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Wyoming's stunning weather and landscapes in time-lapse

By dpreview staff on Jan 15, 2014 at 06:00 GMT
Photographer Nicolaus Wegner's dedication to his craft has produced a captivating time-lapse video of the wild weather and beautiful landscapes of his home state. In the 14 months it took him to complete his Wyoming Wildscapes II project, he saw it all — from meteor showers, to lightning across hills and prairies, and 60mph winds.   
According to Wegner's website, consider some of the numbers behind the making of the video: 
  • 150 days of driving, walking, backpacking, shooting, and exploring. 
  • 20,000 miles driven.
  • 100+ miles hiked in the wilderness and back country with a pack full of cameras, lenses, time-lapse gear, and a slider.
  • 125,000 stills taken over the entire project. 
  • 20,000 photographs in the video that runs at 24fps, 1920x1080.
  • 75 sequences in the video. 
  • 3 weeks of burning up hard drive space processing, rendering, re-processing, re-rendering, re-processing. 
To see more of Wegner's work and learn more about the video, visits his website

Comments

Total comments: 231
123
Scott Birch
By Scott Birch (3 months ago)

Breathtaking. Thank you.

0 upvotes
jefenniejr
By jefenniejr (3 months ago)

Absolutely incredible! GREAT JOB! Thanks dpreview for posting!

2 upvotes
aftab
By aftab (3 months ago)

Breathtakingly inspiring! WOW!!

0 upvotes
UhBre
By UhBre (3 months ago)

Masterful

Thank you

Comment edited 14 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
mjphoto2013
By mjphoto2013 (3 months ago)

Something like this reminds me of how far I have to go.

Simply stunning. Thanks.

0 upvotes
Jim F
By Jim F (3 months ago)

Curious about the time interval between shots that, when put together, make up the video sequence?

0 upvotes
Jim F
By Jim F (3 months ago)

Wow. Just awesome. As enjoyable and impressive as Nicolaus's video work is, it's somewhat depressing for me because after I see this brilliant work I then go and look at some of my image/video stuff and just shake my head in frustration about how much I need to learn. Raimundo has it 100% right - Nicolaus's work is truly inspiring.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Much of what I've learned, other than the trial and error bits, was from the internet and forums such as this. Great thing about the age we live in is information is so readily available.

To answer your interval question, it depends on the movement and amount of time you wish to elapse. Check out timescapes.org forum. Great info regarding general recommendations regarding intervals depending on the scene you are shooting. Intervals between exposures in this video range from 1 to 10 seconds though. Hope this helps.

9 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (3 months ago)

> Intervals between exposures

so you have one exposure for each frame instead of 3 or 5?
(had to shoot a painful 9 with Nikon for sunrise/sunset before)

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Just one exposure per frame, yes. I see no need to over complicate things if it's unnecessary. Used to get hardcore into manual high dynamic range blends with luminosity masks and such with my photography until I learned buyers of my prints don't really give a crap. They want mood, or something that evokes an emotion. If it looks beyond the real, the only people usually interested in it are other photographers, and they don't buy prints, they make them. ;]

Cameras these days are capable of decent DR as it is. Programs like lightroom make that range even greater.

4 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (3 months ago)

I see it more a technical issue (automation). the requirement depends on application that the sun or moon can be the main subject of interest (like sunset over a pagoda, that people want to see a clear disk or even non-saturated color).

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
bofo777
By bofo777 (3 months ago)

I grew up in Wyoming …went to U of W in Laramie..if I would have known it was that beautiful I would have stayed there…But of course I was from the top of the moon part of Wyoming… 7.000 ft of high prairie where antelope and jackalopes only reside….but your work is absolutely gorgeous..much enjoyed exploring old memories…

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

You'd be surprised how many of those high plains locations have hidden gems. If you split Wyoming in half north to south through Casper, everything east is great for storm chasing, everything to the west is great for landscapes...give or take a few locations each direction.

0 upvotes
raimundo gaby
By raimundo gaby (3 months ago)

Gorgeous work. I am inspired. Which camera and lenses did you use?

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Favorite comment is hearing people being inspired. Thanks!

Canon 5dmii and 1dsmiii. 16-35mii and 70-200f4. All nicely scratched and beaten up, but still doing their jobs quite well.

1 upvote
DH2000
By DH2000 (3 months ago)

Nicolaus,

Great work. Stunningly beautiful landscape and nice synchronized music.

I watched it three times.

-Derek

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Thank you Derek. The reason this flows the way it does is all thanks to the awesome trio at Ghost Kollective. They did a great job merging several music genres and setting a mood. Love the way they did the voice and drums.

0 upvotes
fgbd70
By fgbd70 (3 months ago)

Mindblowing, I can't take it in just one go, have to watch it partially...
Absolutely stunning, thank you!!!!

0 upvotes
Biological_Viewfinder
By Biological_Viewfinder (3 months ago)

Nicolaus Wegner,

Hey, one thing kept bothering me about this video shoot from a technical standpoint. And I'm not talking about your rail. It could be any single image from the entire video.

So my problem with it is that I can't explain the aperture to myself in your photography. As a Landscape Photographer, I am very well aware about how difficult taking a good picture outside actually is. Most people look at stuff like yours and say, Man that guy was lucky, look at the lighting he got! What they fail to realize is that you have to act so very quickly during light that is changing by the minute! Just a passing cloud can change everything.

One of the things about Landscape Photography that is different than almost anything else is bokeh is mostly meaningless. It's all about depth of field. So I know that you have your aperture closed down. But after so much, it starts diffracting. But EVERYTHING is so sharp from stuff you could touch out to infinity. HOW are you doing THAT?!?!?

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Hmmm...I'm not sure what you mean. Shoot time lapse just like I would single exposure photographs. Much of this is at f16, which is fairly sharp for a canon 16-35mii. There's tons of debate on what the sharpest aperture is for that lens, but it works for me. Any chromatic aberration created by a smaller aperture can be removed in post. For the night scenes, it's f2.8. But I always try to stay within the hyperfocal distance range of my lens. You can get pretty sharp results even at larger apertures if you focus properly. Ultra wides do a pretty good job at this as long as you're not taking images with subject matter 6 inches from the lens. Does this help any?

0 upvotes
chaos215bar2
By chaos215bar2 (3 months ago)

Keep in mind these videos are scaled down significantly from the original photos. Even at f20, the kind of effects your describing will only be visible at near 100% scale with most lenses. (In other words, don't be afraid to stop down if it's the only way to get the depth of field you want. You won't be losing that much sharpness, and it might be just what you need to capture the shot.)

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

True chaos. I've seen no need to drop below f16 though. f16 might even be overboard in the case of 1080p video, even 4K. Hell, this level of sharpness is probably possible at f8 within hyperfocal distance and a bit of post sharpening.

0 upvotes
Biological_Viewfinder
By Biological_Viewfinder (3 months ago)

I guess that's the reason then. It's video.

In a single image though, to get that kind of sharpness I have to use f/5.6 and take 3-5 pictures at various focal lengths and hand-blend it in; and it takes hours!

So I'm just astounded. But I probably shouldn't be so surprised because I'm working with resolutions way beyond 4k in a single printable image.

Well let's just say that I'm highly impressed with your work.

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

The only times I've had to do DoF blending are on compositions with foreground subjects around 6 inches from the camera lens. You can achieve extremely sharp images front to back with single exposures if you foreground starts a couple feet out to infinity. Hyperfocal distance. ;]

I used to get really hard core about DoF blends on all my still photography, but after selling a 40x60 metal print to a client that was taken with a single exposure, I came to realize it's usually only the photographers that care about everything being tack sharp front to back.

Also, have you used Photoshop's automated image stacking? It usually produces amazing results. Some hand blending may be required from time to time but it will save you a ton of time.

Here is an example from my gallery using the photoshop stacking with a wee bit of hand blending. This this was 7 or 8 images blended for DoF and dynamic Range. http://www.lightalivephotography.com/basins/h3fd3500#h3fd3500

Comment edited 35 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Biological_Viewfinder
By Biological_Viewfinder (3 months ago)

Yeah, I use automation when possible; but at some point the machinery starts to show. So at pixel-level and full-view I manage the rest by hand-blending with several tools to make it tonally and detail correct. For prints it's important.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Simon Elwell
By Simon Elwell (3 months ago)

wow.

just wow.

1 upvote
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (3 months ago)

I've seen many great time-lapse videos, but that's the first time I see one moving the camera and the focal length of the lens together, in perfect sinchronization.

They might have used an electronically controlled zooming system, but I wonder what lens allows hundreds of focal length microadjustments so precisely like that.

Simply awesome. Congratulations!

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

No focal length changes in these. It's static throughout. Not sure what you are referring to?

There is gear that will do that, but I don't have 10 grand laying around. Plus it weighs too much to take into the wilderness. All I used was a 3 foot rail and motor with a control unit for the motor. Don't want to say which one as I've had issues with it...but the company seems like a cool group of people. Might just be harder on it than most...

1 upvote
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (3 months ago)

At 2:23 there is, sir. It started with a less short focal length and zoomed out a little. You can see the close subject moving outwards and the far one inwards. But, I'm not sure this is the effect they really wanted, because the most common is the closest subject not to move. Well, maybe that's what they really wanted.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

False vertigo effect. I aimed the slider directly into the scene. Zoomed out in post. Creates that hitchcock zoom look. Works best with busy scenes such as this.

0 upvotes
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (3 months ago)

So, by saying false vertigo effect, you're implying there isn't any mechanical focal length change (zooming) in this scene? Or there is, but it was created digitally?

0 upvotes
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (3 months ago)

And how do you explain the last 3 or 5 frames of that scene where the zooming stops but the "camera" is still moving in? This kind of failure doesn't look digital. But, look, I do believe the camera moviment is digital, but not the zooming, unless you worked with the scene twice, superimposed or something, but shadows don't denounce that. But, man if you say there was no focal length change, I might be stubborn and say you're not telling the whole trick.

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

No mechanical zooming unless an invisible dwarf or gremlin was messing with my gear. I was staying warm about 1/4 mile away in the jeep for most of that shot. The stop is because my camera reached the end of the slider, while the camera kept clicking away, but the digital zoom/pull out was still ongoing. Bad edit on my part, I only caught that after it was uploaded. Didn't think that one sequence would get the attention it got. Figured everyone was aware of that technique by now. ;]

Haha, be stubborn if you wish. You can check out this link if you need more proof of the fake vertigo concept. Try it out yourself sometime as well. The more layers in the scene, the cooler it will look. No tricks. https://vimeo.com/45557059

0 upvotes
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (3 months ago)

Aw, man, tsk-tsk-tsk (to myself). No dwarfs and no gremlins... Well, there's always someone lagging behind, right? Actually, I practically don't shoot videos. Just love this kind of work, but do nothing related to it. Thanks a lot for the explanation!

1 upvote
jaygeephoto
By jaygeephoto (3 months ago)

I'd like to see the rig that was used to make the images, especially the camera
movement mechanism.

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

They are all pretty much the same. Motor and rail with a band that moves a plate with a camera mount. Mine is about 3 feet long and held together with jb weld at the moment because the bolts stripped their threading from constantly having to re-tighten the stupid thing. ;]

0 upvotes
AcerAntec
By AcerAntec (3 months ago)

Thank you so much, Nicholaus for all of the wonderful results of so much work and endurance.
Your love for these places just shows, to the point of creating nostalgia among those of us who didn't visit them.
One thing made me wonder: what makes the sky shift between (very) pale and deep, saturated blue at 4'40?
We want some more encore!

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Thanks AcerAntec. Those are just crepuscular rays. They are exceptionally visible in that scene as it was fairly humid...for Wyoming standards. Part of why that supercell wrapped up so awesomely, had lots of moisture in the air to play with. You can actually see a wall cloud with a funnel wrap up into the mesocyclone just as it zooms out to full view.

0 upvotes
bernie1945
By bernie1945 (3 months ago)

Absolutely beautiful! Thunderstorms and lightening = spectacular! Thanks for sharing!

0 upvotes
Jeff Greenberg
By Jeff Greenberg (3 months ago)

Snow scene with footprints arranged?

I don't know video but it led me to wonder:
what about series of scenes, snow, sand,
wet rock, etc., in which each footprint
is seen to be made by "invisible" person & each scene
relates to next to create one long "walk" through WY
or wherever...?

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Interesting thought Jeff. I don't really know video either. There are some interesting areas where that could work though. We have sand dunes as well. We also have ancient velociraptor prints along the Red Gulch Scenic Backway.

I just thought those prints were sort of cool as the animal that made them was able to actually not sink all the way through. I'm guessing a coyote. The snow there is about 3 feet deep...my tracks behind the scene looked like a train wreck in comparison. Slider was almost buried in the snow on that one, couldn't even see the tripod legs.

0 upvotes
clauderobidoux
By clauderobidoux (3 months ago)

Absolutely amazing Nicolaus! Congratulations on your fantastic work!
Maybe that's just me but if this was mine I would submit it to the 'Wildlife Photographer of the Year' contest, they have this new 'time-lapse' category.
Here's the link if you are interested:
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit-us/wpy/competition/adult-competition/categories/index.html
All the best and thank you for sharing.

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Thanks for the info! It's currently entered into a local contest so I'm not sure if that would go against any of their rules. Will read through and check it out.

0 upvotes
Biological_Viewfinder
By Biological_Viewfinder (3 months ago)

CONSTANT CHILLS!!!!!

0 upvotes
dr jim
By dr jim (3 months ago)

Thank you for this Nicolaus. So beautifully done. So inspiring. Pretty much any frame in this could be printed and hung on my wall.

0 upvotes
PDL
By PDL (3 months ago)

Having grown up in WY and spent a great deal of time "in the boonies", this was a pleasure to watch. The only issue I have is that the movie concentrates on the Northern Half of the state, there are some additional opportunities in the southern parts of the state.
In addition, I spent a few summers working archaeological sites in the Powder River Basin (Thunder Basin National Grasslands) in the NE part of WY. Watching the thunderstorms roll in brings back a lot of memories of working in 100+ degree F heat, seeing the storm coming off of the BigHorn's, having the air temp drop to 50 F, covering up the site, running back to camp with 33 F rain soak you. Then the wind and 1/2 inch hail ---- ah the good old days.
Thanks for the memories.
PDL

1 upvote
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Thanks for the comment PDL. Yeah, I actually went to the Red Desert for the last portion of this project, but didn't come out of the experience with any decent photos. There are a couple of shots from Honeycomb Buttes, WSA though. Every single part of Wyoming has something amazing to offer. A few areas I would have liked to include: Flaming Gorge, anything in the Bighorn Basin, Adobe Town, Killpecker Dunes, Hells Half Acre, Snowy Range (in first WW), Norther Absorokas...the list goes on. If I ever get enough funding to do a complete Wyoming Wildscapes, I plan on including as much as possible, taking a couple years to complete it, shooting real time and slo mo, and turning it into a dvd or on demand product. Ahhh dreams. ;]

Glad the storm sequences brought back memories. NE WY has the best storms, although some real supers come off of the Laramie Range and track E SE towards the end of the season.

1 upvote
Farmer in the Dell
By Farmer in the Dell (3 months ago)

I want to quit my job and intern for you when you do a Utah version! Beautiful work-- stunning and thank you!

0 upvotes
digiart
By digiart (3 months ago)

Awesome work! America has such a diversity of wild landscapes, it's a photographer's dream. Thanks to DPR for sharing this. I'm sure it will inspire many amateurs...

0 upvotes
Pankrac
By Pankrac (3 months ago)

Stunning.

0 upvotes
Birse Boy
By Birse Boy (3 months ago)

excellent work.....brilliant, good choice of music too

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Ghost Kollective did an amazing job creating this song for the video. Can't thank them enough.

0 upvotes
LarH
By LarH (3 months ago)

Awesome work, and from my favorite part of the country. Thanks for sharing. - Larry

1 upvote
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (3 months ago)

Astonishing!
How'd he manage to move the frame? camera movement on a slow-moving rig or PP?

0 upvotes
joe6pack
By joe6pack (3 months ago)

When there were perspective change, it must be a (slow) camera movement. Otherwise, I would guess PP.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Eddy M
By Eddy M (3 months ago)

Motorized slider + time lapse

2 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

LensBeginner. I used a slider for a lot of the foreground movement stuff, the pans and zooms were done in post for the most part.

2 upvotes
chaos215bar2
By chaos215bar2 (3 months ago)

So what about the vertigo effect? Slider plus post processing for the zoom? (It was really smooth!)

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

You got it chaos. https://vimeo.com/45557059

0 upvotes
LensBeginner
By LensBeginner (3 months ago)

Thanks

0 upvotes
jimrpdx
By jimrpdx (3 months ago)

Very nice! Personally sliders and time-lapse are hard on my visual system, I've turned off many videos that do this - but I managed the whole show this time to see more of Wyoming. Good stuff.

0 upvotes
Bill Bentley
By Bill Bentley (3 months ago)

Very nice Nicolaus.

0 upvotes
Optimal Prime
By Optimal Prime (3 months ago)

Shot with an iPhone?

1 upvote
dyoon153
By dyoon153 (3 months ago)

trying to troll?

1 upvote
Optimal Prime
By Optimal Prime (3 months ago)

Left your sense of humour at home?

6 upvotes
dyoon153
By dyoon153 (3 months ago)

That same sense I mimicked from your comment?

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Optimal Prime, I wish! Then I could have included some epic 720p 120fps slo mo of golf ball size hail smacking me in the head. ;]

4 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (3 months ago)

Gorgeous! Well done.

1 upvote
borax
By borax (3 months ago)

Only one word: stunning. If this is an add for living in the Wyoming, then it's a damn good one... the amount of work to create such a light-show deserve at least respect. The result is awesome.

0 upvotes
shutterbobby
By shutterbobby (3 months ago)

Fantastic..what alot of work he put into it..think I will compose some music for it... an adventure for sure

0 upvotes
bgmonroe
By bgmonroe (3 months ago)

Cool but others have been doing similar work. This one's my favorite: http://youtu.be/usHC-O1BPCM

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

You are definitely right. This has been going on for a very long time. Ron Fricke was doing motorized rail time lapse before it was cool.

Really surprised this video received the attention it did to be honest. I won't deny there are way better time lapse videos out there. This is only the second project I've done...maybe I'll get better, probably not. ;]

5 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Thanks for the share, kind words, and critiques. Figured this video was dead last month. Looks like DPReview gave it another minute or so of life. ;]

2 upvotes
bosco1955
By bosco1955 (3 months ago)

Beautiful Work !

0 upvotes
Simon97
By Simon97 (3 months ago)

Gorgeous! But can someone tell me why the Vimeo window self pauses? I have to keep hitting play to may it continue.

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Yeah, some people have issues with Vimeo. Try this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gaNRL5_WdE8

0 upvotes
exm3racer
By exm3racer (3 months ago)

really impressive work. How are you able to get the foreground illuminated for that long of a period? I was thinking flash might do it, but wasn't sure if the illumination would be so consistent from frame to frame...

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Hello exm3racer. Just used a headlamp in all of the night scenes but one. The first night shot, Devil's Tower, was taken using an Einstein strobe, bare bulb. Surprised that even worked, as most strobes aren't consistent enough between flashes to do something like this. The AB did great, that's a few hours worth of time as well, so several hundred flashes transpired. Props to Paul C. Buff!

5 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Forgot to mention it was around 5 degrees out that evening as well. When I hiked back to grab my gear, the battery in the camera was dead, but the battery for the strobe was around half full. Everything metal was frosted over. Can't believe the Einstein fired through the entire sequence.

1 upvote
exm3racer
By exm3racer (3 months ago)

thanks... and you also answered one of my other questions... so you don't stay with your gear during the capture? hmm. that's faith man!

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

I stay with it some times, but for a lot of the wilderness and basin stuff, especially at night, there is no one else around. Animals usually avoid buzzing/clicking equipment. ;]

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (3 months ago)

Really cool. Having attempted timelapse photography/video in the past, i can appreciate the amount of work that must have gone into this.

0 upvotes
Brian Alpert
By Brian Alpert (3 months ago)

Stunning!! Mesmerizing. A great understanding of light and composition. Forget the critics, I'm so glad that we live on a beautiful planet and that there are people who can combine technical ability with artistic vision. Thank you for posting this on DP Review!

0 upvotes
Dennis
By Dennis (3 months ago)

I agree that it was 6:50 well spent. Really enjoyable video and the scenes from 4:00 - 5:00 that showed the clouds were really amazing. I also agree that the slider became tedious to the point of being a distraction. It's about 1,000 times better than anything I can do, but could have been even better without every single scene utilizing that effect. It could probably be educational to a newbie to figure out when the slider was beneficial and when it wasn't. (If I ever get to the point of dabbling with a slider, I might just do that, but I doubt I'll ever get that advanced w/video). Ultimately that's just a nit ... I forwarded the link to friends.

2 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Thanks for the well thought out critique Dennis. However, not every single scene uses a slider. All of the storm sequences were shot on a tripod, and there are 3 sequences that are hyperlapse, using a tripod, shoot a few inches, move, shoot. Slider use, whether used on real time, slo mo, or time lapse is definitely a matter of taste. Fun fact though, all but one clip I've licensed over the past year or so was dolly driven. While there may be too many in this time lapse for some, individual sequences get licensed out for film, television use, and advertising often enough that I now have gas money for my next project.

That said, I don't pretend to be a film maker, so there is no doubt my use of time, space, movement, etc is way the hell off. Honestly, I just shoot with what feels right at the moment. I'll use a slider a lot because it's fun, same reason I take photos. ;]

5 upvotes
dyoon153
By dyoon153 (3 months ago)

I love how you used sliders and other tools to add the depth in time lapse, which makes the scene more interesting. Truly inspirational... Thank you for sharing this with us, Mr Wegner!

0 upvotes
shademaster
By shademaster (3 months ago)

wow

0 upvotes
KennyXYZ
By KennyXYZ (3 months ago)

Bravo.

0 upvotes
shigzeo ?
By shigzeo ? (3 months ago)

One of DPReview's best picks in a long time. My heart still is fluttering at the raw power of the heavens.

0 upvotes
hazwing
By hazwing (3 months ago)

Amazing work! Respect!

0 upvotes
Steve Balcombe
By Steve Balcombe (3 months ago)

Superb. Maybe just a little long - it's very hard to hold the attention for nearly seven minutes - but I wouldn't want to be the one to decide what to cut out, it's all so good.

2 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Have close to an hour of time lapse from last year, imagine how boring that would have been...haha. Originally it was planned to be around 9 minutes, but cut some of it (sadly) to try and make it a bit more internet friendly.

2 upvotes
XMN
By XMN (3 months ago)

Nicolaus, i wouldn't mind watching the 9 minutes version or even more! Is it available anywhere?

0 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Not at the moment. Contemplating a longer dvd or downloadable purchasable copy eventually, but that's a couple years out. Would like it to include more than just a bunch of time lapses. Maybe some real time and slo mo as well. We'll see what the future holds. ;]

0 upvotes
daddyo
By daddyo (3 months ago)

Three amazing things shown here:
First - The video is an amazing work showing skill and dedication. I personally have no clue how some of this was done.

Second - Even more amazing is the arrogance and pretentiousness of many posters on these forums. The degrading comments always come for those who have no work of their own to display to support their negative comments.

Third -- Yet more amazing, is the display of a unique planet that is a speck of dust in the vast universe, and yet has a balanced eco-system that sustains life and allows pretentious people to proudly walk about displaying their arrogance. It's not all a big accident.

7 upvotes
Nicolaus Wegner
By Nicolaus Wegner (3 months ago)

Kind of you do say daddyo. It was a blast of project, and I have plenty more planned for the future.

If I let critique bother me, I would have given up photography years ago. Much of what I have learned over the years is from people who gave me honest critique. Some people have valid points and articulate them well, some have valid points and aren't the greatest at getting their point across, and others just like to troll. It's all good.

8 upvotes
b craw
By b craw (3 months ago)

daddyo, I agree with much of what you say, but in reference to your second point: I believe you are speaking about the non-constructive comments; as opposed to constructive veins of criticism (useful to the photographer/artist), I can definitely understand the frustration with this type of commentary. What I do take some issue with is the general assertion that those not able to demonstrate good work (or any work at all) should not provide negative criticism, or more specifically, are not qualified to do so. The fact is, most photographers' audiences consist of more non-photographers than photographers. Everyone should be welcomed to contribute commentary. And, in the case of photographers, I think one needn't do similar work themselves, to contribute negative (preferably constructive) opinion. Whether commentary be well-considered or the cheap shot, hit-and-run variety, processing it is a fundamental part of art making and often essential to artistic growth. The key is to know what criticism to take in, give decent consideration, and what to leave at the door.

2 upvotes
MandoBear
By MandoBear (3 months ago)

Personally, I find this sequence really captivating. "Stunning" might be a slightly slack and overused adjective, but in this case, I think it's justified.

I found the slides really added something to the sense of depth and perspective in the views. I think if the vantage point had been fixed, many of the sequences could have looked rather flat.

Given that "photography" literally means "drawing with light" I consider that this is very beautiful and compelling photography.

I would love to produce a work as good as this.

1 upvote
neo_nights
By neo_nights (3 months ago)

Breathtaking!

0 upvotes
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