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SanDisk offers 'world's first' 256GB CompactFlash card

By dpreview staff on Sep 12, 2013 at 18:39 GMT

SanDisk has introduced a high capacity CompactFlash card with 256GB of storage. The card boasts write speeds of 65MB/s and transfer speeds up to 160MB/s. It's also rated with a VPG-65 Video Performance Guarantee, promising adequate speed for 4K video capture. As is the case with SanDisk's other Extreme Pro cards, it's designed to withstand shock, vibration and extreme temperatures.


Press Release:

SANDISK OFFERS WORLD’S FIRST HIGH CAPACITY 256GB COMPACTFLASH CARD SUPPORTING THE LATEST VIDEO PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE SPECIFICATION

SanDisk Extreme Pro CompactFlash Cards Are Optimized For Cinema-Quality 4K Video Recording

PMA, MELBOURNE, Australia, Sept. 12, 2013SanDisk Corporation (NASDAQ: SNDK), a global leader in flash memory storage solutions, today announced the availability of the 256GB1 SanDisk Extreme Pro® CompactFlash® memory card, the world’s first high-capacity, high-performance CompactFlash card with the latest Video Performance Guarantee (VPG-65)2 specification. Also being announced by SanDisk today are faster speeds across all other capacities of the SanDisk Extreme Pro CompactFlash line of memory cards.

"SanDisk has been at the forefront with storage solutions that enable the broader adoption of new video capture technologies. We always design our SanDisk Extreme Pro cards with professional photographers and videographers in mind," said Susan Park, director, mobile and imaging worldwide retail product marketing, SanDisk. "Cinema-quality 4K video capture demands tremendous performance and capacity, which is exactly what we have delivered with the new 256GB SanDisk Extreme Pro CompactFlash card."

The card delivers minimum sustained write speeds of 65MB/s2, optimized to capture 4K and Full HD video3. The 256GB SanDisk Extreme Pro CompactFlash card has industry-leading transfer speeds of up to 160MB/s4, designed to dramatically improve workflow efficiencies, and delivers fast shot speeds of up to 140MB/s4 for advanced functions such as fast action and continuous burst mode shots.

"The speed and capacity of SanDisk Extreme Pro CompactFlash cards, as well as the ability to shoot and store 4K video directly to a CompactFlash card, are a major step forward for professional photographers and videographers," said Sam Nicholson, founder, Stargate Studios. "My work rarely allows for a second chance to capture a big shot or important footage, so when I select SanDisk memory cards, I’m trusting them with assets that are essential to me and my clients."

SanDisk Extreme Pro memory cards are designed for professionals and are backed by a lifetime limited warranty5. The cards are durability tested, include RTV silicone coating inside for added protection against shock and vibration, and perform in extreme temperatures from minus 13 degrees Fahrenheit to 185 degrees Fahrenheit. The cards also include a one year downloadable offer for RescuePRO® media recovery software6, which lets photographers recover their images in case of accidental deletion.

Increased Speeds Across the Product Line
To coincide with the launch of the 256GB SanDisk Extreme Pro CompactFlash card, SanDisk is increasing the speed across each capacity of the SanDisk Extreme Pro CompactFlash line. The other SanDisk Extreme Pro CompactFlash cards, available in capacities of 16GB, 32GB, 64GB and 128GB, will now feature read speeds of up to 160MB/s4 and write speeds of up to 150MB/s4, as well as the same VPG as the 256GB card.

Pricing and Availability

SanDisk Extreme Pro CompactFlash cards are available in capacities of 16GB, 32GB, 64GB, 128GB, and 256GB, and are shipping worldwide now with MSRPs of $219.99 to $1,809.99.

1 1GB=1,000,000,000 bytes. Actual user storage less.
2 Video Performance Guarantee enabled to ensure video recording at 65MB/sec minimum sustained write speed. 1 MB = 1,000,000 bytes.
3 4K (4096x2160) and Full HD (1920x1080) video support may vary based on host device, file attributes and other factors. www.sandisk.com/HD
4 16GB-128GB: Up to 160MB/s read speed; Up to 150MB/s write speed. 256GB: Up to 160MB/s read speed; up to 140MB/s write speed. Based on internal testing; performance may vary depending upon host device. 1MB=1,000,000 bytes. X = 150KB/sec.
5 30 years warranty in Germany, Canada and regions not recognizing lifetime limited warranty.
6 Registration required. Terms and conditions apply.

Comments

Total comments: 70
Maddrew
By Maddrew (7 months ago)

All of a sudden my 16GB SandDisk Extreme Pro CF Card is starting to feel really small...

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Funduro
By Funduro (7 months ago)

So the new SanDisk Maximum Ultimate Extreme Pro Mark III CF cards will . . . .

0 upvotes
neo_nights
By neo_nights (7 months ago)

Years ago, when Sony released the 8GB version of their Memory Stick Pro, Phil (I think) made a comment like: "8GB? Who's ever going to need that much space? Probably Sony is aiming this memory stick at PSP users"

Phil had his Bill Gates "640kB should be enough for everyone" moment :)

0 upvotes
MrTaikitso
By MrTaikitso (7 months ago)

For the last 25 years or more, I have logged every purchase I have ever made, from a bus ride to a computer or car. Recently found the details for an 8MB Sony MemoryStick that I purchased in 2001. That's eight megabytes. Price? £90 or so. (About $140.)

Today, that would get you a tad more memory in the Gigabyte range. We're talking a 1000 or more fold increase in performance to price ratio. That 256GB Sandisk card should be at the most £25 in 10 years, although I think it may be a lot sooner.

(Ironic, the price of that 8MB MemoryStick would buy you an entry level point and shoot today with a 2G SD card on the side!)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
DaytonR
By DaytonR (7 months ago)

What a fascinating story ! Its amazing how much changes over such a relatively short amount of time :)

0 upvotes
Henrik NJ
By Henrik NJ (7 months ago)

Still remember my first digital camera. A Nikon Coolpix 950. 1,9 mpix, and it costed me 9995 danish kroner - 1340 €, 1790 $ or 1123 £. And then the CF-card 2995 danish kroner - 401 €, 337 £ or 536 $ - the biggest and the best, 128 megabytes (not gigabytes).

Still got it, of nostalgic reasons - and still works on AA-batteries :-)

More expensive than my brand new Canon EOS 70D with 128 gigabytes of memorycards - so it's a lot cheaper today to be on the beat - and we still complain.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (7 months ago)

I still have my 256MB cards of Sandisk, and they are still working!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
SergioMO
By SergioMO (7 months ago)

Think about when you loose it !

0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (7 months ago)

While it may not mean much to us regular folks who can get by quite nicely with the current generation of cheap SDXC media, this new SanDisk CF card is a home run for serious movie makers and pro stills action photographers. OUTSTANDING, SanDisk!

3 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (7 months ago)

Since all of the DSLRs from Canon and Nikon that came out in the last year like the full frame 6D and D600 along with APS-C 70D and D7100 only have SD/SDHC/SDXC slots the amount of cameras with CF slots will continue to shrink.

The Lexar Professional 600x 256GB SDXC UHS-I Flash Memory Card has been out for a year and with UHS-II SD cards coming out next month with up to 260MB/s speed (312MB/s max) more and more DSLRs will move from CF to SD cards.

1 upvote
DaytonR
By DaytonR (7 months ago)

Good point about the shrinking CF market, I wonder if Nikon will ditch the CF slot completely when they release the next camera after the D4 .....

The other interesting thing about this card is that it comes with a capacity that matches some SSD drives .... it might just make a good replacement for a bulky external hard drive :)

0 upvotes
Gionni Dorelli
By Gionni Dorelli (7 months ago)

Some motion cameras will adopt this new CF standard.
The not released yet, ARRI Amira, will take this kind of cards.
I think this more a card for motion picture rather than still photography.

0 upvotes
similaar
By similaar (7 months ago)

Komputerbay 256GB 1200x CF cards have been in customers' hands for weeks, and they're going for $500 or so. First one you can actually trust, I'll give them that.

Also: the market for this is people shooting RAW video with a 5D3 and magic lantern. It will only hold 50 minutes of footage. And the comparable 128GB card is $600.

0 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (7 months ago)

Leica and Hasselblad should come out with cameras to support the 256 GB model. better yet, produce their own versions of it, from plastic cut out of the Apollo program ships.

0 upvotes
Shamael
By Shamael (7 months ago)

1809$ for 256GB ???? I buy any same sized ssd like OCZ Vertex 4, for just 180$ now, a 500GB Vertex 4 is around 230$. So, what makes this card then so expensive. Then, how much future is left in CF cards, most cameras to come step over to SD HC and SDX. We see now DS cards with 128GB from Sandisk for 100 to 130$, and in a near future, they will be up to 1TB. With the SSD disks becoming better, maybe, some day we will have 2 tb units we just put in a videocam slot, just as we do it with CF or SD today.

2 upvotes
sfpeter
By sfpeter (7 months ago)

The market for this looks to be people with a Red camera or something similar, who would be recording in the field and need portability and durability. Honestly this would last me about 7-10 photo shoots before filling up; for a still camera it could practically replace any internal memory, just wary of relying entirely on one card.

1 upvote
mgblack74
By mgblack74 (7 months ago)

The first memory card I bought was in 2005. 512mb for $80. Now you can buy terabyte drives for the same. 256Gb flash card may sound like a lot but at 4K video, it will fill up fast. If you're shooting 4K video though, I'm not sure why you'd want to write to a card, and not do a direct out recording like the newer DSLR's are capable of. A 256 Gb SSD is less than $150 now.

2 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (7 months ago)

Cheap technology is expensive. +$7,00 a Gb in one piece.

2 upvotes
Charlie boots
By Charlie boots (7 months ago)

Apple charges $100 for 32Gb for the new Iphone 5s and that is on the high side although I do not know how fast it is. Based on this pricing this card should cost no more than $800.00.

Obviously way overpriced. Why? Because they can!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
graybalanced
By graybalanced (7 months ago)

I looked up the Samsung Galaxy S4 16GB, which Verizon sells for $199 on the same contract as the iPhone 5. If you want the 32GB version, it's $299.

This proves that Apple rips people off. Because the extra memory for an iPhone is an exorbitant $100, while the same memory upgrade on a Samsung is a much fairer $100. (...if you factor in the Apple-Hate Math Distortion Field)

2 upvotes
Wild Shooter
By Wild Shooter (7 months ago)

This statement makes no sense. Please explain.

3 upvotes
samhain
By samhain (7 months ago)

$1809? That's gotta be a typo. In 5 years these will be $100

1 upvote
Scorpius1
By Scorpius1 (7 months ago)

You mean in 2yrs ...

2 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (7 months ago)

Will memory cards become obsolete, with the camera streaming images or video to the "cloud," one's home computer or a nearby laptop?

1 upvote
Shamael
By Shamael (7 months ago)

maybe, when on every corner of the jungle and the deserts, we have errected Wi-Fi towers, the last ones we need to destroy by microwave pollution what remains intact of our nature and the animal life. When all the bees and insects have disappeared, you will throw all the Wi-Fi stuff in the trash quiet fast, since you will find out that, with money together, one can not eat that crap. Human will destroy itself by technology and useless stuff it produces. Wi-Fi is such a stuff.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
DaytonR
By DaytonR (7 months ago)

I doubt memory cards will become obsolete - if anything they are now more important than ever .....

shooting directly to computers is already here but video to the cloud is way way off , unless you have some super-speed internet connection - and even the best internet connections have such ridiculously slow upload speeds , I can`t see video to the cloud as being realistic for a while yet

1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (7 months ago)

I remember when a 20MB external hard drive was a big deal!

5 upvotes
Charlie boots
By Charlie boots (7 months ago)

And cost $1000.00. I bought a LaCie one for a 512k Mac at that price and it weighed a couple of kg.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
OngNikon
By OngNikon (7 months ago)

My First HDD was a 15MB from Miniscribe, I bet many here do not even know them, but was a key player then. It cost me a equivilent of USD1200, at the current exchange rate. And the drive, came with bad sectors - very common then... (but back then, a 360K floppy can store my MS-DOS, Wordstar software and my document!!!)

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Shamael
By Shamael (7 months ago)

I remember when Internet and Wi-Fi was unknown, and a computer was playing tenis with beep, beep. The sole noise in the house was a creepy sounding radio, TV was something revolutionary and in B&W, the neighbor has a Leica and me a medium format Mamyia C330. In that time, whales and turtles, dolphins, never stranded, or went wrong, bees came back to there hives, food was natural, and had taste and the only crap you could drink was Coca Cola. Maybe, I am too nostalgic.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Petka
By Petka (7 months ago)

When buying my first PC in early eighties I could choose either a 10 MB or 20MB HDD, I went all the way and got the 20 MB version and Hercules graphics card & 13" amber monitor!

0 upvotes
David M Warwick
By David M Warwick (7 months ago)

The saying 'keeping all your eggs in one basket' come to mind again! If this card becomes corrupted you lose hundred of images, I would rather use a number of smaller cards rather than this one!

2 upvotes
samhain
By samhain (7 months ago)

I'd rather use 3 of these.

2 upvotes
Daniel L
By Daniel L (7 months ago)

8 years and more than 500k clicks later i have yet experienced this so call one egg in the basket problem. However, i missed too many shots and too many times i ran out of memory space or forgot my big card... I would get 10 of these instead of 100 of smaller cards any time at any prices.... if i can afford one.

3 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (7 months ago)

One pro photographer (can't remember the name) framed the argument from another point of view:

Oh sure, lose one big card and you lose a lot of photos. But in the real world, the bigger risk is you or one of your runners actually misplacing one of the cards during the necessary task of changing cards. And the more cards you have, the bigger the chance to lose one because the overhead of tracking them goes up.

While true for Compact Flash, this is even worse with SD cards. From personal experience it is very easy to lose sight of those little guys if you happen to drop one.

If you have a big enough card for the shoot so that you do not have to change it, you eliminate the risk of dropping the card because you are not removing it from the camera until you get back to your desk.

6 upvotes
PredatorsPrey
By PredatorsPrey (7 months ago)

The card is mainly for people who record 4k videos. I guess you do that with small cards, with which you run out of memory after a few minutes right?

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (7 months ago)

@graybalanced
That sounds very true. If you assume a fixed probability of any one card failing (irrespective of the card memory size), then there is no gain from swapping one big card for several smaller cards. All that happens is that you get more frequent, but smaller, data losses. Over time you end up losing the same amount of data - either all in one go or in several smaller batches.
But now figure in the additional risks of handling multiple smaller cards and it indeed makes more sense to have one big card that stays put.

0 upvotes
imsabbel
By imsabbel (7 months ago)

People have said the SAME crap when the first 1GByte SD card came out...

0 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (7 months ago)

Lexar Professional 600x 256GB SDXC UHS-I Flash Memory Card has been out for a year. With UHS-II SD cards coming out next month with up to 260MB/s speed (312MB/s max) more and more DSLRs will move from CF to SD cards.

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (7 months ago)

All this pro stuff. The regular cards are already Extreme Pro, right? So these should be Ultra, Ultra, Extreme Super Pro.

It's too bad they don't hold their value. They take less space than gold bullion and you can't take pictures with gold bullion.

4 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (7 months ago)

LOL - these guys are running out of hyperbole and superlatives quicker than my laundry soap manufacturers.

Nice one.

3 upvotes
agentul
By agentul (7 months ago)

they should hire some theoretical physicists to help them name products. those people have a talent for corny names and acronyms.

0 upvotes
The Andy G
By The Andy G (7 months ago)

What do you get the D800e user who has everything?

1 upvote
Scorpius1
By Scorpius1 (7 months ago)

A medium format camera... ;-)

2 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (7 months ago)

I would get one, just to place it beside the 256 MB card.

There's space for a third... 256 TB, then it goes on a picture frame, and will hang on a wall.

.

3 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (7 months ago)

Why not 1 MB, 1 GB, and 1 TB? Should be possible within 2-3 years.

2 upvotes
Shamael
By Shamael (7 months ago)

1 TB is existing, but the commercial policiy want it to be released later, stretching issues of technologies is what we call evolution. And even if all exist at same time, they release one by one, they want to earn money and sell all sizes. Most companies have now on the table what we will see on the market in 5 years only.

1 upvote
chaos215bar2
By chaos215bar2 (7 months ago)

Please go lookup the sizes (physical and memory) of currently available flash chips and let us know which ones you would put in a 1TB CF card. (Or are you going to claim any of the flash memory manufacturers wouldn't jump at the chance to sell something with four times the memory density of any of their competitors?)

1 upvote
JonathanRphoto
By JonathanRphoto (7 months ago)

This is mostly likely not designed for the still photographer unless your shooting the 200mp hassy. This is probably targeted at the Video guys most likely. For most people even in the pro market 32gb-64gb is fine.

3 upvotes
tabloid
By tabloid (7 months ago)

It will sell like hot cakes in the pro market.

For those here who simply want to take pictures of the neighbours cat......lol,
I dont think that its for u, or should i say its not for mew.

1 upvote
agentul
By agentul (7 months ago)

yeah, go buy your own cat first, then spend money on such luxury items.

2 upvotes
HawaiiVolcanoes
By HawaiiVolcanoes (7 months ago)

$1809 Dollars??...hahahahaha..they will sell like 10 of these...no frikkin wayyyyyyyyy

0 upvotes
tabloid
By tabloid (7 months ago)

In the pro marker its tax deductible.

0 upvotes
riveredger
By riveredger (7 months ago)

Big deal - you save 1800 of taxable income.

0 upvotes
rayand
By rayand (7 months ago)

Er, what about this: http://www.amazon.co.uk/KOMPUTERBAY-256GB-Professional-COMPACT-Extreme/dp/B00EM9I6II/

0 upvotes
yehudakgtbnet
By yehudakgtbnet (7 months ago)

For me, 16MB is all I need in shooting events.

2 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (7 months ago)

16MB?

7 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (7 months ago)

Do you just shoot one image that captures the essence of the entire event?

16 upvotes
Reilly Diefenbach
By Reilly Diefenbach (7 months ago)

Lol!

2 upvotes
fastglass
By fastglass (7 months ago)

+1

Too sweet!

Long live CF.

Cheers.

1 upvote
yabokkie
By yabokkie (7 months ago)

would prefer an SD magazine.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2013/09/05/lexar-introduces-600x-64gb-microsdxc-uhs-i-card-four-way-reader-hub

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 29 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
offertonhatter
By offertonhatter (7 months ago)

$1800 for the 256GB? Ouch! Mind you remember when even 16MB SM cards were VERY expensive. Prices will come down.
However, the CF card has been the mainstay for sports/pro photographers for years, but SD has been catching up very fast indeed. Plus SD does not have the potential issue of the pins inside the camera being bent that has happened with CF connections.
Could this be the last hurrah of the mighty CF card, before handing over the crown to the SDXC or indeed the XQD card? only time will tell, but it is not looking good for it.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (7 months ago)

$1800? I get that it's a heck of a lot of storage, but wow.

Fortunately my DSLR has a dual slots (CF and SD) so I can use two less expensive smaller card, a 32 GB CF and a 32 GB SD, which I have yet to fill even with combined RAW/JPEG and video.

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (7 months ago)

now it's camera makers' turn to move on to 256 MPix sensors.

0 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (7 months ago)

won't fit in my sd-slot

3 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (7 months ago)

I wonder what GoPro thinks about this. They are not too happy with Sandisk right now.

1 upvote
Jogger
By Jogger (7 months ago)

Are there even any 4k cameras that use CF? Most are outputting to external recorders that use SATA3 SSDs. The data rate in the new Sony 4k cam is 600 mbs and it uses qXD.

3 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (7 months ago)

Canon will probably introduce something. They are stuck in the dark ages with CF.

3 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (7 months ago)

we are definitely going to have 8K broadcast in Tokyo before the Olympics games in 2020. but most who shoot 8K video may have to beam to 4K youtube.

0 upvotes
Paul Guba
By Paul Guba (7 months ago)

Awesomeness! Not that I am rushing out to buy these but technology marches forward and prices for the now less awesome cards comes down.

1 upvote
Total comments: 70