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June 2014 | By Barney Britton


Preview based on a pre-production Nikon D810

Two years after Nikon shook up the high-end DSLR market with the 36MP D800 and D800E, it has consolidated the 800-series with the release of a new camera, the D810. The D810 replaces both previous 800-series models, and will be offered at an MSRP of $3299 - about the same as the D800E, and a little more than the D800. Why is the D810 priced like the D800E, and not the D800? Well, the D810 takes the D800E's 'AA filter cancellation' trick one step further by dispensing with an AA filter entirely, which should result in a camera that offers greater resolution than either of the two models that it replaces.

Anti-aliasing filter aside, the D810 is not by any means a reinvention of the popular D800/E concept, but the handful of major changes should make the new camera more capable than its predecessors. Perhaps more importantly, they should also make the camera more attractive to potential buyers who have been weighing up whether or not to jump into full-frame. The D810 isn't a camera that you should necessarily sell your D800 or D800E for, but it's a better camera than both older models - at least on paper.

Following Nikon's general philosophy a few of the refinements made in the D4S have trickled down into the D810 and videographers especially should be pleased with a couple of the additions to its video feature set. Other welcome changes include a redesigned shutter and mirror mechanism to mitigate resolution-reducing shock from shutter actuation, and a new S-Raw mode for reduced-resolution raw capture (Nikon owners have been asking for that one for years).

Nikon D810: Key Specifications

  • 36.3MP Full-frame CMOS sensor (no AA filter)
  • ISO 64-12,800 (expands to ISO 32-51,200)
  • Electronic first-curtain shutter and redesigned mirror mechanism
  • New 'RAW Size S' 9MP Raw mode
  • Expeed 4 engine
  • Max 5fps shooting in FX mode, 7fps in DX (with battery grip + EN-EL18 / AA batteries)
  • 3.2in 1,229k-dot RGBW LCD screen with customizable color
  • OLED viewfinder information display
  • Improved Scene Recognition System allows face detection in OVF mode
  • 'Split screen zoom' display in live view allows horizons/lines to be leveled precisely
  • 51-point AF system with new 'Group Area AF' mode (inherited from D4S)
  • New 'flat' Picture Control mode (intended to appeal to videographers)
  • Auto ISO available in manual exposure mode
  • Zebra strips for focus checking in video mode
  • Uncompressed HDMI output with simultaneous recording to memory card
  • Built-in stereo microphone

D800 and D800E: Two become one...

In testing, we found that the practical difference in raw detail reproduction between the D800 and D800E was minimal except in a very narrow range of circumstances - specifically, tripod-mounted short shutter duration shooting at wide apertures with prime lenses.

As such, if two models must be consolidated into one, it makes sense for that single model to offer the highest possible resolution. We can only hope that Nikon has given the D810 the same sharper, more detailed JPEGs that it (apparently arbitrarily) gave the D800E, which were significantly more print-ready than those from the D800 for no obvious reason at all beyond justifying the extra $300 MSRP.

Some people might not have been entirely sure why Nikon released the D800 and D800E as separate models two years ago. Our take on it at the time was that the D800E offered some advantages, sometimes, but if you weren't too bothered you could be perfectly happy with the D800 and you'd have saved a little cash. Perhaps now, after success with the D7100 and D5300 the company felt more confident about omitting the AA filter from its highest-resolution body - albeit naturally at the risk of more moiré than we'd expect from the D800 and possibly also the D800E.

D810 versus D800/E: Specification highlights

  • 36.3MP full-frame CMOS sensor with no AA filter (D800E has effects of AA filter 'canceled')
  • 5fps maximum shooting in FX mode (compared to 4fps in D800/E)
  • New 'Group Area AF' mode (5 AF points can act together)
  • New electronic first-curtain shutter and redesigned sequencer/mirror balancer to reduce vibrations
  • New 'highlight-weighted' metering option (to preserve highlight detail in contrasty scenes)
  • 1080/60p movie recording with built-in stereo mic (compared to 1080/30p with monaural audio)
  • 3.2" 1,229k-dot RGBW LCD screen (compared to 3.2" 921k-dot RGB)
  • Power aperture available while shooting video to SD/CF card (compared to only when using HDMI)
  • The ability to record to memory card while simultaneously outputting video over HDMI
  • New 'flat' Picture Control mode (intended for videographers who need broader dynamic range)
  • Unlimited continuous shooting (previously 100-frame limit)


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2014 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 1096
12345
linsen80586
By linsen80586 (7 hours ago)

very well

0 upvotes
Galbertson
By Galbertson (21 hours ago)

Totally amazing all the 180 degree views on d810. Hope we get complete detailed reviews and comparison views to slow down confusion.

In reading photographylife.com first reviews, they state lack of any AA filters just might slightly allow better performance with film era lenses, having to do with filter stacking. Interesting read.

0 upvotes
R Vaquero
By R Vaquero (1 day ago)

I see a good improvement in high ISO performance compared to the D800.

0 upvotes
David Smith - Photographer

I think Nikon now uses the same sensor that Sony uses in the a7r. Amazing detail is now also available for Nikon users.

0 upvotes
spikethompson
By spikethompson (1 day ago)

I have a D800 which I use every week for wedding photography, these cameras are so advanced you you would need to print pictures 60ft x 40ft to pixel peek with the naked eye. The real ability of the d800 is its low light ability and doesn't look like this one has made many advances . By the way, Real videographers use video cameras, real photographers dont read reviews, they take photographs.....!

0 upvotes
luxor2
By luxor2 (2 days ago)

"Viewfinder type Optical (tunnel)" is an error, should be pentaprism

0 upvotes
stevevelvia50
By stevevelvia50 (2 days ago)

Comparing the paint tube lettering, and other small edge details at ISO 800 and above, the D 800 and D 800E appear to have slightly better detail. Perhaps the Nikon D 810s noise suppression is overly aggressive on extremely fine detail? Maybe they used a different lens? From these samples I see no "Visible advantage " to using the D810.

0 upvotes
Reality Check
By Reality Check (2 days ago)

"Note that in order to get maximal image quality out of the D810, we flipped the mirror up 3s prior to each exposure, and engaged electronic 1st curtain to eliminate any effects of the shutter opening on image sharpness."

Um yeah.. That may be fine and well for studio test scenes and landscapes, but how does that work for all the other types of photography - you know the other 90% of photography...

Seems something with lower mp would have greater benefit overall, unless test charts and shadowless landscapes are your thing..

3 upvotes
sandy b
By sandy b (1 day ago)

Tripod and shutter up improves output of every camera made. The d800 line handheld is still sharper with more detail than lesser mp camera, provided you are capable of good shooting techniques.

0 upvotes
Khizer
By Khizer (3 days ago)

I own the D800E and was at first tempted beyond reason to trade in my body for the D810. Thanks to this review, I have decided not to be the lab rat.

1 upvote
goosel
By goosel (3 days ago)

edges and corners are quite blurred with a fair amount of CA. Which lens was used?? Surely not the same one as with the D800 ??

0 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (3 days ago)

http://blog.kasson.com showed, that the D810 is practically ISOLESS over a wide range for scenes with average DR. That is, instead of ISO 2000 use ISO 64 and push 5 stops in post. Instead of ISO12800 use ISO 400 and push 5 stops in post.
Citation" It means that at normal scene dynamic ranges, there’s not much point in increasing the ISO from 64. You might as well push in post. In very wide dynamic range scenes, where read noise becomes important, turning up the ISO to as high as 5000 may help."

0 upvotes
Reality Check
By Reality Check (2 days ago)

Except that it does not actually compare at ISO64 pushed to ISO800 as a shot taken at ISO800 with better performance in that range - which is just about every other camera available in its class, and many in lower tiers as well.

0 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (2 days ago)

I don't understand exactly what you mean. It shows that pushing ISO 64 to 2000 in post and taking the shot at ISO 2000 are almost the same, agreeing with measurements. I don't see how that is achieved with other cameras in its class. Look at photography life.com to see what happens if a Canon 6D (best DR Canon) is pushed a few stops in post at this lower ISO . At higher ISOs other cameras with lesser pixels fare better, but you still get very good results when downsizing. The A7r will behave similarly as it has probably the same sensor.

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (3 days ago)

It's good to be king :^)

1 upvote
SimonWilder
By SimonWilder (3 days ago)

Why are the RAW files so much larger in the studio shots compared to the D800E?

0 upvotes
lacikuss
By lacikuss (3 days ago)

Excellent resolution and detail, unexpectedly bad high ISO performance for this camera class IMO. No matter how you put it, smaller pixel pitch won't see as much light in darkness as a the bigger "eyes"...

BTW I made my opinion on the picture samples not on the lab stuff which is only an approximation to the real thing (the picture samples).

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (3 days ago)

? Look at Dxo measurements, S/N and DR. when scaled down to print size it is similar to 5D3, D610 A7,A7r... So, quite good.
If you want to use all the 36MP at ISO 6400 you won't get it. But the nice thing is: I can use it for best in class DR at lower ISOs and when scaled down to 16MP get very good high ISO performance. That's great isn't it?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
Reality Check
By Reality Check (2 days ago)

Depends on what tradeoffs one considers necessary for their output. The DR advantage is gone by ISO160 depending on what you compare it with, and most of the other options available own the D8xx at every other ISO setting..
What significance does that have? Well if most photographers would assess their needs accurately, by their work as opposed to their ego, they would realize that a good majority of their images are shot above ISO160. There are a lot of photographers out their who rarely step outside of a studio, and many capturing things that do not move at long shutter speeds, but ironically (the ego assertion) they do not represent the majority of D8xx owners - who would be better served by other bodies..

0 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (2 days ago)

Reality Check: it depends on whether you compare per pixel DR or for print size. Until ISO 600 the DR is excellent even per pixel and looses of course thereafter. What I like is that you can use it to have great resolution and DR at lower ISOs and still have the possibility to get very good results when downsized to the pixel count of other cameras in its class. If I only were to shoot at higher ISOs I would go for a DF (I like this camera), but the AF is a little on the slower side. Nikon does't have a D800 body with the DF sensor which would suit me best. So in terms of performance all around I think Thom Hogan is right, its probably the best all around camera right now on the market (unf. the price is on the higher side).

0 upvotes
mestreamador
By mestreamador (4 days ago)

A Nikon, em seus projetos de engenharia,sempre aguarda uns anos para lançar novos produtos diferencial, fazendo com que nos façamos up-date ou adquirindo o novo equipamento.Portanto pessoal é sempre bom aguardar as novas investidas das potencias como Nikon, Canon, para a gente não ficar com equipamento descontinuado.No meu pensar esta é a maquina.!.
Pretendo adquiri-la em um verão próximo.
abs a todos
MestreAmador

1 upvote
Guenter Hofstaedter
By Guenter Hofstaedter (4 days ago)

your right renault5,
my mistake.
i mixed some pics in the gallery by accident becouse
on this day i shoot with D4s and D810 !

http://www.pbase.com/mascular/d810_samples so hier you will find another samples
( ready to print, so sharpnes i a bit more )
most of them i did shortly after unpacking the camera, to get a quick overview !
when i have a time i will of course take some more carefully shoot that will become better ( i hope )

0 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (4 days ago)

What a joke, Nikon can't even produce its sensors.

0 upvotes
sandy b
By sandy b (3 days ago)

The only joke around here is your constant inane comments.

2 upvotes
Wubslin
By Wubslin (1 day ago)

@sandy b: Didn't you know that beavertown produces his own sensors? He has a workshop in his garage he uses to make everything he needs from raw elements instead of buying things from other people like a total loser.

Why can't you do that?

2 upvotes
Mike Griffin
By Mike Griffin (14 hours ago)

Joke is: Nikon makes the steppers that make the sensors.

0 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (13 hours ago)

Not being able to produce its own sensors isn't good for Nikon for their future.

Canon will have a brighter future than Nikon in the long run.

0 upvotes
sangeethpp
By sangeethpp (4 days ago)

Even though it doesn't show a big difference in IQ from d800,it still stands on top...no point in comparing a 36MP camera to a 22MP one(almost half MP) ,only because it has similar pricing and features...D810 stands alone as a great camera....comparing 22MP to sony A7s's 12MP (almost half) also shows big difference...in that way Nikon d810 does its maximum that a 36 MP can...

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
linsen80586
By linsen80586 (4 days ago)

I can't see any difference.

2 upvotes
Lassoni
By Lassoni (4 days ago)

The ergonomics are getting worse and worse with every new nikon body. Not only did it take 2 years for nikon to make "movie record" button customizable for ISO, but they also happened to move the meter mode selector to somewhere really really awkward. How are you supposed to hold those top left buttons, while simultaneously trying to spin the wheel with right hand finger. You could do this with a light lens, but even then it seems risky. You run into risk of damaging your mount, because there is no ergonomical way of doing this without losing the support of your lens, which in turn is big risk when you go into lenses that start weighting more (teles are obvious and heavy, but I struggled even with a 24-70).

This is really an inexcusable design choice. As if it's not bad enough when trying to switch between AF-S and AF-C whilst trying to support a lens... Why did they even had to put the movie button in there in the first place? D7000 had it right. Y fix something that isn't broken?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Thematic
By Thematic (4 days ago)

It really is not that difficult.

1 upvote
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (4 days ago)

Cry us a river.

5 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (3 days ago)

Fortunately noone's forcing you to buy one.

2 upvotes
Lassoni
By Lassoni (3 days ago)

ofc not, that's why I'm just pointing out that there are nikon bodies with better ergonomics out there. Heck even the D800 has it better, and that's quite rich compliment.

0 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (2 days ago)

Lassoni, your original comment was "slightly" OTT, which is why I (and others) commented.

I (but who am I?) find the grip of the 810 better than my current 800. The 800 grip is just slightly too shallow for average sized hands and as irrelevant as a grip might seem, it's something one notices (particularly with recently clipped nails, ha ha) every time one picks up the camera. It's not lethal, just a repetitive minor annoyance. So there's progress for you.

Need I go on? Better viewfinder (instantly noticeable), smoother and quieter shutter action (instantly noticeable). So what's no to like? The minor shuffling around of a few buttons?

0 upvotes
Reality Check
By Reality Check (2 days ago)

Your explanation of why you and others 'commented' sounds logical and intelligent, except that it could have also simply been typical forum retaliation against anyone bad mouthing any Nikon body especially the D8xx - which is what happens 100% of the time it occurs.

As for the OP comments;
Just about anyone older than the D7000/D6xx/D8xx/4x knows the current ergonomics are terrible, literally becoming the opposite of 'ergonomic'.. Nikon is headed towards needing to have a ergonomic safety specialist visit each customer to show them how to operate the camera without suffering short/long term discomfort.. Everything that had been evolving up to the D700/D3/D3xx has been thrown out the window and replaced with - something else.

But hey, lets not be too critical of Nikon, maybe they know something the rest of us don't.. perhaps they have inside knowledge that humans will have grown a third arm in the near future..

3 upvotes
Joed700
By Joed700 (1 day ago)

@Lassoni & Reality Check - I would agree with you in regards to the ergonomics. Nikon had it right when they introduced the D300 and D700 in terms of ergonomics, colors, LCD display, etc. However, the only improvement they made with the D800 was higher MP, and they screw up on the WB, AF button, low light performance and LCD display. I had to paid $35 for Nikon to adjust the color on LCD color display to rid of the green tint. I've recently acquired a used D600 (no wants them due to dust/oil issues) and it's a better camera compared to the D800 in terms of speed, colors and low light performance. 36MP is better some say...compared the images size by size and the differences are minimal. I can go on about all these half-ass products Nikon's been producing lately...

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (1 day ago)

@ Lassoni, Reality Check and Joed700: so now we know.

0 upvotes
Joed700
By Joed700 (4 days ago)

I'll consider the upgrade if the D810's low light performance is comparable to the D4s...we'll wait and see.

0 upvotes
huyzer
By huyzer (4 days ago)

Moire and color artifacts around such are worse in the D810.

1 upvote
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (4 days ago)

... as you'd expect from a sensor with the capability to resolve more detail than previous generations (lack of AA filter, electronic 1st curtain decreasing potential shutter shock, etc.).

0 upvotes
Timbukto
By Timbukto (4 days ago)

Really? So we should not expect what Nikon wrote in verbatim in their press release: "Image quality further benefits from the application of Nikon’s exclusive EXPEED 4 image processing engine, which also provides enhancements to overall performance while suppressing instances of false color and moiré."

I think hindsight is 20/20 here...obviously based on results we should not expect much...but prior to seeing both studio and real-world results I did feel silly and expect better moire suppression.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
huyzer
By huyzer (3 days ago)

Yes, I realize that Rishi Sanyal. Thanks for the reply.

0 upvotes
Guenter Hofstaedter
By Guenter Hofstaedter (4 days ago)

this is a half sized pic from the harley davidson meeting with the D810+58 f/1.4
http://www.pbase.com/mascular/image/156717479/original

Its not perfekt, so no comments nessesary, just take a look, thats all !

0 upvotes
Boky
By Boky (4 days ago)

Those sample photos are the best I've seen... ever! Truly outstanding. Thank you for sharing.
Nick

1 upvote
renault5
By renault5 (4 days ago)

EXIF says D4S for some reason

3 upvotes
Dougbm_2
By Dougbm_2 (4 days ago)

Oversharpened

1 upvote
GPW
By GPW (4 days ago)

Hey DP, how teleconverter friendly is this camera. Nikon tele's ( 1.7, 2xlll ). would like to see some samples

0 upvotes
G1Houston
By G1Houston (4 days ago)

We can complain all day about these dSLRs being too big, too heavy, and that they are dinosaur (which to some just means they are not mirrorless), but the IQ of this camera is just spectacular.

2 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (4 days ago)

Im going to upgrade from the D800e but to be truthful, this is more of a way for nikon go get the price back to MSRP till the D900 comes out. Its a old trick, it works for cars and so also with cameras.

0 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (4 days ago)

UMRP on the D800e is still $3300, as it has been from day one.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (3 days ago)

I think the street price is around $2600 (but im sure it goes back up to $3300)

0 upvotes
eestlane
By eestlane (4 days ago)

no need to find excuses not to upgrade to d810
its your problem if u dont have money
its absolutely way to upgrade, i did, and i have now d800, d810 and 5dm3
its no sense to have 1 body and change lenses
d810 has 300f4 constantly on
d800 has 85mm 1.4g
and 5dm3 135 L
i dont care about wide lens
i want to see closer whats over there, where u cant go

1 upvote
Michael_13
By Michael_13 (4 days ago)

Yeah, great idea!
By this way you can even cancel your membership at the local gym!

3 upvotes
Petak
By Petak (4 days ago)

Have we seen any of your work with all this expensive gear or you have just gotten rich recently and desperately need to shout it out?

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
mais51
By mais51 (4 days ago)

$12,000 worth of gears is hardly filthy rich - question is how fit is the OP to carry all of that weight

0 upvotes
Vladik
By Vladik (4 days ago)

Wow, these are some vibrant photos!

0 upvotes
3systermuser
By 3systermuser (5 days ago)

read DXO mark on this one, you will see the IQ is the same or extremely similar to that of the D800E.
and considering the price difference between the D810 and the D800E, there is no point getting it if you do not need a touch better AF, a bit better LV,etc over the D800E.
I think this is what D800E should have been, but it is now already dated even at this point, Nikon should focus its very limited R and D money onto FX mirrorless.
for me , the Sony A7R wins over all this extremely old dated D-SLR.

0 upvotes
tom43
By tom43 (4 days ago)

Why is it dated? The D810 delivers best image quality of all current full format sensor cameras together with a fantastic optical view finder, nice display, fast autofocus, huge number of lenses and this is all based on a technology platform which has been proven to deliver results under most demanding conditions. A true professional instrument! If you are as good as a photographer you should be proud of yourself!

11 upvotes
InTheMist
By InTheMist (4 days ago)

I've been shooting 1000 photos over three days on just one battery, and I never turned my camera off.

Who's dated now?

6 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (4 days ago)

Agree. A7r doesn't have electronic first curtain. Is it dated now? The core is the sensor and processor + optics (+ photographer!), it's important that they are not dated!

0 upvotes
PerL
By PerL (4 days ago)

"Extremly old dated D-SLR"? One has to understand that EVFs are subpar for many discriminating users (lag, bad dynamic range, longish blackouts, timing precision, lacking true-to-life-representation, etc etc). So its not about being dated, its about being demanding.
All things considered, this is one of the absolute best cameras on the market, in some ways the best. The images will look even better when Adobe does a real update on the RAW-conversion.

2 upvotes
PerL
By PerL (4 days ago)

Mirrorless fans should realize that EVFs is not up to par in several key areas, important to many - like lag, limited DR, long black outs etc. So its not about being out dated, it is about being demanding.

2 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (4 days ago)

I meant I agree with inthemist. There should be the possibility to reply to all comments and not only to the topmost one.
One thing that really annoys me with EVFs is macro work in suboptimal light or using flash. Lots of noise in the EVF, so it's hard to focus or black EVF, such that you need to turn off image preview and basically turn it into a simulation of an optical VF. This will get better with time, but right now I often use my DSLR instead of Fuji in that particular case.

1 upvote
Deliverator
By Deliverator (2 days ago)

A7r has inexplicable 11+7 bit compressed RAW, and ridiculous shutter slap.

Mirrorless fanboys should concern themselves with the pictures and not the specs.

0 upvotes
tom43
By tom43 (5 days ago)

Wouldn´t it make more sense to wait for the final versions of the RAW converters like ACR or (better) Capture One Pro? Furthermore, does it make really sense to judge this high resolution cameras with sub-optimal lenses? Why not shooting with a Zeiss Otus 55, Sigma 50 Art or Zeiss Apo-Sonnar 135? To my opinion these sensors deliver such outstanding results that you have to work under perfect conditions!

7 upvotes
wingnut1
By wingnut1 (5 days ago)

Totally agree, should have used some of Nikon's best (or other brand) fixed focal length lenses for at least 50% of test rather than "high quality" zoom lenses

1 upvote
Picturenaut
By Picturenaut (5 days ago)

DSC_8558 impressed me most: looks like the D810 is the sweetest pastry-shooting DSLR in the world. Good news for pastry shooters!

2 upvotes
rubank
By rubank (5 days ago)

Interesting. Almost as good as the "old" D800.
Definetly more moié, and less resolution according to DPRs studio comparison, especially in edges and corners.

Possibly a little, and I mean little, less colour noise from ISO 12800 and up.
So what.

0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (4 days ago)

The 'less resolution' you mention in the corners is likely due to lens/body mount variations; therefore, it's incorrect to say the D810, by any stretch of the imagination, has less resolution than the D800. It has more.

Its higher resolving ability also gives it more potential for false color.

The lower chroma noise at higher ISOs might have everything to do with the lower default saturation with this beta version of ACR.

2 upvotes
rubank
By rubank (3 days ago)

It´ s not just in the corners where 810 loses to 800.Look at the line bars. 810 just produces moiré when the going gets tough...
36 Mpix isn´t enough to get rid of the OLPF, you would need at least the double pixel count. Those who claim otherwise have blurry vision.

Nikon´s reason for the omission is just cost reduction.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
lensberg
By lensberg (5 days ago)

The 5D Mark III is an all-round class act... definitely superior to the D800 / 800E / 810 in low light...

As for DXO... well I suppose the average Nikon fan needs their egos propped up from a "scientific" point of view... thus its existence...

Its amazing how many pro's use Canon... despite DXO's claims of Nikon's vast sensor tech prowess... at most major international sporting events white lenses still reign supreme... with perhaps with a thin speckling of black glass here and there... :)

1 upvote
paulski66
By paulski66 (5 days ago)

You sound somewhat desperate...

12 upvotes
LSE
By LSE (5 days ago)

it's a nice camera but for low light 1DX d4 are the way to go. which leaves the question what is the 5DIII good for since its low resolution and banding problems make it a non starter for landscape and studio. I guess the extra 1fps over the 810 is better but the compromises in DR and noise are too much to ask for 1fps.

9 upvotes
raybies
By raybies (5 days ago)

I just sold my 5D3. I recently took it and my a6000 on a 6 week vacation. I also took a low powered ultrabook + LR5 and it really struggled with Canon RAW files, where as Sony ARW's would look quickly.
I was able to get more shadow detail with the a6000. In all honesty the only thing the 5D3 was slightly better at was fast auto focus of moving subjects... which I rarely shoot. The a6000 beat it in every other way... AE, WB, detail, colour, noise.
PS: I hate the a6000's viewfinder.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
badi
By badi (4 days ago)

@lensberg:
Oh, I didn't know DXO exists to please Nikon and it's fans. Thank you for the info.
By the way, maybe you should write that down on wikipedia so everybody to know it :).

0 upvotes
brycesteiner
By brycesteiner (4 days ago)

>>Its amazing how many pro's use Canon... despite DXO's claims of Nikon's vast sensor tech prowess... at most major international sporting events white lenses still reign supreme... with perhaps with a thin speckling of black glass here and there... :) <<

Because brand is what defines good images....

I learn so much here!

1 upvote
BJN
By BJN (4 days ago)

Sounds like camera creationism. The Church of the Holy White Canon.

1 upvote
raybies
By raybies (2 days ago)

Canon reign in the pro market ONLY bcos of company workflow, dependability and support; it has nothing to do with best tech.
Canon's are very well made... I dropped the 5D3 from 1.2m on a concrete floor, it bounded multiple times (sounded empty)... I was sure it was farked; just a scratch on the body and a bent strap ring lens also had a scratch on the hood.

0 upvotes
Joed700
By Joed700 (1 day ago)

Here is something you should know about 5D III. Yes, it has better WB and other nonessential features compared to the D800. The secret to the 5D III's low light performance is that it smudges the finer details of the images so that they will look smoother, which means that it lacks details in shadow areas. This works find for small prints...Canon's targeted customers are not pure photographers, but people who rely on the video features of the 5D III, while Nikon has the pure photographers in mind. Therefore, their approach to the design of their cameras are quite difference. Take two identical images with the 5D III & D800 and check out the shadow areas, and you'll see what I mean. BTW, Canon overpriced the 5D III because it is old technology by today's standards....Quick frankly, either 5D III or D800 are perfect cameras, and they both have their goods and bads.

0 upvotes
crashpc
By crashpc (5 days ago)

With all respect of (IN MY OPINION :-) ) better Nikon output for general use, I´m surprised how well 5D III holds its own, and how good it still is at low light. It still looks that Canon sensors noise cleans out easier, and also has better character. Hope they make some progress for their new lines, and that high megapixel count sensor will make it to APS-C, otherwise I´ll have to save some mony for Nikon :-)

3 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (5 days ago)

Strange DXO Mark always bashes Canon's sensors. But the 5D Mark III produces better IQ than the newly released D810 in terms of colours, sharpness, noise performance both in JPG and RAW.

9 upvotes
halfwaythere
By halfwaythere (5 days ago)

You forgot to add "In my humble opinion" at the beginning of your second sentence.

12 upvotes
d3xmeister
By d3xmeister (5 days ago)

As much as I love the Mark III, it doesn't even come close in any IQ aspect to the D800

14 upvotes
Johannes Zander
By Johannes Zander (5 days ago)

The D800 is allready better than the 5D MKIII.

13 upvotes
Timbukto
By Timbukto (5 days ago)

Everyone cares about pixel sharpness over anything else. Disregarding how much moire issues are being revealed in both the studio or real-world samples. Moire issues show on small prints while extra sharpness requires a slight nudge of a slider to be imperceptible on large prints. Why Nikon ignores their DR advantage and only focuses on their tack-sharp moire inducing AAless sensors is mind boggling.

Even in flat lighting with a zoom capturing even movement and I see moire.
DSC_8514 and DSC_8563 is just two I found so far.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
KW Phua
By KW Phua (5 days ago)

Now I look at the jpeg to see how good the IQ, because they is no raw RAW OFC. If the jpeg can be clean and detail then other, that mean that the RAW is good also. Some camera cooked too much on RAW, and taken up too much time on processing the RAW. The RAW look like slightly better then Canon's jpeg.

0 upvotes
LSE
By LSE (5 days ago)

the problem is that DR wise the 5DMKIII is basically a noise and banding party in shadows which is a non starter if you want real life DR. see Loyd Chambers extensive comparison of the huge drawbacks of the canon sensors. you simply cannot take them seriously and canon needs to catchup badly.

6 upvotes
KW Phua
By KW Phua (5 days ago)

@LSE DR wise I have to agree with you. Canon really need to catch up. DR mostly affecting Landscape photography, for action shooter usually shoot with higher ISO, Canon still not bad.

0 upvotes
KW Phua
By KW Phua (5 days ago)

Can Canon catch up with the IQ if the MP increase? I am not sure. This is what many birders like. We can crop a lot. Do not need to carry heavy lens. Canon please give me 7D2 with Hi MP and good IQ.

0 upvotes
InTheMist
By InTheMist (5 days ago)

Is it me or is the white balance looking much better?

1 upvote
Alec
By Alec (5 days ago)

I currently have a D800, and for tethered shooting using HDMI out to an external 24" monitor for manual focusing, I currently have to use an EyeFi card, because D800 won't simultaneously enable USB tether and HDMI output.

Is D810 able to do the latter?

Also on the video front, is it scaled from all pixels on the sensor or produced using line-skipping?

0 upvotes
Zlik
By Zlik (5 days ago)

about the video, it looks like it's the same line skipping method as the D800... Watch the moiré at 0:22 and 0:34 :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvP3bi6qU4c

0 upvotes
Galbertson
By Galbertson (5 days ago)

No hd,i tethering to external monitor??? I have limited eyesight and had hopes of using 7" monitor to focus stills shooting. Please tell me i can still use external monitor without using eye fi card!

0 upvotes
Alec
By Alec (5 days ago)

Galbertson on a D800 you can, if you capture pix on a memory card as opposed to directly in a computer.

Since D800 can write video to the memory card AND HDMI out, I was thinking it might also be able to do USB3 tethering and HDMI out concurrently as well, that D800 can't. So, anyone?

1 upvote
Blackraven
By Blackraven (5 days ago)

I owned a D800 for 18 months but sold it because the focussing couldnt be trusted. I used it primarily with a Nikon 20-70mm f2.8 and had the combo calibrated by Nikon. This improved the performance significantly but still only managed to produce in-focus shots around 90% of the time. I do a lot of travel photography and the mis-focussing caused many once-in-a-lifetime shots to be spoiled.
I have many other Nikon lenses and the only way that I could guarantee a high level of focus accuracy was when I manual-focussed with AI lenses using the green-focussing dot as an initial guide - but with final focus confirmation by eyesight. This got very tiring - especially as I am not a teenager any more!
As I have so many Nikon lenses - around 12 - I need to get another Nikon body. I was eagarly waiting for the D810 and with the supposed improved AF, I really hope that this time Nikon have got their AF act together.
I really hope that the D810 is what the D800 should have been in the first place

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Esign
By Esign (5 days ago)

Well, the camera doesn’t know where you want your exact focus point. In will make the best possible guess from the average of 51 measurements and hope for the best. But it still doesn’t KNOW. More pixels means more missed shots. In critical work, you must always choose YOUR focus point. That’s what real photography is all about. With my EOS-M, I can tap the screen, and haven’t missed focus once. Slow, but good.

1 upvote
Teru Kage
By Teru Kage (4 days ago)

Or maybe the focus couldn't be trusted coz you were using a non-existent 20-70mm lens :)
Seriously though, did you notice a pattern in terms of the missed focus photos (i.e. was there a particular type of photo/composition that the D800 would often misfocus)?

0 upvotes
mmitch
By mmitch (1 day ago)

Is it really that hard to focus manually? Particularly travel photography. I prefer to pic my own part of the subject to focus on. I think most photographers are spoiled and want the camera to do everything for them.

0 upvotes
brycesteiner
By brycesteiner (5 days ago)

I'm a little disappointed in this. The image samples have a lot of noise even at relatively low ISO (1800). The shuttershock is also noticeable in quite a few pictures and mentioned in the review on what they had to do for the sample page. Expecting your wedding party to wait 3 seconds between shots for the shutter to stop vibrating is excessive nowadays. Hopefully they'll have fix soon.
The sensor has so much detail, it really shows issues with the lenses.
I think I would choose a D4 over this one.

0 upvotes
Mike Griffin
By Mike Griffin (5 days ago)

I see no evidence of shutter shock

0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

The shutter shock is noticeable in our studio scene? No it's not - there was no shutter movement at all as we used electronic 1st curtain (EFC).

And, technically, it's more the mirror slap that a wedding photographer would have to worry about. As we show in our 'Lab Report - Electronic 1st Curtain' page, the shake introduced by the VR mechanism responding to the shutter opening is pretty much eliminated by EFC.

That said, no photographer - besides a landscape photographer - wants to shoot in Mirror Up mode.

By the way, EFC is only available in Mirror Up mode on the D810. We think this is a very strange choice by Nikon. Perhaps they feel that the vibrations induced by the mirror flipping up will swamp any benefits an EFC might bring? Secondly, EFC doesn't reduce shutter shock outside of Live View unless a delay is added between the shutter opening & initiation of exposure via EFC (since the shutter has to open). Perhaps they were unwilling to add this delay.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

But what makes least sense is Nikon's omission of EFC in Live View shooting mode sans Mirror Up. In Live View, the mirror is already up, so it makes little sense to ever engage Mirror Up in Live View. Nikon's requirement of Mirror Up simply to engage EFC means an odd shooting experience in Live View with EFC: the first press of the shutter does nothing (since the mirror is already up), and then the second press initiates the exposure electronically. The first press of the shutter button is an entirely unnecessary step. When EFC is engaged in Live View, the first press of the button should initiate the exposure electronically - as is the case for many mirrorless cameras.

We feel this is likely an oversight on the part of Nikon, and hope to see a fix for it in a future update.

1 upvote
brycesteiner
By brycesteiner (5 days ago)

Rishi, That is exactly what I was referring to.
>>"Note that in order to get maximal image quality out of the D810, we flipped the mirror up 3s prior to each exposure, and engaged electronic 1st curtain to eliminate any effects of the shutter opening on image sharpness. We talk about the benefits of electronic 1st curtain on the next page."<<
Which was the right thing to do. And I agree with you "We feel this is likely an oversight on the part of Nikon, and hope to see a fix for it in a future update."
Mike: quite a few of the samples demonstrate the shock. Here is one I grabbed quickly. Look at her eye brows or about any contrast details:
https://s3.amazonaws.com/masters.galleries.dpreview.com/2982018.jpg?X-Amz-Expires=3600&X-Amz-Algorithm=AWS4-HMAC-SHA256&X-Amz-Credential=AKIAJ7ICBHXPIPPMTNCQ/20140724/us-east-1/s3/aws4_request&X-Amz-Date=20140724T021625Z&X-Amz-SignedHeaders=host&X-Amz-Signature=230f6cd598d9709c63cfd81f7a4f7aae4738ac8710a5efff1ce1a5c427aefb38

0 upvotes
brycesteiner
By brycesteiner (5 days ago)

Her hair on her forehead clearly shows it too. Perhaps it just a lousy lens, but I don't think so.

0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

brycesteiner: That particular shot looks plenty sharp to me. At these resolutions, though, anything outside the plane of focus will appear unsharp.

Note also that that shot was taken at 1/250s. We're still going through our hundreds and hundreds of mirror slap/shutter shock images, but there's little reason to believe you'd see it at such a high shutter speed at the focal length used in that photo (55mm).

0 upvotes
brycesteiner
By brycesteiner (5 days ago)

The E-M5 and the E-M1 both had users deny the existence of it even though the images showed it. Olympus finally fixed the problem.
Maybe I'm seeing something else, but her right eye has double image around the eye brow. Her hairline in the center of her forehead also shows the double image even clearer. There are sections that look sharper on the right side of the image and don't seem to experience the shuttershock.
I would get the same thing on the Olympus cameras too. Part of the image would have it and other parts wouldn't. 1/250 is in the range for that size of sensor.

0 upvotes
Mike Griffin
By Mike Griffin (5 days ago)

The D810 really shines when resolving the green feathers and their shafts in the widget where there are very subtle colour differences.

0 upvotes
Marcelobtp
By Marcelobtp (5 days ago)

The only thing i want to know about the d810 is dynamic range at iso 64.
It is better then a7r iso 100?
This is really a true base iso 64 with all of its vantages?

0 upvotes
LSE
By LSE (5 days ago)

check Lloyd Chambers comparison. the D810 runs circles around any DSLR or mirrorless out there. it's the finest 35mm sensor in the world for this task.

4 upvotes
Marcelobtp
By Marcelobtp (4 days ago)

Thanks LSE.

0 upvotes
David Kinston
By David Kinston (5 days ago)

Question re shooting video with DX lens in DX mode on FX cameras.
What is the effect on resolution and other video settings?
I'm hoping the camera is smart enough to use the cropped area to produce full resolution videos without any penalty.
(I asked this question a while back re the D610 but no answers).

0 upvotes
chillgreg
By chillgreg (5 days ago)

Probably better luck asking in the forums David.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/1021

0 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (5 days ago)

Lens issue: in RAW, lots of fringing, visible as you move into the corners. Also , lens seems soft in corners. Which lens was used?

1 upvote
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

Nikkor AF-S 85mm f/1.8 G, as noted in the metadata if you hover over 'i' at the bottom right of each crop.

We can't control for lens/body mount variations, which are more visible with these high resolution sensors. And we don't wish to shoot at apertures smaller than f/5.6 b/c of diffraction-induced softening.

0 upvotes
Timbukto
By Timbukto (5 days ago)

The D800 studio shot still looks to be the best done. Either the lens copy was sharper or the test was done better, or something was magical about the D800 as it clearly is just as sharp with the least moire. So far it seems the best of the 3 for the versatility and money is the D800, the rest seems to be technique, chance, or lens copies.

0 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (5 days ago)

The only improvement I can see (and I'm talking only RAW) is that at high ISO the D810 has less chroma noise, otherwise they are so close as to not matter, at any ISO. Clearly Sony won't be getting any more out of its current sensor technology, not that it needs to do much more. The main reason I'd get a D810 is if I had a D700, it's not worth a D800 user upgrading. The native ISO 64 and increased shooting speed are welcome but not reason enough to upgrade.

I wonder if there are many real breakthroughs left on the sensor front using current technology. Canon needs to deliver a 7D II with a sensor that is line-ball with the Sony efforts, lest they face the nightmare of Sony releasing all new sensors that further widen the considerable gap that already exists.

0 upvotes
mgblack74
By mgblack74 (5 days ago)

Actually, as a D800 user I don't really care what real world samples are like. I know they will only be good. But thanks for trying to think like a D800 user. What has sold me on the upgrade is the multitude of refinements, specifically in AF, AF accuracy, and group AF and a new warranty to replace my early D800. ISO 64 may not sound significant but it buys me some f/stops when using a big flash outside that only syncs to 1/250. The IQ may be a tick better without an AA filter but it's the easier operability that will sway D800/E users.

0 upvotes
RichRMA
By RichRMA (5 days ago)

It doesn't matter much, D800/810. If people want the lowest noise and to preserve detail at high ISO, then a 36mp sensor is not the way to go, even if you downsize to match a 12-16mp sensor. If they bring out something like a new D700 with the 4s sensor, that would be an alternative.

0 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (5 days ago)

Only D800 owners with more money than sense would rush out to upgrade. If you seriously think the small differences will improve your photography you need a new hobby.

4 upvotes
Daviddgf
By Daviddgf (5 days ago)

So your a canon researcher for your day job?
What a dick!

0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

Note that the D810's seemingly lower chroma noise at high ISO might be due to lower overall saturation in these ACR conversions. The ACR version used is a beta version, so the color profile may not yet be final.

Take a look at how much more saturated the D800E appears to be. That'll likely have an effect on observed chroma noise.

We'll hold back on more definitive comments on noise until a final ACR version is released.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (5 days ago)

Sorry Daviddgf that you are flipping burgers for a career, but no need to take it out on others. I'm sure you'd love to do research, if you knew what it meant.

1 upvote
chillgreg
By chillgreg (5 days ago)

@Daviddgf is your "I'm a whackjob" T-Shirt in the wash?

0 upvotes
aftab
By aftab (5 days ago)

High ISO noise is better than D800 and better than A7r starting from ISO400.

0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

The differences are marginal, at best (in Raw, anyway).

Also, make sure you're comparing shots taken with the same exposure. In ISO 12.8k shadows, the D810 performs on par with the D800E, & perhaps a tiny bit better than the D800. The fact that the D810 & D800/E perform better than the A7R in this particular comparison is mostly due to the fact that the A7R received 1/3EV less exposure.

We are still in the process of making sure all cameras are shot at the same exposures in Raw.

0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

Also, in general, noise differences of less than 1/3 EV aren't worth poring over, as they likely fall somewhere within the margin of error.

First, there's the issue of potential shutter speed inaccuracy at high shutter speeds. To be fair, though, the margin of error is likely tighter in our low light scene b/c the lower shutter speeds used tend to be more accurate.

But then you have to consider that ACR performs some basal level of noise normalization, even with NR set to 0 (as we do).

So we'd encourage everyone to be wary when talking about minuscule differences in noise performance.

2 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (5 days ago)

Mr. Sanyal: at photographylife.com they talked about using the new Nikon software instead of ACR, since ACR delivered suboptimal results. This of course would make comparisons with other cameras redundant. Nevertheless, could it be that at this stage the D810 is not supported in an optimal way by ACR? Other than that, I appreciate the effort you provide in making things as transparent as possible and the way you interact with the commenters!

4 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

No worries, that's appreciated. Audience perspective is important when you're trying to address, well, an audience :)

Yes we choose not to use manufacturer software as it's a limited use-case. Furthermore, the manufacturer software's default settings are generally what's reflected in JPEG anyway.

ACR use is far more widespread. But it has its downsides for comparisons - mainly some level of noise normalization. Of course, such normalization is sensible - it's not like you see worse or smaller sensors performing as good as better or bigger ones b/c of this basal level of NR!

There's some internal interest in using dcraw for noise comparisons, at least when it comes to quantitation. The upside of using dcraw is that there's absolutely no noise reduction performed on the Raw data (AFAIK). The downside is that very few people use dcraw, so for visual results, we feel ACR (zero'd out) is more representative. So we're kind of stuck between a rock and a hard place there...

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
1 upvote
qianp2k
By qianp2k (5 days ago)

Only slightly. Bear in mind that DPR used Planar T* 85mm F1.4 ZA lens which is an Alpha-lens thru adapter tested on A7R, not a native FE lens such as FE 55/1.8, so it's not a quite fair test. If that adapter is LA-EA4 that built-in SLT motor, then A7R will inherit 1/3-stop ISO disadvantage from SLT compared to the native lens on D810.

1 upvote
Photoman
By Photoman (5 days ago)

The good thing now that Nikon's NX-D software is free...for Windows only thought.

0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

qianp2k: We used the LA-EA3, no built-in SLT.

There is still a 1/3 EV disadvantage to the A7R in Raw b/c of the shorter exposure. We will re-shoot it shortly using our new, standard, matched exposure method in Raw.

Probably with the FE 55mm as well, btw.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
qianp2k
By qianp2k (5 days ago)

Thanks Rishi. In very high ISO, A7R could have slight more noise due to full-time LV so sensor will be overheated a bit more.

0 upvotes
qianp2k
By qianp2k (5 days ago)

It still show more moire than A7R.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison/fullscreen?attr18=daylight&attr13_0=nikon_d810&attr13_1=sony_a7r&attr15_0=raw&attr15_1=raw&attr16_0=100&attr16_1=100&normalization=full&widget=130&x=-0.6282213213349404&y=0.37960868016953847

2 upvotes
InTheMist
By InTheMist (5 days ago)

Yep. Weaker AA filter

Neither camera looks really good in that specific use case.

0 upvotes
Sonylover1
By Sonylover1 (5 days ago)

Comic.
800E looks better - and less moire.
Sony A7R kicks them both.
End of story.

If I had Sony A7R sensor in my old trustworthy Canon 7D I could go on for 10 years still to come. The 7D is my all-favourite for action-photo.
My RX100 for street.

I think you shouldnt by a new camera more than 2 times in a decade.

2 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (5 days ago)

? What are you comparing? At ISO 6400-25600, RAW the Nikon looks better IMO than the A7r, slightly less noise, especially color noise. Several review sites already pointed to 1/3 to 1/2 a stop advantage. Your comment is exaggerated ("kicks them both"). At lower ISOs differences in the used lenses could make a difference. But even then I can't see an advantage in the A7r or D800E.

8 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

800E having less moire is highly debatable; they're very similar here. And if it does have less moire, it may be due to slight softening by the presence of the OLPF + the element that reverses its effects, or by the ever-so-slight softening due to the shutter going up to initiate the exposure.

0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

Where does the A7R kick them both? Remember to not over-interpret edge/corner sharpness, as this is highly lens/mount dependent. That is variation in lens quality, lens decentering, lens/body mount variations, etc. These are all more noticeable at such high resolutions.

More centrally, the D810 is the sharpest compared to the D800/E & A7R.

Though, at this point, we're really splitting hairs, so to speak.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
7 upvotes
EricCul
By EricCul (5 days ago)

@Sonylover1. I also have an RX100 series and A7R cameras and love them. But, you need glasses if you think the A7R "kicks" the Nikon D810. Then again, it may be a silly fanboy comment to get attention.

The Nikon D810 is top of my shopping list.

1 upvote
Valiant Thor
By Valiant Thor (5 days ago)

"More centrally, the D810 is the sharpest compared to the D800/E & A7R.

Though, at this point, we're really splitting hairs, so to speak."

Well then, let's get some hi-res samples of split hairs and get to the bottom of this.

0 upvotes
Timbukto
By Timbukto (5 days ago)

There is an area that the Sony A7R is superior, and that is contrary to Nikon's claims of improved moire handling (because it surely isn't that good in NX-D and just isn't there in its OOC jpeg), the Sony's A7R *clearly* does seem to have some good anti-moire mojo going on in their OOC jpegs. This is a real-world advantage.

0 upvotes
Sonylover1
By Sonylover1 (2 days ago)

@EricCul and HFLM.
This was a spontaneus comment after an extensive analyse of the DP testchart.
My point is that 810 isnt THAT good so you throw your 800E and the A7R over board. IT has other advantages.
D200 was a major step from D70 as was D700 over D200.
The D90 and D300(s) wasnt a Giant leap.
Canon 30D, 7D and 5DIII plays out all the other versions.

Sony did a smart thing - on the same platform releasing 3(!) different cameras - two of them extreme in their respective usage.

P.S I am to old to be a fan boy.

0 upvotes
Anastigmat
By Anastigmat (5 days ago)

Digital camera sales are slumping, and it is not hard to figure out why. There is really little that is worth buying. If you have an APS-C model, you can either keep upgrading to another APS-C model and get no improvement in image quality, or you can spend $2K or more for a slight improvement in image quality. Prices are not falling, and image quality has pretty much remained the same. Consumers are asked to pay more when Nikon took out an expensive low pass filter so the chance of a photo being ruined by moire is increased. Sounds like a raw deal to me.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
10 upvotes
Retzius
By Retzius (5 days ago)

I'm sure this is a great camera but somehow these output of these images don't wow me.

5 upvotes
Simon97
By Simon97 (5 days ago)

Looking at the D810 vs D800 (non E) RAWs, the D800 seems a bit sharper and (of course) suffers less moire. Very noticeable in the etching to the left and other places of fine detail around the test scene.

1 upvote
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

But you have decouple the effects of lens/body mount variations on left/right/corner sharpness.

We've noted that the D810 with our 85/1.8 lens suffers from slight left-side softness, while the D800E with the same lens suffers from right -side softness. On the other hand, the lens seems well aligned w/ the D800.

0 upvotes
Rishi Sanyal
By Rishi Sanyal (5 days ago)

The larger point here is that small variations at edges shouldn't be over-interpreted.

The D810 is considerably sharper than the D800 more centrally.

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Total comments: 1096
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