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July 2014 | By Barney Britton


Preview based on a pre-production Nikon D810

Two years after Nikon shook up the high-end DSLR market with the 36MP D800 and D800E, it has consolidated the 800-series with the release of a new camera, the D810. The D810 replaces both previous 800-series models, and will be offered at an MSRP of $3299 - about the same as the D800E, and a little more than the D800. Why is the D810 priced like the D800E, and not the D800? Well, the D810 takes the D800E's 'AA filter cancellation' trick one step further by dispensing with an AA filter entirely, which should result in a camera that offers greater resolution than either of the two models that it replaces.

Anti-aliasing filter aside, the D810 is not by any means a reinvention of the popular D800/E concept, but the handful of major changes should make the new camera more capable than its predecessors. Perhaps more importantly, they should also make the camera more attractive to potential buyers who have been weighing up whether or not to jump into full-frame. The D810 isn't a camera that you should necessarily sell your D800 or D800E for, but it's a better camera than both older models - at least on paper.

Following Nikon's general philosophy a few of the refinements made in the D4S have trickled down into the D810 and videographers especially should be pleased with a couple of the additions to its video feature set. Other welcome changes include a redesigned shutter and mirror mechanism to mitigate resolution-reducing shock from shutter actuation, and a new S-Raw mode for reduced-resolution raw capture (Nikon owners have been asking for that one for years).

Nikon D810: Key Specifications

  • 36.3MP Full-frame CMOS sensor (no AA filter)
  • ISO 64-12,800 (expands to ISO 32-51,200)
  • Electronic first-curtain shutter and redesigned mirror mechanism
  • New 'RAW Size S' 9MP Raw mode
  • Expeed 4 engine
  • Max 5fps shooting in FX mode, 7fps in DX (with battery grip + EN-EL18 / AA batteries)
  • 3.2in 1,229k-dot RGBW LCD screen with customizable color
  • OLED viewfinder information display
  • Improved Scene Recognition System allows face detection in OVF mode
  • 'Split screen zoom' display in live view allows horizons/lines to be leveled precisely
  • 51-point AF system with new 'Group Area AF' mode (inherited from D4S)
  • New 'flat' Picture Control mode (intended to appeal to videographers)
  • Auto ISO available in manual exposure mode
  • Zebra strips for focus checking in video mode
  • Uncompressed HDMI output with simultaneous recording to memory card
  • Built-in stereo microphone

D800 and D800E: Two become one...

In testing, we found that the practical difference in raw detail reproduction between the D800 and D800E was minimal except in a very narrow range of circumstances - specifically, tripod-mounted short shutter duration shooting at wide apertures with prime lenses.

As such, if two models must be consolidated into one, it makes sense for that single model to offer the highest possible resolution. We can only hope that Nikon has given the D810 the same sharper, more detailed JPEGs that it (apparently arbitrarily) gave the D800E, which were significantly more print-ready than those from the D800 for no obvious reason at all beyond justifying the extra $300 MSRP.

Some people might not have been entirely sure why Nikon released the D800 and D800E as separate models two years ago. Our take on it at the time was that the D800E offered some advantages, sometimes, but if you weren't too bothered you could be perfectly happy with the D800 and you'd have saved a little cash. Perhaps now, after success with the D7100 and D5300 the company felt more confident about omitting the AA filter from its highest-resolution body - albeit naturally at the risk of more moiré than we'd expect from the D800 and possibly also the D800E.

D810 versus D800/E: Specification highlights

  • 36.3MP full-frame CMOS sensor with no AA filter (D800E has effects of AA filter 'canceled')
  • 5fps maximum shooting in FX mode (compared to 4fps in D800/E)
  • New 'Group Area AF' mode (5 AF points can act together)
  • New electronic first-curtain shutter and redesigned sequencer/mirror balancer to reduce vibrations
  • New 'highlight-weighted' metering option (to preserve highlight detail in contrasty scenes)
  • 1080/60p movie recording with built-in stereo mic (compared to 1080/30p with monaural audio)
  • 3.2" 1,229k-dot RGBW LCD screen (compared to 3.2" 921k-dot RGB)
  • Power aperture available while shooting video to SD/CF card (compared to only when using HDMI)
  • The ability to record to memory card while simultaneously outputting video over HDMI
  • New 'flat' Picture Control mode (intended for videographers who need broader dynamic range)
  • Unlimited continuous shooting (previously 100-frame limit)


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2014 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 1218
12345
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (20 min ago)

...........Compared to the D800, images from the D810 look like they've had a veil removed............... OK, but is this due to the elimination of the low pass filter OR the new Clarity feature in Picture Controls? (I'm surprised you do not discuss the Clarity feature)

With Clarity set fairly high (as it is in some Picture styles) the images definitely look more snappy in MY preliminary tests. The key is to compare a D800 vs. D810 image .... made with the D810 Clarity control set to OFF. (I have not done so yet)

You can set Clarity high in Adobe Camera Raw with any camera but the D810 has this feature in-camera, and it is ON by default (at various levels depending on the Picture style in use) ... while the D800 does not.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (24 min ago)

The Moiré issue depends on pixel size in relation to pattern size and focal length plus distance. Hence you can work around it when it becomes an issue.

0 upvotes
57even
By 57even (31 min ago)

I am really struggling to see any difference to the detail levels between the D800 (RAW ISO100) and the D810, though I do see a lot more moire.

Not sure I could use this camera for a fashion shoot, or even a studio portrait.

0 upvotes
marc petzold
By marc petzold (3 hours ago)

@HowaboutRAW
The A7/R/S Series use a 11+7bit Delta compression in RAW terms,
for myself, i'd be happier with a true 14bit lossless or lossy RAW compression -
but let's face it - it seems almost *all* current Sony DSLR/DSLMs are using that kind of delta RAW compression - and you just can't say that the results into RAW from the A7/R/S or A77, II & A99 are just bad, period - no offence.
I'm happy with my A3000, NEX5 & A7 series with the RAW results, into the end, the picture, composition counts, not any technical camera specs onto paper.

And yes, there's a difference between 12/14 bit RAW, lossy & lossless compression, but negligble, i've read the results ages ago onto the net which tested the D300(s) with 12 & 14bits for example, my D7000 shoots always 12bit RAW, and about 1-2% into 14bits lossless when it does really count. About the A7R shutter: i don't find it that annoying, but i don't own the A7R, but have had it in my hands. I shoot RAW since 2001 (Oly C-5050Z).

Greetings

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
marc petzold
By marc petzold (3 hours ago)

To be continued...i am way sure you're aware of this, about the Delta 11+7 Bits compression:

http://diglloyd.com/blog/2014/20140212_2-SonyA7-RawDigger-posterization.html

For sure, that does exist, but...i've never seen sth like that into the real world, from my A7 Pictures yet, i mean, no compression artefacts, to be exactly.

One has to mention that these are also way special circumstances. I hope Sony would include a real lossless compressed 12 & 14bits RAW Mode, for instance, my Sony DSC V3 from 2004 already recorded 14bit RAW files.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (8 min ago)

marc:

I don't think I've ever called the raw results from the A99, A77 and, now A77II, bad. In fact I like all three of those cameras for lower ISOs. And the image quality improves with use of the good A mount SonyZeiss lenses.

I don't like the fact that a Sony sales representative told me, in person, that that the A77 would be nearly noise free at ISO 6400. Nor do I like it when Sony claims the mirror doesn't impede high ISO performance one bit--when clearly the Nikon D610 is a better high ISO body than the A99, but uses nearly the same sensor.

I don't spend a lot of effort reading up on the exact terms of the raw compression used for the A mirrorless, but the results seem consistently weak. And it is simply baffling as to why Sony insists on this compression, when Sony has perfectly good to excellent lenses for this system. (I guess smaller raws allow for faster frame rates, well then Sony should provide a choice.)

0 upvotes
Guenter Hofstaedter
By Guenter Hofstaedter (3 hours ago)

I own the D810, but to be honest, the sensor technology is at a point where no significant improvments can be done ! yes, the D810 is a good camera, but the sensor technology is old chesse. have you ever seen stills from a Sigma Merill 2 or 3 ? ( not perfect for all, but in native Iso the details and colors are shocking ( especialy for pround 36mp camera users)

5 upvotes
marc petzold
By marc petzold (34 min ago)

exactly, if you take the time and carefully postprocess the Sigma Merrill RAWs...the details are awesome, my DP2M does have medium format quality.

For these guys who always believe in nothing, check out this youtube video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3VjyHQiqdE

Comment edited 56 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Eric Glam
By Eric Glam (4 hours ago)

DPreview team,

The video samples you've posted are 23.976fps, not 60fps (I've downloaded the original MOV files).
Please correct the labels under the videos, and please upload a true 60fps video.
Thanks.

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
HSway
By HSway (4 hours ago)

I always enjoy the 'Shooting experience' series.
I just wanted to mention that the ‘Odd experience using EFC in LV’ note presents more subjective perception.
If you shoot in LV this reminds you that you are shooting in LV (I only focus in LV) which may not be the optimal mode for you. And that it drains more power from the battery and introduces more noise into the image which may or may not be a factor for one depending on settings and on the nature of the shoot and the requirements one has. or whether you shoot at ambient temperatures of 30 - 45 C which is common in some areas. So there is quite a different view to this - as the shooting experience goes - as well.

0 upvotes
NiklaiN
By NiklaiN (6 hours ago)

Use Nikon software for Nikon RAW files. You will see miracles!

0 upvotes
groucher
By groucher (5 hours ago)

And you will do miracles.

The reason why Adobe is incapable of incorporating something as great as NX2's Selection Brush Tool into Photoslop's antiquated toolset is one of photography's great mysteries.

0 upvotes
Damo83
By Damo83 (3 hours ago)

@NiklaiN from your experience how does Nikon's raw conversion software compare with Capture One, assuming you have tried both? And using which camera? Cheers.

1 upvote
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (14 min ago)

I agree; I get MUCH better image quality when converting a RAW file with Nikon NX-D vs. Adobe Camera Raw. BUT ..... only the new NX-D supports the D810. **If you use CaptureNX2, you end up with a very small file after conversion from NEF to TIF.**

NX-D works perfectly and it is FREE, but it is not nearly as versatile as CaptureNX2. (I guess Nik will no longer work with Nikon on the Capture software so Nikon has gone with SilkyPix software in developing NX-D. So with the D810 and future cameras, we won't be able to use NX2).

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (6 hours ago)

Interesting that the 5D3 images might be a little smaller but they are consistently much sharper, especially at the higher ISO's.

I'm sure the D810 is very good but it's overkill for 90% of subjects compared to the excellent Canon

0 upvotes
DarkShift
By DarkShift (6 hours ago)

These are not resolution chart images.

5D3 images were shot with different lens and smaller aperture which give longer DOF. That helps to keep 3D subjects sharper from back to front.

0 upvotes
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (5 hours ago)

They are put here for direct comparison and the Canon are much better whether you choose to believe it or not

0 upvotes
DarkShift
By DarkShift (4 hours ago)

No it's not. The difference in corner sharpness is most likely due to different aperture. Otherwise I see much more detail in D810 images.

I have owned or used all 5D series cameras and their sensor performance is quite lackluster compared D800 and D810. Dynamic range is even worse than with my EM-5. Canon needs to wake up.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
BigJohnno
By BigJohnno (3 hours ago)

"Canon are much better whether you choose to believe it or not" -
<yawn> - Really? Are we going there again on a Nikon v Canon debate? Thought we left this behind in the playground.

3 upvotes
Mikael Risedal
By Mikael Risedal (3 hours ago)

strange. I find all d810 raw files much sharper than Canons , also at 25 and 50K iso. AND I use Canon and Nikon daily in my work

Comment edited 14 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (9 min ago)

The entire Nikon vs. Canon comparo issue is mostly academic. If you own a half dozen Nikon or Canon lenses, you will probably stick to your current brand, no matter how much better one camera is than another.

And I'm sure that both EOS Mk III and Nikon D800 series owners are perfectly happy with what they own.

0 upvotes
h2k
By h2k (6 hours ago)

Some interesting findings here and i enjoyed the comparisons with 2 or 3 different versions of an image. Still i would have loved to see 100 % crop comparisons of D800 vs D810 to appreciate how the "veil is lifted" from the D810's AA-filterless images.

I thought the examples for shadow retrieving (yellow plane, rusted oldtimer) looked exaggerated, slightly HDRish.

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 hours ago)

You can take a look at the studio scene comparison and simply add the D800 against the D810. The difference is most visible in JPEG.

0 upvotes
karwaiwesley
By karwaiwesley (6 hours ago)

I checked out the D800 vs D810 images RAW ISO100 files.

I see *sharper* D800 details with the portraits vs D810. Other than moire, the D810 is sharper with lines, etc.

0 upvotes
h2k
By h2k (5 hours ago)

Barney, thanks for the hint! (Real life photos would be nicer though :) ).

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (7 min ago)

Barney: Did you test D800 vs. D810 with the CLARITY control completely disabled? I am still wondering if that control is affecting the results. It is ON, at one level or another, in most Picture Control modes.

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (7 hours ago)

My D800 and lenses are beginning to acquire a nice pate, must be my sweaty hands. I really like, maybe even love that camera (which, and that may come as a surprise to some of you, was made in Japan by skilled craftsmen and -women).

Ming Thein described it as a camera he valued but couldn't "love". I feel differently.

0 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (7 hours ago)

FF is going to die in years.

Nikon should migrate their FF lenses into DX.

Put some decent glasses to your DX systems to safe your company please.

Next should be mirrorless - NOT 1" tiny sensor!

The D810 is an overly priced toy, should be sold in half price.

2014 still no touchscreen?

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Johannes Zander
By Johannes Zander (6 hours ago)

Why "NOT 1" tiny sensor" if it could deliver the IQ of a D810?
There will always be different formats.
FF will not go away and MF is still there and will be for a reason.

3 upvotes
Ian from Berks
By Ian from Berks (6 hours ago)

It's about quality, I am about to migrate to full frame Nikon after giving up on my appalling Sony pile of rubbish - simply because it is a camera with a mirror. I want a camera that is a camera first and a computer second- not a camera that is a computer first and a. Camera second.

1 upvote
Timbukto
By Timbukto (8 hours ago)

I see moire in DSC_8405 (tree + wood benches), DSC_8514 (lady riding brown horse, moire on pants), and DSC_8563 (man in denim jacket on car). I don't consider the areas of moire to be under strong lighting but actually rather soft, and would like to know out of those pictures which were possibly tripod shots vs handheld?

0 upvotes
kadardr
By kadardr (8 hours ago)

For your consideration:
http://blog.mingthein.com/2014/07/29/nikon-d810-vs-d800e-to-upgrade-or-not/

2 upvotes
l_d_allan
By l_d_allan (8 hours ago)

I'd be Very Interested to see "apples vs apples" comparisons between the D800e, D810, and Sony A7r as far as "Shutter Shock".

0 upvotes
thejohnnerparty
By thejohnnerparty (9 hours ago)

I just recently purchased the D610 with the kit lens. And so far I am very pleased. I like visiting DPR to learn more about photography and equipment. I am really enjoying the learning experience. But I digress. ....

When I first saw the gallery shots for D810 I was disappointed, but I went back and looked at them again. And, I have to say I was really impressed. There were many photos that I really enjoyed, but the photo of the old truck - OMG, the color, the contrast, the detail and clarity! How could we ask for more from a camera? And I have to say: I think the camera guy did a great job demonstrating different lenses and focal lengths. That bi-winged air frame @ 16 mm made me say "Really"? Before seeing that photo, I didn't think that 16 mm was necessary. That photo changed my mind about 16 mm. This is an addictive site. ;-)

3 upvotes
7829mark
By 7829mark (10 hours ago)

The review is disappointing. There are ergonomic changes in the camera's grip that was missed. Along with a 30% faster processor, much brighter view finder, a sharper LCD display, live view has new functions, the protective panel for hdmi and usb has been redesigned, changes in metering, video, battery power, etc. While there is no mega pixel wow, the sum total of all the changes is actually a big wow!. The EVS is 14.8 up from the 14.2 on the D800 and up considerably from the Canon D5 Mark III at 11.2 EVS. This increase in dynamic range and over the Canon shows up in much greater detail throughout the image. Did I mention video at 60 fps and moving aperture? Come on DPreview. You made a mediocre analysis by missing key attributes. You can do better.

4 upvotes
Jeff Keller
By Jeff Keller (8 hours ago)

This isn't a review - it's the experience that Barney had while shooting with the camera.

0 upvotes
AKH
By AKH (8 hours ago)

One thing that I miss is an analysis of the new focus system which should be on par with the focus system in the Nikon D4s.

0 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (6 hours ago)

If you put an 810 next to an 800, as I did, you'll see that the bodyshape, including for instance the pentaprism housing is just slightly different at many points. Even the "Nikon" logo is bigger in the 810 and I've seen no comments on that.

I found the number of minute differences baffling, as I can't explain them from a design of manufacturing perspective. Different country of manufacturing, different suppliers? Who knows.

0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (10 hours ago)

If you need or want a 36mp camera, then the Nikon D810 is an excellent choice. Lets just hope that Nikon doesn't shoot itself in the foot again anytime soon, because the D810 is a camera that could make users forget about the company's recent missteps and put some of the polish back onto the brand's image.

7 upvotes
RichRMA
By RichRMA (11 hours ago)

Investors in the D810 (who dumped their D800's) will be a bit annoyed in six months when a brand new D900 (or whatever) hits and you get to take another $1000 depreciation bath.

0 upvotes
Gerry D
By Gerry D (10 hours ago)

Rich, do you know more about that?

2 upvotes
AlexRuiz
By AlexRuiz (5 hours ago)

As it has been the case since forever. When replacement products go to market, the model being replaced looses value. How much is the D700 worth now?

0 upvotes
Eelco van Vliet
By Eelco van Vliet (4 hours ago)

perhaps it is better to keep shooting with the D800 and use it and start taking pictures. In stead of persuing the latest kit and moan abount losing a lot of money.

I am still on a Canon 40D and it still does the job well.

0 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (2 hours ago)

For one (like me) that does a lot with the larger apertures accurate autofocus is very important. Any improvement there is worth something. The other improvements, including image quality, matter less to me.

0 upvotes
ConanD
By ConanD (33 min ago)

Any given item will depreciate at a pace proportional to the amount of change in that item's market. Therefore, one should expect anything based on computer technology to depreciate very rapidly.

1 upvote
sandy b
By sandy b (25 min ago)

So you think Nikon is on a 6 month update cycle with FF cameras now? It will be at least two years until the next iteration. And I would think most d800 owners are probably not upgrading, but the D800 is still a good selling FF, and it is a good thing that it is updated. Its up to you how you choose to spend your money.

0 upvotes
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (4 min ago)

Every camera is eventually replaced but the D810 should have a life of about two years.

If we worried about the fact that our camera (or vehicle) will eventually be replaced with a new/improved model, we would all be shooting with a 1950's camera (and driving a 57 Chev.) Only then would we be able to ignore new/improved models and never worry about that aspect.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (13 hours ago)

@lacroix75:

Except "for me personally" was not in your original post.

There was I guess a "for me going forward", not exactly the same and not relevant to the D800.

Therefore: My point about the D800 stands. It simply did NOT have broad serious problems. And, though it doesn't have incredible colour like say the D3s, it is an excellent low ISO (below 6400) camera, with good AF.

0 upvotes
Barend
By Barend (14 hours ago)

Reading all the comments I think that my Nikon D700 still does a decent job.

6 upvotes
lacroix75
By lacroix75 (13 hours ago)

Agree, that camera was a true success!

1 upvote
AKH
By AKH (8 hours ago)

Sure the D700 was and is a very good camera, but once you get used to the "fat" files from the D800 there is no going back :-)

3 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (4 hours ago)

" once you get used to the "fat" files from the D800 there is no going back :-)"
So don't bother going "forward" then.

0 upvotes
AshMills
By AshMills (14 hours ago)

VR on on a tripod not recommended.

1 upvote
Jetranger_Pilot
By Jetranger_Pilot (10 hours ago)

That is not always true. Some Nikon high-end lenses (like mine) stipulate to leave the VR in the ON position on a tripod. Check the owner's manual for your specific lens. You cannot make a blanket statement like that.

4 upvotes
BigJohnno
By BigJohnno (3 hours ago)

Why do Nikon have a VR On/Off switch then if it can intelligently compensate?
p.s - I'm not challenging your statement - genuine question.

0 upvotes
JamesD28
By JamesD28 (2 hours ago)

To save battery life if you can do what you need to do without the VR.

0 upvotes
Frank C.
By Frank C. (14 hours ago)

9. Lab Report - Studio Comparison

LOOK AT b&w image on the let hand side

D810 moire is HORRIBLE

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (13 hours ago)

And the raws I shot look just fine for moire.

So it's likely something about jpeg or extraction. And I don't even particularly like the image quality from the D810.

2 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (2 hours ago)

Why not @HowaboutRaw?

0 upvotes
lacroix75
By lacroix75 (15 hours ago)

I learned great lesson in the past couple years from Nikon, never buy their first release of anything. Case in point, D800 (early on focus issues, etc..) vs D810 (much more refined version of practically the same thing with minor upgrades), D600 (Oil issues) vs. D610 (again cleaned and refined version). So for me going forward, wait for the second pass, i.e., D910 instead of D900 (if there's such a thing in the future)... ;)

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (15 hours ago)

Except the D800 is an excellent lower ISO camera. And any problems with some D800 bodies just aren't akin to those with the D600.

So bad advice.

8 upvotes
Joed700
By Joed700 (15 hours ago)

Good point, but I would like to add one more thing to your suggestion. Just because Nikon comes up with their latest products, it doesn't always equal to better performance. I own both the D800 and the D600, but my D600 is already one stop better in terms of noise performance than my D800. Thus, the D810 is not worth the upgrade in that regard...the differences between 24 MP & 36MP is not that big of a deal unless you are printing wall size photos.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (15 hours ago)

Joed700:

The D800 wasn't a replacement for the D600.

The D600 is a budget FF Nikon, with somewhat better high ISO performance than the D800 because less pixel density.

3 upvotes
dbateman
By dbateman (13 hours ago)

I think your both missing his point. Which is wait for the second release of a Nikon product, as the first release will have problems. Don't buy a D600, get the D610. Don't buy a D800, get the D810. Don't buy a D900, get the D910.

2 upvotes
lacroix75
By lacroix75 (13 hours ago)

@HowaboutRaw - I'm not advising anyone for anything, do what you wish... in my comments, I specifically said "...for me personally..." take care!

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (13 hours ago)

dbateman

Quoting myself from above:

Except the D800 is an excellent lower ISO camera. And any problems with some D800 bodies just aren't akin to those with the D600.

I'm sorry you just don't have any idea how good the D800 was at release and remains today.

You've made a hugely mistaken claim regarding the D800, even if some examples may have had left AF point problems.

No one says skip the Canon 5D and get the 5DII.

The 5D was a big deal when it released.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (13 hours ago)

@lacroix75:

Except "for me personally" was not in your original post.

There was I guess a "for me going forward", not exactly the same and not relevant to the D800.

Therefore: My point about the D800 stands. It simply did NOT have broad serious problems. And, though it doesn't have incredible colour like say the D3s, it is an excellent low ISO (below 6400) camera, with good AF.

0 upvotes
Joed700
By Joed700 (13 hours ago)

@HowaboutRAW - Actually, the D600 was released after the D800, so it goes back to the Lacroxi75's suggestion: later is better, but than it also proved my point that later is not always better...dust issues....For people who never own a 36MP camera, the number seems to be a fantasy, but after using it for 2 yrs and compared numerous images side by side, I would rather use a 24 MP or a lower MP camera because they are well rounded cameras from the stand point of practicality.

0 upvotes
Joed700
By Joed700 (13 hours ago)

@HowaboutRAW - I know it's an opinion thing, but ISO 1600 is as far as I will go on the D800..IQ starts to deteriorate starting at ISO 3200.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (12 hours ago)

Joed700:

I didn't make any claims about which came first the D600 or D800.

The point was that the D800 is a big deal, and it doesn't have serious problems, so waiting for the D810 would have been silly. (Waiting to make sure there are no serious problems being broadly reported early in a release is a different matter.)

Right about ISO for the D800; it's a question of taste and depends what you plan to do with the image.

Shooting raw, I have no particular problem with the D800 at ISO 6400, and a Zeiss lens would improve things, but I'm not real interested in detail resolution.

My problem with the D800 is that the colour is not great, and a lower pixel count would probably help, so that's why the D600 looks better in many instances. And the Df and D4s are both better for colour than the D800.

0 upvotes
lacroix75
By lacroix75 (10 hours ago)

@HowaboutRAW I can't describe you but you are certainly a true "Fanboy" who's easily offended. Relax and get yourself a D810 :)

0 upvotes
7829mark
By 7829mark (9 hours ago)

They ALL HAVE PROBLEMS!!! It does not matter what was the release date. The D810 has read/write issues and produces corrupted images. You can read about in the forums. People are waiting for the D810. I have already gone through two of them. Shoot in burst mode and see what you get in 50 shots.

0 upvotes
DarkShift
By DarkShift (5 hours ago)

Anyone who has problems with D800/D810 colours should create custom camera profile for their camera.

It seems that ACR's default profiles for both D800 and especially for D810 are not very good.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (44 min ago)

lacroix75:

Clearly you've not read what I wrote since you claim that I be a "fanboy".

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (31 min ago)

DarkShift:

Doesn't have much to do with profiles, right ACR 8.6beta is not profiled correctly for the D810, but the problem is more like oversimplification of color. Sort of akin to Sony's compressed raw problems with the A mirrorless bodies, but with its own Nikon flavor.

I never thought the colour from the D800 excellent, but the D800 could do better than what I've shot with the D810. Maybe firmware can fix something.

0 upvotes
HappyVan
By HappyVan (16 hours ago)

No surprise that BB was impressed by D810. All too often, we are satisfied by "good enough". Then, we get blown away by the 'best".

There is no free lunch. MILC is small and portable. But, ultimate ability lies elsewhere.

3 upvotes
Adamant
By Adamant (11 hours ago)

True. Ultimate ability still resides in medium format.

2 upvotes
Wye Photography
By Wye Photography (17 hours ago)

Here I am processing some pix just taken on my 5mp Olympus E1 thinking to myself "I must get out of the Jurassic". But then again more than 5mp is wasted on me and I do love my E1. I would also love to have a go on this machine.

3 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (17 hours ago)

Right, but you can't shoot above ISO 200 with that Olympus.

And you can't win the MP claims contest.

1 upvote
Preamp
By Preamp (3 hours ago)

Still using my 8MP E-500, too. Without AA filter and Bayer pattern it's even more sharp and less noisy than before.

0 upvotes
bocajrs
By bocajrs (17 hours ago)

I'm passing on this one (No issues with my D800) and I'm curious to see what they'll announce in Photokina.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (17 hours ago)

Speculation:

A 20MP APSC DSLR with a decent buffer and weather sealed body?

An APSC mirrorless system, with on sensor phase detect AF, so it's easy to use Nikon SLR lenses with an adapter+plus new lenses for the system.

2 upvotes
M35G35
By M35G35 (17 hours ago)

Doesn't make sense. The current offerings from Nikon in APS-C sensor are 24MP.

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (16 hours ago)

M35G35:

So? Fewer MPs means better higher ISOs, likely better colour, and certainly a faster frame rate.

You've made a classic mistake of assuming more pixels in the same space is automatically an improvement.

The fact remains that Nikon never replaced the D300s, and that's a loved 12MP APSC body.

1 upvote
M35G35
By M35G35 (16 hours ago)

Nikon is not going to back pedal on the APS-C sensor.

3 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (16 hours ago)

M35G35:

It's not back pedaling. Back pedaling would be using a CCD sensor.

And it's not like Nikon would be doing this still hypothetical pixel reduction in every APSC DSLR line. One model, the high end one, would be fine.

Both the Pentax K3 and Nikon D7100 have problems above ISO 6400, though the Pentax is a bit better, and for reasons of build and buffer the Pentax is closer to a replacement for the D300s than is the D7100. Anyhow both could do with fewer pixels.

Canon reduced the number of MPs in the G series.

In addition to the Sony A6000, Sony makes the A5000 with fewer pixels in the same sensor size.

There's a reason that Fuji, Leica and Ricoh, and Nikon all still use that 16MP APSC Sony sensor.

Nikon could team up with Renesas and do a stunning 10-12MP APSC sensor, put it in a weather sealed body, with a deep raw buffer; that would sell really well. Of course could eat D810 and D610 sales.

1 upvote
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (12 hours ago)

Maybe nothing new on the dSLR front.

0 upvotes
ScottRH
By ScottRH (17 hours ago)

Nikon has fixed their quality issues from the problematic D600, D800/E.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (17 hours ago)

What was the big problem with the D800/E? (And yeah, I hear some focused oddly with the left points. But that was far from universal.)

Also how do you know there's no hidden problem with the D810?

2 upvotes
Stanchung
By Stanchung (9 hours ago)

Was the green cast an issue?

0 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (18 hours ago)

"in our experience it's most problematic if you're taking pictures that include fabric."

LOL, not much of a handicap for me I hate photo's of people. Bit of an own goal for a medium format camera though, fashion, weddings etc.

Technology isn't a smooth progression is it?

0 upvotes
noirdesir
By noirdesir (17 hours ago)

It ain't worse than other medium format cameras since to my knowledge they all come without an AA filter.

4 upvotes
InTheMist
By InTheMist (23 hours ago)

After receiving mine it's clear that this is more than just a minor upgrade. So many things are improved and polished.

- Improved auto white balance
- Extremely quiet, and sexy shutter sound. It’s my quietest DSLR yet
- Focus is fast and accurate! My D800 needed a lot of tuning.
- D810, no focus fine tuning necessary.
- The buffer is huge
- 6 FPS in 1.2 crop and 7 FPS in DX crop is well appreciated
- It goes without saying that the files are beautiful, even at high ISO. Not sure if there is a real improvement over the D800, though.

However, Small Raw (9 MP) is a waste. Compressed NEF (36 MP) is the same file size, and even the in-camera NEF converter can't process them!

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
16 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (20 hours ago)

You just had to post this In the Mist; couldn't help yourself.

The all pervading insistence to let us know how good the 810 is. I just hate that.

0 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (18 hours ago)

MikeF4Black: Why the rant? It's his right to give his personal impression. If you don't like them ignore them. I second his opinion, although I needed fine tuning my lenses consistently by + 9.

10 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (18 hours ago)

You probably live in a t.i.c.-free zone then. It happens. But I understand your 810 required fine tuning (consistently +9? That points to a camera miscalibration?)?

A comforting thought, as the almost guaranteed absence of that hassle would almost force me to fork over my hard earned.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (17 hours ago)

I read in many different reviews/hands-on that you still need to do it (every lens has tolerances, too), but that it is less than with others in general. Review sample size is too small to make a definite judgment. I can live with a fine-tuning like that, as it now works perfect for all my lenses.

0 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (7 hours ago)

Does it work perfectly on all 51 af points? Or did you finetune just the central point, as I do? It's always a balancing act between tolerances and possible inconsistencies in the body's af system and the lens's characteristics, field curvature for instance.

0 upvotes
linsen80586
By linsen80586 (2 days ago)

very well

0 upvotes
Galbertson
By Galbertson (2 days ago)

Totally amazing all the 180 degree views on d810. Hope we get complete detailed reviews and comparison views to slow down confusion.

In reading photographylife.com first reviews, they state lack of any AA filters just might slightly allow better performance with film era lenses, having to do with filter stacking. Interesting read.

0 upvotes
R Vaquero
By R Vaquero (3 days ago)

I see a good improvement in high ISO performance compared to the D800.

1 upvote
David Smith - Photographer

I think Nikon now uses the same sensor that Sony uses in the a7r. Amazing detail is now also available for Nikon users.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (17 hours ago)

Um, so what sensor did the D800 use?

Too bad about the less than stellar colour from this sensor. That's what chasing details gets ya.

0 upvotes
EricCul
By EricCul (12 hours ago)

@HowaboutRAW, You come across as quite new to photography. Don't get too discouraged by your lack of understanding, or wear yourself out making negative comments on every product that isn't from your favorite brand.

1 upvote
spikethompson
By spikethompson (3 days ago)

I have a D800 which I use every week for wedding photography, these cameras are so advanced you you would need to print pictures 60ft x 40ft to pixel peek with the naked eye. The real ability of the d800 is its low light ability and doesn't look like this one has made many advances . By the way, Real videographers use video cameras, real photographers dont read reviews, they take photographs.....!

1 upvote
Marshall Thompson
By Marshall Thompson (1 day ago)

Hey, Thompson, I'm a real "both" (40 years) and I read reviews when looking to purchase real gear with my real and hard-earned money. I'm interested in the 810 cause it has a zebra pattern to sort out video exposures. You know, like in a "real" video camera which I agree have form-factor advantages. Paid $38,000 for my Sony 400 Betacam without a lens. You?

3 upvotes
luxor2
By luxor2 (4 days ago)

"Viewfinder type Optical (tunnel)" is an error, should be pentaprism

0 upvotes
stevevelvia50
By stevevelvia50 (4 days ago)

Comparing the paint tube lettering, and other small edge details at ISO 800 and above, the D 800 and D 800E appear to have slightly better detail. Perhaps the Nikon D 810s noise suppression is overly aggressive on extremely fine detail? Maybe they used a different lens? From these samples I see no "Visible advantage " to using the D810.

1 upvote
marc petzold
By marc petzold (17 hours ago)

Compared by DxOMark, the D800E is slighty better when it comes to LowLight Score. When i'd be in the market to buy a new fullframe camera, if i could afford it...it would be the D800E instead of the D810...because the predecessor is way cheaper,
at least in germany...wait, no i'd go for the A7R, because it's the smallest FF body of all three, the performance is equal, i could adapt all my mf primes & zooms by adapter, and the A7R is the cheapest of all three 36 MP FF guys here.

0 upvotes
Ednaz
By Ednaz (17 hours ago)

Lossy raw as the only raw option for the A7R means the performance is by no means equal. That decision made by Sony is still absolutely baffling to me. As to adapting old lenses, you may be quite disappointed by the results. Old lenses seem to do OK at 16mp, but at 24mp and above, many really show their age. Going from d700 to d800e was the jump that killed a number of favorite older lenses for me. If 36mp is important, cutting corners shouldn't be.

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (16 hours ago)

And besides the colour weakness, the Sony A7R's shutter is incredibly audible.

"baffling" is an understatement. At least the A7S has a quiet shutter option, but it has the same baffling colour limitations of the other A bodies.

0 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (12 hours ago)

D810 and D4s are clearly using more NR in jpg and at the same time using more sharpening, than the D800E and D4. D810 only looks to have improved chroma noise. If you shoot RAW you will be hard pressed to see any difference whatsoever below ISO 3200-6400.

0 upvotes
Reality Check
By Reality Check (4 days ago)

"Note that in order to get maximal image quality out of the D810, we flipped the mirror up 3s prior to each exposure, and engaged electronic 1st curtain to eliminate any effects of the shutter opening on image sharpness."

Um yeah.. That may be fine and well for studio test scenes and landscapes, but how does that work for all the other types of photography - you know the other 90% of photography...

Seems something with lower mp would have greater benefit overall, unless test charts and shadowless landscapes are your thing..

9 upvotes
sandy b
By sandy b (3 days ago)

Tripod and shutter up improves output of every camera made. The d800 line handheld is still sharper with more detail than lesser mp camera, provided you are capable of good shooting techniques.

2 upvotes
Gary Martin
By Gary Martin (16 hours ago)

Maybe there's something to be said for a camera you can use for 100% of your photography?

0 upvotes
Khizer
By Khizer (5 days ago)

I own the D800E and was at first tempted beyond reason to trade in my body for the D810. Thanks to this review, I have decided not to be the lab rat.

4 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (12 hours ago)

Eh? You *were* the lab rat! D800E was Nikon's test mule for the AA filterless concept.

0 upvotes
7829mark
By 7829mark (9 hours ago)

It is not a good review and it did not cover all the new features. In fact it mis-states. DP said there was nothing new outside of the camera. That's not true, the grip was redone, new individual covers over the USB and HDMI ports, means you don't have one door but three! DP missed improvements in live view, brighter viewfinder, better LCD, better battery power, 30% faster processor, etc. It's not the big wow of a 36 mpx but the sum of all the improvements make this a wow.

0 upvotes
goosel
By goosel (5 days ago)

edges and corners are quite blurred with a fair amount of CA. Which lens was used?? Surely not the same one as with the D800 ??

1 upvote
thx1138
By thx1138 (12 hours ago)

Yes indeed, quite noticeably so, compared to 5D III which is sharp corner to corner. I was wondering if they should try another lens or copy.

0 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (5 days ago)

http://blog.kasson.com showed, that the D810 is practically ISOLESS over a wide range for scenes with average DR. That is, instead of ISO 2000 use ISO 64 and push 5 stops in post. Instead of ISO12800 use ISO 400 and push 5 stops in post.
Citation" It means that at normal scene dynamic ranges, there’s not much point in increasing the ISO from 64. You might as well push in post. In very wide dynamic range scenes, where read noise becomes important, turning up the ISO to as high as 5000 may help."

1 upvote
Reality Check
By Reality Check (4 days ago)

Except that it does not actually compare at ISO64 pushed to ISO800 as a shot taken at ISO800 with better performance in that range - which is just about every other camera available in its class, and many in lower tiers as well.

0 upvotes
HFLM
By HFLM (4 days ago)

I don't understand exactly what you mean. It shows that pushing ISO 64 to 2000 in post and taking the shot at ISO 2000 are almost the same, agreeing with measurements. I don't see how that is achieved with other cameras in its class. Look at photography life.com to see what happens if a Canon 6D (best DR Canon) is pushed a few stops in post at this lower ISO . At higher ISOs other cameras with lesser pixels fare better, but you still get very good results when downsizing. The A7r will behave similarly as it has probably the same sensor.

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
SmilerGrogan
By SmilerGrogan (1 day ago)

But how do you check your exposure? Won't the histogram be shoved all the way left?

1 upvote
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (5 days ago)

It's good to be king :^)

2 upvotes
SimonWilder
By SimonWilder (5 days ago)

Why are the RAW files so much larger in the studio shots compared to the D800E?

1 upvote
lacikuss
By lacikuss (5 days ago)

Excellent resolution and detail, unexpectedly bad high ISO performance for this camera class IMO. No matter how you put it, smaller pixel pitch won't see as much light in darkness as a the bigger "eyes"...

BTW I made my opinion on the picture samples not on the lab stuff which is only an approximation to the real thing (the picture samples).

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
HFLM
By HFLM (5 days ago)

? Look at Dxo measurements, S/N and DR. when scaled down to print size it is similar to 5D3, D610 A7,A7r... So, quite good.
If you want to use all the 36MP at ISO 6400 you won't get it. But the nice thing is: I can use it for best in class DR at lower ISOs and when scaled down to 16MP get very good high ISO performance. That's great isn't it?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
6 upvotes
Reality Check
By Reality Check (4 days ago)

Depends on what tradeoffs one considers necessary for their output. The DR advantage is gone by ISO160 depending on what you compare it with, and most of the other options available own the D8xx at every other ISO setting..
What significance does that have? Well if most photographers would assess their needs accurately, by their work as opposed to their ego, they would realize that a good majority of their images are shot above ISO160. There are a lot of photographers out their who rarely step outside of a studio, and many capturing things that do not move at long shutter speeds, but ironically (the ego assertion) they do not represent the majority of D8xx owners - who would be better served by other bodies..

1 upvote
HFLM
By HFLM (4 days ago)

Reality Check: it depends on whether you compare per pixel DR or for print size. Until ISO 600 the DR is excellent even per pixel and looses of course thereafter. What I like is that you can use it to have great resolution and DR at lower ISOs and still have the possibility to get very good results when downsized to the pixel count of other cameras in its class. If I only were to shoot at higher ISOs I would go for a DF (I like this camera), but the AF is a little on the slower side. Nikon does't have a D800 body with the DF sensor which would suit me best. So in terms of performance all around I think Thom Hogan is right, its probably the best all around camera right now on the market (unf. the price is on the higher side).

0 upvotes
mestreamador
By mestreamador (5 days ago)

A Nikon, em seus projetos de engenharia,sempre aguarda uns anos para lançar novos produtos diferencial, fazendo com que nos façamos up-date ou adquirindo o novo equipamento.Portanto pessoal é sempre bom aguardar as novas investidas das potencias como Nikon, Canon, para a gente não ficar com equipamento descontinuado.No meu pensar esta é a maquina.!.
Pretendo adquiri-la em um verão próximo.
abs a todos
MestreAmador

1 upvote
Guenter Hofstaedter
By Guenter Hofstaedter (1 week ago)

your right renault5,
my mistake.
i mixed some pics in the gallery by accident becouse
on this day i shoot with D4s and D810 !

http://www.pbase.com/mascular/d810_samples so hier you will find another samples
( ready to print, so sharpnes i a bit more )
most of them i did shortly after unpacking the camera, to get a quick overview !
when i have a time i will of course take some more carefully shoot that will become better ( i hope )

0 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (1 week ago)

What a joke, Nikon can't even produce its sensors.

1 upvote
sandy b
By sandy b (5 days ago)

The only joke around here is your constant inane comments.

8 upvotes
Wubslin
By Wubslin (3 days ago)

@sandy b: Didn't you know that beavertown produces his own sensors? He has a workshop in his garage he uses to make everything he needs from raw elements instead of buying things from other people like a total loser.

Why can't you do that?

6 upvotes
Mike Griffin
By Mike Griffin (2 days ago)

Joke is: Nikon makes the steppers that make the sensors.

2 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (2 days ago)

Not being able to produce its own sensors isn't good for Nikon for their future.

Canon will have a brighter future than Nikon in the long run.

1 upvote
philharris
By philharris (17 hours ago)

Canons ability to produce it's own sensors would appear to be holding them back...

1 upvote
Ednaz
By Ednaz (17 hours ago)

sensors are commodities. system integration is where all the value comes from.

1 upvote
pwilly
By pwilly (17 hours ago)

Yes, Nikon is making the same mistake as Apple, Qualcomm, ARM Holdings, Kyocera, Sharp, HTC, LG, Broadcom and many others.
FAB is expensive and quickly obsolete. Canon's biggest problem if you pay any attention to their forum is the sensor technology that results from old steppers.
http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1322324
http://beta.fool.com/ddelony/2012/09/14/5-fabulous-fabless-chip-makers/11957/

1 upvote
beavertown
By beavertown (10 hours ago)

At least the sensors should be made by Nikon.

0 upvotes
philharris
By philharris (5 hours ago)

Why?
That's like saying Boeing's aircraft are in some way substandard because they didn't make the engines. No one says they flew in a Rolls Royce.
It's about the results, obviously.

0 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (5 hours ago)

RR doesn't make aircrafts.

Boeing don't make engines, should Nikon stop making lenses?

Sony and Canon make both Sensors and camera bodies. That make them have the edge over Nikon.

Nikon is still one of the BIG TWO, soon they will give their position to other manufacturer such as Sony.

Sony would charge Nikon a fortune for the future sensors.

Plus making camera bodies and lenses are not rocket science anymore, some of the 3rd party lenses already surpasses Nikkor lenses.

To have their own sensors is better for Nikon.

0 upvotes
sangeethpp
By sangeethpp (1 week ago)

Even though it doesn't show a big difference in IQ from d800,it still stands on top...no point in comparing a 36MP camera to a 22MP one(almost half MP) ,only because it has similar pricing and features...D810 stands alone as a great camera....comparing 22MP to sony A7s's 12MP (almost half) also shows big difference...in that way Nikon d810 does its maximum that a 36 MP can...

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
linsen80586
By linsen80586 (1 week ago)

I can't see any difference.

2 upvotes
Lassoni
By Lassoni (1 week ago)

The ergonomics are getting worse and worse with every new nikon body. Not only did it take 2 years for nikon to make "movie record" button customizable for ISO, but they also happened to move the meter mode selector to somewhere really really awkward. How are you supposed to hold those top left buttons, while simultaneously trying to spin the wheel with right hand finger. You could do this with a light lens, but even then it seems risky. You run into risk of damaging your mount, because there is no ergonomical way of doing this without losing the support of your lens, which in turn is big risk when you go into lenses that start weighting more (teles are obvious and heavy, but I struggled even with a 24-70).

This is really an inexcusable design choice. As if it's not bad enough when trying to switch between AF-S and AF-C whilst trying to support a lens... Why did they even had to put the movie button in there in the first place? D7000 had it right. Y fix something that isn't broken?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Thematic
By Thematic (1 week ago)

It really is not that difficult.

4 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (5 days ago)

Cry us a river.

11 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (5 days ago)

Fortunately noone's forcing you to buy one.

6 upvotes
Lassoni
By Lassoni (5 days ago)

ofc not, that's why I'm just pointing out that there are nikon bodies with better ergonomics out there. Heck even the D800 has it better, and that's quite rich compliment.

0 upvotes
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (4 days ago)

Lassoni, your original comment was "slightly" OTT, which is why I (and others) commented.

I (but who am I?) find the grip of the 810 better than my current 800. The 800 grip is just slightly too shallow for average sized hands and as irrelevant as a grip might seem, it's something one notices (particularly with recently clipped nails, ha ha) every time one picks up the camera. It's not lethal, just a repetitive minor annoyance. So there's progress for you.

Need I go on? Better viewfinder (instantly noticeable), smoother and quieter shutter action (instantly noticeable). So what's no to like? The minor shuffling around of a few buttons?

1 upvote
Reality Check
By Reality Check (4 days ago)

Your explanation of why you and others 'commented' sounds logical and intelligent, except that it could have also simply been typical forum retaliation against anyone bad mouthing any Nikon body especially the D8xx - which is what happens 100% of the time it occurs.

As for the OP comments;
Just about anyone older than the D7000/D6xx/D8xx/4x knows the current ergonomics are terrible, literally becoming the opposite of 'ergonomic'.. Nikon is headed towards needing to have a ergonomic safety specialist visit each customer to show them how to operate the camera without suffering short/long term discomfort.. Everything that had been evolving up to the D700/D3/D3xx has been thrown out the window and replaced with - something else.

But hey, lets not be too critical of Nikon, maybe they know something the rest of us don't.. perhaps they have inside knowledge that humans will have grown a third arm in the near future..

4 upvotes
Joed700
By Joed700 (3 days ago)

@Lassoni & Reality Check - I would agree with you in regards to the ergonomics. Nikon had it right when they introduced the D300 and D700 in terms of ergonomics, colors, LCD display, etc. However, the only improvement they made with the D800 was higher MP, and they screw up on the WB, AF button, low light performance and LCD display. I had to paid $35 for Nikon to adjust the color on LCD color display to rid of the green tint. I've recently acquired a used D600 (no wants them due to dust/oil issues) and it's a better camera compared to the D800 in terms of speed, colors and low light performance. 36MP is better some say...compared the images size by size and the differences are minimal. I can go on about all these half-ass products Nikon's been producing lately...

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
MikeF4Black
By MikeF4Black (3 days ago)

@ Lassoni, Reality Check and Joed700: so now we know.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 1218
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