PIX 2015
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Body & Design

At first glance the D3100 looks a lot like its predecessor, but the changes are more significant than the small numerical change would suggest. The higher resolution sensor brings with it several other enhancements such as live view and video capability. These additions, of course, require subtle changes to the camera body to accommodate them. On the back there's a sprung lever to enter live view, which surrounds a small red-dotted button that initiates movie recording; the previously-combined '+' and 'i' functions also now each get their own button (as both functions need to be available in live view). On the top plate, the new drive mode switch makes for a very welcome addition.

In addition to these buttons and switches the D3100 has also gained a proper rubber grip, rather than the rubberized coating that featured on the D3000 - a small change but a big improvement to handling. Small grilles on the front and back conceal the microphone that's used during movie recording and the speaker that provides sound during playback respectively. Finally the D3100 gains two connectors under the enlarged rubber door on its left side, namely HDMI for movie playback and a combined GPS / remote release socket, but loses the D3000's IR remote receiver in exchange.

Side by side

The D3100 is a similar size to its obvious competitors, the Canon EOS 1000D and Sony A290. Being the newest camera in this group it's no surprise that it offers the highest specification, and its Full HD movie recording (albeit at 24 fps) and 14.2MP sensor makes it look pretty impressive. Like the other two cameras here, the Nikon offers a decent degree of external control and, as a result, requires very little menu diving.

In your hand

Thanks to its lineage the D3100 remains one of the most pleasant to hold cameras in its class. It may be small but it's very comfortable to use. It's almost impossible to pick up without your hand falling into a sensible position with the key controls at your fingertips. The layout and positioning of the buttons is some of the best we've come across and their function has on the whole been carefully thought-out too. Our one quibble would be the positioning of the Fn button (which many users, we suspect, will use to control ISO) on the side of the camera, while the the far-less-useful 'info' button occupies prime real estate beside the shutter release.

Viewfinder specs and view

The D3100 has a very typical viewfinder specification for its class of camera. It offers 0.8x magnification and a 95% field of view, which is pretty standard.

Viewfinder size

One figure hidden away in every SLR's spec is the size of the viewfinder (often in a format that makes comparison between competing models impossible). The size of the viewfinder is a key factor in the usability of an SLR - the bigger it is, the easier it is to frame and focus your shots, and the more enjoyable and involving process it is.

Because of the way viewfinders are measured (using a fixed lens, rather than a lens of equivalent magnification), you also need to take the sensor size into account, so the numbers in the diagram below are the manufacturer's specified magnifications divided by the respective 'crop factors'.

The D3100's viewfinder is almost precisely the same size as those offered by its immediate peers. It loses a bit of ground to the A290 but is a fraction larger than that of the EOS 1000D.

Viewfinder crop

Most cameras at this level crop the frame slightly when you look through the viewfinder - in other words you get slightly more in the final picture than you see through the viewfinder. In common with most of its competitors the D3100 only shows 95% (vertically and horizontally) of the frame.

Nikon D3100: 95% viewfinder.
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Comments

Total comments: 10
Spectre13

I bought this camera for my wife when it first hit shelves 5 years ago. We got the package deal that came with two great lenses, plus we bought a third. It's a fantastic DSLR camera with pro features, but simple enough for beginners to use out of the box. The only feature that's missing, and certainly not a deal breaker is the lack of an external microphone input. This is something photographers won't miss at all, yet a feature that filmakers can easily get around with some ingenuity. That leads into my new love of this little gem. As a budding filmaker, I was watching tutorials and reading articles on the subject and found out that most independent filmakers and some pros swear by DSLR cameras for their tool of choice for capture. I remembered my wife's Nikon 3100 and immediately repurposed it for my new endeavor. With a cage, shotgun mic, 7" live feed monitor and matte shade on the way--our Nikon 3100 will get even more use!

0 upvotes
AminDoha

Hi
I'm using Nikkon D3100...can anyone suggest which other lens should fit into it for zoom as well as for wide angle pictures. please tell me the specifications. the current lens 18/55mm...

0 upvotes
Redzone

Hi,
I have just bought the new Tokina 11-20 and it's amazingly sharp !
AF is fast an IQ is awsome.
For Zoom, I wait to buy the Tamron SP 150-600mm. I have currently the Nikkor 55-300. This one is a good one but now I want more.

0 upvotes
Spectre13

More information is needed in order to answer this. There are plenty of fantastic lenses available. It just depends on your needs. What zoom magnification you need, for example.

0 upvotes
ekobkc

salam hangat

saya memiliki camera nikon D3100 dan saya memiliki masalah pada camera saya,permasalahannya adalah ketika saya ingin melakukan pemotretan dengan modul manual atau auto lampu flash tidak menyala dan timbul tulisan (r24) pada Viewfinder Eyepiece namun apabila lampu flash tidak di aktifkan camera dapat melakukan proses pemotretan
terima kasih

0 upvotes
aliceinblack

Hello
i am a novice and use my D3100 in auto mode. do you know if i can set a slower shutter speed for effects and still stay in auto mode? i want to try special effects with motion blur. any help would be appreciated.
thank you
ali black

0 upvotes
Spectre13

Hi Alice,
The short answer is no. One of the things you'll learn as you get acquainted with digital photography is that Auto Mode is a neat feature for quick shots that have predetermined settings calculated and set for you. I'm not sure if you're shooting video or stills, but the same principles apply to both.
Manual settings are where you can get down into the great features of DSLR cameras for what you are looking at doing.
You must learn these features to properly use your camera.
There are many great online resources that will walk you through it.

0 upvotes
sarath cp

nikon d3100 is an intermediate dslr? right? i saw a post about guides for buying a dslr on www.know4u.com
actually they says that there is too much to investigate before buying one... is that true always..? the link is http://know4u.com/dslr%20photography/How%20to%20Choose%20a%20DSLR%20Camera/How%20to%20Choose%20a%20DSLR%20Camera.html

0 upvotes
whodat101

Looking at the comparison, it appears to my novice mind that the d3100 has in most areas slightly better specs than the d5000. Since I am looking at both of these cameras, would appreciate comments. The 3100 is on sale at the local camera shop; the 5000 is available on Craiglist at a considerably lower price, but is of course used.

Also; packed away I have two nikon entry level cameras from the early 1980's with quite a few E series lenses. The E series lens was standard on the two cameras. Will these work on the 3100 and 5000, and if so, are there problems in compatibility such as auto-focus, etc.

0 upvotes
Flight815

D3100 is a great camera. i bought another one recently new from Target..dont need anything newer or more $$$ this thing is just perfect.I think it only auto focuses with Nikon AF-S..you'll have to read up on 3rd party lenses for af.

1 upvote
Total comments: 10