Canon EOS-1D Mark IV

Announced Oct 20, 2009 •
16 megapixels | 3 screen | APS-H sensor
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Product description
Announced Oct 20, 2009

Fifth generation of Canon's speed-orientated range of professional DSLRs. The 1D Mark IV retains its predecessors'form factor and 1.3x crop, APS-H sensor size, but this time increases its pixel count to a whopping 16MP. This may not seem like many in the era of 25MP full-frame DSLRs and 14MP compacts, but it's a lot when you consider the Mark IV still has the ability to shoot at 10 frames per second. If you consider that this is almost the same resolution as offered by the last generation of Canon's studio-targeted camera, the 1Ds Mark II, but with the ability to shoot twice as fast, then you start to appreciate what this camera is promising to do.

In our tests it proved that Canon has left the autofocus problems that plagued the Mark III well and truly behind it, and while the Mark IV isn't the best high ISO camera on the market, it's still an exceptionally good one. From the point-of-view of the tasks it was built to tackle (high speed sports), there is nothing that can touch the detailed, high resolution images that it can deliver ten times a second.

Quick specs
Body type Large SLR
Max resolution 4896 x 3264
Effective pixels 16 megapixels
Sensor size APS-H (27.9 x 18.6 mm)
Sensor type CMOS
ISO 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800 (50, 25600, 51200 and 102400 with boost)
Lens mount Canon EF
Focal length mult. 1.3×
Articulated LCD Fixed
Screen size 3
Screen dots 920,000
Min shutter speed 30 sec
Max shutter speed 1/8000 sec
Format H.264
Storage types Compact Flash (Type I or II), UDMA, SD/SDHC card
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
Weight (inc. batteries) 1230 g (2.71 lb / 43.39 oz)
Dimensions 156 x 157 x 80 mm (6.14 x 6.18 x 3.15)
GPS None

See full specifications

Our review

Putting the EOS-1D Mk3's demons behind it Canon has produced an upgrade that's not just better, but delivers an incredibly versatile tool that blurs the 'sports camera/studio camera' line more than ever before. The Nikon D3S might beat it in very low light, but if you want speed and resolution the EOS-1D Mark IV delivers convincingly.

Good for: Professional shooters needing fast, high res performance

Not so good for: Pros working in ultra low light - the D3S is still better

Read the full review

Gold Award
89%
dpreview score
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Canon EOS-1D Mark IV Review Samples
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