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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF6 Preview

April 2013 | By Richard Butler, Andy Westlake
Buy on GearShop$448.00


Preview based on a pre-production Panasonic DMC-GF6

It's taken a couple of generations of camera for manufacturers to really work out who wants to buy mirrorless cameras and, as a result, what features they should offer. Panasonic's GF series has slalomed around the demographics before arriving at a similar conclusion to that reached by several of its rivals - a small camera that can work as a point-and-shoot, but with some expectation that the user might want to take more control over it.

By this we mean that the GF6 is a small camera with a compact kit zoom, flip-out screen and a dedicated mode dial - a very similar set of features to those offered by the Olympus E-PL5 and Sony's NEX-3N. This puts the GF6 somewhere between the enthusiast-friendly GF1 and the more point-and-shoot orientated GF5. But, while it gains features that will appeal both to the point-and-shoot and the take-control crowd, the GF6's trump card is Wi-Fi. Or, more specifically, the best implementation of Wi-Fi to hit the market so far.

In common with a couple of recent Panasonic compacts, the GF6 gains Near-Field Communication (NFC), through which the camera can establish a conventional Wi-Fi connection simply by tapping devices together. NFC is a very short-range means of exchanging data that allows the camera to share details of its Wi-Fi connection with compatible smartphones or tablets. The list of compatible devices includes many recent Android devices, though Apple has yet to embrace the technology.

In addition to an extra control point provided by a top-plate zoom lever encircling the shutter button, the GF6 gains an additional customizable Fn button on its rear, plus another two on a 'pull-out' tab on its touch screen. These direct controls come in addition to the camera's user-definable Q.Menu. Equally, though, the camera retains its point-and-shoot-friendly iA button that provides one-button access to the camera's fully-automated mode.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF6 key specifications

  • 16MP Four Thirds sensor (as used in GX1)
  • Tilting 'Cell-touch LCD' touchscreen - 1.04m dots (720 x 480 pixels)
  • Near-field communication (NFC) to simplify Wi-Fi connection
  • Mode dial and four customizable function buttons (two on-screen)
  • 1080p30 video as MP4 or AVCHD (presented as 60i PsF in AVCHD mode)
  • Jog lever around shutter button (which operates zoom or exposure compensation)
  • Sensitivity expandable up to ISO 25,600
  • Faster startup (as quick as 0.5 sec with non-power-zoom lenses)

The GF6 is the second mirrorless camera we've seen to gain a compact-camera-style zoom lever around the shutter button but, whereas the Sony NEX-3N is often bundled with a power zoom lens, the same isn't true for the GF6. However, when you attach a conventional zoom lens, it instead controls exposure compensation. This makes a lot of sense to us, since arguably the most useful additional property a point-and-shoot user might want to gain control over, simply, is image brightness.

Many of the camera's basic specs have also been upgraded over its predecessor - the rear screen is a higher-resolution panel, but it's what's in front of it that users are likely to notice. The touch capability is now capacitive, rather than the GF5's pressure-sensitive design, and the front glass has been attached without an air gap, reducing internal reflection and improving visibility. This more precise touch screen allows the implementation of touch-based photo editing (including a Clear Retouch mode that attempts to remove distracting object s from your images, which sadly we haven't been able to test yet). The screen also tilts, both downwards for overhead shooting and upwards to face forwards for self-portrait shots.

NFC-simplified Wi-Fi connection

Connecting the GF6 to a an NFC-equipped smartphone is as simple as starting the Panasonic Image App, pressing the Wi-Fi button on the camera and tapping the two devices together. NFC works over such short distances it may take a couple of attempts to locate the antenna on your smart device, but once located, it's all pretty simple.

If your device doesn't have NFC, the process involves manually selecting the right Wi-Fi connection in your phone's settings, then typing in a fairly long password (as is the case with most Wi-Fi cameras). Once you've paired your devices, the camera will remember the connection to speed up the process in future.

The Panasonic Image App on iOS gives a live view image and allows you to set the focus point, take the exposure or control the zoom if you're using a power zoom lens. The equivalent app for Android also gives the option to control manual focus. Panasonic says the apps will also give the ability to control exposure parameters (as is the case with the Lumix Link app for the GH3).
 
Both apps also allow you to view the contents of the camera's memory card and transfer images (at various sizes) across to the 'phone.  

The Panasonic Image App gives a pretty good level of control over the camera - allowing the user to position the camera's focus point, control a power zoom lens and the ability to control exposure (though this didn't appear to be available when we tried the currently-available version of the app). Once a shot is taken, it can be uploaded across to your smartphone - either at full or reduced resolution.

In addition to smartphone connections, the GF6 allows you to create an account on Panasonic's Lumix Club cloud service. With this established, you can send images up to Lumix Club by connecting to a local Wi-Fi router, with the option that they are then posted on to various popular social networks, via Lumix Club. Alternatively, if you're connected to the same Wi-Fi network as your computer, you can get the camera to push all your images across to your computer as you shoot.

Compact 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 kit zoom lenses

Panasonic's latest compact 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 II kit zoom (center), compared to its predecessor (left) and the 14-42mm powerzoom (right).

The GF6's compact size is complemented by a couple of the smallest zooms available for any interchangeable-lens cameras. The basic kit zoom is the recently-announced Lumix G Vario 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 II ASPH Mega OIS, which is on of the smallest around that features conventional rotary zoom and focus rings (it's about the same size as Olympus's collapsible M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 II R).

The GF6 can also be used with the tiny 'pancake' Lumix G X Vario PZ 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS powerzoom, which can be controlled by its top-plate zoom lever for very compact camera-like operation. As can be seen in the comparison above, both are considerably smaller than Panasonic's previous 14-42mm kit zoom, which is pretty typical in size for its type.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 99
Luminar
By Luminar (Jul 3, 2013)

or can you please point me on a camera mirrorless, with hot shue, external microphone, maual exposure for video and interchangeable-lens? it would be awzome your opinion

0 upvotes
Luminar
By Luminar (Jul 3, 2013)

question, does the video is manual exposure? please let me know,

0 upvotes
Luminar
By Luminar (Jul 3, 2013)

question, does it have hot shue? external microphone?

0 upvotes
buri pakath
By buri pakath (Jul 22, 2013)

Bless you!!

3 upvotes
franzeez
By franzeez (Apr 25, 2013)

Does either GF6 or G5 have manual kelvin settings for difficult lighting situations when needed?

0 upvotes
mediasorcerer
By mediasorcerer (Apr 15, 2013)

Thankyou for the review, good read, shame it seems to have no option for an add on viewfinder, guess you can't have everything though.[considering size and price etc]
Bet it shoots a nice image none the less, it's just that bright daylight that kills viewing the rear screen i find.

0 upvotes
wlsinwi
By wlsinwi (Apr 14, 2013)

I have some concerns about the tilt mechanism also. The exposed ribbon cable is an issue too. It's larger and heavier which I don't like either. The good news is that the GF5 is available at a huge discount and represents a terrific value.

0 upvotes
CNY_AP
By CNY_AP (Apr 12, 2013)

The comparable Sony is only 9.5 ounces. I haven't check lens weight. The NEX are somewhat popualr to use on muti-rotrs ("drones").

I found elsewhere a picture of the LCD. The arms are scary - will they break too easily? And I surmise the wiring runs inside the arms, so the wiring might fail even if the arms don't...

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Axel Vercauteren
By Axel Vercauteren (Apr 12, 2013)

So Panny got rid of the awkward rear dial, good news!

0 upvotes
rocklobster
By rocklobster (Apr 11, 2013)

This camera gives M4/3 fans another option where the Olympus E-PL5 may turn off some buyers with the lack of built-in flash and smaller effective screen size. However, my experience with the E-PM1 and the clip on flash is a very minor compromise and I just carry the flash around in my pocket if I may need it.

A big step forward from the GF5 especially with the 16Mp sensor.

P.S. When will Olympus step up and produce a pancake power zoom - may be even smaller than the Panasonic as it does not need OIS on Oly cameras.

Cheers

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Jun 10, 2013)

Sadly after owning the e-m5 and the gx1 i would still take an e-pl5 as olympus is far far ahead in the focusing and low light department. Panasonic need to get back in the game.

0 upvotes
lorenzo de medici
By lorenzo de medici (Apr 11, 2013)

A decently written introduction, as usual you can't judge a camera on specs, you have to wait for a hands on full review with test shots. I don't see the need for the words "presumably faux-retro". Didn't you take any writing courses in university? "Presumably" is unnecessary and pretentious, and please define "faux-retro". Is that retro styling that really isn't? I agree that the silver top plate is a retro touch. That's all it is.

2 upvotes
chillgreg
By chillgreg (Apr 11, 2013)

First you compliment the article, then pick it apart for utilizing the phrase "presumably faux-retro" which makes perfect sense used in the context of the camera market. Presumably is accurate since Panasonic haven't (to my knowledge) defined why they have altered their design language to include a silver top panel. As the rest of the camera is not retro, this can be "presumed" to follow the recent popularity of true retro designs from Olympus and Fujifilm. So fake or false or faux-retro is accurate and relevant.

The statement "I don't see the need..." could do with more work. Using the first person can create the impression of arrogance or superiority, which can be off-putting and distracting; was that your intention? Try "However the need for the phrase "presumably faux-retro" is debatable" or similar, you might get a more positive reaction from your audience.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
chillgreg
By chillgreg (Apr 11, 2013)

Lastly the inclusion of the word "pretentious", and the university reference, is a rather rude and thinly-veiled slur on the author, and only results in the destruction of the credibility you tried so hard to attain.

2 upvotes
RichRMA
By RichRMA (Apr 11, 2013)

I prefer the G cameras over the GF series. I don't see the point in losing the EVF or having to buy an clip-on one later.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Apr 13, 2013)

> having to buy an clip-on one later.

you don't buy a clip-on with each camera. you just get one and use it with all new cameras you buy later.

0 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Apr 13, 2013)

You don't se the pont? here is a simple one: the clip-on comes with the camera & try puting a G camera even with the 20mm 1.7 in your jacket pocket, difficult is it not? That is why the GF line is there for, for those who want to be able to slip it in they're pocket. For example if your worried about some shady charachters, slip it quckly in your pocket or if your in the bad part of town & are trying to get to the "good" part, it stays hidden if robbers are nearby

0 upvotes
Rowland Scherman
By Rowland Scherman (Apr 10, 2013)

I like the looks of the GX better. As long as the sensor is the same, why the new design? I don't like roundish humps on the top plate of any camera.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Apr 10, 2013)

besides personal tastes, I think it's a good thing that Pana and Sony choose modern industral design over retro ones like Fuji or Oly. they feel confident that they have good cameras (to me, retro design means diffident minor player).

personally I like Pana m4/3" ones more but the image quality.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Apr 13, 2013)

well it is not a new design per say, the GF series have since the GF2 i believe had an even bigger hump but I agree even though I use the olympus M43rds I really like the shape of the GX1.

0 upvotes
Thomas Kachadurian
By Thomas Kachadurian (Apr 10, 2013)

Yawn. talk about a giant step backward. Where's the viewfinder port? Isn't that a mistake Olympus made way back with the E-P1 and never again.

0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 11, 2013)

You're mixing the ranges up - GX has a viewfinder, GF doesn't.

0 upvotes
47872Mike
By 47872Mike (9 months ago)

GF-1 and GF-2: viewfinder port.

GF-3,5,6: no viewfinder port.

The GF range is mixed up and has been positioned gradually downmarket.

0 upvotes
Holgs
By Holgs (Apr 10, 2013)

"It's taken a couple of generations of camera for manufacturers to really work out who wants to buy mirrorless cameras and, as a result, what features they should offer. "

Actually Panasonic got it pretty right first time around with the GF1 & has since taken about 5 steps backwards with the GF & GX series. The key to that cameras success was the combination of body & lens - the 20mm f1.7 was critical to the success of the camera - without it any of the GF cameras are really just so-so bodies with mediocre lenses.

They lack the Olympus rivals in-camera IS, so if you have to buy an extra lens for decent performance, the Olympus bodies are a better choice. For enthusiasts, there really hasn't been a decent compact Panasonic camera worth buying since the GF1. Attempt #6 doesn't really change anything.

If Panasonic really want to have some success in the GF series, its time to upgrade the 20mm 1.7 & include it as a kit lens again.

3 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 11, 2013)

How is the GX a step back? Name a single way it's a step backwards compared to the GF1.

2 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Apr 13, 2013)

Andy Crowe it does not have that hump ;3 (but yea i like the gx1's design more)

0 upvotes
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (Apr 10, 2013)

Despite some criticisms here like always whatever camera is, consumer or pro, this Panasonic Lumix GF6 is a good improvement.

I think they could have not put much more in a real small camera, the built in EVF will be for the GX line, or whatever they are going to call it.

Well done Panasonic Lumix.

2 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Apr 13, 2013)

bah full frame sensor is the minimum requirement now, heck put a medium format in there (is just making a terrible joke) But yea I am very happy where micro four thirds is going, now we just need Prime lenses that are 200mm and more instead of terribly unsharp telephotos.

0 upvotes
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (Apr 14, 2013)

Micro 4/3 already has good long focal length zooms, and they are sharp. But a new Panasonic Lumix 150mm f/2.8 (300mm) is on the way.

1 upvote
Justtimthen
By Justtimthen (Apr 10, 2013)

It's a little fatter and weighs more? It might be a better picture taker but I want the same thing just smaller. plus second generation power zoom then I'll be heading off to the shops.

0 upvotes
mvdude
By mvdude (Apr 10, 2013)

The G6 is right around the corner, but still no sign of the promised G5 review on this site. I'd be happy just to see the RAW studio scene comparisons for the G5.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 10, 2013)

See GH2 comparisons - the same sensor. Lack of the review is strange though.

0 upvotes
Thomas22
By Thomas22 (Apr 10, 2013)

I don't believe that the G5 and GH2 have the same sensor. The GH2's sensor hasthe "variable aspect ratio" feature that was also present on the GH1, and the G5 does not.

0 upvotes
Mister J
By Mister J (Apr 10, 2013)

G5 is nice - lightweight, with good ergonomics.

0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Apr 10, 2013)

G5 does have the GH2 sensor, but it doesn't take advantage of its larger size to provide "true" multi-aspect ratios. The total number of photo sites on the G5 sensor is 18.3 MP, same as the GH2, which is a good indication that it's the same oversized sensor.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Apr 10, 2013)

cannot say "true" multi-aspect is a good thing. it is however an interesting that worths a try.

0 upvotes
vroger1
By vroger1 (Apr 9, 2013)

Certainly not a replacement for the GX1- VRR

0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 11, 2013)

No it's not, that's the point of having different lines. The GX2 will be a replacement for the GX1, the GF6 is a replacement for the GF5.

0 upvotes
chrisnfolsom
By chrisnfolsom (Apr 9, 2013)

I would like to see this in a pocket with the zoom - so small, but pretty expensive for the specs - they can't charge too much for 4/3rds cameras, but it seems they still want to keep them well above compacts....Seems like a pretty complete package overall for a hopefully pocket-able package.

1 upvote
ThomasSwitzerland
By ThomasSwitzerland (Apr 9, 2013)

I have Panasonic cameras in use. Sometimes, I am an early adopter. I would like true innovations from Panasonic not case transformations. Some Sony/Olympus tilt screen here and there. I would like a better sensor – more dynamic range and color sensitivity.

This camera is a horrible “me too” product low point. But I will stick with Pana because of their smooth design and ergonomic handling. And I still continue to put the hope into Panasonic which I lost with Olympus.

Otherwise – with little more bulk, but great pictures – the wonderful Nikon D5200 will do the job for me now.

Come on, Panasonic, get out, and make a better jump with your cameras to convince the markets.

1 upvote
Chatokun
By Chatokun (Apr 9, 2013)

Well, they have that new sensor technology to replace color filters, which should increase light sensitivity (sounds like they claim a whole stop). Hopefully that will start hitting m43 sensors by the next Gen.

1 upvote
Flaimelion
By Flaimelion (Apr 20, 2013)

If you look at the panasonic website and compare the older gf5 is increases the resolution from 12.1 to 16 mp so they are improving over older models of the same line.

0 upvotes
LMNCT
By LMNCT (Apr 9, 2013)

No built-in viewfinder and no provision for an add-on. Too bad. Will wait to see what the GX2 looks like.

0 upvotes
ssh33
By ssh33 (Apr 9, 2013)

The body is going to be $200 in a year like all other GFs. This is pretty awesome for $200, don't you think?

On a side note: the flash sucks if pointed at your subject, but you can jam it in or hold it with your finger to point upwards for a nice bounce. Jamming trick worked for me on an old Oly PL1 and Panasonic GF2, it will probably work on others of the same line. I wish bounced flash was a FEATURE cause it makes a world of difference.

1 upvote
Chatokun
By Chatokun (Apr 9, 2013)

It is on the GX1(you can lock it in bounce position), so it's possible. I wouldn't know until I or someone else has it in hand.

1 upvote
plasnu
By plasnu (Apr 9, 2013)

This would be a mainstream design, but it looks ugly and cheap to me...

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 9, 2013)

"The overall result is a camera that ends up looking extremely similar to the Sony NEX-3N in terms of both control layout and features. "

Actually it is closer to NEX-5r:
1) WiFi
2) Touch screen
3) Weight (although even 5r is lighter - not counting its big 18-55 kit lens, but 3n is lighter still).

0 upvotes
eivissa1
By eivissa1 (Apr 10, 2013)

The Sony NEX-3n will definitely beat this Panny in photo quality, right? Bigger sensor for starters. The Sony is also smaller (the lens) and cheaper.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Apr 9, 2013)

Perhaps Panasonic will soon announce a G6, and maybe even a GH4. Great: no need to complete full reviews for the GH3, G5, or GF5.

4 upvotes
Shamael
By Shamael (Apr 9, 2013)

By the way, launch price with the new 14-42 lens is 680$. Sony will have a big smile for this one then.

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 9, 2013)

Yeah, NEX-3N is $500, and that is with 16-50 PZ.

Although $680 - isn't it UK price converted to USD?

1 upvote
Chatokun
By Chatokun (Apr 9, 2013)

Yes, Amazon has it at $599 preorder.

0 upvotes
martyvis
By martyvis (Apr 9, 2013)

Why would Sony smile? Panasonic have produced a much better camera system for only a slightly premium on the price. M4/3 has a much better value and capability with lots of 3rd party support. With this type of camera as well as G, GH and OM-D "SLR style" Sony will be further seen as a niche product

1 upvote
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Apr 14, 2013)

The GF6 has WiFi, nicer menus, more and better controls, including a more useful touch screen. The NEX-3N & lens are smaller, lighter, cheaper, have more useful photography modes and features, have a better zoom range, a powered zoom, a bigger, better sensor, and costs a hundred dollars less. If this were the same price as the Sony the fight would be interesting. Buyers at this price point don't often buy a whole bunch of lenses, so that advantage of MFT doesn't matter much. In any case, a big upgrade for the previously pathetic GF line. Back to its glory days, even? Makes me wonder if there is any need for a GX1 replacement, unless they move it way upscale, with a built-in evf to compete better with the NEX-6. I hope so as I like MFT and we need a stronger lineup from Panasonic or it is doomed.

1 upvote
Shamael
By Shamael (Apr 9, 2013)

what is strange is that in the presentation report, you wrote, "The DMC-GF6 integrates new 16.00-megapixel Live MOS sensor", and here you claim it to be the old GX1 type. If it really has the GX1 sensor, there is no reason to make noise for this camera. If, on the other side it has the OMD sensor, it could be of interest, and, if it has that very new Pana sensor with special filtering system, then it get of very high interest. Old shoes with new tyres are out of fashion.

1 upvote
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Apr 9, 2013)

I could be wrong but I think the sensor is really newly made.

I have no doubt that OMD's sensor is made by Pana.

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Chatokun
By Chatokun (Apr 9, 2013)

Several sources have said that it's the GX1 sensor with an updated processing Engine. an updated engine can help some, but the GF series is supposed to be mostly entry level. While I'd have preferred for them to put in a new sensor, they probably tried to save money by using their own sensor. The GH3/OMD/EPL5/EPM2 have Sony sensors, which would probably cost more.

They instead seem to be trying to attract with:
Over Pen: Built in flash
Over GF: Articulated screen that can front face
Over both: Wifi and NFC connection to tablet/phone, video is probably better, has stereo input built on

For me, not enough incentive, but it might attract m43 newcomers.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 9, 2013)

It is not OM-D/E-PL5/E-PM2/GH3 sensor. Those have 17.2 megapixels on-sensor and crop to 4608 x 3456 effective in 4:3 max res. GF6, like GX1, has about 16.7 megapixels and crops to 4592 x 3448 effective.
Other characteristics are also sufficiently different, no way it is another Pana.

0 upvotes
nikanth
By nikanth (Apr 9, 2013)

Why is the power zoom lens smaller than manual zoom lens?

0 upvotes
Chatokun
By Chatokun (Apr 9, 2013)

It's a collapsible pancake zoom, the whole point of it is to be small. It extends when powered up. This also creates a slight downside:
It takes longer to get the camera ready, and according to Dx0, it seems inferior optically to the new 14-42mm.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 9, 2013)

"according to Dx0, it seems inferior optically to the new 14-42mm."

Except the Pana 14-42 II is f/5.3 at 25mm, vs f/4.9 for 14-42PZ. And this new lens sharper only in the center.

0 upvotes
Mario G
By Mario G (Apr 9, 2013)

These new kit lenses have been getting slower, the older 14-42mm is f/4.6 at 25mm...

0 upvotes
babart
By babart (Apr 9, 2013)

Sigh. Or maybe yawn. Or both really. For my money, Panasonic would have been better off to put a better sensor in the GF-1, which still is one of my favorite cameras in spite of the (today) lower sensor quality and poor Hi-ISO response. It's that camera that's always with me. Of course, Pan needs to sell a lot of cameras to the smart-phone crowd, but couldn't they pay just a bit of attention to the significant number of photographers that bought something really useful -- the GF-1.

BAB

3 upvotes
techmine
By techmine (Apr 9, 2013)

Now why they didn't complete the package by including gps too? I am still searching for a mirrorless camera with wifi and gps built in. Any one?

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 9, 2013)

I actually think that GPS is a much more important feature to "a camera mostly for travel" market than WiFi and of course NFC. When I travel, why would I need to keep my iPad and camera with me and turned on all the time to immediately transfer pictures I take? When I return, USB3 card reader is much faster than WiFi and does not require keeping the camera on, while quickly discharging its battery. But a precise location of where each picture is interesting, especially if the camera can have some location database and add some comment into EXIF automatically so not to make me even use any software later.

4 upvotes
Mario G
By Mario G (Apr 9, 2013)

I also think GPS data would be much more useful for travelling. I wouldn't count too much on in-camera databases (since they would necessarily need to be limited in size and might get obsolete quickly anyway), but just the GPS coordinates can be massively useful... linking them to external maps and location names should technically be easy, and you could know the location of the photos within a few metres... that's an information that could be impossible to have (or at least very tedious) if you have lots of photos and need to find each of the various places you might have been travelling around... Without GPS data, with photos taken by yourself several years before, you might just barely know the city where they were taken, and possibly have no clue about what place it was exactly...

0 upvotes
Geekapoo
By Geekapoo (Apr 9, 2013)

YAWN. At the going price for the GF3/GF5, buying this camera makes absolutely no sense....great camera but not enough of a "step up" to warrant the very significant differece in price. Panasonic is amazing in the way they are late on delivery of new products and then quickly canabalize sales by having minor upgrades for the new models and significant discounting (dirt cheap) for the 6-9 month old model!

Thank you Panny....you make cameras affordable by your dysfunction!

Geekapoo

1 upvote
jquagga
By jquagga (Apr 9, 2013)

Well, this has a much better sensor than my GF5. Where I think Panasonic has messed up is that you can now get the GX1 substantially cheaper, with real camera features instead of gimmicks. And I don't think this is competitive against the E-PM2.

This just doesn't seem well thought out.

3 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (Apr 9, 2013)

What was wrong with G5 sensor? why Pany like using GX1 sensor? if not GH3's. No doubt controls, size, featureset and ergonomics are perfect!!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
tt321
By tt321 (Apr 9, 2013)

The GX1 sensor is cheap. Plus they'd like to use the different sensors as a method of organizing the different model levels.

1 upvote
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 9, 2013)

It doesn't make sense to put an expensive premium sensor in a cheap consumer oriented camera. Especially not the GH3's! Expect a better sensor in the GX2 instead.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Apr 9, 2013)

But that premium sensor sits inside the E-PM2 and E-PL5, and they aren't that expensive.
Not that it's anything wrong with the GX1 sensor, especially not in an entry-level body.

4 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 9, 2013)

Why would their use Sony's sensor in their lowest priced m43 when they need to keep their sensor department going? And they have a chance to discount it to half a price in a few months while keeping profit positive.

2 upvotes
the reason
By the reason (Apr 10, 2013)

revenant, thats what i call shooting one self in the foot. putting the same sensor in all the models like oly is a bad move. Youll see, theyll pay for it dearly when the ep4 comes

0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (Apr 10, 2013)

I think Olympus use the same sensor for economic reasons. Buying a large volume of one sensor, rather than smaller volumes of different sensors, probably saves them some money.
And there are other ways to differentiate camera models besides the sensor. Canon put the same sensor in the 7D and 60D, as in the Rebels, but I don't think that has hurt the sales of the high-end models. Gearheads may choose a camera based on the sensor, but I think most people make their choice based on the feature set.

0 upvotes
TheEye
By TheEye (Apr 9, 2013)

Great little cam for those who want neither an EVF nor a hot shoe. I'm hoping the the G6 will have what I want.

3 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Apr 9, 2013)

Of course it will, that's why there are different models with different featuresets.

0 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (Apr 9, 2013)

There is a manual movie dial. That could be interesting. The flip screen is also good.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
Airless
By Airless (Apr 9, 2013)

I want to see images of the red version. Black and white are kind of lame colors for a camera.

6 upvotes
Prime85
By Prime85 (Apr 9, 2013)

Epic Comment!

2 upvotes
Mister J
By Mister J (Apr 9, 2013)

Black is ideal, as you avoid reflection issues near glass.

2 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Apr 9, 2013)

Sorry I read the preview up to this line

" - 16MP Four Thirds sensor (as used in GX1)"

and lost interest.

12 upvotes
Alexis D
By Alexis D (Apr 9, 2013)

Me too, GX1's sensor, how exciting.

4 upvotes
whyamihere
By whyamihere (Apr 9, 2013)

...And I read both of these comments and thought, "Since this is a GF camera - which is very obviously Panasonic's entry-level upgrade enticement camera - at what point did you think you were possibly getting a new sensor?"

Why would Panasonic upend their current lineup by introducing a superior sensor in a camera that is at the bottom of their product stack? If anything, you should be glad this has the GX1 sensor, which means the replacements for the G5 and GX1 should have better sensors than they do right now.

0 upvotes
the reason
By the reason (Apr 10, 2013)

people are amazing...
the entry level model got a 4 mp boost, a 1 stop more if ISO, NFC, wifi, 4 fn buttons, the sharpest kit lens out there (compare it to canon and nikon in dxo mark), a flip screen, wireless flash control and people STILL complain

4 upvotes
arguros
By arguros (Apr 9, 2013)

Why this over the GF2?

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Apr 9, 2013)

It takes better pictures and videos. It has more controls. It has wifi. It has an improved new kit lens. It has better battery life. It has better Auto modes. It allows higher ISOs with less noise. It looks better.

I could keep going but you get the point. It simply is a newer better camera.

12 upvotes
oluv
By oluv (Apr 9, 2013)

i think the GF2 still looks better, it is slimmer, more elegant and has a more classy look. this one looks like an olympus-clone!

0 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (Apr 9, 2013)

wtf about looks .. just don't compare it with gf2 otherwise you are only insulting yourself!!

0 upvotes
Geekapoo
By Geekapoo (Apr 9, 2013)

I agree...WTF about looks, the fasionistas of photography...gotta love 'em!

0 upvotes
jquagga
By jquagga (Apr 9, 2013)

The sensor would be the only compelling reason, however there'd be no reason to not go for the cheaper for feature-full GX1.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 9, 2013)

"It has an improved new kit lens."

It is not really an improvement over 14-45, this 14-42 II darkens up very quickly (f/5.3@25mm, sheesh!), even quicker than Oly 12-50 which by itself was a champion (f/5.1@25, the worst "feature" of this lens). For comparison, the tiny Pana 14-42 PZ is f/4.9@25mm, Oly 14-42 II (same size as Pana 14-42 II) is f/4.4@25mm.

0 upvotes
the reason
By the reason (Apr 10, 2013)

4 more mp, much better noise control, nfc, wifi, wireless flash, 4 fn buttons, better jgp engine, and the kit lens is sharper than any other kit lens.
You really dont see this as a massive upgrade?

peevee between f4.9 and 5.3 the difference is negligible, what is that? less than a third of a stop? nitpicking at its finest! but the sharpness difference is actually noticeable on the other hand

0 upvotes
Sean Nelson
By Sean Nelson (Apr 9, 2013)

The spec list shows 1080 video at 60,50,30,25 fps but the "feature highlights" says 1080p30 in a 60i container. It would be nice to see some clarification...

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Apr 9, 2013)

It is 1080i/30 psf. Also known as 1080p @ 30 FPS(Or 29.97 FPS to be more precise).

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Sean Nelson
By Sean Nelson (Apr 9, 2013)

If so, DP Review's list of specs needs to be corrected.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Apr 9, 2013)

Dpreview's specs were clarified within half-an-hour of this first comment being posted, to bring the specs page into line with the preview text.

1 upvote
JoostL
By JoostL (Apr 9, 2013)

What is the aspect ratio of the monitor? 4:3? 3:2? 16:9? I really wish you would include this in the specs list by default!

0 upvotes
Sean Nelson
By Sean Nelson (Apr 9, 2013)

Ah yes, I see the specs have been clarified. Glad to see they've been updated, less happy to see what they say...

Thanks!

0 upvotes
Total comments: 99