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CP+ 2014: Things we found that had been cut in half

By Barney Britton on Feb 16, 2014 at 03:34 GMT
CP+ 2014: Stuff we found that was cut in half
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CP+ 2014: Stuff we found that was cut in half

The OM-D E-M1 is Olympus's flagship mirrorless interchangeable lens camera, and one of the best of its kind that we've seen so far. Offering a compelling combination of high performance and great, highly customizable ergonomics with full body weather sealing the E-M1 was your choice for best mirrorless interchangeable lens camera of 2013.

You wouldn't like this one though. This one's useless. It's been cut in half.

Read more about the Olympus OM-D E-M1

Comments

Total comments: 107
12
MarshallG
By MarshallG (2 months ago)

I have a photo of a Nikon D3 or D4 that was cut in half for CES 2013. It's in my gallery. You can add it to your collection if you want, DPReview.

0 upvotes
MediaDigitalVideo
By MediaDigitalVideo (2 months ago)

When will they cut the price in 2 ?

1 upvote
MarshallG
By MarshallG (2 months ago)

I think the point of showing you the innards is to convince you of the difficulty and expense of manufacturing.

1 upvote
MediaDigitalVideo
By MediaDigitalVideo (2 months ago)

All made by a 3D printer ?

0 upvotes
Janoch
By Janoch (2 months ago)

I want to cut my D800 in halfs... later of course!

Love this kond of stuff!

0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (2 months ago)

EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender is amazing. The 2 mirrorless lenese are so so especiallythe Q lens

1 upvote
Vladik
By Vladik (2 months ago)

Were Nikon Lenses too expensive to cut in half? :)

0 upvotes
X Faktor Photo
By X Faktor Photo (2 months ago)

there was nothing to see inside. ;)

1 upvote
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (2 months ago)

Besides the deep respect for majestic perfection of current human achievements in the field of precision mechano-opto-electronics, there is yet another feeling that these images bring to my soul:

satisaction that the bloody mirror is gone from inside of Oly OMs !

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
jaygeephoto
By jaygeephoto (2 months ago)

Just can't get that song out of my head - I've got a splitting headache!

A one, two
A one, two, three, four

Half a bee, philosophically
Must, ipso facto, half not be
But half the bee has got to be
A vis-a-vis its entity, d'you see?

But can a bee be said to be
Or not to be an entire bee
When half the bee is not a bee
Due to some ancient injury?

Read more: Monty Python - Eric The Half A Bee Lyrics | MetroLyrics

5 upvotes
Olgierd
By Olgierd (2 months ago)

Just when I was ready to perform yearly "Confuse-A-Cat".

0 upvotes
Matthew Miller
By Matthew Miller (2 months ago)

The punchline of each of these photos seriously cracks me up. Nice.

1 upvote
Frank_BR
By Frank_BR (2 months ago)

It seems that there is a lot of interest, but little information available about how these cuts in half are made. I believe a viable technique could be using what is called "wire saw", where a metal wire impregnated with an abrasive powder (diamond, for example) slowly cuts the workpiece. More information here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wire_saw

1 upvote
new boyz
By new boyz (2 months ago)

Thanks for the info!

0 upvotes
Frank_BR
By Frank_BR (2 months ago)

This YouTube video shows a diamond wire saw working:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lloXbDrBhY&feature=youtu.be

0 upvotes
Hachu21
By Hachu21 (2 months ago)

another video where you can see how to cut 100µm thick sillicon slices! (in english at 2:40)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtPZMUhR-oI&feature=youtu.be
Impressive mechanic technology used in almost all our electronic devices.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 31 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Clueless Wanderer
By Clueless Wanderer (2 months ago)

.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Andre Benschop
By Andre Benschop (2 months ago)

Hi All, The cutting technology used is a trade secret and Yes, it is VERY time consuming to make a really nice model.
Lots and lots of technical challeges to be tackled.

One of the most interesting challenges is make a 90 or 120 degree cut out and keep a lens (partly) functional in terms of moving parts (i.e. without the darn thing coming apart). Been working on it for some time now.

Check techunveiled.com if you're interested.

2 upvotes
Hachu21
By Hachu21 (2 months ago)

Thanks for the -limited- info.
Want to know more now... :)
But I understand the trade secret.
Roughly, how many hours to cut a "simple" lens?

A big impressive cutaway here
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Wn1EFLa2C8

0 upvotes
Hachu21
By Hachu21 (2 months ago)

Don't be sad for those. I guess they are all non-functionning samples. Why?
Because all parts should have been glued together before cutting. If not, each half part cannot stand up like that. they should fall appart.
What do you think?

1 upvote
new boyz
By new boyz (2 months ago)

Ermm.. make sense.

0 upvotes
Zoofy
By Zoofy (2 months ago)

Both beautiful and incredibly wasteful!

0 upvotes
beavertown
By beavertown (2 months ago)

Nikon would never do that. They thought people would copy them.

0 upvotes
new boyz
By new boyz (2 months ago)

wow, look at that demi-Otus. it's like 80% of it is glass..

3 upvotes
Adamaflex
By Adamaflex (2 months ago)

i quite like looking at ho-

this comment has also been cut in half

4 upvotes
esmoxd
By esmoxd (2 months ago)

Do you mean the Sony 70-200 mm f 4 is fast focusing because at f 4 it isn't very fast as a maximum aperture?

0 upvotes
cjcampbell
By cjcampbell (2 months ago)

What, no comments about half frame cameras?

1 upvote
Just another Canon shooter
By Just another Canon shooter (2 months ago)

The crop factor is 4 now, I guess.

1 upvote
Frank_BR
By Frank_BR (2 months ago)

A Zeiss Otus cut in half has an effective aperture equal to 2.0, that is, the loss is a modest one stop. On the other hand, I suspect the bokeh becomes horrible...

4 upvotes
DotCom Editor
By DotCom Editor (2 months ago)

I've noticed that Canon's DSLR innovation and market momentum have both been cut in half.

9 upvotes
Zerg2905
By Zerg2905 (2 months ago)

Oh, sure, the 200-400 is quite common... Cheers! (...)

0 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (2 months ago)

Q 08 "This one is even tinier than usual. By around 50%. Because it's been cut in half. "
:-P ;-)

3 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (2 months ago)

Wow on the Zeiss Otus... it's all glass glass glass....

1 upvote
Kipplemaster
By Kipplemaster (2 months ago)

Amazing the Zeiss Otus has such good optical quality given that the elements appear to be made out of wood. Or maybe Zeiss are just less good at cutting stuff in half...

3 upvotes
wherearemyshorts
By wherearemyshorts (2 months ago)

.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (2 months ago)

Looks like the report was written after a few sakes. ;-)

2 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (2 months ago)

A few coffees, is more accurate!

1 upvote
Lukino
By Lukino (2 months ago)

All this stuff is to expensive for me to afford. To bad I can't just buy half.

0 upvotes
AV Janus
By AV Janus (2 months ago)

Wow!
E-M1 is backed tight! ! !

0 upvotes
AV Janus
By AV Janus (2 months ago)

...packed

0 upvotes
JohnEwing
By JohnEwing (2 months ago)

Otus regrets.

1 upvote
Buhl213
By Buhl213 (2 months ago)

How can the Tamron be ENTIRELY useless when cut in half?

1 upvote
Steen Bay
By Steen Bay (2 months ago)

Should be OK for half-format.

6 upvotes
JayBratcher
By JayBratcher (2 months ago)

It turns out that it's only half useless!

2 upvotes
BobORama
By BobORama (2 months ago)

I want to know HOW they cut them in half. I've done this on a small scale for metallurgical specimen preparation. Same thing just bigger?

0 upvotes
Danny
By Danny (2 months ago)

They do it with an old rusty saw.

7 upvotes
PlainOrFancy
By PlainOrFancy (2 months ago)

With an axe. Really fast.

8 upvotes
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (2 months ago)

They just give a quick call to Darth Vader and he cuts them with the laser sword.

1 upvote
JayBratcher
By JayBratcher (2 months ago)

Airport security.

3 upvotes
RichardBalonglong
By RichardBalonglong (2 months ago)

They used the laser that almost killed James Bond.. XD

5 upvotes
edu T
By edu T (2 months ago)

Now seriously: they were never cut in half, actually each half was taken from the production line to be showcased just BEFORE being joined with the other half during final assembly.
(Or do you believe there exists some cool alien tool called "water jet cutter"?)

2 upvotes
brycesteiner
By brycesteiner (2 months ago)

@Everlast66 - It's a lightsaber dude. Get it right if you want to be one with the force!

1 upvote
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (2 months ago)

Some happy geek somewhere out there is having too much fun with the water jet cutter.

1 upvote
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (2 months ago)

Doesn't this lead to big light leaks? ;)

3 upvotes
thebustos
By thebustos (2 months ago)

Was anyone else expecting them to say that "This Otus is half-priced"? :)

3 upvotes
reginalddwight
By reginalddwight (2 months ago)

Some people view these lenses as half empty, while I see them as half full.

8 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (2 months ago)

In case of the Pentax Q it's more like 20% full.

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
iJoost
By iJoost (2 months ago)

I was surprised to see how much of the Zeiss Otus is glass compared to other lenses.

7 upvotes
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (2 months ago)

"I was surprised to see how much of the Zeiss Otus is glass compared to other lenses."

And metal compared to plenty of plastic in others

3 upvotes
iJoost
By iJoost (2 months ago)

I knew that. From everything else from Zeiss I've touched so far. But the percentage of space taken up by glass seems relatively large in this new design. I'm curious to learn some more about it. But it I guess it'll be a while before they tell us the secrets. ;-)

1 upvote
frisianstar
By frisianstar (2 months ago)

I count 32 maybe 33 glass elements in the ef 200-400mm lens, a double or a triple cemented element count for 2 or 3.
That must be a huge light loss?

Garret, Holland

2 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (2 months ago)

you are doubtless reading this via light that travelled through glass many miles thick. Much depends on the quality of the glass.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (2 months ago)

Love this article!

Many of those glass monsters cost no more than a pair of glasses.

2 upvotes
Photato
By Photato (2 months ago)

Very interesting, than you.

0 upvotes
Rickard Hansson
By Rickard Hansson (2 months ago)

"One of the interesting things about telephoto prime lenses is how few pieces of glass they contain compared to a lot of zooms. This is the Canon EF 500mm F4L IS II USM, sliced wide open for all the world to see. Shameless."

Interesting that we pay so much money for so much air. ;-)

5 upvotes
Apewithacamera
By Apewithacamera (2 months ago)

Ok how do they cut these in half?

2 upvotes
Couscousdelight
By Couscousdelight (2 months ago)

They put the camera/lens in water (in water, you can cut glass without breaking it), and use a diamond cutting wheel.

7 upvotes
Kirppu
By Kirppu (2 months ago)

How about all the flexes my logic say they should be ripped nastly by he cutting edge.

0 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (2 months ago)

@Couscousdelight, haven't heard about this method. I assumed it was water jet saw. In fact, some images show two halves - making it more probable that water jet was involved.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Apewithacamera
By Apewithacamera (2 months ago)

Interesting thanks!

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (2 months ago)

There has to be more to it that just wielding the diamond-tipped angle-grinder, under water or not. Surely most of the lenses would drop out without the other half there to hold it in place? I'm guessing much of this is a painstaking manual job for the apprentices to demonstrate their art.

1 upvote
Mario G
By Mario G (2 months ago)

I was also wondering about this... All those bits and pieces cannot stay up there by themselves when cut in half, unless the whole camera was designed to be cut in half with internal components anchored to either side (which wouldn't sound like design time well spent). So I guess this cutting would involve disassembling quite a few of the individual parts, cutting them, and possibly glueing them to keep them in place?

0 upvotes
JohnEwing
By JohnEwing (2 months ago)

Wot, no ladies?

3 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (2 months ago)

Crikey why would you want to see ladies cut in half?

6 upvotes
JohnEwing
By JohnEwing (2 months ago)

Because it wouldn't be as cruel to watch as bisecting an OM-D E-M1.

0 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (2 months ago)

I used to know someone called John Ewing. He tore a lady's heart in half. Coincidence?

0 upvotes
Couscousdelight
By Couscousdelight (2 months ago)

Of course, DPR miss the Pentax stand with the 645D :
http://uppix.net/fgt49p.jpg

15 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (2 months ago)

Wow, they really cut that in half! Do you mind if I use the photo?

2 upvotes
Couscousdelight
By Couscousdelight (2 months ago)

It's not my picture, a can't give you the rights to publish it.
Sorry !

0 upvotes
b534202
By b534202 (2 months ago)

I like the Stylus 1 picture, you can appreciate how tight they package the lens in there.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (2 months ago)

Well the 12-40mm 2.8 oly is all plastic....thin little sheet of metal on the outside.

2 upvotes
Zeisschen
By Zeisschen (2 months ago)

Yet they call it "all metallic", whatever that means...

2 upvotes
Mario G
By Mario G (2 months ago)

"All metallic"-plated, that's what it means.

0 upvotes
RussellInCincinnati
By RussellInCincinnati (2 months ago)

Too clever by half, and (perhaps the unkindest cut of all) a lopsided point of view.

Lots of yen but no yang. The examples are not well-rounded, lack focus, and would shed little light on the subject were they twice the size.

The text is plagued with semi-circular reasoning throughout. Something's missing here, I'm of two minds. Side-splitting nonetheless.

6 upvotes
AngusCNH
By AngusCNH (2 months ago)

Xxxxxxxxx because it been cut in half....

LOL ! Ilove the reason very much , if the 200-400 can cut the price in half but not the lens , than it will be nice , LOL

0 upvotes
rrccad
By rrccad (2 months ago)

after taking a look of it cut in half and seeing the complexity.. maybe there's a reason it's the price it is

1 upvote
AngusCNH
By AngusCNH (2 months ago)

I know the reason why so costy , no serious ,LOL

I just love the series of "cut in a half" very much

0 upvotes
sirrah
By sirrah (2 months ago)

When I look at these pictures, especially the Canon 200-400 lens it makes me realize how hard it must be for companies producing photographic equipment to make a profit. The cost for design alone for a lens comprising close to 30 elements must be difficult to recover. We users of such sophisticated should be lyrically grateful that we are able to enjoy this technology at probably well below its true cost. As a yacht owner I look at the cost of a few crude, by comparison, stainless steel fittings and marvel at how cheap my camera and accessories are.
Strangely the cost of having fun on the water seems to be accepted with considerably less grumbling than I read on forum pages here.

2 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (2 months ago)

As someone that works for a camera company the prices you see are way above the price the factory needs to sell at to make a return. There is a huge amount of fat in the products especially as you move up the food chain. If you really think a 200-400 is making a loss for Canon at $12K you are very naive.

7 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (2 months ago)

@thx, yeah. You can buy a new car for that price.
Rather amazing how little $10K can get you.
Independent of brands.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
MarkByland
By MarkByland (2 months ago)

I think we're only getting half the story here.

19 upvotes
realq86
By realq86 (2 months ago)

How hard was it to come up with 10 difference clever sentence of how its useless "cut in half?"

12 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (2 months ago)

Always wanna know, how did they do it?

3 upvotes
arhmatic
By arhmatic (2 months ago)

on a table saw

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (2 months ago)

Lasers from a giant evil robot

11 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (2 months ago)

It think it is water jet cutter.

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
1 upvote
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (2 months ago)

Yeah, me too! I looked for this process on YT but nothing until now. If anyone has anything about it, please, show us. The interesting thing is that it is not a new process. I remember already seeing pictures of cameras and lenses cut in half in my childhood in the 80s. My guess is they use a very thin line coated with, I don't know, diamond perhaps?, and this line runs in a loop and very fast, as a chain in a chainsaw. Am I tripping too much? Or a water jet cutter as mentioned?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
LarsLeibgott
By LarsLeibgott (2 months ago)

Last line of every caption had me rolling.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 107
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