Previous page Next page

Panasonic Lumix DMC-G6 Hands-on Preview

April 2013 | By Barney Britton
Buy on GearShop


Preview based on a pre-production DMC-G6

Less than a year after releasing the G5, Panasonic is back with another mid-range G-series Micro Four Thirds interchangeable lens camera aimed at the upper entry-level DSLR/ILC market. The G6 sits above the recently-announced GF6 and below the GH3 in Panasonic's lineup and, although most of its key specifications are fairly familiar to anyone that's been watching the G-series for a while, the G6 does bring a couple of interesting new features, as well as some solid specification upgrades.

An interesting new feature is 'Clear Retouch', - a simple touch-based 'heal' tool. This function can be applied to captured images in review mode - you simply touch the area that you wish to clone-out and the camera attempts a context-aware fill, removing the offending object/blemish. We've only had a limited time with a pre-production camera, but we're not all that impressed by the feature's implementation. The 'healing' seems to be based on a highly simplistic proximity match, which we've found is more likely to insert bizarre, distracting textures than to effectively conceal unwanted scene elements.

More usefully, the G6 joins the GF6 in offering Near Field Communcation (NFC). NFC is a very short-range means of exchanging data that allows the camera to share details of its Wi-Fi connection with compatible smartphones or tablets through simply touching them against one another. The list of compatible devices includes many recent Android devices, though Apple has yet to embrace the technology.

Panasonic G6 specification highlights

  • 16MP Live MOS sensor
  • ISO 160-12,800 (extendable up to 25,600)
  • 3.0", 1.04 million dot capacative LCD
  • 1.44 million dot OLED electronic viewfinder with eye sensor
  • Full AVCHD 1080/60p video with full manual control (and 2.4X digital teleconverter option)
  • 3.5mm external mic socket
  • 7 frames per second continuous shooting, 5 fps with AF-tracking
  • 23 Scene modes including 'Cute Dessert' and 'Sweet Child's Face'
  • iAuto mode can automatically detect when to use 9 scene modes
  • 'Clear Retouch' touch gesture-based heal tool

In terms of core photographic features, the G6 offers a solid set of specifications, including the same sensor as the once range-topping GH2, albeit without that model's multi-aspect feature. Maximum effective resolution is 16MP effective, from 18MP (total pixels). Panasonic claims that the G6 offers superior image processing though, including improved noise reduction enabling it to achieve a maximum native ISO sensitivity of 12,800, extendable up to ISO 25,600.

Like its predecessors, the G6 has a built-in electronic viewfinder, an OLED unit no less, boasting 1.44 million dots (800 x 600 resolution). We're not sorry to say goodbye to the older field-sequential technology, with its associated issues with rainbow 'tearing' (issues that are not unique to Panasonic). Panasonic claims that the G6's finder is three times more responsive than that of the G5, too, and our first impressions are certainly very encouraging.

Of course, there's more than one way to compose your image, and the G6's fully-articulated rear display offers 1.04 million dot resolution. This is essentially a slightly wider, 3:2 aspect ratio screen, rather than the G5's 4:3 panel. As we'd expect from recent Panasonic G-series cameras it's also touch-sensitive though it now uses a capacative system that offers multi-touch control and should be more responsive than the pressure-senstive example that came before it. That said, as usual for mid-range and high-end G-series cameras, the G6 still has plenty of 'hard' control points for photographers that prefer a more traditional ergonomics.

NFC-simplified Wi-Fi connection

Connecting the G6 to a an NFC-equipped smartphone is as simple as starting the Panasonic Image App, pressing the Wi-Fi button on the camera and tapping the two devices together. NFC works over such short distances it may take a couple of attempts to locate the antenna on your smart device, but once located, it's all pretty simple.

If your device doesn't have NFC, the process involves manually selecting the right Wi-Fi connection in your phone's settings, then typing in a fairly long password (as is the case with most Wi-Fi cameras). Once you've paired your devices, the camera will remember the connection to speed up the process in future.

The Panasonic Image App on iOS gives a live view image and allows you to set the focus point, take the exposure or control the zoom if you're using a power zoom lens. The equivalent app for Android also gives the option to control manual focus. Panasonic says the apps will also give the ability to control exposure parameters (as is the case with the Lumix Link app for the GH3).
 
Both apps also allow you to view the contents of the camera's memory card and transfer images (at various sizes) across to the 'phone.  

The Panasonic Image App gives a pretty good level of control over the camera - allowing the user to position the camera's focus point, control a power zoom lens and the ability to control exposure (though this didn't appear to be available when we tried the currently-available version of the app). Once a shot is taken, it can be uploaded across to your smartphone - either at full or reduced resolution.

In addition to smartphone connections, the G6 allows you to create an account on Panasonic's Lumix Club cloud service. With this established, you can send images up to Lumix Club by connecting to a local Wi-Fi router, with the option that they are then posted on to various popular social networks, via Lumix Club. Alternatively, if you're connected to the same Wi-Fi network as your computer, you can get the camera to push all your images across to your computer as you shoot.

An advantage of using the GH2's sensor is that the G6 is able to offer more comprehensive video functions than the G5. It gains a socket for attaching an external mic as well as gaining full PASM exposure control over its movie capture. The G6 can capture movies in 1080 60p/60i/30PsF and 24p in AVCHD mode, along with 60p and 30p video in MP4 format (Cameras bought in PAL regions get the same combinations but with 50 and 25 frames per second).

Compared to its peers:

The Panasonic G6 and Olympus' flagship Micro Four Thirds camera, the OM-D, have similar dimensions but the retro-styled Olympus looks considerably skinnier and more angular. The G6's generous grip is very obvious in this view - the OM-D is not uncomfortable to use, but the G6's sculpted handgrip gives a really secure hold.
Despite the different approaches to body design the control and button layout of the two cameras is not too dissimilar, with a four-way controller and a few buttons located to the right of the screen and a screen that can be flipped out and tilted. However, the Olympus features two control dials, while the less-expensive G6 only has one - a slightly 'plasticky' small dial on the upper right of the camera's rear.
The G6's general size and layoput are very similar to the its predecessor the G5, but the higher 'shoulders' of the new model are very obvious in this view.

On the back, there are few significant changes - the G6 features five customizable 'Fn' buttons, but has only one extra control point - a button for activating the camera's Wi-Fi mode at the extreme lower-right of the rear control cluster.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

Previous page Next page
160
I own it
20
I want it
11
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 199
12
Mk7
By Mk7 (Apr 24, 2013)

I suppose Panny's market research tells them there's a market for large "micro" cameras. Let's hope, for Panny's sake, they're right.
Too big for my taste. Waiting for GX2.

2 upvotes
AndyGM
By AndyGM (May 4, 2013)

Its gained 2mm in width and 2mm in height over the G5. The depth is the same which I guess means the grip is no bigger, just a better shape.

The G5 is not a big camera (yeah bigger than the GX1, but add the EVF to it and then compare), and neither is the G6. The more angular shape just makes it look more chunky than it is.

0 upvotes
mfj197
By mfj197 (Apr 24, 2013)

"An advantage of using the GH2's sensor is that the G6 is able to offer more comprehensive video functions than the G5."

The G5 also had the GH2 sensor, so any differences in video capabilities are not because of a different sensor.

1 upvote
h3csc
By h3csc (Apr 24, 2013)

Nope mate. The software plays a huge role in video (or I would say software is more important than the sensor size itself in video). The GH series offers uncompressed RAW video output and much more customisation in video shooting.

0 upvotes
mfj197
By mfj197 (Apr 24, 2013)

Fully agree, h3csc. What exactly were you disagreeing with on my post?

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Apr 24, 2013)

How many GH3 purchasers have a real need for RAW video? How many terabytes of RAW would it take to shoot a tournament, ceremony, or trip? How much serious editing do the gear gurus do with RAW that they could not do with AVCHD or MP4? What difference will a viewer see in the 5mbps version they stream over YT and view on their iPhone?

A G5 or G6 offers all the video spec most people (even serious ones) can handle. Video-wise, an HC X920 (3x1/2.3" CMOS) is more versatile in practice, has less moiré, and better stabilization.

Manual customization of video, or narrow DOF, are not anyone's "best friends" if you are shooting an event you can't orchestrate or double-take. One can get very good video with very simple kit. Content is king, audio is queen, editing is the prince, camera hype is the knave, and the camera buyer is often the fool or jester.

3 upvotes
mediokre
By mediokre (Apr 24, 2013)

what about the internet forum philosopher?

0 upvotes
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Apr 24, 2013)

"Manual customization of video, or narrow DOF, are not anyone's "best friends" if you are shooting an event you can't orchestrate or double-take. One can get very good video with very simple kit. Content is king, audio is queen, editing is the prince, camera hype is the knave, and the camera buyer is often the fool or jester."

Clever, and true. I like the G, GX and even the hacked GF series for events and other long clip scenarios. But I do think that the manual control on the G6 and 24p is very welcome too. For those times when you have the time to set up and get it right. So this is a nice upgrade.

0 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Apr 24, 2013)

This is nice, and if the price quickly drops, like previous G models, it will be a massive bargain. Instead of a sweet deal, which it is already. I only had a few quibbles with the G5, and this addressed all of them. I know people love the OM-D E-M5, but this offers more features for a lot less money, and even bests the NEX-6 in some ways. OK, the sensor isn't quite up to Sony standards, but it isn't far behind anymore. I do wish Panasonic would dump the clunky faux-dslr styling for something cleaner, but that's about the only remaining problem. If I were shopping this would be hard to resist.

1 upvote
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Apr 24, 2013)

I am one of those who likes the feel of the G series in the hand. Reminds me a lot of Nikon dSLRs that I shot for some years. Ergonomics matter a lot to me and these two brands epitomize the best of that.

0 upvotes
Hen3ry
By Hen3ry (Apr 24, 2013)

The specs don't mention flash wireless stuff but as noted on the forum by Ezzelin, the Panny system pdf says it has it: http://panasonic.net/avc/lumix/systemcamera/gms/pdf/g_series_system_chart.pdf

Interesting. An excellent feature.

Cheers, geoff

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
DElliott
By DElliott (Apr 24, 2013)

Corrections to preview:
1) The G5 also had a 3:2 aspect ratio LCD, rather than 4:3 as stated.
2) The G6's battery is 1200 mAh (same as G5), rather than 1000 mAh.
3) The G5 also had the GH2 sensor, while the preview implies otherwise.

1 upvote
anentropic
By anentropic (Apr 24, 2013)

glad to hear about the battery! 1000mAh is not enough

0 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (Apr 24, 2013)

i'm surprised that they didn't use the GH3 battery. the body seems to have the same chassis (the buttons are different, but overall it seems to be the same), so it could have fitted in there.

0 upvotes
Ricardo Maia
By Ricardo Maia (Apr 24, 2013)

Body is certainly not in the same chassis. The GH3 is much bigger than the G6.

0 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (Apr 24, 2013)

in the specifications page:
Lens mount: Unknown. really?
Image Stabilization: Unknown. I'd guess it's still in the lens.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Apr 24, 2013)

All Panasonic G and GH m4/3 cameras rely on in-lens stabilization. Some lenses have Mega OIS, a few offer Power OIS, and some primes have none.

0 upvotes
eddie_cam
By eddie_cam (Apr 24, 2013)

Does the G6 feature the same battery as the one in the G5? If not, is it an entirely new one so you have to wait for third-party manufacturers to join in?

0 upvotes
arndsan
By arndsan (Apr 24, 2013)

Looks like the latest Leica R
So when will the Leica logo will go up there?

2 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (Apr 24, 2013)

as soon as you pay double the MSRP, they'll bring the Leica sticker box from the back room while you look away. oh, sorry, i should have said the "Leica camera".

0 upvotes
digifan
By digifan (Apr 24, 2013)

Quite right Leica R design.

1 upvote
Mister J
By Mister J (Apr 24, 2013)

Looking forward to this, though I can do without in-camera effects. Still, the sales guys need some USPs to offer I guess.

G5 has been a highly convincing camera, with light weight and razor sharp focus working nicely with good handgrip and ergonomics. Partners well with iPhone when pocketability needed.

0 upvotes
sderdiarian
By sderdiarian (Apr 24, 2013)

I'm holding out for the G7, should be announced in another month or so...

11 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (Apr 24, 2013)

wtff

0 upvotes
Hen3ry
By Hen3ry (Apr 24, 2013)

Looks terrific. Reading the specs, the only thing missing for me is being able to use the Oly flash "wireless" (light, not radio) communication. I don’t think it’s a great way to communicate for flash -- why not radio? -- but I have two Oly flashes and …

Generally, the specs look amazing. I do think the G5 with shoulders looks a bit better, but hey, with the capabilities this camera offers, I can live with that (my shoulders aren’t that pronounced either!)!

And phooey to those who say it is a big camera. It simply is not. Compare it with my Oly E-PL3 (or the E-PL5). Add a lens and the VF2 and the silly little accessory flash to the E-PL3/5, and weight is almost exactly the same and the outside dimensions favor the G5/6. Ten if you fit the Panny PZ 14-42 pancake zoom to the G6 …

Looks like the G6 is an outstanding camera at an affordable price.

Cheers, geoff

2 upvotes
Jorginho
By Jorginho (Apr 24, 2013)

Otoh: there is no way you can get the G5/6 smaller than it is while you can do that with EPl5. You do not need the EVF all the time, I rarely use it in fact. Silly little flash: never used it.

EPL5 has better IQ, is smaller and weighs a lot less. itis truely pocketable in a coat pocket, the Gh2 is not and G6 isn't either. I guess they are for different uses in general. G6 seems much more an allround camera. But it is not nearly as easy to carry everywhere at least I rarely took my GH2 with me (always needed a bag) just for fun. I do so almost all the time with my EPl5.

0 upvotes
FoolyCooly
By FoolyCooly (Apr 24, 2013)

Imaging Resource says the G6 has an External Mic Jack. Does it?

60FPS in Full HD is NICE! I hope it's priced less than a used GH2.

3 upvotes
FoolyCooly
By FoolyCooly (Apr 24, 2013)

Here's a photo of the right side ports from fourthirds-user dot com.

http://fourthirds-user.com/images/435/g6_06.jpg

Looks like the top one is an external mic jack.

0 upvotes
kaiser soze
By kaiser soze (Apr 24, 2013)

Panasonic is obviously commited to MFT. But of course there are mirrorless cameras that use APS-C sensors and that are a lot smaller than this camera. And even they are too small to fit comfortably in the hand, for most people. It seems to me that a mirrorless camera about this size, or perhaps even a tiny bit larger, but that uses a full-frame sensor, would make a compelling camera. Whichever company is first to break ground there will have bragging rights for many years. Most likely it will be Sony. I predicted the advent of mirrorless cameras with interchangeable lenses several years before Panasonic announced MFT. But i did not anticipate that this would emerge in connection with a smaller sensor format. I still do not "get" that aspect of it. Compactness is part of it, but only in relation to the size of sensor that is used. The manufacturers are dragging drag their feet, and are only giving us minor refinement with each new freshening of their lineups.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
Hen3ry
By Hen3ry (Apr 24, 2013)

Thank goodness you predicted mirrorless, kaiser, or it might never have happened. You don’t grok the smaller sensor? in the era when I began my photographic career, you would still be shooting 6x9 roll film when everyone else had gone 35mm.

6 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (Apr 24, 2013)

kaiser soze: " It seems to me that a mirrorless camera about this size, or perhaps even a tiny bit larger, but that uses a full-frame sensor, would make a compelling camera."

indeed, sir, i might actually be compelled to buy that instead of a new yacht. i believe two yachts per person are quite enough these days. of course, i'd have to hire someone to hold the camera for me, these full frame lenses can get quite heavy, especially those for 600mm. not to mention i'd look like a working man, and i'd end up the laughing stock of the golf club. but, indeed, a full frame camera in the body of a GH3 would be a gentleman's camera.

3 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (Apr 24, 2013)

their bigger bodies are still much smaller than fullframe and even APSC smallest DSLRs. There are smaller mirrorless APSC but their lenses are still huge.

smaller sensor doesn't force you to make only small bodies.

this camera is just slightly bigger than G5 and it add many cool features over it, more f buttons and cooler look and feel with wifi functionality. m43 is more about feature-set, speed, focus accuracy, higher end video capabilities and lenses..

if you are only looking for smallest possible bodies .. GF series is for you!

0 upvotes
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Apr 24, 2013)

The bodies are not smaller than the smallest APS-C DSLRs, let alone APS-C mirrorless cameras.

1 upvote
kaiser soze
By kaiser soze (Apr 24, 2013)

Hen3ry, your reply is pure sarcasm, and insulting. You have no manners at all. And your comment is not correctly informed. The fact is, as I pointed out already, that there are mirrorless cameras that use APS-C sensors, that are smaller than this camera. And the lenses are not larger. Your comment clearly implies that you do not believe this. But it is a fact, and you are in denial of reality. Furthermore, you likely do not realize that a mirrorless FF camera will be smaller than existing FF DSLRs. This was my point, which you did not grasp, because you were too anxious to disagree than to make any sincere effort to understand my point. Shame on you. And do you know that when the mirror is removed and the lens moved physically closer to the sensor, that the lens decreases in diameter? My point is that a FF mirrorless camera will have very real advantages. If you do not personally appreciate those real advantages, that is not good reason for you to behave like an ass.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
kaiser soze
By kaiser soze (Apr 24, 2013)

I will try to make my point clearer, to make it easier for dullards like Hen3ry to understand. The advantages of mirrorless, relative to mirrored, is no less when applied to FF camera than when applied to compact cameras. Manifestly and unarguably, this is true. Moreover, the advantage is GREATER when applied to FF, because the FF camera is that camera that stands to benefit most from any reduction in size, whereas, IN ORDER FOR THESE MFT CAMERAS TO BE LARGE ENOUGH TO FIT A USEFUL QUANTITY OF PHYSICAL BUTTONS ON THE BODY, PANASONIC IS HAVING TO MAKE THEM A GOOD DEAL LARGER THAN WHAT THE SENSOR ITSELF IMPLIES. Hen3ry obviously is not able to follow this simple logic, and chooses to insult me for making a valid point that he is incapable of understanding. I do not like people who think it is their prerogative to INSULT other people simply because the other person expressed a valid opinion that didn’t resonate with their own personal preferences. Hen3ry (Geoffrey Heard) is a lout.

1 upvote
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Apr 24, 2013)

@kaisersose you miss the point that glass for FX is a lot bigger than glass for APS-C and 4/3. Remember the lens mount for APS-C and FX is the same (hence the interchangeability of lenses on DSLRs between the two formats). So the advantage you speak of really isn't there. FX bodies are bigger because, like these MFT cameras, they have to house buttons and controls, which require more real estate than something like the body of a D3200 could hold. The bodies are also metal and waterproof in contrast to the flimsy plastics of low end APS-C DSLRs. Plus, coming back to the glass, FX tends to run heavier, longer glass that warrants a bigger body for balance.

And finally, price. An FX mirrorless body would cost about the same as a FX DSLR, but would be at a disadvantage with glass as all glass would have to be proprietary to that mount. It would also be wayyyyy more expensive than APS-C glass. It makes more sense to make smaller DSLRs like the D600 and mirrorless ones like the A99.

1 upvote
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Apr 25, 2013)

@kaiser soze
Completely agree with you. Technology can make sensor and electronic smaller but it cannot make hands smaller and eyes sharper. Size of the buttons, grip and screen are all limited by human physiology.

If the smallest comfortable size is the size of E-620, 700D, D5200, K-5, A-58, X-E1 and GH3, then it make sense to design a sensor + lens combo that fit into the body with the greatest image quality. Sure size can be smaller but that affects the ergonomics, a common complaints on small cameras.

I believe FF EVIL/mirrorless will be the gold standard in ten years and under it will be large sensor compact and superzooms. Everything below will be smartphones. Samsung and Sony is known to be working on FF EVIL/mirrorless and rumor suggests Panasonic as well. Nikon and Canon will jump in as soon as FF EVIL/mirrorless begin to erode traditional FF DSLR advantage.

I have used Nikon APS-C, Olympus m4/3 and Fuji X over the past few years. m4/3 users are not very friendly.

1 upvote
ntsan
By ntsan (Apr 24, 2013)

del

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
HaroldC3
By HaroldC3 (Apr 24, 2013)

Dimensions of Panasonic G6: 122 x 85 x 71 mm (4.8 x 3.35 x 2.8″)

Dimensions of Canon SL100: 117 x 91 x 69 mm (4.61 x 3.58 x 2.72″)

hrmmmm :/

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Apr 24, 2013)

I LITERALLY came to post this. Hell, the D3200 is not much bigger (4.92 x 3.78 x 3.03″), and with the kit lens it costs the same. Sony NEX 3N costs less with the kit lens. You are limited to native glass for wide angle (unlike APS-C- you can get cheap 20mm FX glass). Higher pixel density (always bad). ~1/3-1/2 stop slower. What is the point of Four Thirds/Micro Four Thirds???

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
napilopez
By napilopez (Apr 24, 2013)

Now add the lenses.

The beauty of M4/3 is not so much in the individual bodies as in the available options. Think the G6 is too big? Fine, get an E-PM2, which with some lenses is legitimately pocketable, and still give you the very best image quality you can achieve in the system.

Some people like the big bodies. I'm not one of them, which is why I own an OM-D and not a GH3.

To be clear, I'm not a big fan of Panasonic's current trend in making their bodies larger, but I appreciate the diversity it adds to the system. Now if someone would only make a rangefinder-styled M4/3 camera with an EVF AND weathersealing...

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
13 upvotes
ntsan
By ntsan (Apr 24, 2013)

Canon 17-55mm F2.8: 635g
Panasonic 12-35mm F2.8: 300g

Panasonic 35-100mm F2.8 360g
Sigma 50-150mm F2.8 1340g

7 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (Apr 24, 2013)

yeah but SL100 and D3200 are dumb cameras. D3200 just got better sensor!

why so obsessed with bigger sensor size if your camera doesnt know how to focus, when to focus and where to focus!!

agree with napilopez about making a complete camera range and ntsan about much lighter and smaller lenses!!

4 upvotes
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Apr 24, 2013)

@ntsan that comparison is ridiculous

For the lenses to be truly equivalent you would have to compare the APS-C standard zoom with a lens of equivalent aperture. Both of your calcs are way off.

@Naveed Akhtar improper focusing is not an issue for most APS-C cameras. Anything a 4/3 or M4/3 camera can do, an APS-C camera already does at least as well for about the same or less money. For example if the SL100 or D3200 have focusing problems that can be fixed with a firmware update. Where's the firmware update to give a 4/3 sensor 40% more light gathering ability, 40% less tight sensor density, 40% shallower DOF, the ability to run wide angle film lenses etc. etc.

1 upvote
agentul
By agentul (Apr 24, 2013)

no FF equivalence trolls yet, but we managed to get one APS-C fanboy. i guess it's better than nothing, the comments regarding the new 14-140 lens don't even have this much.

Comment edited 10 seconds after posting
1 upvote
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Apr 24, 2013)

There is no point in comparing to FX; completely different price point and ergonomics. A Sony NEX on the other hand costs the same, handles the same, but is also objectively better on many fronts

1 upvote
dbateman
By dbateman (Apr 24, 2013)

@sportyaccordy,
Depends on what you want for equivalent. I like the more light coming in with f2.8 and seem to NEED more DOF. So 43rds is better! I tend to shoot my 43rds at F4, my full frame at f8 and my medium format at f16. It really sucks to loose all that light and need slower shutter speeds at f16. Thus I tend to shot 43rds more now.
Who really needs razer thin DOF? I have been told that the picture is out of focus when it has been provided. People are used to Phone cameras and like to see stuff in focus.

1 upvote
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Apr 24, 2013)

@dbateman you make a good point about too narrow a DOF. But the point is a bigger sensor gives you that many more options. You can play w/ISO and shutter speed to get a deeper DOF on a bigger sensor. And you get better low light performance etc etc. You can't get shallow DOF on a 4/3 if you want it.

And for me a huge thing is being able to use old 35mm glass. 35mm glass is pretty much only good for portraiture on a 4/3 camera.

1 upvote
Jon Ragnarsson
By Jon Ragnarsson (Apr 30, 2013)

Average sized m43 camera versus the absolutely smallest DSLR... hmmmm indeed.

0 upvotes
Xellz
By Xellz (Apr 24, 2013)

Oh wait, focus peaking? Almost missed this major part, first m4/3 body with focus peaking from panasonic? Nicely done, though still dislike pany decision using older sensor, when they already have better one in production.

6 upvotes
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (Apr 24, 2013)

GH2/G5 sensor is just fine ..
Am getting amazing results from even older GH1 sensor!!!

1 upvote
Xellz
By Xellz (Apr 24, 2013)

I'm not saying it's bad, just gh3 is better and already in production. I like to bring back details from shadows, kind of pseudo hdr. G3 sometimes is noisy and doesn't preserve as much details in shadows as i would like. So the more DR, the better. Though doesn't matter now, anyway still too little time for hobby :(

0 upvotes
plevyadophy
By plevyadophy (Apr 24, 2013)

@ Barnaby Britton/DPReview

Am I missing something?

In your intro you say "However, the Olympus features two control dials, while the less-expensive G6 only has one - a slightly 'plasticky' small dial on the upper right of the camera's rear."

Am I seeing things or misinterpreting the image, but is there not a second control wheel on the top plate behind the shutter button of the G6 (which is clearly visible in Page 3 of your Preview)?

Regards,
plevyadophy

1 upvote
Sizzlebee
By Sizzlebee (Apr 24, 2013)

I think you are talking about the "compact camera-style zoom rocker switch just behind the shutter button"

2 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Apr 24, 2013)

Yep. That's the zoom rocker switch. Not a dial. Sorrrreeee....

2 upvotes
plevyadophy
By plevyadophy (Apr 24, 2013)

@Barney Britton/DPReview

Eh?
Zoom rocker switch?
Yuk!!
So I take it then, that's to control those power zoom lenses right?
And pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeez tell me that the "zoom rocker switch" can be programmed to do something else??!!! No?

And lastly, is this cam compatible with the new wireless flash system (well new to Panny, Oly had it from day dot)?

Thanks in advance.
plevyadophy

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ntsan
By ntsan (Apr 24, 2013)

On the G5 it works as EV compensation when connect to a non power zoom lens

0 upvotes
plevyadophy
By plevyadophy (Apr 25, 2013)

@ntsan

Well, lets hope to God it does the same thing on the G6.

Thanks for that info.

0 upvotes
zakk9
By zakk9 (Apr 24, 2013)

You are all wrong. Google Leica R8 or R9. The G6 is a miniature copy :)

Apart from that, it looks like a capable camera. Pity that they omitted the multi-aspect feature though. Now the question is: Did they invent yet another battery or does it use one from another camera?

7 upvotes
Dennis Linden
By Dennis Linden (Apr 24, 2013)

That's exactly what I was going to post. Looking a lot like a Leica R .. R ? hmm, M, R, I can see it.

0 upvotes
SHood
By SHood (Apr 24, 2013)

Interesting to see focus peaking. Does this mean the GH3 will get it?

Also, does the G6 have a silent shutter mode with full resolution like the GH3.

3 upvotes
mfj197
By mfj197 (Apr 24, 2013)

Well, the G5 had a silent shutter mode with full resolution so I expect the G6 will do. Haven't looked at the specs though yet.

0 upvotes
Baba Ganoush
By Baba Ganoush (Apr 24, 2013)

The body is a close copy of the Panasonic FZ200.

0 upvotes
Xellz
By Xellz (Apr 24, 2013)

Wonder how much price difference there is by using old sensor, not new. Or simply they want to keep their "pro" body better by cutting down specs of more cheaper bodies? Either way, seems going to be oly user soon. G3 i have lacks some things i'd like to have in body.

0 upvotes
Infared
By Infared (Apr 24, 2013)

Kind of plain-Jane looking, no?

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
elemenoP
By elemenoP (Apr 24, 2013)

"23 Scene modes including 'Cute Desert' and 'Sweet Child's Face'"

I'm sold, I've been wondering how to get my desert landscapes cuter; all that sand is so serious. Unless it was a typo for "cute dessert," in which case I'm not interested.

15 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (Apr 24, 2013)

they should just put a general "why so serious?" scene and simplify things a bit.

5 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Apr 24, 2013)

It looks like a Sony A77 from the front.

4 upvotes
maaggyr
By maaggyr (Apr 24, 2013)

No wire remote control (DMW-RSL1) ?? :((

0 upvotes
DerpyWebber
By DerpyWebber (Apr 24, 2013)

Wow, that looks like a Leica S.

0 upvotes
jkrumm
By jkrumm (Apr 24, 2013)

It does a little. I'm sure someone sells red Leica dots you can stick over the G.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
plevyadophy
By plevyadophy (Apr 24, 2013)

eh? really? you think so?

to me, the Leica S is far better looking (and along with the Fuji X Pro 1, Fuji XE, Leica M Type 240 with grip, and Oly OMD, the best looking interchangeable lens camera by miles).

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
steven_k
By steven_k (Apr 24, 2013)

To bad they went with he GH-2 sensor and not the newer GH-3 sensor.
I think Panasonic blew it.

2 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Apr 24, 2013)

GH2 sensor is multi aspect. Lots of people miss that feature.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Apr 24, 2013)

"it has the same GH2 sensor, albeit without that model’s multi-aspect feature." that sucks

2 upvotes
Thomas22
By Thomas22 (Apr 24, 2013)

Using the multi-aspect sensor from the GH2, but omitting the multi-aspect feature just seems strange to me. If the sensor supports it, why not include this feature, which one that I've appreciated on both the GH1 and GH2.

2 upvotes
Jun2
By Jun2 (Apr 24, 2013)

hacking multiple aspect ratio,anyone?

1 upvote
agentul
By agentul (Apr 24, 2013)

while i like the m4/3 format, the multi-aspect sensor really gives the GH2 versatility. the only thing missing would be a 16:10 mode, so that i may be able to take perfect images to use as desktop wallpapers. i usually just stick to 3:2, because the GH2 seems to actually be built for it, judging by the aspect ratios of the EVF and the screen. also, i want to print my photos without the people at the print shop trimming my images. i actually can't think of any application that a 4:3 aspect ratio would be a perfect fit, now with widescreen displays everywhere.

oh, the irony of including a Panorama mode an not allowing you to take a 16MP wide angle photo.

0 upvotes
jonpais
By jonpais (Jun 15, 2013)

Does anyone know if the G6 has zebra stripes? Also, I've heard the GH3 screen turns itself off after ten seconds when viewing in movie mode if you don't start recording (or something to that effect). Does the G6 have the same problem? I often spend more than ten seconds viewing before pressing "record"!

0 upvotes
String
By String (Apr 24, 2013)

Looks like a mini Canon

3 upvotes
xlynx9
By xlynx9 (Apr 24, 2013)

Sounds like a really solid upgrade. Well done Panasonic!

1 upvote
Total comments: 199
12