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Samsung Galaxy NX Hands-on

June 2013 | By Lars Rehm
Buy on GearShopFrom $1,149.00


Preview based on a pre-production Samsung Galaxy NX Camera

Samsung has had broad success with the Android operating system in the smartphone and tablet space, and last year introduced a long-zoom camera with Android and cellular wireless capability. Samsung now brings Android to its NX mirrorless system with the Galaxy NX. The new camera uses most of the same essential elements as the NX300, including the NX lens mount, the 20.3-megapixel sensor, and DRIMe IV imaging processor, but it also includes a large 4.8-inch 921K capactive touchscreen, the largest display on any interchangeable lens camera so far, and several forms of wireless communication.

Samsung was the second company to announce an Android-based camera in 2012, but it was more ambitious than the Nikon S800c, which ran Android 2.3, while the Galaxy Camera ran 4.1. The Galaxy Camera also had a 4.8-inch LCD, and a wider and longer zoom, ranging from 23-481mm equivalent. What the Galaxy NX offers over the Galaxy Camera is interchangeable lenses, an APS-C sensor, dedicated processors, and a larger battery, among other things.

Samsung Galaxy Camera NX key features

  • 20.3MP APS-C CMOS sensor (same as NX300)
  • 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 kit lens
  • ISO 100-25600
  • 4.8-inch 921K LCD with capacitive touchscreen with Gorilla Glass
  • SVGA electronic viewfinder with diopter control
  • JPEG, RAW, RAW+JPEG capture
  • Movies 1920x1080@30fps, 1280x720@60fps
  • Built-in GPS +GLONASS (A-GPS supported)
  • 16GB Memory, 2GB RAM
  • MicroSD card slot supports up to 64GB
  • 1.6GHz Quad-core processor
  • DRIMe IV imaging processor
  • Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean)
  • 4360mAh battery
  • Enhanced voice commands
  • Advanced Hybrid Autofocus: 105 points on-chip phase-detect; 247-point contrast-detect
  • Focus peaking
  • WiFi a/b/g/n 2.4GHz, 5GHz
  • Bluetooth 4.0 (LE)
  • NFC
  • 4G LTE/3G HSPA+42Mbps cellular data
  • Bundled with Adobe Lightroom
  • 1/6000 second top shutter speed
  • 8.6 fps

While it looks like an ordinary SLR or mirrorless EVF camera from the front, from the back the Galaxy NX looks more like a big smartphone. Samsung decided to rely primarily on the touchscreen for most settings, leaving only one dial on the back, which also serves as a button, the shutter release, movie record button, plus power and flash pop-up button, and the i-Function button on more recent NX lenses.

Though there is no telephone application, the Galaxy NX can run essentially any Android app, according to company representatives, including Skype, so there's potential to use the phone as a communication device. Of course, the primary form of communication intended with the Galaxy NX is uploading images and videos to servers and social media sites via its WiFi and 3G/4G cellular radio. The Galaxy NX can also transfer images to smartphones and tablets for storage, editing, and upload.

The advantages to a camera that is also an Android device are wide-reaching, potentially omitting the need for a computer, at least for the initial phases of a photoshoot. Application of filters and edits are limited only by the programs available on Android. Our initial impression is that the camera doesn't need a SIM card or contract to work.

The Samsung Galaxy NX Camera will come either body-only or kitted with an 18-55mm O.I.S lens. The new camera will work with all NX lenses, including the company's 45mm 2D/3D lens.

Dedicated processors

Unlike the original Galaxy Camera, the Galaxy NX Camera has two separate processors: one for Android (the 1.6GHz Quad-core processor) and one for images (the DRIMe IV), which promises to make both Android and image processing faster.

Size compared

The Galaxy NX camera is noticeably larger than the NX20, which also has an electronic viewfinder. The size increase is likely due to the considerably larger LCD, which literally dominates the back of the Galaxy NX, leaving no room for buttons and just enough for a slight thumb grip.

From the front, the Galaxy NX looks like a larger version of the NX20, though it's not immediately obvious why it's bigger (that becomes more clear below). There is no depth-of-field preview button on the Galaxy NX.
The top view reveals a larger grip - which helps pull your hand forward so your thumb isn't as prone to encroach onto the large rear LCD. The Galaxy NX also uses a power button instead of the power switch that rings the NX20's shutter release, and there's no Mode dial (by default the rear dial functions as a Mode dial on the Galaxy NX). Note the large diopter adjustment knob left of the EVF.
The LCD on the back leaves no room for other control types, save for the dial upper right, which also serves as a button to confirm selections. Naturally the LCD is also a capacitive touchscreen, which cell phone users will find quite familiar.


If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used).

Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions.

Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window.

To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top.

DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C.

This article is Copyright 2012 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.

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Comments

Total comments: 192
12
Miguel Rodríguez
By Miguel Rodríguez (Jun 21, 2013)

Maybe HTC could make a good camera with android but Samsung?? forget it... they just know how to destroy an android image, make the system slow, unreliable and in general terrible, this is a failure...

0 upvotes
kayone
By kayone (Jun 21, 2013)

Wow, exaggerate much?

1 upvote
Optimal Prime
By Optimal Prime (Jun 21, 2013)

Last paragraph typo: 'deserves' not 'diserves'.

0 upvotes
iAPX
By iAPX (Jun 21, 2013)

I am very skeptical: the price of a 4G/LTE contract for this camera will cost more than the camera itself, in few years, while limiting the number of photos you could really upload through the air (especially if you shoot RAW!).

Logically users will transfer photos using their smartphone as a wifi router, thus they don't need Android (or any OS or application) on the camera itself, but a wifi-enabled camera, and a smartphone with applications.

0 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Jul 16, 2013)

I agree. Cell phone cameras are size limited. Anything beyond a few ounces of extra weight is better off on a wifi (or better yet bluetooth data transfer) connection to your ubiquitous smartphone.

But the target is not regular people, it's android developers. There's an entire hacker community that salivates on playing with things like this. They spend money. Also, they generate apps that maybe a more "normal" shaped camera that just happens to be android based in the future could leverage. Samsung would probably eat some money on this thing if it meant generating android apps they could leverage in other future cameras.

0 upvotes
radissimo
By radissimo (Jun 21, 2013)

Size is not that bad, similar to GH-3 (with smaller sensor) ,bigger than canon SL-1 (with almost no grip at all)

http://camerasize.com/compact/#465,381,448,hd,t

0 upvotes
radissimo
By radissimo (Jun 21, 2013)

AT first I was really skeptical about this camera, but hey we are all are when a new tech cames.
1)When I think more about it I starting to like the idea.(esp. 3rd party apps idea)
also combination of i-Fn button and the wheel on the top can work very well for a breed of photographers who are not changing setting frequently.

2)I think Samsung can make this phone, sorry ....camera quite cheaply (no buttons,easy design,stock of touchscreens) and can surprise us with a very good price and this cane be an success for them on the end!

0 upvotes
RKGoth
By RKGoth (Jun 21, 2013)

This is truly a game changer. Journalists are discovering the use of things like Snapseed for rapid, appealing images outside of our "photographic" bubble - I introduced Snapseed's tilt effect and processing to a motoring journalist by demonstrating how to give an iPhone shot of a car engine a bit of apparent depth of field and bite, and he instantly started using it - and his social media images look damn good for it, just the right balance of drama.

The Galaxy Camera is good. In context, it's something quite remarkable if you need that sharing ability. This is something else, this is something that can be taken seriously by the majority of users not obsessing over things like optical finders (of which I tend to be one, this isn't blind enthusiasm - I'd much prefer a true SLR).

1 upvote
matteov
By matteov (Jun 21, 2013)

Samsung Galaxy NX-2 will have a 10.1" retina display and an optional black cloth to imitate an 8x10" camera :-)
Obviously you will not have any button. You can shoot your photo with touch screen or with vocal command!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Tan68
By Tan68 (Jun 30, 2013)

Only if we can program the voice commands.
'oh, heck, i didn't mean to touch that' for portraiture and 'shoot' for action photography.

I do wonder how easy it will be to hold. There is quite a ridge on the upper right. It is visible in some pictures of the camera. I think that will help. I wonder if it will be possible to have a really secure grip without touvhing the screen.

Should be an interesting product for some people.

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Treeshade
By Treeshade (Jun 21, 2013)

It is an Android phone with APS-C, EVF, grip, and NX mount. Consider that there are millions of apps-enhanced (or degenerated) photos on the internet, smart phone and tablet users might consider this. Now they can play fisheye lens with Instagram and upload video that is not terriblly grainly. The only problem is size and weight. (or just thickness for IPad user.)

For NX users, if they could endure the touch interface and ugly look, they gain better connectivity, in-camera Lightroom, and thousands of games. Not a bad deal I would say.

For DSLR users complaining its lack of control: phones never have wheels, be grateful that it has one.

0 upvotes
Impulses
By Impulses (Jun 21, 2013)

Anyone that's imagining this future of ultra-configurable and modifiable cameras should really take a look at what's realistically possible with current Android devices. I'm a huge fan of Android and some of the ROM devs do amazing work on phones, but at the end of the day they have very little freedom to actually alter core functionality.

It's usually more about playing with the UI or adding functionality that's locked down by default by the manufacturer (tethering, USB OTG, overclocking, etc). Just because Samsung releases the source code doesn't mean they're giving you access to every single driver for every component in the camera... Far from it actually.

Yeah, sometimes devs do pull off amazing feats that genuinely enhance existing technical capabilities (Voodoo for phones/tablets with Wolfson DAC comes to mind, or enabling full HDMI output on the original EVO); but those are the exceptions and usually require a great deal of work plus root access (jailbreak, sorta)...

Those are far from simple to write or install apps.

1 upvote
Fedupandenglish
By Fedupandenglish (Jun 21, 2013)

It's an interesting concept, but as I can't see a d**n thing on my phone in bright sunlight I wonder how useable this will be in such conditions with no hard controls?

0 upvotes
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Jun 21, 2013)

First thing I did in setting up my Panasonic M43s was to disable the touch screens and program the buttons so I could make all important adjustments with my eye to the viewfinder. Touch screens just slow me down. GPS geotagging would be nice to have, though.

3 upvotes
CDBayy
By CDBayy (Jun 23, 2013)

Unfortunately for you, this is fast becoming a touchscreen world.

0 upvotes
Tan68
By Tan68 (Jun 30, 2013)

I lost it, but one of the posts here said there will be apps that make the camera as good as a dSLR. I figure the person means dSLR interface. Maybe an app can make things work better....

OK. Here is the comment: Third party apps could make the camera a flexible as high-end DLSR's.

Maybe the post isn't about the interface... I just figured it was. Other than interface, I am not sure what other flexibility could be gained.

Anyway, hopefully there will be an interface app to make it like a dSLR. I think that would be a good thing.

Oh, and as far as a toche screen world, there may be more and more touch screen stuff, but there are some times a touch screen doesn't work. Those times are always when it is sunny. I figure you know this, J. Cornell, just a general comment.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 12 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (Jul 2, 2013)

Yes-a touchscreen world. Has its uses but why folks want to work with their hands in their field of vision all the time is beyond me. The proprioception available with a mouse, dials, joystick is FAR superior, although there are unique things that gestures can do.

0 upvotes
Jesse P
By Jesse P (Jul 9, 2013)

The idea that a touchscreen interface would work better than an OVF plus dials only tells me that people don't know how to use an OVF and dials on a professional level DSLR. I can't even get past how touching the screen to take a picture "doesn't" cause subtle motion blur!

0 upvotes
Guidenet
By Guidenet (Jun 21, 2013)

I see some folks talking about professional use as an event camera. I certainly doubt it. This is still a plastic entry level type, not a robust pro grade camera. At events, pros often machine gun off a load of image files that would need a guaranteed connection and that would be hard to guarantee. Furthermore, I don't know if the bandwidth would be there for the volume of images that may need to move.

I don't believe a professional would be willing to give away his/her tactile controls for a touch screen. I've seen too many touch screens fail at some point as well. I"m not sure how you could quickly bump exposure when shooting manual.

No, I just don't think this could serve in any real professional role.

2 upvotes
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Jun 21, 2013)

As an event pro, I see no advantage and many disadvantages to a camera like this. I love my Panny M43s for travel & landscapes, but I can't imagine giving up my 1D3 & 1Ds3 for event work. When I'm in a hurry, the action is fast, and conditions are tough, there's no substitute.

2 upvotes
photofan1986
By photofan1986 (Jun 21, 2013)

This thing is BUTT ugly. It reminds me of the Fiat Multipla.

9 upvotes
CDBayy
By CDBayy (Jun 23, 2013)

What's ugly about it? It looks like the Panasonic GH3.

2 upvotes
kff
By kff (Jun 21, 2013)

I have bought Ricoh GR this week, but Galaxy NX is so sexy (Android + a big display + connectivity) ... If they'll make a modular system with a possibility to change senzor I would buy instead of a new comming Pentax Ricoh GXR because I like: Android + a big display + connectivity.
What a pity ! For Galaxy NX isn't an AF adapter for Pentax lenses ... :(

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Charlie Jin
By Charlie Jin (Jun 21, 2013)

Well done Samsung. Two Thumbs Up~! Even though I don't have plan to purchase this time, probably in the future. During the time, I hope that this would trigger more interesting products.

1 upvote
george4908
By george4908 (Jun 21, 2013)

What strikes me as the real new development here is the voice control. It's in its infancy right now, but pretty soon some camera will have a smarter-than-Siri voice activated system that will allow you to pretty much say anything, like "aperture priority f8" or "custom setting three" or "upload disk" and it will do what you tell it to do down to the last detail.

There are obviously many situations where you would not want to be talking, or even whispering, into your camera, but there is a lot of potential here for development.

1 upvote
Mrrowe8
By Mrrowe8 (Jun 21, 2013)

What will give this camera traction or not is price point .. If its in the rx100 wheel house it will be a hit , if its over priced like Nikon's coolpixA1 then it will fail .. Face it guys bit by bit the merger of smart phones and cameras is coming .. Those want the click of dials and such Can cling to that dying animal , but it is dying ..oh and Fuji makes great niche products but nothing more then that .. So I wouldn't site that as examples of dials being wanted by the public at large ..

2 upvotes
duartix
By duartix (Jun 21, 2013)

Am I the only one who immediately sees the FIXED LCD as this camera's ultimate flaw? Let's be honest:

Android 4.2.2 on a Camera = amazing workflow/flexibility bonus.

4.8 HD screen = major MF/video/review advantage.

Focus peaking, on sensor PD, connectivity galore, for some (and some of them Pros) this can be da TOOL!

Now, why on Earth would they severely limit it's use (photographically and elsewise) by nailing the screen to the body???
I'd rather pay 100$ more, for a tilting 4.5''.

1 upvote
Marcelobtp
By Marcelobtp (Jun 21, 2013)

Why no 1080p display?

0 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (Jun 21, 2013)

It's not even a 720p display, it's only 480p, on a massive screen.

I'm guessing they couldn't afford the battery size needed to power a full HD screen.

Anyway give me a Olympus Pen, or Sony NEX any day.

4 upvotes
brixter
By brixter (Jun 21, 2013)

It is a 720p screen, 912k is the number of pixels not dots.

0 upvotes
Pierre Louis
By Pierre Louis (Jun 22, 2013)

EXACTLY what I first thought when I saw the camera duartix. It's good to see some people in this forum are able to think beyond superficial nonsense such as how the camera looks.

For video, a 4.8 HD screen would be awesome, but only if it can tilt and turn. Once somebody releases a camera that does this, and provides at least 2 physical dials, it will be a game changer in terms of usability for video IMO!

Now what I really want to know more about is this dual purpose mic/earphone jack the reviewer mentions. A double duty jack... How does that work? Can an adapter be used to use both functions at the same time? If not, it's a major fail in this design and will keep any serious video professionals who need good audio looking elsewhere.

1 upvote
iAPX
By iAPX (Jun 21, 2013)

Another time Samsung is doing smartphones (or in this case Android devices) doing photos, and Pentax doing cameras.

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
1 upvote
reginalddwight
By reginalddwight (Jun 21, 2013)

Thank you to Shawn and Lars for their initial impressions on this interesting product.

I am uncertain if the Galaxy NX will gain sufficient traction among serious photographers, however I am grateful to Samsung for pushing the other camera manufacturers out of their comfort zone and years of stagnant innovation.

You can bet that Nikon and Canon executives will be following this product closely.

2 upvotes
iAPX
By iAPX (Jun 21, 2013)

I hope they won't!

A camera without controls is just a smart phone or tablet in disguise, I will prefere dumb and ugly camera will all controls available at my fingertips than any "smart" camera using touch screen.

In fact, looking at the Fuji X100, X10 and then X100s and X20, it seems that I am not alone :)

5 upvotes
duartix
By duartix (Jun 21, 2013)

Keep away from Phase One then.
They're the devil's work... :P

0 upvotes
CDBayy
By CDBayy (Jun 23, 2013)

I view DSLRs with flip up mirrors as quaint, historical throwbacks to the 1950s. They should all be in a museum.

0 upvotes
Jesse P
By Jesse P (Jul 9, 2013)

If they are so quaint then why does a Canon 1D or Nikon D4 still count as a professional camera?

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Jun 21, 2013)

This might work for the reporters at the Sun-Times who just became professional photojournalists. It looks like it can replace two devices while being as big as both of them. But as a conversation starter, wow.

0 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Jun 21, 2013)

According to camerasizecom it's 17% wider, 12% taller, and 22% heavier than the Canon SL1 / 100D DSLR.

I thought the point of mirrorless cameras was to be light and compact.

3 upvotes
starwolfy
By starwolfy (Jun 21, 2013)

Because you think that without mirrorless offerings Canon would have released the Canon 100d ?
You have to think the other around.

0 upvotes
CDBayy
By CDBayy (Jun 23, 2013)

nope. the point of mirrorless is to do away with a 70-year old antiquated technology (the flip up mirror). There are many benefits to this, not just the ability to make a smaller camera.

1 upvote
Jesse P
By Jesse P (Jul 9, 2013)

It hasn't worked yet.

0 upvotes
Macintosh Sauce
By Macintosh Sauce (Jul 29, 2013)

This has got to be the most stupid camera I've ever seen. :/

0 upvotes
gerard boulanger
By gerard boulanger (Jun 20, 2013)

How do you handle it to talk/listen? The idea of having to hold a camera and its lens on my ear is troubling to me.

0 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Jun 21, 2013)

It's not a phone. OK, if you use voip it can be one, but it doesn't have phone-style speaker and mic placement. You can always put in earbuds and the mic will pick up your voice if you talk anywhere nearby. And it will have small speakers built in that will be loud enough to hear without holding it anywhere near your head, if you don't have anything plugged into the headphone jack. I don't know whether they designed this to work with Bluetooth headsets or not. I hope so.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Kuturgan
By Kuturgan (Jun 20, 2013)

With Android platform the Galaxy NX will constantly freeze up as my Samsung Galaxy smartphone does.

9 upvotes
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Jun 21, 2013)

That's not a given. My Android devices rarely have problems. When they do it's typically a app that stops working abruptly, but it never freezes up.

1 upvote
Beat Traveller
By Beat Traveller (Jun 20, 2013)

Even if the initial design looks a little clumsy, having access to third party software to use in-camera would be fantastic.

1 upvote
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jun 20, 2013)

Not a big camera at all considering its APS-C sensor.

http://camerasize.com/compact/#289.332,465.105,381.3,ha,t

Silly for Samsung not to put a few more buttons and dials on the top of the camera though. Look at the waste of the space there, compared to the other two cameras in this diagram.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Jun 21, 2013)

Exactly what I was thinking. They seem to have wanted it simple, but it would have been better with a second dial on the front, as well as an exposure comp. dial and another couple of function buttons. There may not be much room on the back, but the top and front look barren.

0 upvotes
mandophoto
By mandophoto (Jun 20, 2013)

How is the 3G/4G connection accessed? Is this another revenue stream for Verizon, ATT, et al.?

1 upvote
MarkInSF
By MarkInSF (Jun 21, 2013)

Yes, of course. Got to have a data plan from somebody. Or don't use that and rely on WiFi. That's very realistic these days. My tablet is WiFi only and I never feel I'm missing a thing. If your phone can act as a hot spot, you may be able to just use that, though 4G would be faster in a city with good service. Many of my friends use it exclusively now, even at home. They all work for Google and can afford it.

0 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (Jun 20, 2013)

It looks interesting, just sorta like Frankenstein or child of cellphone with mirrorless.

I think slightly more regular controls and slightly less of LCD would work.

2 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jun 20, 2013)

There is actually a headphone/microphone jack. Great.

That can be used with Skype. I still would prefer if it is designed so that the back can be removed to become an S4 like phone.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Jun 20, 2013)

This is probably a very nice camera, and my guess is that image quality will be outstanding. At least as good as the latest NX flagship was, and perhaps better.

But I just don't see who the target market is for this product.

It's too big and heavy, and probably too complicated for the camera phone people, and it is probably too bizarre for the real photographers and camera enthusiasts.

If this was designed for professional photo journalists who want to transfer images back to headquarters quickly, then OK. But there are only a couple of hundred of them.

It probably won't be cheap to buy, so the cool factor may not help it in the mass market. And the truth is, it really isn't that cool.

This camera might be a solution searching for a problem.

9 upvotes
WirenL
By WirenL (Jun 20, 2013)

I think that a target market is the everyday photographer at family outings who takes photo's and never processes them.... remember the kodak commercials of people playing the photo subject and wondering who'll be deleted next in order to capture the newest image....? With a cam like this, you take the photo, use your app for simple pp and upload to your fave social media site(s) and your done.... no going to the store for a disc that will collect dust or for prints nobody will look at... instant gratification is what this beast provides and I think it will appeal to the market that forgets to take their camera to most of the events and only the family events that matter or to their kids sports events.

2 upvotes
anthony mazzeri
By anthony mazzeri (Jun 20, 2013)

It's basically the same length as a Galaxy S4 phone, so not that big.

Which makes me wonder if it wouldn't have been a better idea to make it so the phone can dock with the body rather than having it built in, so the phone users are more likely to buy and use this camera for when they want serious imaging.

Makes me wonder why nobody's done that by docking an iPhone yet either. All the camera attachments I've seen just use the phone's own inbuilt camera, not make the phone dockable to control a proper camera.

As it is, Samsung is pretty much asking the mostly likely buyers, existing Samsung Galaxy phone owners, to now buy a whole second separate and more cumbersome Galaxy device to do near 98% of what their Galaxy phone can already do.

4 upvotes
dcperspective
By dcperspective (Jun 21, 2013)

This would be an ideal press/event/social media device.

0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jun 20, 2013)

This is interesting. I think we need to reassess the situation. Samsung has under one roof the capability to make all these - AMOLED screen, smart Android phone, camera and lenses. It has been slow in the last two, but is catching up with the new NX line. It is also financially strong, unlike most of the other camera makers including Panasonic and Sony, and it can afford to spend to develop its camera business. Based on this camera, it seems finally ready to get serious in MILCs, which neither Nikon or Canon is willing to do yet. We may be looking at an emerging power in enthusiast cameras in the next couple of years. The timing is perfect for Samsung to do this, since this is an opportunity when all the camera makers are struggling at this time when camera markets are declining. A new breakthrough design may be just what's needed to sell to the younger generation used to swiping and touchscreens, and who have not invested yet in or tied down by old DSLR or other MILC purchases.

Comment edited 15 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
Amnon G
By Amnon G (Jun 20, 2013)

I agree with what you say, except this is not the breakthrough design you're talking about IMO.

3 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jun 20, 2013)

OK, not a real breakthrough in any of the parts, but a good concortion of available technology to converge them.

I think it will appeal to the younger swyping generation, though not necessarily a lot of us older know-it-all photogs on these forums. Hey, but let's not ignore what the young ones have done for Apple and then Samsung. This could be the future.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Flying Snail
By Flying Snail (Jun 20, 2013)

Interesting concept, but how do you hold this thing without accidentally touching the back button with your thumb? The onscreen settings wheel also looks odd and complicated to use.

0 upvotes
DPReview Staff
By DPReview Staff (Jun 20, 2013)

It wasn't much of a problem, as we mention on the body page, because of the grip design. Your results may vary. Samsung also said they did a lot of work on 'thumb rejection' in that corner of the screen.

1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (Jun 20, 2013)

Next generation. Our thoughts command the device. For now, I liek being able to use a touch screen for certain things but not everything. I will be the last person using a computer mouse, I guess. Superior proprioceptive device.

0 upvotes
Johnsonj
By Johnsonj (Jun 20, 2013)

What's needed is a Sony RX100 / iPhone 5 mashup.

7 upvotes
walliswizard
By walliswizard (Jun 20, 2013)

I wonder what button I'll press with my nose when I go to take a picture....

0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jun 20, 2013)

I think the EVF sensor will turn off the LCD (and the touchscreen feature) when it detects your nose getting close, and turn on the EVF.

0 upvotes
Danel
By Danel (Jun 20, 2013)

This is an interesting concept camera. It will take a few more attempts before someone really gets it right though.

7 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (Jun 20, 2013)

Yea I would say same.

0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jun 20, 2013)

I think it is easy to miss this important point. This is pointing to what the future holds in cameras. Unlimited flexibility, with the open applications, connectivity and customisation or enhancement of the camera's features. It is obviously not perfect, but look at the possibilities and what this means when a better and more perfect second generation model appears.

This is the start. I would prefer a design that allows the "back" of the camera to be removed and used as a mobile phone, just like an S4. And more buttons. I think that will follow.

2 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jun 20, 2013)

Hi, Shawn and Lars,

You said first Android 4.1 and then in the features list 4.2. Which is it?

(43rumors said 4.2.2)

0 upvotes
DPReview Staff
By DPReview Staff (Jun 20, 2013)

Actually, we said 4.1 when referring to the Galaxy Camera, which is their first Android model. The confusion is partly because Samsung calls everything Galaxy, which makes referring to more than one of their products in the same paragraph rather confusing. The firmware photographed in our screen captures is 4.2.2.

2 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Jun 20, 2013)

Thanks, Shawn. I was confused there.

1 upvote
Sean65
By Sean65 (Jun 20, 2013)

It's quite an unsettling camera to look at. The lob sided aesthetic is troubling. How did the design team at Samsung, who have some pretty cool designs under their belts, get this one so wrong.

2 upvotes
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (Jun 20, 2013)

News journalists can now fire off photos at events and send direct in camera to secure Dropbox site (on Android) to send to editors of newspapers or other media companies like TV and web news. The quality of the image would be better than trying to take photos through iphones with limited or no lens options and smaller sensors. However, iphone may be more discreet due to small size. Which way will the today's changing news journalist go?
Some may carry both I think.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Amnon G
By Amnon G (Jun 20, 2013)

Another option photographers have is the WiFi cameras or WiFi memory cards + a companion device to do the sending to headquarter parts.

I was at a talk by a NASA photographer from JSC that said that's how they work.

For the photography part, this architecture seems to be in the way more than helping. Tactile physical controls are much more important during the photography activity itself than the big screen to send it.

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jun 22, 2013)

Adrian Van:

The iPhone can't touch the image quality of this camera. And there are plenty of discrete cameras that do way better image quality than the iPhone.

Amnon G:

You're absolutely right about tactile controls, and I think the other Samsung Android cameras are a disaster. However, if one wants a camera that communicates over data networks, a wifi-sdcard doesn't solve the operating system problem. The computer in the camera needs to be able to organize and assemble the data (photos) for sending and then execute that process smoothly.

This Android system is not the answer, unless this Android 4 camera is radically better than the other Android 4 cameras Samsung just started shipping. Samsung is playing with an idea. Let's hope it doesn't limit further development of the Samsung NX bodies running the normal NX software with tactile buttons and rings--say the NX30 or NX400.

0 upvotes
Dave Evans Real Photog
By Dave Evans Real Photog (Jun 20, 2013)

I don't undestand what Samsung is thinking with this. How can they make a touchscreen camera with an evf? Doesnt the evf also have to be a touch screen?

0 upvotes
Felix11
By Felix11 (Jun 20, 2013)

"Advanced Hybrid Autofocus: 105 points on-chip phase-detect; 247-point contrast-detect"

That's interesting detail.
Does anyone know what the equivalent figures are for the X100s?

0 upvotes
tecnoworld
By tecnoworld (Jun 20, 2013)

The nx300, which has been out for 3 months, now, has exactly the same af specs.

1 upvote
Felix11
By Felix11 (Jun 20, 2013)

Yeah. I am waiting to upgrade my NX11 to an NX30 (maybe). But I was wondering about the comparison with the Fujifilm X100s.

0 upvotes
Felix11
By Felix11 (Jun 21, 2013)

I am told by TheDreamingWatchmen that the X100s has 36 points for phase detection and 49 points for contrast detection.

DPreview will have to update the camera database to start including this information. :-)

0 upvotes
Sonyshine
By Sonyshine (Jun 20, 2013)

Very interesting! Event and sports photographers usually shoot jpeg for fast upload. Now there won't be a mad scramble for the media room PC's just hope for a decent 4G signal and fire your shots ( edited even! ) off to the editor or straight online....

2 upvotes
instamatic
By instamatic (Jun 20, 2013)

This is the future both for consumer use and professional event photography. I didn't expect it to come from Samsung, but hey here we are.

3 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jun 20, 2013)

and since it's unlikely to allow the upload of raws over wifi, it's not a pro camera, so here we aint.

then theres the potentially slow and confusion OS/menu, so again not here.

it's dumb idea and should be dropped and the NX30 should be shipped.

1 upvote
Anepo
By Anepo (Jun 20, 2013)

what have you been smoking? by username alone we know you got NO experience outside cellphone shooting and with your biased crazy comment you have proven me right thanks.

7 upvotes
RevT
By RevT (Jun 20, 2013)

Um, why wouldn't it allow the upload of RAWs over Wi-Fi? They are simply a file type and Android allows you to transfer any file from your ondevice file system to Dropbox/email/whatever.

1 upvote
instamatic
By instamatic (Jun 20, 2013)

HowaboutRAW, I'm not saying this is the camera to do it, but generally wi-fi sharing and fast delivery is where we are headed. This appears to be the new workflow paradigm.

Anepo, why so bitter? Imagine the possibilities. You take pictures with a camera employing such or similar technology and automatically keep uploading them to your company's servers while your post-production staff is working on processing them as the event unfolds. You are done by the end of the day, and so is your post-production work. Your clients check their email the next day to find a link to their finished password-protected gallery. Done.

This may also be the beginning of the end of RAW photography...or at last large RAW. Why? Bandwidth first, but then, the cameras released in the last couple of years produce better JPGs than those from 5 years ago, and dramatically better JPGs than those from 7 years ago or more, both in color quality and especially dynamic range.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jun 20, 2013)

instamatic:

Faster sharing without serious raw extraction is not coming anytime soon. Raw is not ending, film negatives never went away for people who cared about doing well shot still photos in the analog era. Back then people carefully worked with a negative in darkroom or later used a film scanner, but no one said: "sure whatever the 1hour place does is the best I can get from this negative."

You do realize that many movies+TV shows are still shot on film, guess how that gets to a computer for editing? That's carefully scanned film. And trust me no one says: "Toss out 3/4s of the data to make color and exposure work easier."

If you only want to shoot jpegs fine, but then get a good jpeg camera, Samsung does not have a good reputation for camera jpegs.

Then unless the exposure, WB, tint, and noise control are perfect the first time, jpegs are a joke, even the better ones from companies like Fuji or Olympus.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
1 upvote
wansai
By wansai (Jun 20, 2013)

250 shots, likely 150+ on stand by while running android. 30 second boot time changing batteries or random crashes or device lock up due to android OS. likely less if you have the radios on and "sharing" or uploading 5 MB files (jpeg) or 15-20 MB RAWs.

I don't know what kind of event photos you take but I usually take thousands of shots just one evening event.

Are you really going to be fiddling with a touchscreen and carrying 10 batteries and waiting 20-30 seconds between 10 swap outs? On my Nex 7 and OMD, I usually swap out once per event and startup is near instant. That gives me 2000++ shots - typical for an event shoot.

This has "amateur mobile phone consumer" (not even "pro-sumer") written all over it. And do you really think a complete amateur is going to buy something that big and unwieldy?

2 upvotes
wansai
By wansai (Jun 20, 2013)

also, why would you be thinking RAW will be coming to an end. RAW was never a consumer feature anyway. Ask any random joe if they know what camera RAW is.

It's a pro level format. For the prosumers and pros, RAW is essential. It has never existed in the general consumer space. I like me my Olympus jpegs but 9 out of 10 times, I still go to RAW to correct real problems with the way the camera processes the scene. And I can do it an unlimited amount of time without losing data. Now try that with a jpeg file. After a certain point, the file will have degraded to just blocky pixels; not to mention you'll have next to zero way to recover details in the light and shadow regions in jpeg.

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jun 22, 2013)

instamatic--

To be fair, I agree quick sharing could be helpful, but it's unlikely to come from this camera unless this Android camera is radically better than other Samsung Android cameras running a very similar version of Android.

Now sharing, right but for people who care about high image quality, sharing is much better done from something that can process raws and organize them. So today that means a small mobile computer, not a smart phone, like a MacAir. There's a good reason to take the card out of the camera transfer say 200 raw photos you've just shot, pick say 30 you or your editor could be interested in, perhaps process to tiff or jpeg, perhaps not, and then transfer those 30 over wireless instead of wasting time transferring all 200 over wireless. (See it's not about being able to post 1 or 2 jpegs to FBwhatever quickly, it's about being able to do work with the transferred files, and one still needs a real computer with a screen for that.)

0 upvotes
ProfHankD
By ProfHankD (Jun 20, 2013)

Interesting mostly for the potential to do in-camera scripts and (wireless) tethered control. The phone-that's-not-a-phone on the back is a tad odd, and I wonder what the carrier charges will be for using your camera -- or can this thing work without having a phone carrier?

0 upvotes
RevT
By RevT (Jun 20, 2013)

Yup, fine without a SIM, you can just use a Wi-Fi hotspot from your phone or whatever...

0 upvotes
role_of_72
By role_of_72 (Jun 20, 2013)

The NX10/20 is my favourite design for mirrorless so far regarding ergonomics (yeah, sorry EM-5 and Nex line :) ).

If somebody is interested in it he/she can buy this thing but I DO hope that this won't be the main direction at Samsung.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jun 20, 2013)

Aesthetically the Fuji XE and the Sony Nex 7+6 sure are more pleasing, but I'd settle for an NX20 with a functioning buffer and the phase detect AF of the NX300--WITH THE NORMAL NX MENU.

After all Samsung already way surpasses Sony Nex lenses. And what more important for a camera, the box or the lens?

3 upvotes
role_of_72
By role_of_72 (Jun 20, 2013)

My exact thoughts anyway. :)
Samsung has some quite good lenses for the NX system, however what I don't particularly like about it (I mean the 'box' not the lens) it's that former Samsung models simply failed to deliver the per pixel sharpness/clarity I was used to on my 450d (forget about resolution differences here for a bit).
Maybe there will be some differences this time.. let's hope. ((Regardless, I'll stay with the C brand btw :) ))

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jun 20, 2013)

role_of_72:

Shooting raw with a sharp lens (say the 30mm F2) the NX20 and NX100 are extraordinarily sharp. The kit lens of the NX20+200 is not particularly sharp (18mm-55mm OIS). Unlike the kit lens for the NX100 (20mm-50mm).

I don't have a 450d (Canon?) and say the best Canon lens available to test if the 450d is really that extraordinary--highly unlikely, perhaps with the manual focus 85mm F1.4 Zeiss. (I read that the new 135mm F2.0 Zeiss is really sharp too, but that's the territory of the Samsung (Optron) NX 30mm F2.0 lens.

This new NXdriod is likely to also be incredibly sharp with a good lens and shooting raw. No not as sharp as the same sensor sans anti-aliasing filter--say like the Pentax K5 IIs. But then good Samsung lenses are better than good Pentax lenses.

In short it's a joke to claim that the former NX cameras aren't sharp.

0 upvotes
Jesse P
By Jesse P (Jul 9, 2013)

The Canon 40mm f/2.8 STM is sharper than the Samsung 30mm f/2.

0 upvotes
Amnon G
By Amnon G (Jun 20, 2013)

The future is here. This is THE BEST camera ever - for taking photos of food and posting to Facebook.
Everyone thought Apple would do it (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIRBxRlsYR0), Samsung just took the reigns of innovation ;-P

5 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jun 20, 2013)

That's likely on jpegs of food, stupid for a raw capable camera one should be able to post raw food, pun intended.

But seriously, who cares if the wifi doesn't allow the upload of raw files? Other Samsung wifi cams don't.

0 upvotes
Amnon G
By Amnon G (Jun 20, 2013)

Anepo, wasn't the ;-P enough to give you a hint?
To avoid any doubt - Yes, it was sarcasm.

2 upvotes
Amnon G
By Amnon G (Jun 20, 2013)

Imagine a Galaxy NX 6 and Galaxy NX 8 versions - NX 6 will be a full-frame with 6" screen and Galaxy NX 8 will be medium format sensor and 8" screen.
Finally something that will make people look more awkward than taking photos with an iPad :-)

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jun 22, 2013)

Anepo:

You missed my joke--see the part about raw food.

And then the "but seriously".

the "on" is just bad editing on my part.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Kuturgan
By Kuturgan (Jun 20, 2013)

NO, Samsung, NO!!!!
IT is not the right way for development! Do like Sony! Give us a range-finder with EVF!
This ugly galaxy camera is a total disaster! Ergonomics is a total sh*t. And it is too big for mirrorless system.

12 upvotes
Antonio Rojilla
By Antonio Rojilla (Jun 20, 2013)

The world doesn't revolve around you.

3 upvotes
viking79
By viking79 (Jun 20, 2013)

I like it more I look at it. Not every mirrorless system needs to be small. I will pass judgement once I use one.

6 upvotes
Hannu108
By Hannu108 (Jun 20, 2013)

Sony is going to launch mirrorless A-mount cameras (rumored), so what's bad in offering a big size mirrorless cam??

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
rb59020
By rb59020 (Jun 20, 2013)

And everybody thought the K-01 was big. Next to my Panny G5 and K-01 this thing is pretty big.

http://camerasize.com/compact/#465,347,285,hd,f

http://camerasize.com/compact/#465,347,285,hd,t

http://camerasize.com/compact/#465,347,285,hd,b

0 upvotes
CDBayy
By CDBayy (Jun 20, 2013)

Anepo, it seems you don't know much about photography. I think you may be confusing "mirrorless" with m4/3. The goal of all mirrorless is definitely not just to be small, the goal is to do away with the ancient, archaic flip-up mirror that was designed back in the stone ages. The benefits of this are many - especially for video shooters.

1 upvote
John Driggers
By John Driggers (Jun 21, 2013)

Anepo-your comment is harsh, rude and dogmatic (one could argue that those are the traits of a fool-I'll let others decide).

As pointed out, mirrorless means no mechanical, expensive to build, limited highest speeds, flipping mirror. The Sony A99 is a camera without a flipping mirror. If your head is free from where you keep it, take a look at it. It is HUGE. It does, indeed, appear that you are comparing the justification for the m4/3 camera design with mirrorless. The reason m4/3s can be smaller is a function of the sensor size plus the elimination of a mirror. Look at APS-C and full frame mirrorless cameras with their lenses and you'll see that this camera is certainly within reasonable size parameters and look at that big, beautiful LCD screen.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
tjobbe
By tjobbe (Jun 21, 2013)

the GN120 is a bit smaller then a small sensor GH3

0 upvotes
Total comments: 192
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