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Canon EOS M hands-on preview

July 2012 | By Andy Westlake


Preview based on a pre-production Canon EOS M

It's now almost four years since Panasonic first introduced us to the mirrorless interchangeable lens camera, in the shape of the Micro Four Thirds Lumix DMC-G1. Since then, all of the other major manufacturers have entered the fray, in the process offering cameras in a variety of shapes and sizes - from diminutive beginner-friendly models such as the Olympus PEN E-PM1, to unashamedly high-end models like the Sony NEX-7 and Fujifilm X-Pro1. Nikon, meanwhile, has ploughed its own individual furrow with its family-friendly 1 J1 and 1 V1 models. This simply reflects the fact that different cameras are targeted to different kinds of users - be they serious enthusiasts looking for a small, highly capable camera, or compact-camera upgraders looking for SLR-like image quality in a smaller, easier-to-use package.

Canon is the last big player to show its hand, and its initial entrant - the EOS M - is unashamedly targeted to the latter group of users. To all intents and purposes it's a mirrorless version of the recently-announced EOS 650D, but with a simpler interface that's designed to be more approachable for novice users, and obviously much more compact in size. It's based around a new 'EF-M' lens mount, and two matched lenses will be available at launch: the EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM zoom, and the EF-M 22mm f/2 STM 'pancake' prime. But it's still very much part of the EOS system, and all of the company's existing EF and EF-S SLR lenses can be used via the co-announced 'Mount adapter EF-EOS M'.

The EOS M features a compact, magnesium-alloy body, and will be available in four colours - black, white, silver and red. It has no built-in flash, but instead a hot shoe on the top plate, and in many markets (although not the US) it will come bundled with the new AAA-powered Speedlite 90EX unit. There's neither a built-in viewfinder, nor connector for an external unit - composition is solely using the camera's rear screen (which is fixed, rather than articulated).

Canon EOS M key features

  • New EF-M lens mount (optimized for APS-C sensor size)
  • 18MP APS-C 'Hybrid CMOS' sensor
  • Continuous autofocus in movie mode with subject tracking
  • 14-bit DIGIC5 processor
  • ISO 100-12800 standard, 25600 expanded
  • 4.3 fps continuous shooting, 3 fps with autofocus tracking
  • 1080p30 video recording, stereo sound (with 25p or 24p options)
  • External microphone socket and adjustable sound recording level
  • 1040k dot 3:2 touch-sensitive ClearView II LCD (capacitative type, multi-touch support)
  • Standard EOS hot-shoe for external flash (no built-in flash)
  • 'Creative Filters' image-processing controls, previewed live on-screen
The EOS M will be available in four colours - silver, red, black or white - although they may not all be sold in all markets.

The EOS M's commitment to simplicity is reflected by its physical control layout, with buttons and dials kept to a minimum. The exposure mode dial - a staple of Canon's EOS range for over 20 years - has been reduced to just three positions, distinctly reminiscent of the company's Ixus / Elph compacts. The rear of the camera is also rather compact-esque, with a familiar combined 4-way controller / settings dial and just a smattering of buttons.

The lack of physical controls is, however, substantially made up for by the large capacitative touchscreen on the back. This uses much the same interface that Canon introduced on the EOS 650D, and stands out as the most usable, comprehensive and engaging touchscreen that we've yet seen on an interchangeable-lens camera. But whereas on the 650D its use is very much optional, on the EOS M it becomes the preferred method of interaction with the camera.

Because mirrorless cameras have struggled to make headway in the US, Canon is only going to sell one kit option in this market. Targeting an enthusiast buyer, the camera plus 22mm pancake will be available from speciality photo stores only for $799, with the 18-55mm zoom sold separately for $299. The company will also be emphasizing its video capabilities, which are essentially the same as the EOS 650D but in a smaller, cheaper package.

Movies can be recorded in Full HD 1920x1080 resolution at 30, 25 or 24 fps with stereo sound, using the highly-compatible MOV format and H.264 compression, with a time limit of 29 min 59 sec per clip. The EOS M offers a choice of either fully automatic exposure in video mode, or as much manual control as the user wishes to take. The 3-10x electronic zoom first seen on the EOS 600D, but mysteriously missing from the EOS 650D, is also available - with minimal loss of quality at the 3x setting.

New EF-M lens mount

A new mirrorless system needs a new lens mount, which Canon has called EF-M to emphasis its continued compatibility with the company's existing EF mount for autofocus SLRs. It's a fully-electronic bayonet mount, with 9 contacts between the lens and camera. Unusually, the white dot for aligning the lens is at the 11 0'clock position on the mount.

The EF-M mount is 58mm in diameter, with a flange distance of 18mm from the bayonet to the sensor. As the image above clearly shows it's matched specifically to the APS-C sensor size. So don't expect a future full frame EF-M mount camera - it's not going to happen.

Like all other mirrorless cameras, the EOS M's shutter is open by default even when the camera is turned off, exposing the sensor. This may seem disconcerting to SLR owners, but we've never experienced any problem with this approach. Like Canon's live view-capable SLRs the EOS M uses an electronic first curtain to activate the exposure, and the physical shutter is only used to end it. This helps reduces shutter lag and keep shutter noise down - meaning the EOS M is one of the quieter models of its type.

Two new EF-M lenses: EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM and EF-M 22mm f/2.0 pancake

The EOS M is released with two new lenses for the EF-M mount - an 18-55mm image-stabilized standard zoom and a compact, 'pancake' prime. Both feature Canon's 'STM' stepper motor for autofocus, which allows near-silent refocusing during video recording. This means electronically-coupled 'focus-by-wire' manual focus; thankfully though Canon hasn't been tempted to discard physical focus rings. However there are no switches to set the focus or IS mode - these are controlled from the camera.

Canon EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM and EF-M 22mm f/2.0 STM

The lenses use minimalistically-styled, plain cylindrical barrels that bear more than a passing resemblance to Sony's NEX series optics. In terms of dimensions they're fairly typical for their class, which means they're smaller than corresponding SLR lenses; the zoom is near-identical in size to the Sony E 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 OSS, whereas the pancake is very similarly-sized to Panasonic's Lumix G 20mm F1.7 ASPH.

As the only cameras we've seen so far are pre-production, it's premature to say much about focus speed. But while on first impressions the 18-55mm focuses pretty quickly, the 22mm is distinctly slower. This is not totally surprising given that the entire optical unit racks back and forth for focusing; this is not a design approach that's ever been associated with ultra-fast focusing on this type of lens. But we'll wait for production cameras and lenses to make a proper judgement.

Lens specifications

 

Canon EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6
IS STM

Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM
 Format  APS-C  APS-C
 Focal length  18-55mm  22mm
 35mm-equiv focal length  29-88mm  35mm
 Diagonal angle of view  74°20' - 25°70'  63°30'
 Maximum aperture  1:3.5-5.6  1:2
 Lens construction  13 elements / 11 groups  7 elements / 6 groups
 Focus motor type  Linear Stepper Motor  Linear Stepper Motor
 Focus method  • Internal focus
 • Focus-by-wire manual focus
 • Unit focus
 • Focus-by-wire manual focus
 Zoom method  Rotary, extending barrel  n/a
 Minimum focus distance  0.25m / 0.82 ft  0.15m / 0.49 ft
 Filter thread  • 52mm
 • Does not rotate on focusing
 • 43mm
 • Does not rotate on focusing
 Dimensions  60.9 x 61mm (2.39 x 2.4 in)  60.9 x 23.7mm (2.38 x 0.93 in)
 Weight  210g (7.4oz)  105g (3.7 oz)

Size compared

The EOS M is a small camera - indeed one of the smallest APS-C models around. Here we compare it to the EOS 650D and Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF3.

Here's the EOS M with the 22mm f/2 next to the camera with which it share its innards - the EOS 650D with EF 40mm f/2 STM lens. As you can see, eliminating the reflex mirror and optical viewfinder has enabled a dramatic reduction in size.
Here's the EOS M side-by-side with the Panasonic Lumix GF3 - a model that's similarly-aimed at compact camera upgraders, and one of the smallest mirrorless cameras around (it's since been replaced by the similar-size GF5). Both cameras use a touchscreen to complement their limited array of physical controls, but the GF5 has a built-in flash rather than a hot shoe. It also uses the slightly smaller Four Thirds sensor.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2012 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 551
2345
cxsparc
By cxsparc (Jul 23, 2012)

+ EOS-Lenses can be attached and used (requires adapter)
+ EOS flashes can be attached
+ Mic connector and volumen control options
- uncompetitive price (5N with kit zoom 630 Euros,
EOSM with 22mm 799.-, kit zoom 300 Euro)
- no EVF
- LCD not tiltable
- User interface probably not faster then 5N

So as summary, IF you already own EOS lenses (which worldwide a lot of people do) you might consider this camera. There are enough people who bought the microbones adoater for 300 $ and it cannot even perform AF.

The question though is why would you buy this camera if you already own an EOS DLSR? Going to another brand would be cheaper. Only the weight reduction could be a point in favor. EOS lenses are big.

0 upvotes
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Jul 23, 2012)

My gut says that those owning many good EOS lenses will want something more than this to attach them to and something Canon is unlikely to give them. Rather, they will sell a boatload of these to those who want a "professional" brand camera and haven't already bought a Nikon 1. Just my opinion, but the EOS adapter is just so they can say "we have lots of compatible lenses." Ala. Sony.

1 upvote
epo001
By epo001 (Jul 23, 2012)

No viewfinder? Too expensive in the UK. No interest.

2 upvotes
Paul Saxby
By Paul Saxby (Jul 23, 2012)

If this camera had the option of an external viewfinder, not necessarily an EVF, just a simple optical one even, then I might consider getting this. it might only be a glorified point and shoot but it does offer an alternative to an Ixus or Powershot. If it was between this or the G1X I would probably still get the G1X, but if it was between this and the G12, then it would be this... Thats just my opinion anyway..

1 upvote
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Jul 23, 2012)

See: http://www.ebay.com/itm/170881382441

I still would prefer a real EVF. You can't judge focus on these lenses, since they're fly by wire.

0 upvotes
voland354
By voland354 (Jul 23, 2012)

It does not have flash!! then it is no for me :) hello Pentax / Sony :)

1 upvote
ksraghavendra
By ksraghavendra (Jul 23, 2012)

Canon has released a speedlite 90EX for the new eos-m series. Go get it!

0 upvotes
voland354
By voland354 (Jul 24, 2012)

why should i pay external flash for an entry level camera :) if i had plan to buy a ext flash, then i would buy for my 7D :)

1 upvote
Denton Taylor
By Denton Taylor (Jul 23, 2012)

I don't think too many people on DPR will be buying this. I know I won't

1 upvote
Jokica
By Jokica (Jul 23, 2012)

Agree! People on DPR are informed, and this camera is for non-informed brandlovers with budget :-/

1 upvote
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Jul 23, 2012)

I agree. I think they did do well with the body design and it should appeal to Christmas shoppers at big box stores. The salesmen will talk it up because it's a Canon.

1 upvote
Paul Greenwood
By Paul Greenwood (Jul 23, 2012)

A further thought. they launch this on a bright sunny day when users of their new system may not be able to compase photos due to reflections on the screen.

PMG

1 upvote
Paul Greenwood
By Paul Greenwood (Jul 23, 2012)

As a Canon rebel 350 D then 550D userI had been waiting to see what Canon mirrorless offered before proceeding to micro four thirds as that system now offers quality acceptable to me. The appeal of M4/3rds being the weight of the lenses especially long zooms. Increasingly I have been using a travel compact and leaving the Canon system at home. The use of the APC sensor means no significant weight reduction for longer zoom lenses compatable with this system.

My move from Canon to M4/3 rds proceeds

PMG

10 upvotes
keeponkeepingon
By keeponkeepingon (Jul 23, 2012)

Wow. That describes me exactly.

Once I got my S95/S100 the T2i has been staying at home a lot. Even on trip such as disneyland which is a lot more fun when you are not whacking kids on the head with your DSLR.

I think we all had great hopes that canon would offer a compact innovation but with this.... I may try out the 40mm pancake to see if that makes that lump more palatable but that $200 would go a long way towards financing a M43 body.

Sigh.....

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jul 23, 2012)

Lenses will always be smaller because of a shorter flange distance, otherwise you're right. This camera is doomed to suffer the 'NEX syndrome'.

3 upvotes
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (Jul 23, 2012)

Weight of the long lenses? Long lenses are essentially unaffected by mirrorless. The current Canon EF-S 55-250 f/4-5.6 IS zoom is 390g. The u4/3 equivalent is the Panasonic 45-200mm f/4-5.6 OIS at 380g. Right now you need a 50g adapter tube (not clear if the 50g includes the removable tripod mount or not.)

0 upvotes
Erik Magnuson
By Erik Magnuson (Jul 23, 2012)

Manuel, the u4/3 flange distance is 19.25mm while the Canon and NEX are 18mm, so your logic here is backwards!

Comment edited 27 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jul 23, 2012)

Hmmm... in what sense, Erik? I don't see your point. You should go back and read what I wrote again, because your reply makes no sense.

0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jul 23, 2012)

Let's give Canon some credit. This attempt to stop its DSLR owners switching to M43 is much better than Pentax's brick joke - the K-01. This camera and its lenses are smaller. But is it worth spending $800 for a camera with no viewfinder and limited features to get a smaller size (camera) when the EF lens and adapter will still make the whole thing big? Is it worth spending even more to buy the new lenses for use on such a basic camera? Assuming that Canon will eventually release a high-end mirrorless, how much would that cost? and how long will the wait be, knowing Canon does not want a high-end mirrorless to affect its dominant DSLR business? How long will it take Canon to release more lenses?

In the meantime, you can get the Olympus E-M5 for not much more and it has everything you want, and there are all those lenses, small and quality lenses.

I am afraid that this camera is confirming everything we suspected about Canon and that it is for those who want to use big DSLRs.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jul 23, 2012)

And soon there will be the Panasonic GH3. There are also choices if you prefer a pocketable GF5, or other small M43 cameras.

I cannot see any reason not to go M43, if people want a mirrorless system now. In another year, or two, and assuming the other makers release enough lenses, then it may be worthwhile considering others. Even then, in terms of value, lens line-up, size, weight and balance (huge lens and small body), M43 is unbeatable. The only reservation is its slightly smaller than APS-C sensor and hence IQ. But DPReview in its review said you have to go FF to get any significant improvement in IQ!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jul 23, 2012)

Loving all the no idea commenter's on here. It wouldn't matter if they brought out a full fame 11fps with 61 focus points that have full manual video control and Hollywood would buy into. You just like to have a good old moan like the grumpy old men/ and women you are.
Next you'll be saying that a £39 Vivitar is the camera of the future.

2 upvotes
Infared
By Infared (Jul 23, 2012)

I personally am non-plused at this offering. It is a camera aimed at beginners. Basically a P&S camera. Which is fine. It is just not a camera that I would buy. This is a really funny imageā€¦am I really going to attach my L glass to that?
http://2.static.img-dpreview.com/files/news/1705465526/canon_EOS-M_with_70-200mm.jpg?v=1546
Doubtful...but to each his own.

1 upvote
Ross Murphy
By Ross Murphy (Jul 23, 2012)

sure, why not

0 upvotes
rrccad
By rrccad (Jul 23, 2012)

70-200mm is nothing ..

1200mm F5.6L USM or go home ;)

1 upvote
Infared
By Infared (Jul 23, 2012)

LOL!

0 upvotes
Atlantis95
By Atlantis95 (Jul 23, 2012)

The EOS M is technical similar to the 650D.

That might be, but the Canon 650 D has 9 focus points, the EOS M 31 focus points.

0 upvotes
Roger Nordin
By Roger Nordin (Jul 23, 2012)

Maybe that is why it has an AF illuminator, so it can focus in low light?

0 upvotes
cheddargav
By cheddargav (Jul 23, 2012)

Firstly, bit disappointed. No VF and dumbed down controls.

And I'll be the first Brit to moan about the pricing:
$799 with the 22mm in the US
£879 with the 22mm in the UK (Jessops) = well over $1000.

Not for me but I'm sure it'll make a lot of people happy and it will obviously produce nice photos in the right hands

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Jul 23, 2012)

Yep, pricing of this camera seem to be bit off for what it offers, especially when you have a competition like NEX - with adult system, real PDAF adaptor (not poorly performing on-sensor AF) , and a grow path - either for professional photography with NEX7 or professional video with FS700.

3 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Jul 23, 2012)

That's not quite a fair comparison:

The UK bundle is Camera, 22mm, Speedlite EX-90, EF-EOS M adapter and includes VAT. The US price doesn't include tax, the adapter or, so far as we can tell, the flash.

That should balance things out a little.

0 upvotes
Rooru S
By Rooru S (Jul 23, 2012)

Well, Mr R Butler...the flash is mandatory since the camera doesn't have one available. And other kits from other manufacturers are priced well below the asked price. Still quite overpriced.

And if you really want to have a fair comparison. The new Sony NEX-F3 with 16mm + 18-55mm is £619 including VAT AND the CDAF adapter is £179 including VAT. That gives it a grand total of £798, for Two lenses, camera and adapter (and the adapter is not included as a bundle). And still, you got some money to get the more powerful HVL-F20S with Bounce for 129 including VAT and not included in a bundle if you want to invest a little bit more.

0 upvotes
Johnderock
By Johnderock (Jul 23, 2012)

What you fail to understand is the deadly competition from mobile phones.
P&S camera are dead, finished.
90% of all pix in he world are taken with excellent 5 or 8MP phones.
No one is going to buy a low end camera any more.
So the photo industry has to move upward, hence those bizarre formats like m4/3 or 1" and others. And those super long "travel zooms"
The industry is only buying time
Because we know the end of the story: for 90% of the users, the camera is in the phone.
Sorry

3 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Jul 23, 2012)

P&S goes back alive ever since cameras like RX100 or G1X got released. If it keeps going like that - there wouldn't be much point left in buying crap like Nikon 1 when you can get equally sized P&S with much better sensor or far smaller and actually PORTABLE RX100 that offers identical image quality.
With large sensor compacts a future of low-end expensive mirrorless is endangered.

2 upvotes
Artistico
By Artistico (Jul 23, 2012)

You are right that mobile phones have taken over a lot of the P&S market, but 90% of pictures are not taken with excellent 5 or 8mp phones. I'd guess no more than 5% are taken with excellent 5 or 8mp phones, and the rest with rubbish ones that would make any P&S on the market today look like an SLR in comparison.

But your quite valid point is that is what most people need for their snapshopts. The P&S segment is dying and camera makers need to go for what currently bridges the gap between big SLRs and small camera phones. At this point, however, I think Canon might be a bit late entering a game that to some extent Sony, and especially Olympus and Panasonic, have been playing for so long they play it really well. With the OM-D E-M5 and an ever-growing selection of MFT lenses, that system is about to come of age, and it will be a few years yet until Canon even hits puberty.

0 upvotes
ksraghavendra
By ksraghavendra (Jul 23, 2012)

Yes mobiles have eaten up the P&S market, the future is smart cameras powered by Android. But this is no P&S substitute! Nor is the NEX or the other mirrorless cameras.

0 upvotes
jm67
By jm67 (Jul 23, 2012)

+1 on the phone cameras. My humble guess on where this camera will fit into the scheme of things is for people unhappy with the quality of a P&S but intimidated by the SLR. The problem is they will still have to know how to use a camera to get good results and of course the price is outrageous. Anyone buying it can't use it off the shelf without buying a flash. That'll definitely turn off anyone coming from the casual user segment by adding even more the the cost. Personally, I think if you're going to spend this kind of dough, you ought to get an SLR (and then you can really have a versatile and capable system) but that's just me. This camera is aimed at someone who wants minimalism I would suppose.

0 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (Jul 23, 2012)

I have never understood this "intimidated by an SLR" thing. Sure, they have lots of buttons and widgets, but every one I have ever used can be put in program AE, auto ISO, and will spit out pictures just fine.

My first DSLR (an Olympus E-510, which is in Olympus tradition customizable to the Nth degree) was actually easier to use than my Panasonic bridge camera, just because you didn't have to worry about so many things (i.e. EVF lag, it had a proper buffer, the meter was more reliable, etc.)

0 upvotes
Dabbler
By Dabbler (Jul 23, 2012)

Phone cams don't do optical zoom, a big advantage for any zoom camera!

0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (Jul 23, 2012)

We are into the "second cycle." There was a time (end of film era) when folks were using camcorders more than traditional cameras. Digital brought folks back to "cameras," especially as they became capable of quality video. The second wave are the camera phone-and, yes, in a public setting, I see more people taking pictures with their phones, then cameras. Will the new compact system cameras (much better name, DPR) bring people back to cameras???

0 upvotes
Neimo
By Neimo (Jul 24, 2012)

There are lots of 10 to 15x P&S models that are about an inch thick. Those are selling well and phones won't do that any time soon. Just because 4x P&S cameras are finished doesn't mean the longer zoom ones are too.

0 upvotes
Azfar
By Azfar (Jul 23, 2012)

As always, excellent user interface.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jul 23, 2012)

If we forget the lack of a dial mode, that is.

0 upvotes
WireWess
By WireWess (Jul 23, 2012)

It's nice to see they supplied this camera with the mic input, but the biggest question for me is: Is there manual control available in video mode ??

Hope that someone can clarify that for me :)

0 upvotes
LJSmak
By LJSmak (Jul 23, 2012)

22mm has 6 lens elements in 7 groups, interesting...

3 upvotes
Terence Kearns
By Terence Kearns (Jul 23, 2012)

Does anyone know what the video recording bitrate will be on this thing?

0 upvotes
kapanak
By kapanak (Jul 23, 2012)

Exactly the same as the 650D.

0 upvotes
Oery
By Oery (Jul 23, 2012)

you will get internal flash in 7D (which; mostly won't be used, because more enthusiast photographer, will prefer ext-flash for sure)
but not on EOS-M ?
so, you have to carry ext-flash everywhere ?

0 upvotes
Terence Kearns
By Terence Kearns (Jul 23, 2012)

Yeah doesn't make much sense other than to extract yet more money from the consumer. I would recommend the user buy a https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yc3-8ZpBaXg flash with a cheap OC-E3 (TTL) cable Chinese know-off on ebay.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Jul 23, 2012)

Just get the NEX already. It got build-in flash and a real system instead of wannabe.

Comment edited 14 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Professor999
By Professor999 (Jul 24, 2012)

In Europe it seems the kit will ship with flash included.

0 upvotes
keeponkeepingon
By keeponkeepingon (Jul 23, 2012)

IR is reporting extremely slow AF speeds. Basically the EOS M is about as fast as 2009 M43 cameras.

Question: Why was there no mention of AF speed in the dpreview "hands on".

Is it because this was a pre-production model and you are giving canon a chance to get it right before final release.

Or is IR wrong and the AF speed not an issue?

Thanks!

0 upvotes
Terence Kearns
By Terence Kearns (Jul 23, 2012)

Agreed. The review is very much incomplete without a summary of the AF speeds. This is a big factor for this class of camera.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Jul 23, 2012)

The problem is that all the cameras anyone has seen are pre-production, so no one knows what final AF speed is going to he like.

However, it is a point we're going to cover as we extend the preview over the coming hours (It's the 22mm tgat is slow at the moment, and its unit-focus design may make it difficult to improve).

1 upvote
keeponkeepingon
By keeponkeepingon (Jul 23, 2012)

Thanks!

Can't wait to see your impressions!

0 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Jul 23, 2012)

So STM means it focuses smooth and silently (for video), but not necessarily fast.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Jul 23, 2012)

Essentially yes. STM can be implemented so it's really fast (eg Olympus 45mm F1.8, which is incredibly quick), but, just as AF-S on Nikon doesn't always promise fast focus, STM only tells you what sort of motor the lens has - not how cleverly it's been designed.

0 upvotes
vincelau
By vincelau (Jul 25, 2012)

While many poster lament the lack of built-in flash or EVF or design as the deal-breaker, EOS-M's real downfall will beits AF speed if what IR reported is accurate for the production model.

For now, NEX and m43 are the only mirrorless system worth considering - NEX for higher iso, m43 for higher portability and more interesting lens (e.g. the stunning cheap and shapr and bright Oly 45/1.8)

0 upvotes
Reg Natarajan
By Reg Natarajan (Jul 23, 2012)

This is a solid offering, with a good sensor and a nice overall set of features. It doesn't have a lot of wow factor but it certainly isn't something I'd be embarrassed to carry.

The gearheads here who are disparaging it are the same people who disparaged the Nikon 1 system which is selling like hotcakes. Nikon says "sales have been strong in all regions and at present, our supply cannot keep up with demand". I'd expect this Canon offering to do well in the market.

http://www.nikon.com/about/ir/ir_library/result/qa/2012_2q/index.htm

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
MrTaikitso
By MrTaikitso (Jul 23, 2012)

That is the problem. The sheeple will buy the unimaginatively designed boring boxes like this whilst creatives will (hopefully) stick to versatile offerings with flip out displays and at least one external exposure control dial. No large sensor, but Samsung EX2 is a lot more exciting!

1 upvote
oWarchild
By oWarchild (Jul 23, 2012)

Selling depends on lots of things like marketing and brand value (and we all know Canon and Nikon has lots). People "disparaging" it seem disappointed with lack of innovation when compared with existing mirrorless offerings from M4/3 and NEX. Since Canon took so long to get into this segment expectation was high.

0 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (Jul 23, 2012)

This is Canon's V1 equivalent, disappointing in different ways to Nikon's initial offering. However as sensors develop the V1's improved descendants will still have tiny lenses... The V1 already has a viewfinder and terrific af.
Size matters.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
carlnor
By carlnor (Jul 23, 2012)

I'm not sure I believe Nikon's claim about the fabulous sales of the Nikon 1. In Norway it's been offered at reduced prices for months due to slow sales.

0 upvotes
R Thornton
By R Thornton (Jul 23, 2012)

An augmented humongous Ixus, a "decent me-too camera" to hold at arm's length - just what the world needed! Way to go , Canon, way to go! After all the expectation and suspense, such an anticlimax...

4 upvotes
MrTaikitso
By MrTaikitso (Jul 23, 2012)

Agreed! (See my comment above.)

1 upvote
ogl
By ogl (Jul 23, 2012)

No emotions. Explain me - Why? :)

1 upvote
ogl
By ogl (Jul 23, 2012)

No e-dials...P&S operation?

0 upvotes
igorek7
By igorek7 (Jul 23, 2012)

The Canon is competing primarily with overcrowded APC-sensor mirrorless crowd, including Samsung NX, Sony NEX, Pentax K, and FujiFilm X/XF. This is good for the customers and tough for the manufactures.
The good news is that the EOS-M would attract more customers to consider a mirrorless as they next camera instead of an DSLR. Therefore, it may bring more interest to the mirrorless ILC system as well. As a micro34 user I am glad that Canon has finally joined the mirrorless system, even though I am quiet happy with the current micro34 cameras and lenses.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Merowech
By Merowech (Jul 23, 2012)

What a fantastic preview highlighting all that is special about this camera. This is what makes dpreview my favourite camera site.
The only thing I'm missing is a video and a size comparison with competitors.

3 upvotes
samdman
By samdman (Jul 23, 2012)

Why do I got the impression when looking at it's 18-55kit looked almost identical with Sony's E 18-55 kit? :)

3 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Jul 23, 2012)

Perhaps because they are based on the same sized sensor?

Styling is one thing, but the laws of physics cannot be ignored.

0 upvotes
draschan
By draschan (Jul 23, 2012)

why the complaints ? this little machine will deliver decent images. as a m43s user I am highly curious how this will be answered by panasonic ad olympus. there is a lot of competition going on now and IQ wise APSC will always have a slight advantage over smaller sensors. Olympus has incredible build quality and get's surprising IQ with even the old 12MP sensor. the m43s lens lineup is phantastic. nevertheless: the EOS M has a lot of potential and canon is a huge company that can easily release more professional versions with better manual controls. Canon DSLR lenses are fabulous so they can easily improve their lineup as desired. competition is heating up and that can only be good for us consumers.

1 upvote
Bill Schuppe
By Bill Schuppe (Jul 23, 2012)

Why would Panasonic or Olympus have to answer to this offering? They already offer many models with more features (like viewfinders to name one)

1 upvote
vincelau
By vincelau (Jul 25, 2012)

Exactly! Why would Pana or Oly even need to worry about this offering? The NEX line has equal better products (both body and lens) at its launch.

Both Canon/Nikon are not focused on mirrorless and their design philosophies while extremely different served the same purpose - join the mirrorless frey to please shareholders/analyst whlie stubbornly betting AGAINST professional/serious portable interchangable lens system to portect their bread-and-butter consumer point&shoot and dslr market shares.

Both C and N have the designers and engineers to offer much better MILC systems but the corporate brass and marketeers are the ones calling the shots here

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
highwave
By highwave (Jul 23, 2012)

Dpreview guys

As always I love your work and very much appreciated

But I sure wish you included side by side shots with competitors and even SLRs like you usually do.

Thanks overall though.

1 upvote
GlobalGuyUSA
By GlobalGuyUSA (Jul 23, 2012)

I totally agree -- I want to see it next to the S95 series, as well. A lot of consumers will be upgrading from there (probably more than will downgrade from a DSLR) -- just a thought!

1 upvote
kapanak
By kapanak (Jul 23, 2012)

These are all Canon provided press shots. Dpreview doesn't have their "production" sample yet.

0 upvotes
Jokica
By Jokica (Jul 23, 2012)

Can someone justify price difference between Canon EOS M (with18-55) and Sony NEX-5n (with18-55)?
-------------------------------
Battery Life (CIPA) 230 ?

4 upvotes
GlobalGuyUSA
By GlobalGuyUSA (Jul 23, 2012)

$100 for the Canon brand. Canon has more loyal users than Sony -- so it can charge more. (Call it a "sucker tax"). Canon can quickly get as many users as Sony even with the premium price. So from Canon's perspective, why not keep the price up? They can always lower it later. By the way, if anyone from Canon reads this, I am a Nikon user and would consider buying this camera if it was a $100 less expensive! Its just slightly too high right now. Thanks.

3 upvotes
xlotus
By xlotus (Jul 23, 2012)

Historically, Canon consumer/prosumer cameras (DSLR or not) would see a price drop within 3-6 months after launch date. I got my 60D for $900, $200 less the list price in about 3 months after the announcement. Sony NEX 5N which I also own, has been in the market for about a year and the price has not come down.

1 upvote
kapanak
By kapanak (Jul 23, 2012)

NEX-5N has not come down in price, because it is still selling. Unlike most lower end Canon products, which consumers buy today, and sell on Craigslist for 30% less 6 months later.

2 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jul 23, 2012)

Well, the best justification for the higher price is that now you can whine about something...

If it's too expensive for you there is a simple solution. Don't buy it.

0 upvotes
Jokica
By Jokica (Jul 23, 2012)

I agree with you, guys. But, Canon is forgetting that they are not so strong brand in mirrorless market, they have to prove themselves yet. APS-C users are not so naive to go for it. They decision is based on facts, not brand. Now, there is no Canon legacy lenses to protect this new body. One thing more: P&S users do not need APS-C sensor, and they are fine with 230 battery life. APS-C sensor users will find 230 shot battery small. I soot that much to get one good picture, and I am not even a pro.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Jul 23, 2012)

"Canon is forgetting that they are not so strong brand in mirrorless market" - can't agree with that. People don't care about "mirrorless market" brand strength. They care how strong the brand is in photography world. And Canon is very strong there.

1 upvote
Jokica
By Jokica (Jul 23, 2012)

"People don't care about..."
Don`t you think that it would be more appropriate:
"Some people don't care about..."

0 upvotes
EsVeeFoto
By EsVeeFoto (Jul 23, 2012)

Off late, Canon have been a disappointment as far as pricing is concerned. They priced the G1X at $800 when it came out in Jan. It is selling in the used market for $500. I won't be surprised if the EOS M depreciates similarly. If Canon had priced the G1X at $650, it would have sold like hot cakes just like the Sony RX100.

5 years back, Canon users like me, were proud out the fact that they offered value compared to other brands like Nikon. How times have changed.

3 upvotes
eyeshutter
By eyeshutter (Jul 23, 2012)

I just saw a video demonstrating the focus speed. SLOW AS MOLASSES.

0 upvotes
highwave
By highwave (Jul 23, 2012)

I'm not buying into that video

The autofocus just seems way to slow for a PDAF system. Maybe it was turned off by the reviewers and they were using CDAF of Canon (which sucks like nothing else on the market).

I really think the real PDAF of Canon will be very fast.

0 upvotes
GlobalGuyUSA
By GlobalGuyUSA (Jul 23, 2012)

It probably is slow. Unfortunately, even DP Review's review mentioned that it is as slow as using Live View with a Rebel. So that's your benchmark.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Jul 23, 2012)

"I really think the real PDAF of Canon will be very fast" - we've been through that many times already. PDAF on sensor got too small sensors to be really fast and really accurate. That's why Sony never bothered with it as a sensor-design company. What works through most of focusing process is CDAF - and Canon never got fast one on APS-C sensors unlike Sony, or m4/3 people. (Nikon 1 is a different story cause out there depth of field is so huge that any AF works good enough)

1 upvote
locke_fc
By locke_fc (Jul 23, 2012)

Looks pretty good to me. Coupled to that 22 mm f2 pancake should be interesting, provided it delivers above average IQ.

0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jul 23, 2012)

I can hear a big sigh of relief from Panasonic and Olympus!

At least for now, there is little threat from Canon. This is mainly Canon's attempt to stop its DSLR owners deserting to M43 or NEX cameras, as owner of EF lenses are the main target. New buyers, those upgrading from P&S, and also those more demanding enthusiasts will not be so happy with this camera. With no IBIS, no possibility of any viewfinder, this is offering little threat to other mirrorless makers. When a better model is released, and when there are more lenses, then it may be more threat, but still it would be mainly to Sony, then to M43. M43 still has a clear advantage in terms of size (especially lens sizes) and lens line-up even if Canon would release a high-end model matching the features of the better M43 cameras. But Canon won't for a long time due to its DSLR business.

This is a compromised short-sighted approach. Lens size will still be too big, defeating much of the mirrorless cause. And no IBIS.

10 upvotes
xlotus
By xlotus (Jul 23, 2012)

I also own an Olympus EPM1. There is nothing to write home about its autofocusing speed indoor nor the IBIS either. Panasonic is definitely the king in AF speed in good light or low light.
As far as physical size, the Sony 18-55 for NEX is about the same size as Pany 14-42. I know for sure because unlike you, I own both cameras. Sorry, no size advantage for m43 kit lenses and short primes lenses when compared to APS-C mirrorless cameras. This is to be expected simply by comparing the sensor size.

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jul 23, 2012)

M43 had size advantages until there was only M43 on the mirrorless market. As for the IBIS... well, I hope it stays in Olympus. I certainly don't want it and I doubt there are many Nikon or Canon users who envy you for that.

1 upvote
vincelau
By vincelau (Jul 25, 2012)

and a big sigh of disappointment from this long time Canon SLR user AND m43 early adopter....

the Canon side of me always wanted a small/lightweight camera with retro and photographer focused styling with great prime a la a Fuji x-pro

the m43 side of me wanted Canon, with it's late-comer advantage, to put out something really great to compete with the balanced size/speed/quality of m43 system

instead Canon gave us this uninspired EOS-M that will be more suitable to proof to the corporate brass why mirrorless is NOT the way to go...

sigh....!

0 upvotes
Dan Nikon
By Dan Nikon (Jul 23, 2012)

The touchscreen feature is pretty cool, I would like to see that in DSLR's as well. But no viewfinder, not the least bit interested. Makes me love my X100 even more, a real camera for real photographers.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (Jul 23, 2012)

C650D got touch screen - it's a first DSLR with it. And the feature is definitely overpriced.

1 upvote
intruder61
By intruder61 (Jul 23, 2012)

Fail!!

4 upvotes
acassino
By acassino (Jul 23, 2012)

Just because Canon is struggling to make headway with mirrorless, doesn't mean the consumer is.

3 upvotes
macky patalinghug
By macky patalinghug (Jul 23, 2012)

This will get the silver award.

0 upvotes
Dougbm_2
By Dougbm_2 (Jul 23, 2012)

I thought they would have used the sensor from the G1-X. Then it would have had smaller lenses. Is any one really going to mount a huge L lens via the adapter on this? Seems quite good with the touch screen but no wow factor. Sony Nex 7 seems more appealing despite the dearth of decent lenses. Then again I think Sony is on the money with it's RX100. Maybe this camera is for those that don't have a compact or a DSLR??? Won't encourage me to move from my X100. Anyway it can't be any good - doesn't have an X in the name!!

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Jul 23, 2012)

I already use my Canon EF lenses on my tiny Oly E-PM1. Sure, the lenses are proportionally large compared to the body, but people seem to forget that the overall body+lens is still quite a bit more compact and lighter than the same lenses on a thick DSLR, so there's still an attractive net loss of bulk compared to a DSLR.

It definitely would be a nice thing to have an EOS M body sitting in the side pocket of a Canon DSLR user's camera bag. Great for back up, great as a secondary body with a separate lens mounted, etc.

1 upvote
GlobalGuyUSA
By GlobalGuyUSA (Jul 23, 2012)

This camera is CONFUSED. It is for the DSLR user who wants a "more subtle" camera (thus keeps APS-C sensor). But its controls are for "idiot user." I hate this condescending attitude of Canon and Nikon when it comes to the Mirrorless cameras -- make one for a pro. For gods sake, its not unimaginable that Photography Majors in college, Professionals, and those wanting a real DSLR will actually buy this thing. Just make a "simple mode" if you are expecting your customers to be simple minded -- and give us a few more buttons and setting switches. There is such a thing as being "too Apple" for your own good. I don't want a car where I just have one button to push -- I want a car that I can drive, whether its a mini, a corvette, or a semi.

2 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Jul 23, 2012)

"It is for the DSLR user who wants a "more subtle" camera" - no, it's not.
It's just a P&S upgrade.

2 upvotes
nevada5
By nevada5 (Jul 23, 2012)

It has no viewfinder but you can get it in red. Nuff said.

17 upvotes
Mark Bellon
By Mark Bellon (Jul 23, 2012)

Does the rotational dial work well with the touchscreen? After selecting Av/Tv with the touch screen, I assume the dial can be used to adjust shutter speed, fstop etc.

How many steps does it take to adjust something? How many button presses to drop 1 fstop?

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Jul 23, 2012)

When you're in Av mode (you don't to keep selecting it), you just turn the dial to change Av. Press one direction on the four-way, or tap on the Exp. Comp. section of the screen screen and the dial switches to Exp. Comp. It's a lot like a one-dial DSLR (D3200, say).

1 upvote
macky patalinghug
By macky patalinghug (Jul 23, 2012)

any color but black! my 350d, 450d, 500d, 55od, 600d, 20d, 30d,50d, 7d, D5100, e-330, c-8080 and GF2 were/are all black.

The red and silver EF-M sure looks good. No more black for me.

1 upvote
GlobalGuyUSA
By GlobalGuyUSA (Jul 23, 2012)

Where is an actually attractive blue (not fake/cheap looking blue) when you need it. Red is too noticeable no matter how its done. And silver always looks like a cheap black.

0 upvotes
Lisa O
By Lisa O (Jul 23, 2012)

Glad to see Canon went with APS-C instead of a smaller sensor like the Nikon 1. I would like to see the lens map for the next year. I find it odd the part about mirror less cameras struggling to make headway in the US market. I thought Olympus, Panasonic and Sony were really breaking some ground in the mirror less arena.

I hope the red one is available in the USA.

8 upvotes
b534202
By b534202 (Jul 23, 2012)

Would've been glad if it were an FF sensor. We don't need more dinky size sensor mirrorless cameras on the market. Especially not one that does not offer anything new.

4 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (Jul 23, 2012)

Companies don't want FF mirrorless. Can't blame them for this though. It'd endanger their DSLRs/SLTs/whatever Pentax has. Also the production cost would be very high - right now with EF-M a profit margins for Canon are ENORMOUS.
Sadly: users loose on that (or they'll just go with m4/3 or NEX which are far more reasonable options then this one).

4 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Jul 23, 2012)

Nobody wants to go FF yet because they want some place "up" to go if they run out of places to innovate. And profit margin is higher on the smaller sensors (more chips per wafer) which is just a fact of life, unless process changes in a revolutionary way.

0 upvotes
DoctorJerry
By DoctorJerry (Jul 23, 2012)

Until you have tried using a mirrorless camera with a big, heavy adaptor along with one of those big, heavy, bulky lenses, you don't appreciate how bad that combination is and how awkward it is to use.mi just sold my big Sony adaptor that I was trying to use on my NEX 7 and 5N. The optional EVF on the Sony is superb,
And in some ways better than optical since you can easily see the effects on the image that your exposure or other settings produce.

I would suggest you avoid this camera and wait for the update.i think Canon is taking Kodak's play book so I will look for them to go belly- up in a few years.

0 upvotes
Tony Defriez
By Tony Defriez (Oct 31, 2012)

Strange how people can review and knock a camera which has only just started shipping?
On the serious side I just recieved one last night with the standard 22mm lens. Over the next few weeks I'll use it although I'd prefer to have both the lens adaptor and 18-55mm lens to test it more fully - one buying point for me was as a good replacement for a point and shot with the ability to use all the EF lenses I already own (best of all worlds). So far in limited testing the focus is faster than the G1X (or other G body cameras I have owned or used, G9 thur G1X) even in poor indoor lighting. Image quality looks good even at high ASA settings, although limit chance to test fully yet.
To be continued

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Total comments: 551
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