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Sony Cyber-shot DSC-QX100 First-impressions Review

September 2013 | By Allison Johnson
Buy on GearShop$448.00
 

The smartphone and the point-and-shoot are not, by nature, natural companions. One takes better pictures than the other but has difficulty sharing them. The other takes less inspiring images, but can share them instantly. One is easy to leave at home by accident, and the other is in your pocket at all times.

Camera manufacturers have been trying for some time to make compact cameras more like smartphones by adding Wi-Fi connectivity, but no attempt to date has been quite as bold as Sony's latest effort: the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-QX100 and QX10 are sensor/lens modules designed explicitly for use with smartphones. Each unit contains a lens, sensor and processor and your smartphone provides the user interface.

With a shutter button and zoom toggle the QX100 and QX10 are able to operate as standalone cameras (albeit without an LCD or any way of checking composition) but they're designed to work in concert with a smartphone by way of Sony's PlayMemories Mobile app. Establish a connection between the devices, open up the app and your mobile device acts as the camera's LCD. Included with each unit is a mount that clamps to the backside of a smartphone.

The QX100 is the high-end model, and it's quite a step up: at its core are the best bits of the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 II, based around the same 20MP 1-inch sensor and fast (at the wide end) Zeiss-branded zoom lens. The RX100 II's predecessor won a DPReview silver award when we reviewed it, and its excellent image quality was a major factor. In the RX100 II, Sony added a backside illuminated sensor to improve already good low-light performance, and our initial impressions of the updated model have been positive.

Sadly, although not surprisingly, the QX100 is a JPEG-only device. And not only is RAW mode unavailable, manual exposure control is limited too, to aperture priority and exposure compensation. There's no shutter priority mode here, nor fully manual (even though we can't see why there couldn't have been). HD video recording is available at 1440 x 1080 resolution, reduced from the standard 1920 x 1080 found in most compact cameras (including the RX100 II).

The RX100 II currently sells for $750; the QX100 has been introduced at $499.95. That's a sizable discount if you can live with the trimmed-down feature set.

Key specifications:

  • 20.2 effective megapixel 1.0" Exmor R BSI CMOS sensor
  • 28-100mm equivalent 3.6x optical zoom F1.8-4.9 lens
  • Limited manual control - aperture priority, auto and exposure compensation
  • Optical SteadyShot image stabilization
  • MicroSD card slot
  • NFC and Wi-Fi connectivity

Camera manufacturers are doing their best to make nice with mobile devices by adding Wi-Fi and NFC, but nobody has solved the dilemma yet. Sony's bold attempt with the QX100 isn't just to work with your smartphone, it's designed to become part of your smartphone. The QX100 aims to produce better photos and facilitate easier sharing, all from one device.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 160
12
comet suisei

I am sure a lot of Android and iPhone users will get this camera, the quality will be better than the latest announced Nokia phone and not only in resolution but also in terms of white balance, aperture control etc. it is far better than any other smartphone camera. Finally iPhone users & co. get their zoom as well

1 upvote
Stealthy Ninja

Except it won't work with an iPhone.

0 upvotes
SwedishPhoto

Wrong. It DOES work with iOS (iPhones) as well. Apparently NFC isn't needed (although preferred). On iPhone it uses the Playmemories app.

0 upvotes
dccdp

How does this work with a tablet? I would love to see it paired with my Nexus 7, which would work as a huge and very useful screen for a camera.

Does the app work with any Android or iOS device?

This is a great and very interesting concept, nice work Sony!

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Lars Rehm

works fine with my Nexus 4, so there's no reason it would not work with the Nexus 7. With the 7 the challenge will be to fix it to the device as the 'clamp' is not large enough. But you can always get some velcro ;-) The app you install is the same you need to connect to 'normal' Sony camera, like the RX100II, PlayMemories Mobile.

1 upvote
dccdp

Thanks a lot for your answer. This innovation really looks very tempting -- maybe future versions will have a larger clamp, although I can already imagine a few usage scenarios that would make good use of a tablet screen as it is.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
1 upvote
jcmarfilph

Why create something that would join the rubbish word of Photography? There is nothing to compete in there, just create a toy that will take snapshot and share it instantly if that is really needed. As for me, I would buy a phone and use it for phone calls, and buy a real camera for my photography.

1 upvote
comet suisei

This is a real camera, just read some reviews about the Sony DSC-RX100 II, you just get the possibility control it from your smartphone, and as non of the smartphones delivers comparable image quality it is more than a niche in the photo market!

2 upvotes
chj

So why don't you just get the RX100? Same price, it probably fits in a pocket more easily, you get RAW photos and more control. This is a ridiculous product that will only be bought by a few really silly people.

2 upvotes
naxos41

It is a ridiculous product for those who never want to share their RX100-grade photos instantly. For others, the concept is at least interesting, although, I would like to see them come in more portable forms.

1 upvote
Impulses

There's already more portable ways of sharing "RX100-grade" photos instantly though... You can either buy a newer model with Wifi/NFC built in, or you can hook up your RX100 to most Android phones with a 3 inch USB OTG cable and just select the pictures you wanna share from any file manager or file selection/attachment dialog. Probably takes less time than attaching this lens to your phone, and it certainly fits inside a pocket better.

I like the concept, just not the execution... I actually think the lower end model has more potential to woo the smartphone crowd just because the smaller size, lower price, and longer zoom will all grab their attention more than the RX100 sensor; mooch to

0 upvotes
Impulses

(blah, tapped post by mistake)

...much to the chagrin of the DP crowd.

1 upvote
eestlane

i like this idea with 300mm f4 and phone is not attatched to lens
so i cud take pictures pointing lens on to subject and looking myself another direction where i can see action from from phone screen
it wud be nice spylens system, 300mm f4 with sensor

maybe there are alradey some remote gadget fot 5dm3 or d800 to be away from camera and see what sees camera

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Gregory Kemp

I think this is a really cool idea, but I do have to agree with the reviewers conclusions. Lack of RAW support, ISO control, full hd video, among other features missing will prevent me from considering this model any further. Plus, I don't think I would want to be stuck with a camera that I can only control with my phone.

What I would love to see is an RX100 style compact, that also has the capability of pairing with your phone and can use the QX100 phone app. So basically your phone would be a remote display / controller, as well as giving you sharing abilities. That way, when you just want a normal compact you got it, but when you need those extra tricks this thing can do, you can have that too. Doesn't seem like it would be a big leap to integrate those features to an RX100 type model. Hope Sony will consider it, because I would be all over it!

2 upvotes
Rob Vermaas

Want you want is allready available in the RX100M2.
You can pair it to your iPhone or tablet exactly the same way as this lenscamera works
I have used it with my iPhone and iPad, works perfectly!

1 upvote
SwedishPhoto

Yes, but these lenses have one advantage. When you connect them to a NFC enabled Android phone, they connect in 1-2 seconds, and also automatically starts the PlayMemories app.

You attach the lens, and BaM, 1-2 seconds later you're set.
If only they shot RAW :-(

But for all the JPEG shooters out there (they are damn LEGION, outnumber us RAW shooters easily) this is nice. I like the innovation in this. I think all the damn nay sayers should try it first. But anyway, let's face it. If you're shooting in RAW, this ain't for you (primarily anyway).

0 upvotes
bluevellet

"oh my baby daughter is making her first smile!"

"Quick! Grab the smartphone!"

"Now where's the Sony lens... there it is!"

"let's attach both... wait for the connection... there!"

"ok now where's my daughter?"

"oh, phone's ringing now"

"ugh, that stupid lens is attached to the phone."

12 upvotes
AndyHWC

my thinking exactly. We just need the lens, not the whole bloody screen-less camera. Bright idea, wrong implemtation. Nokia 1020 or Samsung Galaxy NX are the kings for now.

Not to mention potential connection issue....

"oh my baby daughter is making her first smile!"

"Quick! Grab the smartphone!"

"Now where's the Sony lens... there it is!"

"let's attach both... wait for the connection... there!"

"ok now where's my daughter?"

"Oh, there she is... honey smile"

"ugh, Connection error, please check your NFC settings.

0 upvotes
Stealthy Ninja

Your comment doesn't really make much sense when you consider you could have just used the camera built into the phone... OHHHH!!! OK... yep, I agree. ;)

0 upvotes
SulfurousBeast

Why will not one use a GF6 or G6 with WiFi, NFC and full camera control using a mile device for more or less the same price. Still have full fledged interchangeable lens camera? What is new or innovative in this, other than removing all the ergonomic parts of a camera and just retaining the lens and sensor?

3 upvotes
AkDon

From my perspective as a iPhone 4S user, the idea of having a quality zoom lens is in fact an innovation that I'm happy to be looking into. Having had several Nikons, and most recently a Sony, all of which are substantial cameras, the pocket-ability of the iPhone has increased the likelihood of capturing a rare event. It shouldn't be lost on you that there are more images captured by iPhones alone, than ALL other brands of all other cameras combined.
Is the QC10 or QC100's bulk objectionable? I don't know, but when I can purchase one, I'll let you know.
Think outside your box, man...Sony clearly isn't making them for you. They didn't intend to cause your ire.

2 upvotes
Magic Man

I like it...

3 upvotes
gerard boulanger

Why they don't use the "flash" on the phone as an AF assist lamp?

2 upvotes
digifan

Very good idea.
In general this solution has potential. It's just the plain stupid who don't see the market.
But then again the photography world is full of dinosaurs clinging to their 35mmFF camera's as if they are the god of photography. It makes me laugh every time again.
Like someone above also said, this is innovation and thinking outside of the box. I love that.

2 upvotes
gerard boulanger

I thought "Carl" was out of the brand name, only "Zeiss" could stay..?

1 upvote
Wally Brooks

I want a version that shoots RAW. I have the Nikon V1 10 Mpixel and was disappointed in the JPEG only format. I only shoot RAW

1 upvote
odobo

funny that people keep complain about the missing of raw.... and forget about the idea of this camera is to take picture and share it on your phone right away. Raw will take away more time than needed to do that. Besides do you think editing raw is really necessary before you upload the pic to facebook? or if a quick edit on the jpeg is good enough?

4 upvotes
thx1138

Yeah we really need 20MP images to share on on our phone. Vomit has never looked so good.

3 upvotes
Richard Murdey

No reason to buy this $500 device if you are just uploading to facebook though...

7 upvotes
comet suisei

why just uploading to facebook? This is not a new smartphone, it is a camera which is controlled by your smartphone or ipad or notebook, the idea is really good and the sensor performs well in the DSC-RX100 II, so why complain about it?

1 upvote
kodachromeguy

The reason to save the RAW file is to be able to do more sophisticated processing in the future. If you are traveling light, such as on a business trip, you could share photos instantly but yet still have RAW files to take home.

0 upvotes
Gully Foyle

They forgot to put a mirror and a pentaprism and the OVF protruding just above the phone screen. Pfft, rubbish...!

2 upvotes
Marvol

But isn't the lack of manual control and ISO merely a deficiency in the app?
So a "firmware update" to the controlling app should remedy the problem.

Or a combined firmware upgrade, if the QX's themselves right now can't accept ISO changes/manual control.

As with the MyMemories store though, Sony should really open up its ecosystem. Let some 3rd party developers come up with a cool controller for these QX'es. Sell them like it's iTunes/Play and keep part of the profit, everybody happy.

0 upvotes
Richard Murdey

In an ideal world there would be an open standard to allow communication between smartphones and cameras. Then developers could write apps you could use with any camera, and you'd have a range of apps, from simple to advanced, to choose from.

0 upvotes
Marvol

It's interesting to me how all the naysayers - except the ones who want RAW - are divided over what is ACTUALLY wrong with these things.

To some they are too large, to some too expensive - but others want to add flash, EVF, zoom rings, whatnot; larger, more expensive.

The list of things that Sony *should really* have done is seemingly endless. Internal memory, connection with Sony smartphones, fixed wide angle lens, collapsible zoom, FF sensor, E-mount instead, more buttons... indicating to me that Sony (apart from leaving RAW off the QX-100) actually got it fairly right, on average.

2 upvotes
Richard Murdey

It's more-or-less a Ricoh GXR with the smartphone replacing the body unit. You lose the camera-like ergonomics, and gain ... ubiquity.

For the record I do think Sony got it fairly right. I just think that its not something a great many people are going to actually want to use "in real life".

1 upvote
digifan

Well I think Sony has got it right. (and I'm not a Sony fan)
Think of the possibilities of selling larger batteries with back for the phones. The clamps for different phones and I could go on. RAW could be added later incl other software related tidbits. This is but the first iteration so ....
Yeah, I can see it's potential.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
zodiacfml

My jaw just dropped......did they really used/tested this outside work?

I had an idea similar to this while thinking deeply of Sony's capability to reduce the size of electronics such as the NEX and the RX1. I thought that a future camera form factor would be similar only larger, the size of an APSC and Full Frame lens while the other end would provide an Evf/LCD. Ergonomics, almost similar to holding a Sony camcorder with a small strap.

Clearly they wanted to provide zoom capability to a smartphone but what they did here just baffles me. Sony, here's what you do:
1)Nokia Pureview 808 (Prime+high quality ultra compact Zeiss lens+One inch sensor=high quality digital zoom)
2) Get rid of the memory card - internal memory 16gb/32 gb
Now it will be thinner,lighter, cheaper, faster, and will just look way better

0 upvotes
micahmedia

Yeah, that's all crap. Except for raw, Sony got this right.

This sensor gives better results and almost any zoom length (20mp vs 40mp is only a 25% difference in resolution. Even at the wide end they're going to look similar).

I won't touch anything that I can't take the card out of. I can't see any reason to prefer on-board memory. If it breaks, your pics are stuck. If I want a fast download or to pop it in something with a memory slot, I can pull the card. Why get rid of that incredibly useful functionality?! No, I think Sony was smart making the memory removable.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Stealthy Ninja

I honestly don't think a micro SD card is going to add all that much to the weight/size, plus it gives you the option of pulling out the card and using a card reader (or having more than one card).

0 upvotes
Mike Sandman

Wrong turn, Sony. If I'm willing to carry two devices, #1 will be my smartphone and #2 wlll be a small camera that I can fully control - a Canon Powershot 1xx or an almost-small Sony NEX 3 or 5. And a cylindrical clip-on makes no sense, as users will find out the first time it rolls off a table.

BUT: The NFC part is interesting. How about giving me a camera that I can control fully with NFC-enabled my smartphone, and let me compose the image on the phone's screen??

0 upvotes
wetsleet

" How about giving me a camera that I can control fully with NFC-enabled my smartphone, and let me compose the image on the phone's screen??"

Isn't that exactly what this device does do? Or did I miss something?

3 upvotes
ntsan

GF6/G6 have NFC feature and you have full control over the camera

2 upvotes
otterman

The lack of raw support alone is a deal-breaker for me. Next....

3 upvotes
caygreen

Really excited about this when I saw it a couple of weeks ago - good quality images for not much weight. great solution for backpacking - always have your phone with you anyway (ipod/gps/phone, etc). but... no RAW on a £400 camera just isnt on. Ok, you can *share* straight away, but you might also want to tweek when you get home. I certainly would, but jpeg only means may as well just tick with phone camera. I wonder if RAW could be included in a firmware update...?

0 upvotes
peevee1

They need a small EVF at the back, and then no need to take smartphone out of your pocket, power it up etc.

0 upvotes
vtinitus

What I'd like to see is a sensor/nex mount of similar design with full support for af lenses through a adapter. I don't care too much about the clamp either. Wifi offers much more and truly disconnected opportunities

0 upvotes
sportyaccordy

Seems like we are going to run through a lot of bad ideas before arriving at the inevitable most logical conclusion (largish sensor cameraphone). Nikon's V1 system would still be with us today if they had introduced it as an Android phone (and came with a pancake lens- I don't know what the lineup was). An "RX-10" APS-C camera from Sony would be a hot item with a thin design, collapsable fixed focal length lens and full on 4G phone capabilities. Hell, even if it were thicker I wouldn't mind- most of my phones (Ericsson P800/900, Treo 650, G1) have been pretty thick; I think serious photographers would be OK with a bigger phone if it could take pictures like a "real" camera.

I suppose Sony deserves credit for taking a risk, but it was a stupid risk and doesn't really address any of the issues facing phone photography. If I have to bring an extra device that won't fit in my pocket I will bring my cheaper, easier to use, faster NEX-C3 + kit lens.

0 upvotes
Revenant

The Nikon 1 system is still with us today with three current models.

1 upvote
yabokkie

not a good idea unless the module can be attached to the phone for hours while the user is on the move, playing twitter/facebook, and making phone calls, or it will be little more than a smaller P&S (the user will have to take care of a separate device) and worse it cannot be used without a phone.

I'd prefer a CCM = conformal camera module similar to Nokia 808 but more powerful, better be powered by the battery of the phone (like USB).

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ThomasSwitzerland

I admire the courage and the bold move to exploit a smartphone as user interface. Android 4.x is quite mature now.

I take many pictures with the Samsung Note 2 while on the move, but – do not get the IQ I really want.

For flexibility I could now take the lens/sensor combo into the pocket. The smartphone is with me anyway. Traditional cameras look inferior for such situations: More bulk plus the phone.

I see a major trend being opened. Simple but great idea nobody thought of to date. Congratulations to Sony for this true innovation.

4 upvotes
skytripper

Clever idea, but this is a niche product if ever there was one. Most people who have an extra $500 in their pockets would quite rightly prefer using it to buy a real camera instead of a glorified add-on for their smartphone.

1 upvote
rare wolf

As soon as the next crop of P&S cameras, m43 cameras, and others similar come out with better connectivity to our smart phones and tablets, these "clip-on" cameras will all but be forgotten.

1 upvote
Raist3d

I have to call fail. I went from fail to "ok maybe this makes sense" to "mm no."

Here are the issues as I see them:
- Now you have to worry about not one but TWO batteries and charges. I don't like the idea of my phone getting battery dead because I was taking shots.
- The "cool" aspect and possibilities of this combo is to use the lens/sensor in a different position from the LCD/viewfinder as shown in the shot- and here's the biggest problem-

How is this any different from the latest Olympus, Sony's own RX100 MK2, and more to come cameras? What exactly is the difference?

- Finally- give me some buttons and levels (mechanical) over full on touch screen control any day. There's something to be said about camera response, muscle memory here and the ability to change settings while *looking* at a view finder 100% - not obscure it with touching here and there.

It makes business sense if enough people think "it's kewl" whether it's good or not.

2 upvotes
Marvol

" I don't like the idea of my phone getting battery dead because I was taking shots."

This makes no sense. The thing has its own battery and therefore probably drains your phone's battery less than it would from taking its own pictures. If anything it will save the phone battery from draining.

0 upvotes
Snowbird_UT

Too bad they stripped this little sucker down....looked like a great little twist on imaging. Heck, I could even forgive the lack of RAW files but the removal of things as basic as manual settings, focus peaking and ISO make this a no-go for most enthusiasts.

1 upvote
thecameraeye

I don't personally think RAW is a forgivable omission. And that combined with the lack of manual control really makes it an uninteresting proposition. I think Sony bungled this one up.

2 upvotes
GodSpeaks

I see little point in this 'camera' given it's size. I also see little point in putting a 1" sensor in it and then NOT allowing raw capture (or full HD video).

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
wetsleet

The picture of the woman with red fingernails grasping the phone firmly by the screen and rear face show one possible problem. Ultra-thin smartphones with edge-to-edge touch-sensitive screens are awkward to hold in camera mode anyway, they need to be held gingerly by their emaciated edges whilst avoiding all brushes against the screen. So her firm front-to-back grip, whilst ergonomically desirable, is a no-no.

I'd prefer if it was designed to be grasped singlehanded by the throat of the camera, complete with physical shutter button, leaving the other hand free to make control adjustments via the touchscreen as required. A much steadier and surer grip.

PS
Why can't it use the LED 'torch' function available on most smartphones as a focus assist lamp?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
wetsleet

Ah! I now see that the lens does indeed incorporate a shutter button of its own. So maybe it is possible to wield the assembly by grasping the lens, rather than trying (as illustrated) to hold it all by the slender phone only.

0 upvotes
George Sears

After reading the review of the Nokia with the 41MP sensor, that seems like a more refined way to go, and closer to being practical. I think a sensor in the premium small sensor category (Panny LX-7 size) would be a whole lot more practical. The 'year later, paid down fixed costs' price needs to be about $200. If the module were smaller it would work better as a standalone sports vid camera, maybe with a housing. Lots of potential, but this seems like an over-reach in terms of the sensor vs. quality tradeoff. I doubt Sony will go away on this. They clearly are doing the interesting stuff, leaving Canon (in particular) spinning out in the curves.

0 upvotes
stevez

Is time really that precious that we can't just send our pictures to our phone via a WIFI enabled camera or card? Sorry, but it makes no sense to me. Seems like this will be added to another "back to the future" article very soon.

1 upvote
pede59

My first impression: I'd rather have a WiFi enabled camera like the RX100II and a control app for my smartphone. To me this is more of a software challenge. Sure - you are saving an LCD screen but to me the QX cameras look rather awkward.
In addition - if really the use case is to allow fast sharing of photos then why use an expensive and rather high quality camera? I have not really followed quality of smart phone cams vs. P&S cameras. If i take my iPhone4 as comparison there is a lot of ground between it and an RX100. I'd say that if sharing is the target i'd start with something that is in terms of quality spec'ed for that.

1 upvote
dbateman

Dpreview, if you have the Samsung NX camera (yes expensive) But please test it with this lens to see if it works!

I think that would be interesting to have move anywhere lens linked up to a real camera with a view finder.

0 upvotes
tkbslc

Just get an LCD finder for your phone then.

0 upvotes
jkrumm

Still seems a rather odd solution compared to a compact Sony camera with built in wireless. Perhaps in future models they will figure it out. For now, this looks destined for the 2023 edition of DPR's digital camera history article.

3 upvotes
h2k

If Sony doesn't vamp up their app - making ISO control and Raw files available - would it be possible to control the thing with third-party apps or any kind of "hacks"?

3 upvotes
ProfHankD

PlayMemories is really the weak link in this chain -- as lack of tether support has been a weak point for most Sony cameras. Sony should not only improve the PlayMemories app, but provide an open API that will allow wireless tethering of this and all their wifi-enabled cameras with essentially all camera functions remotely accessible. For example, why not provide a software interface that lets the standard Android camera API ( http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/media/camera.html ) control it? That would enable all sorts of 3rd-party app development. Presumably the same API would then also work for things like the latest NEX models, giving a nice upgrade path....

1 upvote
rishi o'

What this review didn't talk about is what is gained by using a modular camera/lens combined with a smartphone. You get the Camera SDK so that you can write custom android apps for it. I think this is more about the software than the hardware. Tons of possibilities.

3 upvotes
PhotoPoet

Nice vivisection concept. But no thanks. I have the RX100 and sadly many other cameras of varying sizes. Even with the RX100 in my backpack I have a tendency to reach for my iPhone. As mentioned in another post, I print rarely, I share daily. I am a committed iAll gadgeteer. I will await the time in the near future when the lens tech allows for optical zoom on an iPhone and then I'll have it all. As I was typing it popped into my head when and why I need my D7000, speed. Birds landing on the water, sporting events (even the amazing Snappy Cam app not good enough), my kids, kids running around, etc. I do not wish to lug a "lens" around, thanks Sony but no...I'll just phone it in....

0 upvotes
h2k

Thx for letting all of us know.

1 upvote
tkbslc

This doesn't really solve any of the current problems for the user because you still have to carry two devices. Not only that, but now you still have two devices, but your camera can't be used without your phone. So you can't ever just go out with your camera as a single device.

Also consider that in the time it takes to snap the camera on your phone and start the camera app, you could have powered on your regular camera, taken the photo, powered down and gone on your way.

I think pairing a real camera with a smartphone via NFC and WiFi makes more sense. It gives you a more powerful camera for regular use, and still allows for all the functionality of this setup.

6 upvotes
Lucas_

"I think pairing a real camera with a smartphone via NFC and WiFi makes more sense. It gives you a more powerful camera for regular use, and still allows for all the functionality of this setup"
-Just get the RX100 II then and you're done...!

1 upvote
tkbslc

Exactly my point, not sure what benefit this is adding over existing products.

0 upvotes
vadimraskin

I like the idea of it a lot. The first thought was that it would be perfect for my wife who is always out taking pictures with her G12 AND iPhone 5 (one pic for later and one to share on FB right away). If she can do both conviniently, G12 would most likely stay home most of the time. $500 is a bit steep, though and the idea that she would have to clip and un-clip the lens all the time, establish the connection, etc to take pictures will most likely not be popular with her and many like her.
One way to find out: order on Amazon, try and return if this product doesn't meet her expectations.

2 upvotes
tkbslc

The Canon G16 has built in WiFi that can share photos anywhere via an app on her iphone.

0 upvotes
vadimraskin

true but it means she will stall have to carry two devices and add a hustle of picture transfer. Eye-Fi SD cards are even cheaper but still don't solve the problem. The path that Sony opened might lead to some very "pancake" like zoom lenses that could be easily attached to the phone and left on it for some time. That would solve the problem. Let's wait and see.

0 upvotes
Lucas_

" $500 is a bit steep, though"
I agree, there's where the QX10 ( $250 ) comes in as a great value!

0 upvotes
jpuglise

Besides the lack of control and no raw, it would have been nice to have a flash on this unit (unless I am incorrect) I did not see one. Also, can you use the app to trigger the shutter or will it only fire from the camera? That would be BAD! IMHO this product might have a chance (even with all the other draw backs) if these two things were included. I could then see using it remotely (on a monopod or remotly mounted) and being able to capture shots that I could not get otherwise (think animals, street photos, sports, etc...). And we all know how poor the quality is on any phone LED flash. That having been said, if there is no strobe on the unit, perhaps the app could at least sync and fire the phone flash in order to provide some lighting support...

0 upvotes
Philip Corlis

Sony has an uncanny ability to underestimate the target markets for their products. This camera is a bold and daring idea - perfect for all sorts of applications including travel and street photography. Heck - pair it up with an iPad Mini and you've go a good starting place for a digital field camera.

Unfortunately Sony has crippled this little dude so badly it will probably become a footnote in history. Heck - anyone willing too settle for a glorified point and shoot will be happy enough with the camera that's already on their smartphone.

I understand market segmentation, I just don't understand Sony's take on it.

6 upvotes
Lucas_

Smartphone cameras actually still have really lousy IQ, even when compared to P&S, with very few exceptions. IMHO most are just to help in a situation when you can't reach to a camera and need instant sharing. Anyway, it looks like Sony is testing the market and if it turns out that the QX's have a reasonable acceptance we'll soon see upgraded versions through firmwares and new models. Other brands will certainly jump in too!

2 upvotes
tinzi1

When it rings while in the middle of shooting, picking it up and having this whole set-up up the face/ear would be a scene :)

5 upvotes
chj

WTF the price is ridiculous, you can just get a RX100

5 upvotes
Duncan Dimanche

Exactly my thought !! hahaha insane !
I don't get why this is better than a normal point and shoot cam with Wifi..... arfh !

0 upvotes
Just a Photographer

So you have your phone in your pocket, but where do you want to leave the lens//camera? I don't think this is going to work.

1 upvote
Red5TX

Not sure who the target market is for this thing. Enthusiasts will just get an RX100II. Consumers won't appreciate the improved IQ and will just use their phone's camera -- especially at $500. So who buys this?

5 upvotes
neo_nights

People said many negative things about the RX100 as well. And yet, I think it was one of the best sold Sony cameras.

Things like these sensor-cameras we will simply have to wait and see.

4 upvotes
Bill Bentley

I can't see a tripod mount anywhere. There certainly is the space for one. I think it would be helpful for a device like this.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler

There is a tripod mount on the bottom.

4 upvotes
neo_nights

There is a tripod mount.

Richard was few seconds faster than me :p

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
1 upvote
spencerda

It appears the only positive gain for a system like that is instant sharing of pictures, everything eles IS a BIG step back, over than say carrying a RX 100. Bulky, unballance, two parts, loss of functions, in my view only people who want the latest gizzmos will buy.

The way to go is make Wifi on ca,eras better for photo sharing..

I think it's good Sony is adventusome, all credit for pushing the envelope, but this ideal will fail....

To quote a GF do thay think we are stupit!
Laughing....

Dave

0 upvotes
hjulenissen

The most positive part of this product:
It might force Sony to update the PlayMemories application (or even open up its APIs), some thing that would (for most other companies except Sony) be a good thing for my RX100M2 camera.

1 upvote
Polariser

Samsung got it right with their integrated Samsung galaxy camera design.

This contraption looks as if the lens/camera could easily fall off if you tried to answer the phone - an expensive mistake.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 160
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