get?

A camera can have a breakthrough technology and still be unusable due to many reasons. Look at Blackmagic, breakthrough IQ, but battery only lasts 30 min, among other problems.

0 upvotes
armandino
By armandino (9 months ago)

well it does have a breakthrough tech and it does not have real flaws so the blackmagic example does not fit. Actually I do not see flaws at all but trimmed down specs to leave room for the 7DMKII. Canon best care has always been avoiding cannibalization of its own products (see D800 vs D3X).
It deserves the gold to me as the sole innovative DSLR in a while.

0 upvotes
Will Gerrits
By Will Gerrits (10 months ago)

In 2013 when everything electronic is minimizing , compare cellphones in 2005 and now, in the department handling there should be more focus on size. In that aspect this Canon is big, very big. Moreover if you consider the enthusiast photographer is not carrying just a single (zoom)lens but a few lenses : the size and the weight you have to carry around for a longer time is a problem that's not taking into account in this review. Please DPReview addept your reviewing aspects to 2013 -2020 standards and don't stay in the low 2000's

1 upvote
vapentaxuser
By vapentaxuser (10 months ago)

To be fair...one of the editors (forgive me if I forget who it was), posted an article back in August or September basically saying that they no longer lug around their DSLR because there are so many compelling compact alternatives.

But outside of your assessment of the level of awareness of the editors, I agree with what you're saying. A lot of people (including me) aren't interested in lugging around a big camera like the 70D anymore. If I go for a dayhike, I would rather take a G15/G16 or a Rebel SL1.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (10 months ago)

Please explain why small is always better. My dad was looking for a new video camera and was dismayed by the fact that so many of them were so incredibly tiny that they were hard to hold and control, not to mention how little real estate there was for controls.
DPR is fine and they really don't need to change their perspective when evaluating the size of a camera because this truly is one time when tiny isn't always the best option. People have hold these cameras for a long time, change orientation, use buttons quickly and have various options for controls like wheels and joysticks, balance the body against long lenses, maybe use controls when wearing gloves, want big screens, love having big and bright pentaprism viewfinders....etc.
One can choose a very small and light kit even with a larger body or they can take a backpack full of big, heavy stuff. Get over yourself.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (10 months ago)

For the record I love using my somewhat small G1 X and my pretty large 7D. I'm young(ish) and have larger male hands. I can control either camera with equal dexterity and enjoy LCD shooting and viewfinder shooting. I use my iPhone when necessary. All considered, I can shoot for hours on end with my 7D and not even notice that I'm using a camera. I'm not tired and I never once have to think about or get annoyed by the controls.

1 upvote
rickyred
By rickyred (10 months ago)

I Carrie around a 7D and a 35-350 with tripod. A good after market strap system makes it bearable. I like how chunky the 7D fits in your hand and balances out a heavy lens.

0 upvotes
Jim in Hudson
By Jim in Hudson (10 months ago)

Despite all the miniaturization going on, hands aren't getting any smaller.

15 upvotes
Will Gerrits
By Will Gerrits (10 months ago)

It's not the size of your hands that's depicts the size of the camera. Not anymore. For long it was the stuff that went into the camera : rolls of 35 mm film an everything else you needed to get a decent picture. We don't use film anymore. So why still size our camera's for it. The sensor and everything else to make a decent picture with it ?! But why the sensor has to be the size of an oldfashioned film format ? 2013 : merely no difference in output between APSc and full-frame 4/3's. Depth of field aside.

0 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (10 months ago)

Why minimizing? If that's what matters, why not just use your smartphone? If you shoot action with a fast tele prime or fast tele zoom you need stability of a larger body. If you shoot portraits you need very fast midtele primes, also requries a good stable body. If you shoot ladscapes for real you need all DR and pixels you can get. If one only shoots candids of people in parties and landscapes in trips, one does not need a dslr, that's it. Why does every maker have to follow the "small is beautiful" mantra? This is the one party line that m43 and nex users keep proagating in these forums and that DPR now and then follow as well.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
SDPharm
By SDPharm (10 months ago)

> Please explain why small is always better.

You are putting words in people's mouth. Nobody said small is ALWAYS better. In fact, what Will said was too big and too heavy is not good, and size should be considered. That's not the same as saying small is always better.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (10 months ago)

I was at B&H in NYC yesterday and one observation was that the overwhelming majority people carrying cameras had either a Canon and Nikon DSLR.

And as usual, the most crowed sections were the Nikon and Canon DSLR kiosks.

So I'm beginning to think that this near constant talk small size, and complaints about "large, and heavy DSLRs" is just something mirrorless fans say to highlight their favorite brands.

Camera size/weight only really impacts portability. And miniaturization in cameras more often than not negatively impacts usability and ergonomics.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (10 months ago)

SDPharm, look at his most recent response. He thinks we're sizing cameras to match the size of old 35mm systems. My fully manual OM2000 35mm was tiny. It had zero features other than a light meter.
He has a fundamental lack of understanding of what requires space. Larger sensor typically requires a larger camera. You can get plenty of tiny cameras that take really good pictures, but they have small sensors. Fast cameras need memory, processors, room for a large battery, a place for AF sensors, a pentaprism viewfinder (or even room for the EVF), and yes even room for the mirror box (in this case) that makes the high-performance off-sensor traditional PDAF sensors so useful. Nothing is being done just to have a bigger camera, unless you are talking about putting a second grip on something like the 1D X, but even then a lot of the bulk is because of needing a larger battery, high-performance mirror/shutter, FF sensor, tons of on board processors and memory to move data.

0 upvotes
David Goodwin
By David Goodwin (10 months ago)

I prefer they compare apples to apples. Its like comparing a Jeep to a Mini. Each has its niche and is better in certain situations.

Id expect most SLRs to come in around the same weight and that they should never be compared to compacts or mirrorless units in terms of handling and feel. Not for a review of technical abilities.

0 upvotes
Will Gerrits
By Will Gerrits (9 months ago)

@ marike 6
You know as well as me that the fact that the majority of people are running to Nikon and Canon-stands doesn't mean these are better camera's !!! The main difference between Canon/Nikon and the other brands that are as good or sometimes even better is not the quality of the stuff they make it's much better marketing. They did that right from the beginning. A brandname is hard to get but hard to loose either.

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (10 months ago)

i was at a book signing/talk a few days ago and the firm they used to capture the interview were shooting video on Canon APSc DSLRs with big white L lenses. that market is gonna eat this up. .. i.e. they want APSc quality video but the ease of use of auto AF.

0 upvotes
NiklaiN
By NiklaiN (10 months ago)

Why the hell don't you compenzate the underexposed nikon d7100 test pic?
I know, you guys like cannon but they don't need these kind of advantage...

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (10 months ago)

Please be more specific. Which shot do you think is underexposed?

3 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (10 months ago)

The E-P5 shot is slightly out of focus (if you compare to the identical E-PL5 and E-M5).

Just admit already that you're being paid to botch the results in favor of Canon.

0 upvotes
armandino
By armandino (9 months ago)

so is the flawed D600 getting top marks? Did DPR favour canon then? The issues were so bad that Nikon hurried up to get a brand new model in one year, screwing the D600 owners instead of fixing the problem, just move on ;-)

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (10 months ago)

So more or less as well reviewed as the D7100 or EM-1 mainly due to an emphasis on LiveView AF and the new Dual Pixel AF module relevant mainly for video and LiveView with the 2 STM lenses.

No weather sealing, no 100% Pentaprism VF or dual SD cards. And most puzzling is how easily IQ differences vs a class leading camera like the D7100 can be explained away or marginalized with phrases like "in most situations" or "for the majority of users", "the difference in IQ are slight". Really? Most enthusiast users of this class of camera shoot RAW and edit in LR where the latitude of files or RAW headroom are extremely important.

Don't get me wrong, the 70D is a nice camera and Canon is a great system, but when all the cameras get Gold Awards with similar scores in spite of some key differences, it makes these reviews less specific, less useful for researching cameras than they could be.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
38 upvotes
armandino
By armandino (10 months ago)

this camera has some truly innovative features, while the others not. Dual Pixel makes video taking with an dslr for the first time convenient and effective without the focusing challenging job. I think it will be huge. The advantages in the other cameras are marginal being a must only for a few. As usual I think Canon makes probably a duller camera but most compelling.

Comment edited 57 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (10 months ago)

"Mainly" due to this or relevant to that? The DP PDAF capability used along with an STM lens is the ideal combinatin, but by no means the only meaningful or useful combination.
"No weather sealing"? Look at page 4. 98% pentaprism not bright enough or large enough for you? Who gives a flying leap about dual SD cards?
Your conception of this camera and ability to place it in context of its competition is skewed, and it sounds like that is due to some very warm feelings about the D7100 or EM-1 that have features that you find more important than some the 70D offers.
Placing those cameras side by side in RAW and it is obvious that image quality differences are indeed marginal. The small difference in megapixels gives the D7100 no clear advantage.

3 upvotes
Elaka Farmor
By Elaka Farmor (10 months ago)

And of cause it has the cool and useful 3x optical crop mode in movie recording at 1080p (just like 600D)! And 60p 1080! No, I´m joking, of cause it has not.

0 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (10 months ago)

So, everybody is unimpressed by where we are today in cameras. It must drive the manufacturers nuts trying to make the "average DPR user" happy. The fact that they don't come out with over the top new designs on a monthly basis seems to be cause for great outrage. I foresee a lot of unhappiness in the DPR user world as some wait for perfection( as they see it ) to arrive.

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (10 months ago)

This camera's greatest strength is its video autofocus with on sensor PDAF and rotating screen. Image quality while very good, is still not as good as D7100 which this review mentions. FF cameras are better, but then again, FF bodies are almost twice the price for a 6D or D610 and lenses can be more and bigger. For APSC, this camera can still take great photos with the right technique and right lenses, and small difference in ranking may become less important compared to D7100.

D7100 still has a lots of great features different than this one, and great image quality, but no rotating screen. Not totally apples to apples as some features are simply different. So it is up to us which is better for us.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
bcalkins
By bcalkins (10 months ago)

I'd be surprised if you could find a significant difference in images taken with the 70D and the D7100 (or the E-M1) in the hands of most buyers of these cameras... There will be differences to be sure - but not significant ones, in my opinion.

0 upvotes
Segaman
By Segaman (10 months ago)

there is no differences for most people, only to some , and even there, I did test the 7100, which is great, but I don't see any differences on my monitor.
Lots of Nikon people over here, and its a Canon camera that scored 83% , why so much complaints?
You guys should be happy you got a great Nikon camera, why all these nonsense battles?
No one wins, there is no war!
gee...

2 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (10 months ago)

> there is no differences for most people

There are significant differences that are relevant for a large number of enthusiasts. Canon forum users are quite actively discussing sensor technology as it relates to RAW processing and therefore overall IQ. To say they don't care or even notice difference is almost an insult to Canon photographers.

DxOMark, a testing site DPR collaborates with, also notices the IQ differences in their tests. The 68 overall score for the 70D, which is actually lower than some m43 cameras (something that should never happen for a just released APS-C camera).

The point is when DPR relies on well worn phrases like "for the majority of users IQ differences are slight" they make a huge assumption about Canon users, most of whom are actually RAW shooters who absolutely care about raw headroom and the latest high DR cameras.

Why bother even testing IQ at all only to later sugarcoat differences between cameras based on an assumption about "most users"?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
armandino
By armandino (9 months ago)

Canon might be a bit behind in dynamic range, but by no means the sensor sucks. I find DxOMark designed to generate a huge spread in the sensor scoring which is not reflected in the everyday life, i.e. if a sensor scores 65% another 90% the second sensor is not 25% better. Canon raw files are fine.

1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (9 months ago)

Guys, DxO scores are not percentages. There is also no scale on which they exist. They are arbitrary numbers created by combining other arbitrary numbers in an arbitrary formula under arbitrary light in Arbitrary, Cananda. DxO scores mean less than nothing. Look at each test and see what you think about the differences. Look at pictures and see if you can tell.

0 upvotes
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (10 months ago)

Canon, please put your on sensor PDAF in the next version of 6D or 5D mark4, and include at least 2 memory card slots for video use like D7100 or higher in Nikon line. For hobbyists or enthusiasts, one slot is okay, but for professionals 2 slots needed, and this type of sensor tech should be on Full Frame. Most professionals would prefer 2 card slots for backup or dual video record.
SD cards can fail, which will not work for professional work as we would only get one shot at getting the moment on paid video. Is Canon protecting its higher Pro camera line (and Pro Camcorders) with limitations on models like this?
Sony A99 already has continuous autofocus in live video in a FF camera, Canon and Nikon should have on sensor PDAF in their next FullFrame camera models. This could boost sales in Pro DSLRs in our current sales climate, attracting new videographers and upgraders in DSLR.
Good to see the new sensor tech in DSLRs though! Good start from Canon and Sony.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (10 months ago)

I think all new Canon APS-C and 35mm format sensors will have dual-pixel AF and would like to see if it go down to 1/1.7" for compacts.

1 upvote
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (10 months ago)

Just wondering how long it will take Nikon or Canon to put one in a full frame camera. Their current models are only a year old or so. Does that mean will have to wait a year or two for the next generation models (PDAF on sensor) in full frame. Would that concern Canon with Pro Camcorder sales taking some hits. Pro Camcorder now with larger aps-c sensors at entry pro level (see Sonys models like Nex EA50UH, still better/faster for dedicated video for long term events but come at a higher price, but not if you start adding lenses and accessories. In my opinion.

0 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (10 months ago)

Nikon has supposedly commissioned Aptina to develop a FF sensor with the Nikon 1 PDAF tech. It's not going to get long before a camera comes out with it (my guess: later next year).

1 upvote
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (9 months ago)

Good to know. Thanks. If this FF is good for Nikon, might update my D700 at last.

0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (10 months ago)

Thanks for the thorough review DPR. Your conclusions at review's end pretty much sum up my reasons for making the 70D my next camera purchase. While many of the camera designers who post here are convinced that this camera isn't worth buying simply because Canon didn't try to cram every new techno toy available into the design, I, on the other hand, appreciate the company's disciplined approach to camera design. The camera has a very well thought out feature set that doesn't rely solely on gimmicks and gadgets to meet the needs of a wide range of users, including those like me, who finance their hobby through paid assignments that rarely involve delivering prints larger than 11x14 inches, and, who may dabble in video from time to time if good (sales worthy) results are easy to achieve. It helps too that Canon sticks to a user interface design theme that doesn't require me to learn the camera all over again with each body upgrade. The 70D wins my wallet vote easily. :)

16 upvotes
Jim in Hudson
By Jim in Hudson (10 months ago)

I read many of the posts but admittedly not every one. Anyone know if the Sigma 18-35 lens used was micro-AF adjusted first? If it wasn't, what would be the point of comparing conventional PDAF to on-sensor focusing?

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (10 months ago)

I agree with your comment, the result is way worse than anything I have seen comparing usual PDAF with LV AF in any camera, once you AF-microtune lens.

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

The conclusions should have looked more like this.

Pros:
It is a Canon camera

Cons:

Outstanding image Quality for a sensor using 4 year old technology.

Dynamic Range that a compact camera would be proud of.

Battery life that equals its competition when in the off position.

Inventive new Auto Focus that delivers almost as good auto focus as the original Mirrorless cameras

Enables Canon to make a profit by requiring you to rebuy all new versions of your lenses.

22 upvotes
vapentaxuser
By vapentaxuser (10 months ago)

How does the sensor use 4 year old technology? It debuted with this camera.

10 upvotes
neo_nights
By neo_nights (10 months ago)

Judging by DxO's scores, that sensor seems very to the old one.
http://www.dxomark.com/Cameras/Compare-Camera-Sensors/Compare-cameras-side-by-side/%28appareil1%29/895|0/%28brand%29/Canon/%28appareil2%29/870|0/%28brand2%29/Canon/%28appareil3%29/663|0/%28brand3%29/Canon

3 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (10 months ago)

Did you actually just say out loud "judging by DxO's scores"? LOL

10 upvotes
neo_nights
By neo_nights (10 months ago)

@ howardroark - I have seen actual image comparisons between Pentax K5 and Canon 5d Mk II. Guess which camera had better DR?

People do not like DxO which is fine by me. But is there any other website out there that has a standarized methodology for measuring sensors' capabilities?

7 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

The 70D uses the new technology for Auto Focus. The portion that actually captures the image is 4 year old technology.

3 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (10 months ago)

You don't need DxO mark, just look at samples and compare performance with a, say, 40D.

0 upvotes
Mike99999
By Mike99999 (10 months ago)

If you look at the provided samples, the sensor is being beat by sensors one quarter of the size.

1 upvote
unknown member
By (unknown member) (9 months ago)

Mike9....I'd love you to tell me which small sensor is beating it.

Neo....which one and by how much and is that the only thing you're concerned with? Measurements are one thing, scores are another. There are quite a few measurements I pay attention to, but their scores are like a 4 year old scribbling on a wall with chalk. Their measurements in some cases are suspect, but I look at test images to see if differences are meaningful.

0 upvotes
Rbrt
By Rbrt (10 months ago)

Would be nice to have the 6D available in the Studio Scene. Maybe it's coming? I know they are in a different class, but helps when you're trying to figure out the extra benefit from the extra cost.

1 upvote
JimBob0
By JimBob0 (10 months ago)

Is anyone here a real photographer? You know, someone who actually takes good photographs? Or does everyone just argue about minor specification details that no one will ever see or notice in a photograph?

I'm beginning to worry that too many commentators can only take a good photograph if they have the very best camera to do it rather than actually having the skill or talent to take a good photo in the first place.

Too many dull nerds here.

6 upvotes
Bjorn_L
By Bjorn_L (10 months ago)

Apparently you missed the point of a camera review. It is evaluate a camera not the photographer.

12 upvotes
Interestingness
By Interestingness (10 months ago)

True that JimBob0. What I do is if someone here has an especially negative comment (about any piece of equipment) the first thing I do is click on their profile and check out their photo gallery. Tells me everything I need to know. Vast majority of those times there isn't anything in the gallery nor a link their personal work. Wonder why that is?

Seriously folks - if you cannot take an award winning photo with ANY brand camera and lens I'll let you in on a secret - it's not the gear.

5 upvotes
vapentaxuser
By vapentaxuser (10 months ago)

I don't think there's been camera announcement within the past year where someone hasn't gone into the comments section and declared the camera "junk" or "trash". Especially the smaller sensored ones.

But at the same time, people are right to level criticism towards camera companies for charging significantly more money for cameras that are only minor refreshes over their predecessors (this is especially true in the enthusiast compact segment right now). Camera companies are shooting themselves in the foot by getting greedy in a buyer's market.

0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (10 months ago)

You need to know about cooking, but you don't need to be a great chef to be a great restaurant critic.

0 upvotes
rickyred
By rickyred (10 months ago)

Ill bet the 70D is a wonderful camera and a huge improvement on the 60D. The one thing I miss the most using my great 7D is the flippy screen from the 60D. And besides, where can you get a camera like the 70D for the price asked?

1 upvote
Interestingness
By Interestingness (10 months ago)

Good point Gesture. Having said that, if a restaurant critic reviews a restaurant and it's 99% overall as good as his/her favourite does that critic slam the restaurant saying how bad it is and all all should stay away?

Another couple of ways of looking at this...

1) I'm middle aged and my physique was doing the middle age thing so I joined a gym a couple of years ago and work out 3-5 times a week. Do I slam the gym because I don't look like a professional bodybuilder? Do I change gyms because my gym uses 'Weight Brand A' when the competition uses 'Weight Brand B' and the latest reviews say 'Weight Brand B' slides on the bar minutely better than what my gym uses?

2) I can't play guitar. Give me the worlds best and a pro some cheap thing from Best Buy. Who do you think will play better? Do I complain about the strings on the worlds best guitar because my non-ability to play well?

Laugh, because this is like the mentality of sooo many of the (most vocal) commenter's here.

0 upvotes
roustabout66
By roustabout66 (10 months ago)

I have noticed that the more emphasis people put on specifications and minutia, the less likely they are to show ANY photos...no less interesting ones.

1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

The Panasonic GH2 was rightfully BLASTED for having very poor dynamic range. Why isn't this camera blasted as well? It isn't even up to the much smaller sensor standards.

13 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

I really miss the days when Canon would put out a new camera and everyone would sing its praises and not just the people getting paid to review it.

7 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

Is it just me or is Canon held to a different standard than every other company?

5 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (10 months ago)

Other people also think that. They're equally wrong.

We review cameras, not companies.

We provide all our test samples and a collection of our real-world shooting examples. We also try to explicitly state all the aspects we think are good or bad about a camera (note 'camera' not 'sensor').

If you disagree with our conclusions, that's fine - we intentionally try to provide the basis for you to draw your own.

All the howls of protest about the 70D being inferior appear to stem from its sensor getting a lower DxOmark than its peers. Almost all of this difference comes down to DR (and accounts for the lower Raw IQ score in our review). However, the 70D also offers better video and live view AF than many of its rivals and is a very nice camera to shoot with (both factors that are relevant to a camera review but not a sensor assessment).

It would get the same mark, regardless of the brand name on the front.

8 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

I want to believe you. However, the conclusions seem to be much harder on Mirrorless cameras than on Canons.

It seems like the conclusions put a HUGE emphasis on Image Quality for m4/3s where it has been weakest in the past. Then image quality is thrown out the window for the 70D because it has a tricky new AF feature.

I know you guys try to remain unbiased. However, I want Canon to realize that the image quality is important as well. There has been no real significant image quality change in 4 years while their competition has caught up and passed them.

The AF in the 70D is cool. However, my GH3 has had that for almost a year now. It also has better image quality along with MANY other features that the 70D was praised for. The GH3 received a much lower score and that was back when NO other cameras offered these features.

It just seems like the only thing Mirrorless can do to get the same score is lower their standards and re-badge a Canon camera. I hope that never happens.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (10 months ago)

> is a very nice camera to shoot with

That is a greatly underappreciated quality. Cameras today are so good, that in addition to a good lens selection (which Canon certainly has), enjoyable operation could sway the buyer.

1 upvote
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (10 months ago)

@mpgxsvcd - I would certainly like to think that's not the case. As a generalised statement, mirrorless cameras are still in development, whereas DSLRs (regardless of brand) have been around long enough that they get most of the basics right - it's the stuff 'round the edges that distinguishes them.

The GH3 is a very good camera and got a very good review, but I'm not sure I'd agree it has better image quality. The 70D doesn't match the D7100 and in some respects loses out to the E-M1, but the differences are not huge (certainly not to the extent that's being argued about) and the rest of the camera is very well worked-out.

2 upvotes
whtchocla7e
By whtchocla7e (10 months ago)

This camera is revolutionary. It's a technological marvel. Whole books will be written about it; children will gaze at it in astonishment; women will kneel before it. It will be mentioned in the same breath as the Great Pyramids, the Sputnik, and the Ferrari F40. It will open the door to time travel. It will be divisible by zero. But one question still remains... does it focus in -3 EV?

10 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

I think Dpreview gives out more "Gold Stars" than a 60 year old Kindergarten teacher. Next they will probably start grading everyone on a 4 point system where no one ever gets a 1 or a 4 and you only get a 2 if you really screwed up in a major way.

7 upvotes
AlpCns2
By AlpCns2 (10 months ago)

And your proposed (more) scientific methodology is?

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

They should just scrap the whole Gold/Silver Star system. It is meaningless to rate cameras on a scale from 1 to 2.

9 upvotes
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (10 months ago)

Yes, almost every recent camera is excellent. Why is this a problem?

2 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

It isn't a problem that every camera is excellent. It is a problem trying to differentiate those cameras on a scale of 1 to 2.

2 upvotes
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (10 months ago)

You are assuming there is a meaningful differentiation that would universally apply to all DPR readers. Gold/Silver/stars/percentages are popular and they have exactly whatever meaning you wish to assign them.

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

@Erik,

Then the ratings are meaningless and everyone has based their impressions on their own imagination.

0 upvotes
Bjorn_L
By Bjorn_L (10 months ago)

Strange that DPR seems at odds with DXOs measurements. For example DR. DXO says it is poor, you say it is good. Are you or are you not partnered with DXO?

DXO's results say this sensor is about the same as the rather ancient 50d.

Canon Canon Canon
70d 60d 50d
overall 68 66 63
Color bit 22.5 22.2 21.8
DR evs 11.6 11.5 11.4
ISO 926 813 696

This is 0.7 bits more color detail, 0.2 Evs more DR and less then 1/3rd stop better in ISO.

Lagging well behind every current offering from Sony, Pentax and Nikon. Even the smaller sensor Olympus OM-D E-M1 and Panasonic GH3 best it in every category except ISO (where the Canon has a 1/7th to 1/5th stop advantage, which is fairly trivial compared to the difference between the 70d and its "same sized sensor" peers.

I am impressed by many details about the 70d and by the camera as a whole, but some of your comments are baffling.

27 upvotes
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (10 months ago)

DXO does not say the DR is "poor" - they say base ISO DR is lower than other models in the same price range. But by ISO 400 the difference is gone. In real world shooting, is the 70D "good?" If another camera is "better" do you know the visible difference?

5 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (10 months ago)

DxO analyzes unconverted (undemosaiced) raw files, to get around the processing of any specific software, and get as close to the hardware performance as possible, whereas DPR analyzes converted images, both out-of-camera JPEGs and raws converted to JPEG in ACR. Looking at raw values or looking at final images, they are two different approaches, not necessarily directly comparable.

0 upvotes
Segaman
By Segaman (10 months ago)

@bjorn

Hey, I see that you shoot Nikon
Did you ever tried a Canon?
Before going only by those scores, try one before talking.
I have tried the D7100, loved it.
Specially the viewfinder which is GREAT, when I checked the images on my monitor, they was no difference with my Canon 5dmkII in normal situation, bright sun, did some test where it was dark on one side and sunny on the other part of the frame, and there was NO difference at all.
What I love bout the D7100 also is that kind mojo it has.
The pics looks a bit more alive, but I can't put my finger on it.
Maybe its the amount details do to a big megapixels camera.

But even there, Its hard to really tell em apart.
So before you conclude that one brand is not as great, try and shoot with one, you'll see.I do great pics, and my Nikon friends love my camera, its just like PC vs Mac, its just a different toy,

0 upvotes
Bjorn_L
By Bjorn_L (9 months ago)

@Segaman
I shot Canon DSLR and film bodies and Minolta DSLRs and film bodies before I shot Nikon.
I was a reluctant Nikon convert as I had glass for other mounts and friends who shot mostly Canon.

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (10 months ago)

I think Canon got a "Gold Star" simply for effort here. It didn't matter how good the camera actually is. Dpreview wants to reward manufactures who take a risk in coming out with inventive products like this one.

I simply care about whether it takes good pictures and videos or not. I am sure it does. However, pretty much everything else does that now and some other cameras cost a lot less.

3 upvotes
Frederik Paul
By Frederik Paul (10 months ago)

Use Canon DPP for raw development and apply some chroma NR and the 70D gets closer to the D7100. But some people will never get this…

2 upvotes
Zoom71
By Zoom71 (10 months ago)

Use Canon DPP if you like artifacts...

3 upvotes
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (10 months ago)

You see DPP artifacts if you pixel-peep at 100%. Do you see them if you print? You always have to ask why are you peeping.

3 upvotes
Ahender
By Ahender (10 months ago)

Not sure I have ever read a DPR camera review that did not list anything about image quality in the pros and cons.

"Dual Pixel AF does not allow tracking autofocus while shooting continuously."

So no AISERVO? Wow.

2 upvotes
Rbrt
By Rbrt (10 months ago)

Why have so few camera makers moved to USB 3.0? There must be either a technical or cost factor. Anybody?

0 upvotes
rrccad
By rrccad (10 months ago)

requires more power, cables are a shorter length, plugs are finicky are my personal gripes on usb 3.0

3 upvotes
Rbrt
By Rbrt (10 months ago)

Thanks! I haven't found the plugs finicky on my computer but wasn't aware of the other limitations.

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (10 months ago)

Plus there's the fact that the storage controller would have to be fast enough for USB 3.0 to matter... I imagine a few of them on higher end cameras might be able to provide enough bandwith for USB 2.0 to be a bottleneck, but they're probably few and far between (and more than likely optimized for fast sequential writing over anything else, like random reading).

There's still a lot of cameras that don't write anywhere near fast enough for the fastest 90MB/s+ UHS-I cards to make a difference... That's about the point where USB 2.0 starts to be a big bottleneck (you can get 40MB/s read/write out of USB 2.0). It's pretty trivial to use a USB 3.0 reader for faster offload to a PC anyway, Kingston makes a tiny one with retractable ports for like $12.

Most burst shooting is done to a buffer first then offloaded to SD storage anyway... This is the same reason you don't see USB 3.0 on phones btw, just wouldn't make much of a difference given the speed of flash NAND within those devices... Plus the bigger/bulkier connector might be a bit of a step back, though eventually it'll be preferred for faster charging as batteries (and some phones) get larger.

2 upvotes
Rbrt
By Rbrt (10 months ago)

Good point re the storage controller but if Kingston can do it for $12...

USB 3.0 connector on my computer is same size the USB 2.1 connector on the same machine. They have to be compatible.

0 upvotes
qianp2k
By qianp2k (10 months ago)

buy a USB 3.0 card reader that is pretty cheap.

0 upvotes
Lab D
By Lab D (10 months ago)

I had the pleasure to use one for a week and focusing was very good during videos. The review is very similar to my thoughts, so good job!
The only thing I did not like was having to hold the larger heavy camera away from your body while in video mode or using live view.
I also found the sensor to be good enough for most uses and not an issue.

3 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (10 months ago)

Any way for a VF to be OVF or EVF? Manufacturers never really pursued heads-up display for the OVF. Is Fuji the only one?

0 upvotes
Segaman
By Segaman (10 months ago)

Great camera, great article.
I had the chance to try it, and yes its lovely.
The focus on video mode is really good.
Not my cup of tea, but a lot of people like to do videos.

2 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (10 months ago)

Why use a film era 85mm portrait lens that seems to be front focusing and a third party EF mount lens at or near their minimum focus distances to test the AF system?

By shooting even a high grade modern EF lens at close focus distances you've already introduced one possible source of focussing error. Adding an older EF lens or a notoriously inaccurate large aperture Sigma zoom into the equation makes the AF accuracy test questionable at best.

3 upvotes
Total comments: 627
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