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Canon EOS M hands-on preview

July 2012 | By Andy Westlake


Preview based on a pre-production Canon EOS M

It's now almost four years since Panasonic first introduced us to the mirrorless interchangeable lens camera, in the shape of the Micro Four Thirds Lumix DMC-G1. Since then, all of the other major manufacturers have entered the fray, in the process offering cameras in a variety of shapes and sizes - from diminutive beginner-friendly models such as the Olympus PEN E-PM1, to unashamedly high-end models like the Sony NEX-7 and Fujifilm X-Pro1. Nikon, meanwhile, has ploughed its own individual furrow with its family-friendly 1 J1 and 1 V1 models. This simply reflects the fact that different cameras are targeted to different kinds of users - be they serious enthusiasts looking for a small, highly capable camera, or compact-camera upgraders looking for SLR-like image quality in a smaller, easier-to-use package.

Canon is the last big player to show its hand, and its initial entrant - the EOS M - is unashamedly targeted to the latter group of users. To all intents and purposes it's a mirrorless version of the recently-announced EOS 650D, but with a simpler interface that's designed to be more approachable for novice users, and obviously much more compact in size. It's based around a new 'EF-M' lens mount, and two matched lenses will be available at launch: the EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM zoom, and the EF-M 22mm f/2 STM 'pancake' prime. But it's still very much part of the EOS system, and all of the company's existing EF and EF-S SLR lenses can be used via the co-announced 'Mount adapter EF-EOS M'.

The EOS M features a compact, magnesium-alloy body, and will be available in four colours - black, white, silver and red. It has no built-in flash, but instead a hot shoe on the top plate, and in many markets (although not the US) it will come bundled with the new AAA-powered Speedlite 90EX unit. There's neither a built-in viewfinder, nor connector for an external unit - composition is solely using the camera's rear screen (which is fixed, rather than articulated).

Canon EOS M key features

  • New EF-M lens mount (optimized for APS-C sensor size)
  • 18MP APS-C 'Hybrid CMOS' sensor
  • Continuous autofocus in movie mode with subject tracking
  • 14-bit DIGIC5 processor
  • ISO 100-12800 standard, 25600 expanded
  • 4.3 fps continuous shooting, 3 fps with autofocus tracking
  • 1080p30 video recording, stereo sound (with 25p or 24p options)
  • External microphone socket and adjustable sound recording level
  • 1040k dot 3:2 touch-sensitive ClearView II LCD (capacitative type, multi-touch support)
  • Standard EOS hot-shoe for external flash (no built-in flash)
  • 'Creative Filters' image-processing controls, previewed live on-screen
The EOS M will be available in four colours - silver, red, black or white - although they may not all be sold in all markets.

The EOS M's commitment to simplicity is reflected by its physical control layout, with buttons and dials kept to a minimum. The exposure mode dial - a staple of Canon's EOS range for over 20 years - has been reduced to just three positions, distinctly reminiscent of the company's Ixus / Elph compacts. The rear of the camera is also rather compact-esque, with a familiar combined 4-way controller / settings dial and just a smattering of buttons.

The lack of physical controls is, however, substantially made up for by the large capacitative touchscreen on the back. This uses much the same interface that Canon introduced on the EOS 650D, and stands out as the most usable, comprehensive and engaging touchscreen that we've yet seen on an interchangeable-lens camera. But whereas on the 650D its use is very much optional, on the EOS M it becomes the preferred method of interaction with the camera.

Because mirrorless cameras have struggled to make headway in the US, Canon is only going to sell one kit option in this market. Targeting an enthusiast buyer, the camera plus 22mm pancake will be available from speciality photo stores only for $799, with the 18-55mm zoom sold separately for $299. The company will also be emphasizing its video capabilities, which are essentially the same as the EOS 650D but in a smaller, cheaper package.

Movies can be recorded in Full HD 1920x1080 resolution at 30, 25 or 24 fps with stereo sound, using the highly-compatible MOV format and H.264 compression, with a time limit of 29 min 59 sec per clip. The EOS M offers a choice of either fully automatic exposure in video mode, or as much manual control as the user wishes to take. The 3-10x electronic zoom first seen on the EOS 600D, but mysteriously missing from the EOS 650D, is also available - with minimal loss of quality at the 3x setting.

New EF-M lens mount

A new mirrorless system needs a new lens mount, which Canon has called EF-M to emphasis its continued compatibility with the company's existing EF mount for autofocus SLRs. It's a fully-electronic bayonet mount, with 9 contacts between the lens and camera. Unusually, the white dot for aligning the lens is at the 11 0'clock position on the mount.

The EF-M mount is 58mm in diameter, with a flange distance of 18mm from the bayonet to the sensor. As the image above clearly shows it's matched specifically to the APS-C sensor size. So don't expect a future full frame EF-M mount camera - it's not going to happen.

Like all other mirrorless cameras, the EOS M's shutter is open by default even when the camera is turned off, exposing the sensor. This may seem disconcerting to SLR owners, but we've never experienced any problem with this approach. Like Canon's live view-capable SLRs the EOS M uses an electronic first curtain to activate the exposure, and the physical shutter is only used to end it. This helps reduces shutter lag and keep shutter noise down - meaning the EOS M is one of the quieter models of its type.

Two new EF-M lenses: EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM and EF-M 22mm f/2.0 pancake

The EOS M is released with two new lenses for the EF-M mount - an 18-55mm image-stabilized standard zoom and a compact, 'pancake' prime. Both feature Canon's 'STM' stepper motor for autofocus, which allows near-silent refocusing during video recording. This means electronically-coupled 'focus-by-wire' manual focus; thankfully though Canon hasn't been tempted to discard physical focus rings. However there are no switches to set the focus or IS mode - these are controlled from the camera.

Canon EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM and EF-M 22mm f/2.0 STM

The lenses use minimalistically-styled, plain cylindrical barrels that bear more than a passing resemblance to Sony's NEX series optics. In terms of dimensions they're fairly typical for their class, which means they're smaller than corresponding SLR lenses; the zoom is near-identical in size to the Sony E 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 OSS, whereas the pancake is very similarly-sized to Panasonic's Lumix G 20mm F1.7 ASPH.

As the only cameras we've seen so far are pre-production, it's premature to say much about focus speed. But while on first impressions the 18-55mm focuses pretty quickly, the 22mm is distinctly slower. This is not totally surprising given that the entire optical unit racks back and forth for focusing; this is not a design approach that's ever been associated with ultra-fast focusing on this type of lens. But we'll wait for production cameras and lenses to make a proper judgement.

Lens specifications

 

Canon EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6
IS STM

Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM
 Format  APS-C  APS-C
 Focal length  18-55mm  22mm
 35mm-equiv focal length  29-88mm  35mm
 Diagonal angle of view  74°20' - 25°70'  63°30'
 Maximum aperture  1:3.5-5.6  1:2
 Lens construction  13 elements / 11 groups  7 elements / 6 groups
 Focus motor type  Linear Stepper Motor  Linear Stepper Motor
 Focus method  • Internal focus
 • Focus-by-wire manual focus
 • Unit focus
 • Focus-by-wire manual focus
 Zoom method  Rotary, extending barrel  n/a
 Minimum focus distance  0.25m / 0.82 ft  0.15m / 0.49 ft
 Filter thread  • 52mm
 • Does not rotate on focusing
 • 43mm
 • Does not rotate on focusing
 Dimensions  60.9 x 61mm (2.39 x 2.4 in)  60.9 x 23.7mm (2.38 x 0.93 in)
 Weight  210g (7.4oz)  105g (3.7 oz)

Size compared

The EOS M is a small camera - indeed one of the smallest APS-C models around. Here we compare it to the EOS 650D and Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF3.

Here's the EOS M with the 22mm f/2 next to the camera with which it share its innards - the EOS 650D with EF 40mm f/2 STM lens. As you can see, eliminating the reflex mirror and optical viewfinder has enabled a dramatic reduction in size.
Here's the EOS M side-by-side with the Panasonic Lumix GF3 - a model that's similarly-aimed at compact camera upgraders, and one of the smallest mirrorless cameras around (it's since been replaced by the similar-size GF5). Both cameras use a touchscreen to complement their limited array of physical controls, but the GF5 has a built-in flash rather than a hot shoe. It also uses the slightly smaller Four Thirds sensor.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

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DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2012 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 547
12345
Banhmi
By Banhmi (Sep 25, 2012)

Why didn't they include built-in GPS??? That feature is now standard on $250 travelzooms. You pay $800 for the EOS-M and you still have to pay another $250+ for a bulky GPS add-on that occupies your hotshoe? Infuriating. Canon really knows to build ill will with the customer base. The Japanese camera oligopoly is ripe for disruption.

2 upvotes
Roberto Mettifogo
By Roberto Mettifogo (Sep 26, 2012)

to sell you the external gps units...

0 upvotes
CJ Chen
By CJ Chen (10 months ago)

Personally, I do not like built-in GPS. My Sony H200 has a built-in GPS. It takes a long time to get a lock and drains on battery. It is useless if you just want to stop, shoot, and go. Instead, I just want to have a bluetooth interface that would allow me to use an external GPS device

0 upvotes
abi170845
By abi170845 (Sep 12, 2012)

There's no bulb setting? I'm a landscapist and bulb hardcore, 100% of the time I bulb my exposures for 10 minutes starting at twilight( if twilight starts at 5:27 a.m, I usually bulb for 10 plus minutes at around 5:20 a.m)

And how about the availability of extra batteries and remote control or cable release?

1 upvote
fred 76
By fred 76 (Sep 13, 2012)

It seems that in Bulb mode, you can only select 400 ISO. However it should be possible to remote control the M from the EOS Utilities' Remote Capture tool.

For the batteries, it usually takes a few month (weeks) before a chinese maker supplies a compatible battery.

1 upvote
abi170845
By abi170845 (Sep 14, 2012)

Thanks for the reply, I guess I'll have to wait until next year for extra batteries, cable release, wait and wait again for a compact body.

0 upvotes
fred 76
By fred 76 (Sep 25, 2012)

It should be worth treating such long exposures as the astronomy photographers do, by substracting a "dark" and dividing by a "flat" master images. The noise will drop down dramatically and the vigneting/dust traces will disappear.

0 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Sep 10, 2012)

Seems like dpr got the competitor just right: Pana GF3 and GF5. Let's see the pics, JPEGs in particular.

If Canon gets some following out of this P&S with macho barrel no flash, the next target would be Pana G5 (and EVF). Only when Canon gets really good can they go after the "retro" of Oly.

For its part, m4/3 needs to strike deeper into DSLR territory and I think superior focusing and f1.4 fast lens are the components. Easier (faster) white balance setting is also needed ("Pros" use a flash and don't care but I bet the guys having fun with photography do).

0 upvotes
rpicinic
By rpicinic (Sep 9, 2012)

I read below in a comment that there is no additional crop factor when using EF-M/EF adapter, but will it effect on min focusing distance, like the extension tube?

0 upvotes
Luau BoB
By Luau BoB (Sep 7, 2012)

All they need now is an FD adapter with an FD AE mode!!! That would be so heavenly retro!

0 upvotes
fred 76
By fred 76 (Sep 7, 2012)

The µ4/3 sensors are 17.3 mm × 13.0 mm in size compared to the 22.2 mm x 14.5 mm APS-C. This is about 40% less in surface. That's a lot !

For the same number of MPixels, an APS-C will have bigger photosites hence a better sensitivity and less noise.

That's a technological fact.

2 upvotes
Preternatural Stuff
By Preternatural Stuff (Sep 4, 2012)

@hoggdoc - "All for a few bucks more"? - Typical BS about the M4/3 value proposition (or lack thereof). I used to want M4/3 to succeed but no more.

Products with smaller sensors and less glass @ equivalent focal length costs more? What kind of fool do the M4/3 makers take consumers for?

M4/3 will never beat a larger sensor for image quality. Look at the comments by your kind of M4/3 users filled with stuff like "nearly as good", "almost as good" qualifiers.

M4/3 will never beat the 35mm or APS-C system for sensor image quality (bokeh, depth of field, noise). Ditto for range of lenses - something any photographer worth his salt knows is what ultimately matters. Please - no nonsense about using the best M4/3 prime lenses to compare IQ with 35mm/APS-C bodies with kit lenses. The best 35mm prime lenses on a 35mm/APS-C body, will blow your measly minds.

M4/3 should be cheaper but instead costs more on an IQ-per-dollar basis. Understand why I refuse to get M4/3 yet?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Sep 10, 2012)

No.

1 upvote
kvanderaa
By kvanderaa (Jan 30, 2013)

Totally agree 100%

0 upvotes
jetty12
By jetty12 (8 months ago)

Not perfect but the vastly superior colour compared to my previous Pana GH2s yellow look makes it worth it

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
1 upvote
hoggdoc
By hoggdoc (Aug 29, 2012)

@ALL for a few bucks more you can have a µ4/3's camera that will kick this camera's butt. Not to mention the ever expanding selection of µ4/3's lens from various sources.

Why Canon and Nikon both always plays this ours idea is better than your game all the time causes me to wonder about their market research.

For the record I am a long time Nikon shooter, but have fallen in love with the picture quality and dreamy film like look produced by my Olympus OM-D M-E5. Which BTW is a nearly PRO level quality of build, unlike this chunk of plastic Canon is trying to sell for $800.00.

The Oly can easily compete with pro-level APS-C Sensor Canons and Nikons. For that matter you would be hard pressed when comparing images from A Nikon D3 FF body with top quality glass and the OM-D M-E5.

If Nikon's success with the Series 1 cameras is any indicator, Canon's offering will meet the same lack luster response from the buying public.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
SiliconVoid
By SiliconVoid (Sep 2, 2012)

The Canon 18mp APS sensor is one of those sensors you mention the OM-D trying to compete with, it is the very reason Canon keeps refining and reusing it instead of upgrading to something else at this time. Not sure what you think Oly is capable of that this (yet to be released) camera cannot do in image quality. However if it is ultimate image quality you are after in this form, the X-Pro1 takes all in this category to school.

Lenses?? Olympus does not have even a fraction of the lenses available from Cannon given that you can use every EF lens Canon makes - and with FULL functionality. Not to mention all the same third party lenses adaptable to any of the other mirrorless cameras.

Strange you mention build quality, and without even reading this hands-on review. This 'first entry' by Canon has a full magnesium body.. Kudos to Oly for the VF though, it still needs to be optical. Maybe you can make a better comparison when Canon releases their (~15th?) mirrorless camera like Olympus..

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 11 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
dali777
By dali777 (7 months ago)

X-Pro1 is $1700 and oly is $1000, i paid $239,- for M, and i can use my 12 canon lenses with it !!!

0 upvotes
MarshallG
By MarshallG (Aug 27, 2012)

I don't know if mirrorless will replace the SLR someday, but this camera isn't the one to do it. This product is much too stripped down for any serious amateur photographer. It looks like Canon must also believe that mirrorless is not (yet?) the solution for serious photographers.

2 upvotes
fred 76
By fred 76 (Aug 27, 2012)

There is definitely NO REASON to buy that kind of camera because it is FAR TOO MUCH EXPENSIVE.

A G1X will do the job for less, with only advantages :
- integrated flash
- orientable screen
- small size
- ability to store RAW pictures
- big CMOS sensor (almost same size than a EOS sensor)
- only 560 EUR !!!

The only advantage of the M compared to the G1X is the ability to change lenses and to use the EOS Utilities softwares. Is it worth the huge price increase ?

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Jim2386
By Jim2386 (Sep 14, 2012)

As an underwater photographer, I liked the G1x, however, the G1X does not have eTTL for my strobes, this camera does. The G1X only allows you to select flash power from the camera screen and does not actually "control" the flash power during the shot. That was the deal breaker for me.

This camera is exactly what I need for underwater photography...full manual, eTTL, much higher res than my last UW camera, and small body so the housing and related equipment is small and easy to transport on a plane with all my other gear. That's what frustrates me a bit here. It may not be the camera you need for your type of photography, and that's completely understandable. However, it may be the camera someone has been waiting for for the photography they do. For example, using a view finder underwater is almost impossible so the screen is almost always used. To write off a camera as "bad"with no explanation lends little to the conversation. SLR's are awesome, but sometimes other cameras fit better

1 upvote
Maurice Daniels
By Maurice Daniels (Nov 11, 2012)

How do you use a touchscreen underwater?

0 upvotes
Pubert Adams
By Pubert Adams (Aug 27, 2012)

Is there a inner magnesium frame? Nothing I have read so far talks about it.

0 upvotes
Paullubbock
By Paullubbock (Aug 23, 2012)

I'll trade you one of them for my well taken care of 40D?.

0 upvotes
Teppo Hytönen
By Teppo Hytönen (Aug 23, 2012)

Looks interesting. Too bad the the price isn't quite as interesting given how few photos I take these days though.

0 upvotes
fred 76
By fred 76 (Aug 21, 2012)

I hope they will sell it bare, without anything (no lens, no flash), just the body.

0 upvotes
smakogon
By smakogon (Aug 21, 2012)

Looks like a goog compact companion to a full-size Canon DSLR to share lenses.

0 upvotes
jmmgarza
By jmmgarza (Aug 18, 2012)

The video of the shutter sound is a joke. C'mon, you can do better than that.

1 upvote
Tom R35
By Tom R35 (Aug 15, 2012)

This seems to be a capable camera, and I am sure that dpreview will provide all of the details, good and bad, after they have a chance to thoroughly review it. Personally, I am not sure what to think about this movement towards mirrorless cameras. I am a dedicated SLR user and especially love true TTL optical viewfinders. Switching to a LCD viewfinder is unappealing to me. If these cameras exist alongside SLRs going forward, that is great. I can see a place for them and in some instances would very much like to be able to use them. I will be upset, however, if they begin to take the place of SLRs. Maybe this is old fashioned thinking.

0 upvotes
eugene825
By eugene825 (Aug 14, 2012)

can the eos m accomodate EF lenses without using lens mount adapter?

0 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Aug 14, 2012)

no. It's clearly described. There's a glassless adapter for EF/EF-S lenses.

If it could accept EF lenses it would have to maintain the same distance between lens and sensor and you'd get something much fatter like the Pentax mirrorless.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Sad Joe
By Sad Joe (Aug 13, 2012)

When using the EF-S / EF adaptor on the camera is there any additional crop factor ? Been told there isn't which would really suit me fine - anyone know for sure ?

0 upvotes
12fps
By 12fps (Aug 13, 2012)

Good question... But I don't think there will be any additional crop penalties.. Even if there are, it won't be too much. may be 1.7X. STM lens tends to focus on normal shots, not fast action stuff, so the arrangement is different, but if you have EF-S lens, no need to bother, unless noise bothers you.

0 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Aug 13, 2012)

I don't see why there'd be a crop factor. It's a spacing difference. The sensor is the same size the two lens formats merely have different distances to the sensor. Since the EF-S is longer, you just give it some more space with a round ring and voala!

3 upvotes
jaime hk
By jaime hk (Oct 25, 2012)

Tried the EOS M with Mount adapter EF-EOS M with a couple of EF lenses and compared same lenses on a 60D from the same distance. I noticed that the crop factor on the EOS M with EF lenses was significantly more. My guess is 2x. Couldn't measure it properly since I was trying the equipment in a shop.

0 upvotes
12fps
By 12fps (Aug 13, 2012)

Well it seems like, many people are demanding these mirrorless cam will have to do everything. I wouldn't disagree on that but even this newer M can do that, I simply wouldn't even look at it. Reason is simple, if you r a guy, we usually have larger hands, and the grips and the controls are key priorities. How r u going to shoot when you finger covers up 3 buttons. The M is nice, it's definitely more man but not man enough for me.

1 upvote
TongY
By TongY (Aug 11, 2012)

EOS M was originally designed for lady (women's camera), see google translation from Japaness "Strategy of "EOS M" Interview with Canon: Interview":

http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=ja&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fdc.watch.impress.co.jp%2Fdocs%2Fnews%2F20120810_551672.html

0 upvotes
Twiseldorf
By Twiseldorf (Aug 9, 2012)

For me the deal breaker is the touchscreen. That seems like it would be a pain to try to do anything quickly while having to navigate through a series of menus to quick change a setting. I'm not too familiar with the controls of the camera, but I would hope that there is at least a dial for aperture, a dial for shutter speed and hopefully a couple buttons for being able to change the iso and thumb focus. Just having a touchscreen would be like the experience driving a Toyota Prius with its screen - impossible to operate without taking your eyes off the road. So many times when operating a camera the photographer needs to change a setting while not taking his/her eye off the subject. With real buttons this can be done by feel. Impossible with a touch screen. Would have had the design lean towards an EVF.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Aug 22, 2012)

You're probably going to have to wait for a higher-level model to have hard buttons. This is geared towards entry-level and casual users.

0 upvotes
Sad Joe
By Sad Joe (Aug 7, 2012)

Well, I'd love one. I either drag my Canon DSLR kit inside my LowePro or Billingham bags or take my sweet Canon s90 (wonderful sensor - thank you Sony) - the new M range might be a good half way point. So pleased they didn't do a Nikon 1 series and damage the brand overall. Anyone brought one yet - no, didn't think so. Predict the J1 will be going for £199 with lens this time next year....

Anyway back to the EOS M - sure its early days/ early models and the prices are too high....all normal.

Fancy that 22mm (35mm F2) lens which takes me back to my days shooting film (and some digital) with a Nikkor 35 f2 - pity that it tended to flare/ ghost but an ideal walk about lens and so much lighter than any of the super zooms we all tend to use today ( today I often carry a 15-85 & 24-105L plus longer lenses etc) so yep - roll on a Canon EOS M and save my back!

2 upvotes
YepYep
By YepYep (Aug 10, 2012)

AGREE! Before I got my EPM1 to play with the 7D, I had considered the J1 and go to the shop to take a look...but... I have to say the J1 is bad... and I hate its flash very much! what's a cheap plastic toy at all... But I love the EPM1 very much although I hate the non-standard interface and I am not able to use a standard USB cable to connect it to the computer... anyway, Olympus did a great job in this section...
Come back to the Canon M...too expensive.....I think. People will spend much for the "pro" things and won't think that's expensive. But the 4 3 mirror-less cameras is not in that field. So I think $1000 for a compact camera is expensive.

0 upvotes
TongY
By TongY (Aug 6, 2012)

very very slow auto focus with EF lenses. This camera will fail without "Peak focus" feature...

1 upvote
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Aug 3, 2012)

booooooooring, a nikon 1 with a bigger sensor, i guess they needed 7 years of developement and a team of 25 highly trained dolphins to find out that people like mirrorless now :)

i mean seven years ago of course, because NOW people want mirrorless bodies that behave like real cameras and are made like a tool, not a toy.

clumsy dolphines

3 upvotes
Sad Joe
By Sad Joe (Aug 7, 2012)

LOL! But at least Canon have done as they said they would by not supporting the 4 3 format which they are on record as dissing. I think that Nikon have made a terrible mistake with their 1 series and I predict that they will be forced to introduce a completely revised system. I love the idea of a compact high quality camera - both Panasonic and the new Olympus OM-D seem excellent - I wish that Sony would spend as much as time on their lens range as they do on new camera bodies (menus are still too complex), as a Nikon/ Canon owner user if 'forced' to select another brand I'd go for the OM-D today - well done Olympus. Takes me back to my OM days - but that's another story.

3 upvotes
fred 76
By fred 76 (Aug 2, 2012)

This camera has a big potential for astrophotography. It is light weight, has a short flange to sensor depth, and a decent sensor. But to shoot astrophotos, we need to be able to operate the camera from EOS Utility (or any other software that uses the Canon EOS SDK).

Some questions about the use of the EOS M with EOS Utility:
1) will it be possible to do remote shooting?
2) will it be possible to get Bulb with very long exposures (say 10 minutes or even more)?
3) will it be possible to use the EOS Utility intervalometer?

Last question about modifying this camera :
1) is it difficult to open so that we can remove and replace the internal UV/IR cut filters?

Fred

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
fred 76
By fred 76 (Aug 2, 2012)

... seen on Canon Canada : when using the Bulb mode, only the 400 ISO gain can be used.

Is it also valid when using Remote Capture ?

0 upvotes
Larry Fine
By Larry Fine (Oct 17, 2012)

The RC-6 will be supported for remote capture per a Canon representative at http://photo.net/canon-eos-digital-camera-forum/00afFH

0 upvotes
PCPics
By PCPics (Aug 2, 2012)

Where is the thumb activated focus? Without that one little item it becomes a toy from my perspective. Perhaps with a firmware tweak, the movie stop/start could be assigned that function whilst in 'stills' mode. Seems like an obvious omission on Canon's side?

0 upvotes
Frank Minster
By Frank Minster (Jul 31, 2012)

Does an artist use one paint brush? Does a mechanic use one tool? NO! Look at this camera for the purpose it's intended. I use my Canon 7D for Weddings and take my Canon 50D as a backup camera. These are only used for special events. I have the Sony HX-100V for everyday shooting where a telephoto lens would be needed. I also have the Canon S95 as a pocketable camera where there might be low light situations and don't need the long telephoto range. Each camera has it's strenghts and weaknesses. My knowing what they are will determine which camera will be used. I acheive great results will all the cameras listed. Every camera has it's good points and bad points and DPR tries to point them out with their reviews. I for one appreciate the work they do, however I am the one who ultimately decides which camera to purchase based on the knowledge gathered here and other sites and the intended use of the purchase.

0 upvotes
Sad Joe
By Sad Joe (Aug 7, 2012)

I have to agree - we all get hung up on which camera is best for this and which other camera is best for something else. Two tales - both true - Saturday I attended a wedding (ex pro photographer now doing car hire) - the 'Pro" used 2x Canon 1 D series cameras with a bag of L lenses - pity he didn't seem to know what to do with them, boy did he take his time - never a good sigh when the pro checks EVERY exposure on the camera back before taking the next image, on Sunday I bumped into a guy who shoots weddings part time - he uses a basic Fuji bridge style compact camera - a super zoom 28-300 bog basic thing - he has no plans nor desire to buy anything 'better' as he said it gives him the quality, speed needed and most importantly he says his customers like his informal not dragging a 'huge bag/tripod/lighting rig with him style'.

So there You/I/ We have it forget your 5D3/ 7D / D800/ D3 etc - get a £200 Fuji instead!!

1 upvote
YepYep
By YepYep (Aug 10, 2012)

haha! I like the Fuji guy!
maybe next time you would see somebody using a iphone...maybe a bigger one...i-pad...

0 upvotes
mytake
By mytake (Jul 31, 2012)

My prediction is that this sensor will be trounced by Oly Em-5...just saying.

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Jul 31, 2012)

Oly do not make sensors and their lack of knowledge about sensors was one of the biggest reasons behind the failure of original 4/3".

0 upvotes
mytake
By mytake (Jul 31, 2012)

I'll resist the grammer lesson...I effectually said, that the sensor in the Em-5, will prove to to a better sensor than the one in the EOS-M. Maybe I'm wrong, but I doubt it. Oh and, "Sony do make sensors" (I couldn't resist after all).

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Jul 31, 2012)

then why you should mention EM-5, which uses a same sensor as several other cameras? Pana said they improved sensor performance and a new, better sensor is used in GF5.

though Pana's sensors aren't the best, they aren't bad either. after all, the biggest problem for m4/3 is the lack of good high spec lenses.

0 upvotes
mytake
By mytake (Jul 31, 2012)

OK, my bad...you are Japanese, and can clearly read and write my language better than I can yours, (which is, I'm afraid, not at all) I'm sorry...sincerely.

However, you are misinformed my friend, the Oly Em-5 uses a Sony sensor, Oly's first I believe, which is probably why it's kicking butt all all over cameraland. As you are, I'm sure, aware, Sony is currently making the best sensors this side of Jupiter.

I'll be back in an hour to comment on the lenses.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
mytake
By mytake (Jul 31, 2012)

Before I go on...would you like to take this private (before I get scalped) maybe we could both learn something. To everyone else of the Canon persuasion, I'm not foolish enough to think I've got a 5dmk3 here, heck, I'd love to be able to just shoot with a mk3 for a week, or two (years). I love Canon lenses, particularly, the 85 1.8, the 100 2.0, the 70-200 4 and IMHO the best FX super wide prime on six continents (Antarctica is a mystery to me) the Canon 14 2.8. OK then, behind kissing mode off.

With that said (you thought I'd never shut-up), I think Canon could have been more aggressive with this release...it should have had viewfinder, and an awesome one at that. Yes, other camera companies, Sony, Oly, Pany, and Pentax, (not Nikon) all started thier mirrorless journeys without a viewfinder while Canon waited. There was no longer a need to test the water, the market was there. Canon should have plowed under the competition (or tried a little harder to)

1 upvote
mytake
By mytake (Jul 31, 2012)

But they released this camera...an ok little cam that will sell to alot of people who already have a Canon dslr and three or four or more Canon lenses. Or it sell to a lot of people who will never buy another lense, because without that "never seen anything like it before in my life" Canon viewfinder, it's just another point and shoot, like the one they had, and oh yea, it says CANON on it . just saying...

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Michael Doleman
By Michael Doleman (Aug 1, 2012)

Hey mytake: I can't resist the spelling lesson, as regards your "grammer" lesson. I think you might have wanted the word "grammar," unless you were going for some sort of odd, vernacular reference to someone's grandmother.

0 upvotes
mytake
By mytake (Aug 2, 2012)

You got me Michael...it was a cheap shot on my part, I regret it. Thanks for not "really" ripping me up.

0 upvotes
Jylppy
By Jylppy (Jul 29, 2012)

What a great opening from Canon! I would say. As with any MILC, one will buy not jus a camera, but into a SYSTEM - including lenses, accessories, future upgrade options. On strategic level Canon played smart here:
1) APS-C sensor gives them upper hand over 4/3rds in image quality - always.
2) APS-C sensor and the EF-M mount gives compatibility of huge Canon lens portfolio. There are many Canon DSLR owners out there, and while using EF/EF-S lenses in EF-M is not optimal in sizewise, it is possible.
3) compatibility with huge selection of Canon DSLR accessories

The first product is really nice also:
4) Fantastic, clean design, without gimmickry. Yes, I think the retro look of Olympus E-M5 is nice, but Canon's clean design language will appeal to broader audience. I and my wife love it.
5) Touch-screen for ease for ease of use - let's see how photography enthusiastics like it.

Lack of EVF is a gap, but there is nothing preventing Canon to implement it in its next prosumer model.

1 upvote
Jylppy
By Jylppy (Jul 29, 2012)

What Canon needs to do next is to:
1) Ramp-up lens portfolio and FAST
2) bring higher-end model with EVF
3) Not to care about internal cannibalisation - let consumers choose

Now I need to choose shall I wait for ahigher specsed Canon M or buy Olympus E-M5 now...

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Jul 29, 2012)

> EVF ... there is nothing preventing Canon to implement it

there is no reason to implement it, either.

0 upvotes
acjohnson55
By acjohnson55 (Jul 30, 2012)

It's certainly not necessary for everyone, but to say there's no reason to have an EVF is obviously false given how many people are interested in having one

0 upvotes
probert500
By probert500 (Jul 28, 2012)

I would really love it if sony came out with a 24mm lens the size and price of the canon's. They could probably learn a bit about menu design too. But otherwise I think you're paying more and getting less with the canon.

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
1 upvote
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Jul 29, 2012)

Sony's E24/1.8 is a very low cost lens sold at an unbelievable high price.

0 upvotes
vladimir vanek
By vladimir vanek (Jul 27, 2012)

what about time-lapse and/or hi-speed video?

0 upvotes
Gully Foyle
By Gully Foyle (Jul 27, 2012)

Like SONY did almost two years ago, Canon too announces an "upgrader" product along with an "enthusiast" lens. Let's hope that unlike SONY, Canon lives up to its name and keeps lens production at a steady pace.

0 upvotes
RicardoPhotos
By RicardoPhotos (Jul 27, 2012)

This is the first mirrorless camera I would consider getting. It's simple and solid. Even the EF-M lenses have a nice range. Body plus 2 lenses for $1100? Interesting. I think people are also missing the point that it can also use Canon wireless flash system. Very very cool.

3 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Aug 1, 2012)

".. the EF-M lenses have a nice range."

Is that a joke or what ? Two friggen native lenses then you have to use a big $200 adapter to use Canon DSLR lenses.

3 upvotes
choochoo22
By choochoo22 (Jul 26, 2012)

Sounds like a bit of a disconnect between engineering and marketing...

"the EOS M - is unashamedly targeted to [compact-camera upgraders]"

"Targeting an enthusiast buyer, the camera plus 22mm pancake will be available from speciality photo stores only for $799"

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Jul 26, 2012)

"combined AV out/mini USM socket"

What is it? Did you mean USB?

0 upvotes
Peak25500
By Peak25500 (Jul 26, 2012)

Hope they'll make a FD adapter!

1 upvote
Valentinian
By Valentinian (Jul 26, 2012)

Question: why there are no full size mirrorless cameras?

0 upvotes
safeashouses
By safeashouses (Jul 26, 2012)

They are full size.

0 upvotes
kphan
By kphan (Jul 26, 2012)

The Leica M9 is a full size mirrorless camera.

0 upvotes
pdelux
By pdelux (Jul 26, 2012)

Define Full size?

0 upvotes
Igor Marques Gil
By Igor Marques Gil (Jul 26, 2012)

Did you mean FULL FRAME?

2 upvotes
eresaw
By eresaw (Jul 27, 2012)

@Valentinian
Because the producers do not have enough imagination...

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Jul 27, 2012)

at least the throat diameter is larger than Leica M.

0 upvotes
keun
By keun (Jul 26, 2012)

Design is not ugly ~ I do think it is bit conventional and boring... features are standard too but the shutter sound is the best I heard from this category.
but I still love my nex5 better haha.

0 upvotes
EasyClick
By EasyClick (Jul 25, 2012)

Why is the design so ugly??? Olympus saw success in a retro style. Canon could've easily taken an old design like the Canonet and adapt it to digital.

1 upvote
EdLu
By EdLu (Jul 25, 2012)

Very interesting offering from Canon.

Mirrorless models offer reduced weight, and that is a big benefit. But I found it a bit tricky to figure out what the weight actually is for my preferred configuration. That made it hard to do useful comparisons. The problem is sometimes the weight is without the battery or without the lens or with the wrong lens. So here is what I found on the weight of the EOS-M.

With battery and with the 18-55mm lens, the weight is 506 to 508 grams.
This compares to 775 grams for the Canon T4i/650D, similarly equipped.
So the mirrorless model has a weight advantage of 268g. That is significant, but far from half the weight of the DSLR. The two cameras will probably produce pics with similar IQ. But note that the DSLR has a viewfinder and flash, which the M does not.

The new offerings from the different manufacturers are fantastic. But I think it is important to gather all the facts you need to make the best buying decisions.

2 upvotes
pdelux
By pdelux (Jul 26, 2012)

Edlu - I agree, i think the weight issue is directly related to the sensor size choice. Canon will find it hard to make small native lenses for an APS-C sized camera. Look at Sony and their native lenses available for NEX. A couple years on and i think it has more bodies than lenses.

0 upvotes
acjohnson55
By acjohnson55 (Jul 26, 2012)

Good points, but imagine what your bag weighs with a small set of EF-M lenses compared to EF or EF-S

0 upvotes
EdLu
By EdLu (Jul 27, 2012)

I am hoping fervently that a suite of EF-M lenses will be introduced and that they will be smaller than the EF and EF-S lenses. One hopes that the new lens mount makes that possible. And it is the established pattern, for instance if you compare 35mm gear to 120 format. The smaller format lenses are smaller and lighter -- and faster by about 1 stop.

But the 18-55mm EF-M lens is not lighter than the 18-55mm EF-S lens, nor is it faster. Not a good start!

1 upvote
looker
By looker (Jul 25, 2012)

And by "mirrorless", you mean point and shoot? I'm scanning through pages and pages here on DP, trying to find out what the difference between "mirrorless" and point and shoot is. Apparently, just a psychological marketing distinction based on a premium price.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jul 25, 2012)

One difference might be the fact that you can change lenses on these cameras. Just sayin'. LOL.

Hey, a DSLR can also be "point and shoot", too. But it's really up to the photographer to take ANY camera beyond just pointing and shooting.

3 upvotes
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (Jul 25, 2012)

It is a P&s without a lens. It becomes a Compact System Camera when you put a lens on it. So it is useless as a P&S without a lens and unpocketable with a lens.

2 upvotes
gssolym43
By gssolym43 (Jul 25, 2012)

It is not a psychological distinction. A critical physical difference is sensor size. The sensors in point & shoot cameras are much smaller than those in mirrorless cameras, which are in turn smaller than those in DSLRs. Sensor size is linked to pixel size which in turn is linked to image quality.

2 upvotes
Terry M
By Terry M (Jul 25, 2012)

The biggest differences are sensor size and the ability to switch lenses. The controls can be very P&S-like, but in my experience, the sensor makes for notable improvements in image quality, especially in low light.

0 upvotes
makarandsaraf
By makarandsaraf (Jul 26, 2012)

Yes its the difference in size of the sensor which as Olympus system users we are so used to knowing.The sensor size on the Olympus 4/3rd cameras and the micro 4/3rd cameras is the same - (Four Thirds (17.3 x 13 mm) so they are able to make tiny lenses on their OM-D EM-5.In the case of Canon the SLR and the mirrorless cameras are having the same sensor size (APS-C (22.3 x 14.9 mm) so will be difficult to make smaller lenses for the EOS-M series bcos of the larger sensor.

Tiny Point and shoots have a miniscule sensor size- so the poor image quality, whereas with the Oly and other mirrorless offerings the sensor size being large enough its IQ is simply stunning(in fact the Oly OMD EM-5 has an IQ quality on par with the Canon 5D Mark II camera as has been shown by the review on DPR and thats why the OMD is making waves all over the world.

1 upvote
mytake
By mytake (Jul 30, 2012)

Yes I agree...I am an Oly Em-5 owner. It's great. I love it...but guess what? The Canon EOS-M is #3 on the best selling compact system cameras list on Amazon. Wow...thats really all I can say.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Sep 11, 2012)

The Olympus is impressive for its size and the Fujis even more so. But no, they are not in a league with any current full frame cameras. Not yet, anyway.

0 upvotes
Pal2012
By Pal2012 (Jul 25, 2012)

Meh

Typical Canon protection of its DSLR line.

1 upvote
Esmee Farquhar
By Esmee Farquhar (Jul 25, 2012)

In Soviet Russia, DSLR protect CANON!

0 upvotes
EdLu
By EdLu (Jul 30, 2012)

Sony and the other players will not protect Canon's DSLR line!

The market is shifting... Canon and Nikon have to move fast to retain their positions in the market.

0 upvotes
gray cat
By gray cat (Jul 25, 2012)

Remember folks, all your optical viewfinders from the "good ole daze" will fit right on the top in the hot shoe. Been working for decades that way, and being able to use my Canon DSLR lenses is really cool. Mic input and level screen, auto focus during video will be very nice too! I'm in.

0 upvotes
m68rk
By m68rk (Jul 25, 2012)

What any one of them, cant see how, surely it would have to be aligned with the lens and its respective focal length, you could use one of those lupes that fits over the screen, difficult because you would have to remove it every time you wanted to make an adjustment. Bet canon have one waiting in the wings just like all the other manufacturers, it will be a steel at just under £200.

0 upvotes
jrfoto53
By jrfoto53 (Jul 28, 2012)

Except that not everyone wants to have the flash installed all the time, nor use it very much. On-camera flash is a killer.
Canon themselves suggest that the high-ISO performance means the flash isn't required for many situations where it migh have been used previously.

0 upvotes
SteB
By SteB (Jul 25, 2012)

I was interested in this release because I have a Canon DSLR system and I have been thinking about moving to m4/3. The advantage of a Canon mirrorless camera being it easier to use my Canon lenses on it. The problem being that I can't think of many occasions where I could use this body on my Canon lenses. The lack of any viewfinder ability, and the lack of focus peaking, mean that except for static tripod use, it would have little use apart from as a carry around camera.

In addition the AF speed looks slow to me. On the video reviews I've seen the touchscreen is touched, and there is a noticeable lag before it focuses on this point, whereas with m4/3 now it is nearly instant.

I think it's acceptable as Canon's first entry, but with this feature set it needed to be much cheaper. And I do mean "much cheaper" i.e. as cheap or not cheaper than any other similar camera. As it stands we have to wait to see what else Canon produces to know how serious they are about mirrorless.

4 upvotes
m68rk
By m68rk (Jul 25, 2012)

OH GREAT..... just what i have been waiting for, something small, compact with a decent sized sensor that i can use with my existing EF lens collection, small enough for street photography, a lot less obvious than a 5D.

BUT why no view finder i don't want to stand there with the other mobile phone users.

Pehaps cannon have completely missed the boat and forgot to add direct dialing and incoming calls as a feature.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
jrfoto53
By jrfoto53 (Jul 28, 2012)

I know what you mean, but maybe there will be more EOS M models in future?

0 upvotes
paolopan83
By paolopan83 (Jul 25, 2012)

Design and IQ are good. Yet it is a bit too expensive in my opinion. I would either buy a premium compact (which fits in my pocket and I can really have always with me) or a DSLR (which is way bigger but more flexible).

Maybe 22mm is good for street photography, but honestly not being a pro I would trade lower image quality for a zoom.

Having a big sensor and a good lens on a compact is all what one enthusiast needs (even if not many example of such a camera are available). I do not see any point in being able to mount a pro lens on a camera like that.

0 upvotes
57even
By 57even (Jul 25, 2012)

Since the market is already well represented with existing products from other makers, it is not surprising that the reaction to this camera is a bit lukewarm as it misses out a lot of things (viewfinder, flash, accessory port) that the others have.

I guess all of these could be addressed in future models. However whereas Nikon were pretty clear about the technical direction on launch, Canon are not.

Almost certainly means future versions will compete with the Rebel line or even replace it, hence they don't want to play their hand too early for fear of damaging sales.

However it does rather imply that Nikon will have to think seriously about a larger sensor MILC camera, even it's based on the F mount.

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
CedricL1984
By CedricL1984 (Jul 27, 2012)

I think that Canon is studiing the market with this camera. They don't want their custumer to go away on m4/3 or any other mirrorless systems.
I don't see anyone using this very small camera with big L glasses, it makes no senses. But I see a lot of Canon addik buying this type of camera With pancake lens and leave their FF dslr at home. It will sell well.

1 upvote
Trevor_S
By Trevor_S (Sep 27, 2012)

That doesn't tmake any sense ? If you're not going to mount your exisiting lenses than the World is your Oyster in terms of choice eg NEX7 etc etc Surely you would not buy it just because it says Canon ?

0 upvotes
FTW
By FTW (Jul 25, 2012)

http://www.techradar.com/reviews/cameras-and-camcorders/cameras/digital-slrs-hybrids/canon-eos-m-1089580/review

Techradar has a complete test and review and together with let's go digital have full size pictures, the same on both sites. Good pictures, but nothing surprising or extraordinary to report here.

0 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (Jul 25, 2012)

I looked at the mounts and compared their size, in particular their inner rings.

Assuming the EOS-M mount is meant for APS-C (and it sure looks like this), then by comparison, the NEX mount is for an APS-H and the Nikon-1 mount is for a FourThirds sensor.

However, next to a K-01 (which has a mount known to support full frame) the NEX mount appears to support the same size. So, it may actually be made for full frame even.

I wonder why Canon made the inner ring this big (without saving space by also reducing the metal mount). It's a bit the same with the Nikon 1, it could support APS-C with a smaller inner ring. For Nikon, I guess it is because they're still going to release their DX mirrorless with a separate mount. But for Canon, I don't see the reason.

0 upvotes
acjohnson55
By acjohnson55 (Jul 26, 2012)

Do you think Nikon is really going to do DX mirrorless? Not saying they won't, but it's hard to imagine them doing that AND continuing the CX mount of the 1 series

0 upvotes
FTW
By FTW (Jul 27, 2012)

Why not, having tourist CX mount and an FXM mount would make sense, both are different worlds and price range. Making and apsc in between would make people choose between the 2 bottom items and the 2 top ones, where the apsc will be the top on one side, and the bottom on the other. That would make choice difficult despite there was a mirrorless for just any category of wallet in there. Now, since market is now saturated in apsc mirrorless cameras, Nikon having a CX and an FXM would be the choice to go for. Except if Nikon was interested to have one in any of that 3 categories. Now, how about a square sensor in 24x24 or 36x36, that was an other good option. Sony had this in perspective according to rumors.

0 upvotes
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