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Pentax Ricoh releases Ricoh GR camera with APS-C CMOS sensor

By dpreview staff on Apr 17, 2013 at 05:01 GMT
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Pentax-Ricoh has announced the much rumored and leaked Ricoh GR, a 16.2MP APS-C sensor enthusiast compact camera. The GR continues on from Ricoh's GR Digital series of high-end, fixed-lens models, gaining a much larger sensor but continuing to offer a 28mm equivalent field of view, now with an F2.8 maximum aperture. It also retains the GRD IV's high-res 1.2m dot LCD and a range of photographer friendly functions. Despite a sensor nearly nine times as big, the recommend price increase by just $200 over the GRD IV, to $799.

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Press Release: 

PENTAX RICOH IMAGING DEFINES THE ADVANCED COMPACT SEGMENT WITH THE INTRODUCTION OF THE RICOH GR CAMERA

Following on the Award Winning GR Digital Series the New RICOH GR Camera Features an APS-C-Sized Sensor and Compact 8.6 Ounce Body at Just $799.95

Denver, CO (April 16, 2013)PENTAX RICOH IMAGING AMERICAS CORPORATION today announced the RICOH GR, an ideal blend of image quality, camera size and price; setting a new benchmark for the advanced compact camera category. The new RICOH GR camera features an APS-C-sized CMOS image sensor delivering shallow depth of field, exceptional low-light performance and a wide dynamic range for remarkable images across a wide variety of shooting styles.

Remaining true to the heritage of the multi- award-winning RICOH GR Digital series the new Ricoh GR camera combines compact size with outstanding performance. Featuring a 16 megapixel, APS-C-sized CMOS sensor, no low-pass filter and a completely redesigned optical path the GR is built for superb image performance. The newly developed and optimized 18.3mm (28mm in 35mm format) F2.8 lens compactly provides high-resolution, wide-angle images with stunning edge-to-edge sharpness all while minimizing chromatic aberration and distortion. The camera’s category-leading, nine-blade aperture diaphragm produces a rounded bokeh effect across a wide range of apertures.

Advanced capabilities of the sensor and lens are supported by a newly developed GR ENGINE V imaging processor which optimizes high-sensitivity shooting to ISO 25600 minimizing noise, producing accurate, color-rich images. Finally, a newly designed lens driving mechanism and optimized AF algorithm combined with faster data readout speeds from the image sensor provide a high-speed auto focus system that can focus on a subject in a mere two-tenths (0.2) of a second. A super quick start-up time of approximately one second ensures photographers are guaranteed a speedy capture ready camera in even the most fleeting scenarios; making the RICOH GR the ideal companion camera at a fraction of the size of a DSLR.

"The introduction of the RICOH GR marks a new standard of confidence in the compact camera segment," said Jim Malcolm, Executive Vice President, PENTAX RICOH IMAGING AMERICA. "The RICOH GR camera’s unparalleled set of robust features and hardware completely redefines what can be expected from a compact camera."

In keeping with its advanced functionality the GR also offers a range of helpful features common to DSLRs like in-body RAW-data development and a dedicated depth of field preview button to aid in accurate image framing and quick inspection of focus prior to capturing an image. Additionally, the GR boasts full 1080p HD video recording capabilities replete with continual AF during video capture creating sharply-focused, high-quality video output.

Instantaneous photo and video sharing is now a breeze with the GR’s optimized Eye-Fi SD card compatibility. Built-in menus allow the user to easily enable automatic transmission of images and video to a smartphone for rapid sharing. Users can even select favorite images and resize them before transmission.

For consumers seeking additional creative expression, RICOH offers an optional wide-angle conversion lens extending coverage to 21mm. The new GR is also compatible with the full range of accessories already offered for the preceding GR Digital line of cameras including viewfinders, flashes, lens hoods and adapters and more.

Pricing and Availability
The new GR advanced digital compact camera provides incredible value with a category-low cost of $799.95 and will be available at retail outlets nationwide and online in May 2013.

Major Features of the RICOH GR include:

Pocket-sized for superb operability
Despite the incorporation of an APS-C sized image sensor, the GR maintains the compact and portable design true to the GR Digital series. Its magnesium alloy body is both light and highly rigid, while its exterior design retains the refinement and style typical of the GR Digital series. Ergonomically designed for maximum comfort and operational ease; all control buttons are laid out for easy one-handed operation.

A new button has also been added to the camera’s side panel for quick preview of the depth of field; making it easier for the photographer to visualize the depth of field effect in the resulting image. Additionally, the focus-assist function comes in handy during manual-focus operation. Coupled with the image magnification and target shift functions, this function simplifies manual-focus shooting.

An AF function lever has been added to the camera’s back panel. When the lever is set to the Continuous AF (C-AF) mode, the user can capture a series of images of a moving subject — all in sharp focus by pushing the shutter release button while depressing the AF button. The user can also choose an optional setting, in which the continuous shooting mode is automatically activated while the C-AF button is pressed.

The GR offers the PENTAX-original Shutter-speed/Aperture-Priority (TAv) exposure mode, featured only in PENTAX-brand digital SLR cameras. This innovative mode automatically sets the optimum ISO sensitivity based on the shutter speed and aperture selected by the photographer. Additionally, aperture and shutter speed indicators have been added to the monitor screen. The layout of on-screen indicators has also been optimized to the 3:2 aspect ratio, with redesigned grid guide and electronic level.

Exceptional image quality produced by new GR LENS
The GR comes equipped with a newly designed GR Lens with the angle of view equivalent to 28mm in the 35mm format. Designed to be compact while providing high performance, this lens delivers high-resolution images with edge-to-edge sharpness and rich contrast, while minimizing distortion and chromatic aberration by incorporating two high-precision aspherical lens elements and a highly refractive low-dispersion glass element in its optics. It also offers benefits unique to a unifocal lens, such as sharp, crisp image description even at the open aperture of F2.8, and superb image definition with backlit subjects. Finally its manually adjustable ND (neutral density) filter, allows users to open the aperture up even under bright sunshine for a wider range of creative expression.

Improved image quality, supported by the large image sensor, GR ENGINE V and Anti-aliasing filter-less design
The new GR comes equipped with a new APS-C-size CMOS image sensor, with an image-sensitive area as wide as that of a PENTAX DSLR image sensor. Thanks to this large image sensor, the GR offers approximately 16.0 effective megapixels to produce beautiful, high-resolution images. By coupling the large image sensor with the newly developed GR ENGINE V imaging engine, the GR offers high-sensitivity shooting at ISO 25600 with minimal high-sensitivity noise to produce high-resolution, color-rich images with a natural sense of depth and a beautiful Bokeh effect. The image sensor has been optimized for the GR Lens 18.3mm F2.8. To give top priority to image resolution, an Anti-aliasing filter-less design has been adopted to bring out the best performance of the lens and assure exceptional image quality over the entire image field.

Quick response time
Thanks to the newly developed lens driving mechanism and optimized AF algorithm, as well as fast data readout speed from the image sensor, the GR provides a high-speed autofocus system that can focus on a subject in 0.2 seconds*1 Its quick start-up time of approximately one second, enables quick response to fleeting photo opportunities. In addition, the GR’s AF Continuous Shooting function captures a series of photos at a maximum speed of approximately four images per second, allowing the photographer to capture a fast-moving subjects, such as athletes and wildlife, in sharp focus.

High-quality Full HD recording of extended movie clips
Taking advantage of the H.264 video format, the GR’s Full HD movie recording function captures high-quality, extended movie clips (1920 x 1080 pixels, 16:9 aspect ratio) at a frame rate of 30 frames per second. Image Effects such as Retro and Bleach Bypass are available during movie recording. During recording, its AF system remains active and the camera continuously focuses on subjects in the center of its angle of view. With this AF mechanism, the user is always assured of sharp focus, along with the excellent image quality delivered by the combination of the GR Lens and the large image sensor.

Eye-Fi card compatibility for easy image sharing
With Eye-Fi wireless LAN SD memory cards, the user can automatically transmit recorded images to a smartphone,*2 and even select favorite images and resize them before transmission. In the playback mode, the user can also recall the transmitted images on the monitor using the Effect button on the side panel.

New shooting functions expand creative horizons
The Image Effect modes allow the user to add a variety of visual effects to create distinctive images without the need for a computer. The GR also offers a variety of in-body image processing functions, including RAW-data development to JPEG-format files.

For greater creativity, three new modes have been added to the GR: Retro for a nostalgic ambience with subdued saturation, High Key for a bright, lively finish while retaining subtle gradation in highlights, and Miniaturize for a diorama-like appearance. Additionally, selection of the nine Image Effect modes is easily accessed with the direct-access Effect button positioned on the camera’s side panel.

The precision of the Multi-pattern AWB (auto white balance) function has been upgraded to automatically achieve more accurate color reproduction by more clearly defining white balance to fit the light source of each segregated area of the image when there are multiple light sources. The Dynamic Range Compensation function, which minimizes washed-out highlights and pitch-black shadows, now offers pixel-level compensation to nearly eliminate borders along the luminance threshold areas and achieve the smoother transition of gradation.

Even when the user fails to set the macro shooting mode, the GR’s Auto Macro function will set it automatically by monitoring the distance to the subject. The Face Detection AF & AE function automatically captures the subject’s face in sharp focus and with perfect exposure. (These functions are available only in the Auto shooting mode.)

The Interval Composite mode captures a series of images of the night sky at a fixed interval, then selects and combines only the high-luminance pixel data from each of those images to produce a single composite image. This mode comes in handy when the user wishes to combine the trails of the moon and the stars with a landscape.

Function expansion via firmware upgrade
Function-enhancing firmware upgrades, which have been popular with all GR Digital series models, are scheduled to become available throughout the lifecycle for the new GR as well. By upgrading the camera’s firmware, the user can always take advantage of the latest, most advanced functions to optimize the camera’s performance.

Other features

  • Dual-axis electronic level for high-precision horizontal and vertical alignment
  • Non-directional stereo microphone
  • Crop mode*3 for instant setting of a 35mm angle of view in the 35mm format
  • Chromatic moiré compensation function to minimize wavy moiré patterns in the image
  • Optional GW-3 Wide Conversion Lens (with 0.75X magnification and optics optimized for the GR) for 21mm ultra-wide-angle shooting
  • Compatibility with UHS-1 high-speed memory cards
  • SILKYPIX Developer Studio 3.0 LE for PENTAX RICOH IMAGING RAW-data processing software (developed by Ichikawa Soft Laboratory) included; in-body RAW-data development also available

Optional Accessories

  • GH-3 Hood and Adapter
  • GW-3 Wide Conversion Lens
*1 Measured based on CIPA standards.
*2 The automatic transmission mode must be selected in advance on the settings menu.
*3 When this mode is selected, the largest recorded size is M.

Ricoh GR specifications

Price
MSRP $799 / £599
Body type
Body typeLarge sensor compact
Sensor
Max resolution4928 x 3264
Other resolutions4352 x 3264, 3264 x 3264, 3936 x 2608, 3488 x 2608, 2608 x 2608, 2912 x 1936, 2592 x 1936, 1936×1936, 1280 x 864, 1152 x 864, 864 x 864
Image ratio w:h1:1, 4:3, 3:2
Effective pixels16 megapixels
Sensor sizeAPS-C (23.7 x 15.7 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800, 16000, 25600
White balance presets9
Custom white balanceYes
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
File format
  • JPEG
  • RAW
  • RAW+JPEG
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.)28 mm
Optical zoom1×
Maximum apertureF2.8
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Live View
Digital zoomNo
Manual focusYes
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3
Screen dots1,230,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeTFT LCD
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (optional)
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed300 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Auto
  • Program shift
  • Aperture-Priority
  • Shutter-Priority
  • Shutter/Aperture priority
  • Manual exposure
  • Bulb mode
  • Time mode
  • Movie
  • My Settings Mode.
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range5.40 m (at ISO 100)
External flashYes (via hot-shoe)
Flash X sync speed1/2000 sec
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive4 fps
Self-timerYes
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±4 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±2 (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (+/- 8 steps B-A axis or G-M axis)
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (30, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 ( 60, 50, 30, 25, 24 fps), 640 x 480 (30, 25, 24 fps)
FormatMPEG-4
MicrophoneMono
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD, SDHC, SDXC
Storage included54 MB
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes
WirelessEye-Fi Connected
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion DB65 rechargeable battery
Battery Life (CIPA)290
Weight (inc. batteries)245 g (0.54 lb / 8.64 oz)
Dimensions117 x 61 x 35 mm (4.61 x 2.4 x 1.38)
Other features
Timelapse recordingYes
GPSNone

Ricoh GR additional Images

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I own it
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I want it
21
I had it
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Comments

Total comments: 103
foto guy
By foto guy (Apr 30, 2013)

If it had a 40mm lens, I'd snap it up in a second!

0 upvotes
CortoPA
By CortoPA (Apr 20, 2013)

Ming Thein : Announcing the Ricoh GR (Digital V) ? Ming Thein | Photographer

"In a perverse way, I’m actually hoping that the Nikon has at least one significant advantage over the Ricoh; this is not so I have an excuse to buy both, but because if Nikon has been so thoroughly bested after such a long wait for them to get in the game, I fear there’s a high risk the Coolpix A will be their first and last attempt – and that would be a real shame."

0 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (Apr 19, 2013)

Almost there, but, let's wait the price drop to ~$600, and there we have the best compact APS-C, price versus quality on the market, maybe for september.

1 upvote
LarryLatchkey
By LarryLatchkey (Apr 20, 2013)

Agree. Interesting, seeing that Ricoh's GR line used to be one of the most expensive cameras on the market. It's Pentax-style value for money now!

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
DrTebi
By DrTebi (Apr 19, 2013)

The text says:
"Non-directional stereo microphone"

The specifications say:
Videography features
[...]
Microphone: Mono
[...]

Now which one is it? I assume stereo, as I observed two strategically placed holes left and right of the lens.

Nevertheless, sounds like a great camera. Similar to the new Nikon A. Having used the Ricoh GXR for quite some time now, I imagine this camera would triumph in usability as well. To me, that's a big plus; I've got no time to mess around in quirky menus.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
1 upvote
mumintroll
By mumintroll (Apr 18, 2013)

I can see clearly from samples, that Sigma DP1 is still a light year ahead in IQ.

Con. Sigma bad on high ISO.
Pro. Sigma has no moire thanks to its' chip.

1 upvote
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (Apr 18, 2013)

How could you see that from samples? Which samples? Were same scenes photographed with both cameras neck to neck and then compared?

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Couscousdelight
By Couscousdelight (Apr 18, 2013)

Yeah, yeah, of course, whatever dude...

3 upvotes
leventhan
By leventhan (Apr 18, 2013)

@zvonimir tosic, See Sigma DP1M review at luminous landscape. Yes Sigma DP Series have a magnificent image quality thanks to the foveon, and yes it is very clear that Sigma is the winner . IMO it will complement each other, GR for more "action-oriented" and DP1M for landscape. I like both GR and DP and I hope those two will smack Coolpix A because of the foolish price.

4 upvotes
mumintroll
By mumintroll (Apr 19, 2013)

Zvonimir. You don't have to have side by side comparison. Just open images in full resolution. There is obviously huge difference in IQ between sigma and ricoh.
And no, I don't have sigma camera. I'm just not blind.

1 upvote
rallyfan
By rallyfan (Apr 20, 2013)

Cool story bro.

2 upvotes
danart
By danart (10 months ago)

yes image quality good if you invest in a tripod, these are completely different cameras. The sigma is good if you are one of those people that likes to take your time and enjoy being limited to still life and landscapes. The ricoh is a camera that you can always have with you and use in most situations. The sigma does take great pics, have used one but its slow, has very little battery life and those files are huge and slow to work with.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Apr 18, 2013)

An instant cult classic. Just like the classic Ricoh GR1 film compact.

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 17, 2013)

Another fixed focal length fixed lens cam? Do you ALWAYS shoot at a single focal length and don't care about composition and perspective at all? How many people are like that? They all have been served by X100 2 years ago (and a few of them may upgrade to X100s, maybe). RX1, Nikon A, Ricoh GR etc will just fail in the market, because the market is too small. If any customer will buy a camera like that by mistake, they will return it as soon as they find out that it is just as limited as their phone, only there is no even the "pinch to zoom" digital zoom.
And this GR does not even have any stabilization, at all, so it sucks even compared to a good smartphone.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
javidog
By javidog (Apr 17, 2013)

Enlighten me, oh wise one, on how a shooter who shoots with a single focal length does not care about composition or perspective?

5 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 17, 2013)

Because you cannot change it, except maybe with heavy cropping. But no widening, and if your object is too small for desired composition, no way to make it bigger except to walk close - and good luck to walk towards a boat, or an animal, or a mountain.

0 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Apr 17, 2013)

A large percentage of the "classic" photographs of the film era were shot on fixed focal length cameras. If it fits the style you shoot most of the time, there is no problem.

5 upvotes
Leandro Dumini
By Leandro Dumini (Apr 17, 2013)

Before the invention of the zoom lenses, people used to zoom with their legs^__^

6 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 17, 2013)

A large number of photographs was shot on a total sht. It does not mean we should restrain ourself to that.

0 upvotes
whtchocla7e
By whtchocla7e (Apr 18, 2013)

We will restrain ourselves in any way we wish. Just because you don't have the imagination to handle a single focal length doesn't mean it's true for everyone else.

4 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Apr 18, 2013)

Zooms offer great convenience, especially as you move towards the Tele end. But they can also make you a bit lazy with your compositions where you simply zoom to make it better, rather than explore to make it best.

I periodically force myself to use a single focal length to help develop my seeing eye. The X100 was great for this but quite hefty.

A few months ago, I would have been disappointed at 28mm, preferring 35mm for a single FL, but more recently I've been discovering just how versatile this FL can be and I'm ready to give it a go, so the new GR just ticks all the right boxes for me.

The Imaging resource site has just posted their test scene from the new GR and the rendering from the lens/sensor is just sublime. GR is a real stunner. I could examine the raw straight away, thanks to the use of DNG.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Apr 18, 2013)

"Do you ALWAYS shoot at a single focal length and don't care about composition and perspective at all?"

Who says you're giving up on composition and perspective just because you're using a prime lens? Clearly you don't know much about photography. In fact, I strongly believe that when you shoot with a fixed focal length lens, you make yourself a better photographer!

Obviously, this camera isn't for everyone. This camera will mainly cater to serious and good photographers who want pocketability and understand how to work with a fixed focal length lens to get the best compositions and best perspectives. You also have to keep in mind that plenty of people who buy and use zoom compacts usually don't do much zooming anyways! With all the zooming compacts I've owned, I hardly *ever* zoom with them. I just keep them at their starting 24mm or 28mm focal lengths. Zooming on compacts generally isn't very precise or responsive anyways. So a lot of people just don't zoom them.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 18, 2013)

"Who says you're giving up on composition and perspective just because you're using a prime lens?"

Laws of nature. Is it a street cam? You walk on the street, you see something happening, what do you do? Come closer? By the time you come closer, the event will go away. Or you best position might be in the middle of the traffic. Or your ass will be kicked.
Landscape? You see a beautiful vista, a mountain etc. How do you cut the distracting surroundings? In post, reducing resolution etc? Every shot? Like there is nothing better to do?
Subject and composition are the most important in any picture, and so FL and aspect ratio are the most important controls of a camera, determining what is and what is not in the frame. And in street, fast FL change is paramount.
Referring to "how things were done 100 years ago" is just an admission of a failure of a certain technology piece, the failure to bring about the positive change over the last 100 years.

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
JEROME NOLAS
By JEROME NOLAS (Apr 18, 2013)

Ricoh GR is for PHOTOGRAPHERS not for freaks. If you have no idea what it is good for, then yes, use a smart phone. Got it?

1 upvote
LarryLatchkey
By LarryLatchkey (Apr 18, 2013)

I have legs that can very effectively be used for composition and perspective.
(And, btw, there is a digital 35mm crop function.)

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Apr 19, 2013)

Hahaha, this peevee1 character is too funny. Clearly, he doesn't understand the utility of this focal length. Just look at the Leica X1 or Nikon Coolpix A or Sigma DP1 and DP2, etc. Good photographers can do quite a lot with this focal length. Bad photographers just whine and moan! Peevee1 is the king of whining and moaning. LOL.

1 upvote
rallyfan
By rallyfan (Apr 21, 2013)

Get over yourself. Insulting people when you're incorrect only helps you feel better for a short while. Your issues are still there.

0 upvotes
danart
By danart (10 months ago)

LOL are you serious. Using a fixed focal length is a restriction that actually forces you to compose with more consideration and be more creative. Serious photographers are like that. Zoom is for the lazy and uninspired and don't even get me started on cropping. Not sure that a smartphone with an APS c sensor exists. Its a 28mm so stabilization is not really a huge factor for those with good technique.As for your ideas of perspective your comments simple demonstrate that maybe you need to adjust yours.

0 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (Apr 17, 2013)

Could someone explain TAv mode to me in more detail? As far as I can tell, it's the same thing as shooting in M on any other camera, but with auto ISO turned on. Is that right?

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Apr 17, 2013)

Essentially, yes.

The difference is that very few of the cameras that offer AutoISO in M then allow exposure compensation. And it's nicer from a semantics perspective, since AutoISO in M mode stops it being very manual.

4 upvotes
JWest
By JWest (Apr 18, 2013)

That makes sense, thanks. The ability to use exposure compensation certainly increases the utility.

As for semantics, the whole "modes" thing seems terribly outdated and pointless to me. Just give me a simple interface where I can independently set Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO to a Value, an allowable Range or full Auto.

0 upvotes
kff
By kff (Apr 17, 2013)

This is a competitor to Leica X2 :)
However, it doesn't have a low-pass filter, it mean that it would be a winner :)

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 17, 2013)

Wow, all this Nikon hate by Ricoh fans is already making me dislike this GRD V, and I've been a GRD user since version III.

If the IQ and video capabilities of this camera are so much better, and this camera ticks all the boxes for you, go for it. What does Nikon have to do with anything? It's not like Nikon took the idea of using no AA-filter or designing a retracting f2.8 lens in front of a 16 mp DX sensor from Ricoh or anything. :-) Choice is good.

As far a Fuji X100s users "wanting $500 back" like someone mentioned below, don't make me laugh. Hybrid VF. Add the $300 VF to this camera, and how's the price looking? Use the GRD without the VF, it's still a P&S.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
samhain
By samhain (Apr 17, 2013)

I'd pay $500 extra for just the faster speed on the fuji lens, not to mention the 35mm focal length over the 28mm

3 upvotes
samhain
By samhain (Apr 17, 2013)

I'd pay $500 extra for just the faster speed on the fuji lens, not to mention the 35mm focal length over the 28mm

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Apr 17, 2013)

These are companies, not people. There is nothing to love or hate. Neither of these compaines or these cameras is capable of having its feelings hurt.

2 upvotes
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (Apr 17, 2013)

Fans are passionate, excited, and they really mean no harm. As a grown up man, you should understand the difference. Imagine it as a kids play in a bathtub, if you'd like.
This camera carries on a 30 year tradition. It's something like Nelson's Victory. Nikon Coolpix A is a French frigate, copied Ricoh's GR concepts, wants to take on the Atlantic and seize more gold to 'ensure en safe passage pour tous', just on the fact they are French and have a right to do so. Ricoh's Victory fired back a salvo, as we can see, and crippled Nikon's little ship.
No one died. :)

Comment edited 12 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
sean lee
By sean lee (Apr 17, 2013)

I like the flexibility of control buttons, fast auto focus, Eye-fi, DNG formats and lower price than coolpix A and x100s.
but, I hate to see that it is made in China.....:(

0 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Apr 17, 2013)

In the USA, one difference between the Ricoh GR and the Nikon Coolpix A, is that the latter is made by a camera company that people have heard of. Pentax is now a lesser known brand, but at least some of us still remember it.

1 upvote
Keith
By Keith (11 months ago)

Pentax ,Asahi, has was founded in 1919. Ricoh bought controlling shares of Pentax in 2011.

0 upvotes
iaredatsun
By iaredatsun (Apr 17, 2013)

There's going to be confusion with the name. Already I can see five entries from 'Buy the Ricoh GR Amazon' and not one of them is the new camera.

4 upvotes
whtchocla7e
By whtchocla7e (Apr 17, 2013)

Now this is a camera, and priced just right, too.

Nikon - go home!!

10 upvotes
spidermoon
By spidermoon (Apr 17, 2013)

In APS-C, for the same money, you have nex6, it's a little bigger with the PZ zoom, but it's much much more flexible.
For me, fixed lense camera at 800$ are the new hispter toys. But yes, it's cheaper than Nikon, Fujy or Sigma DP, so i guess it's a bargain.

4 upvotes
RFC1925
By RFC1925 (Apr 17, 2013)

I guess "a little" is relative.

http://camerasize.com/compact/#454,375.360,ha,t

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 57 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 17, 2013)

But NEX-6 has EVF.
And with the zoom, it is the wrong comparison - the NEX is much more useful. The closest comparison is this:
http://camerasize.com/compact/#454,375.369,ha,t

or even this
http://camerasize.com/compact/#454,369.369,ha,t

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
theranman
By theranman (Apr 17, 2013)

Will it or will it not take an accessory EVF? The pic shows one, but the press release doesn't mention it. Hmmm......

0 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Apr 17, 2013)

Optical only.

1 upvote
Mark B UK
By Mark B UK (Apr 17, 2013)

Does it have IS? I see no mention in the press release or specs.

0 upvotes
avicenanw
By avicenanw (Apr 17, 2013)

IS not useful with fixed wide angled lens cameras. The Fuji X100s costing $500 more (with a lens equivalent of 35 mm) also does not have IS .

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Apr 17, 2013)

IS would have been a home run but at least it's cheaper than the Nikon.

1 upvote
mosc
By mosc (Apr 17, 2013)

RX100 has IS at 28mm. Smaller sensor but brighter f1.8. Aperture times crop factor would say that they are similar, as would MP count. RX100 is cheaper too.

0 upvotes
Jimmy jang Boo
By Jimmy jang Boo (Apr 17, 2013)

"External flashes can be used at a sync speed of up to 1/2000th of a second."

0 upvotes
abortabort
By abortabort (Apr 17, 2013)

21mm ultra wide is a BIG plus for the GR as well.

8 upvotes
Nigel Wilkins
By Nigel Wilkins (Apr 17, 2013)

Perfect for my landscapes.

Lets hope they've matched it well...there's no reason to think otherwise though, considering it's dedicated to this lens/camera.

0 upvotes
LarryLatchkey
By LarryLatchkey (Apr 18, 2013)

I used to use the GR1 a lot with the 21mm adapter and the quality was good... Imagine how much you have to spend for a DSL-R with an almost distortion-free, sharp and bright 28mm. But with 21mm there is almost no competition. Love it!

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 17, 2013)

Certainly makes the Coolpix A price look even more foolish, eh?

17 upvotes
viking79
By viking79 (Apr 17, 2013)

That is what my thought was too. Unfortunately Ricoh doesn't have the same visibility that Nikon does, hopefully review sites point this out. I suppose it comes down to function as well and how they perform.

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 17, 2013)

One big difference is the GRD V is limited to 12-bit DNG vs 14-bit NEF for the Coolpix A. Pentax did the same thing with the K-30, which unlike the K5 has only 12-bit DNG.

This will virtually ensure that the GRD V will have about 1 EV or more less Dynamic Range than the Coolpix A which, like the D7000/K5, get about 14 EV DR.

So there's a lot of talk about how foolish Nikon looks, but perhaps people should dig a bit deeper in this comparison. Clearly price is a concern, but if I'm a landscape photographer and RAW shooter, there is nothing at all foolish about 14 EV DR.

4 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (Apr 17, 2013)

Thanks. Interesting how companies choose value points; product differentiation. I wonder who actually designs and assembles cameras these days.

0 upvotes
mosc
By mosc (Apr 17, 2013)

Seems that Nikon is more capable of cutting price on the A and still making a profit? Nikon and Canon have often changed the pricepoints of their P&S/entry level DSLRs as they have aged.

0 upvotes
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (Apr 17, 2013)

Interesting comparative weight between APS-C brethren (inc. battery & card):
GR = 245 g
Coolpix A = 290 g
Sigma Merrill DP2 = 330+ g
Fujifilm X100s = 445 g

10 upvotes
KingDon
By KingDon (Apr 17, 2013)

Fuji has F2.0 lens, the other three cameras don't. That a full one stop faster lens.

And RX1: 482g with FF sensor and F2.0 FF lens

Comment edited 28 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (Apr 17, 2013)

Yes, RX1 lens is a big one. Beautiful too.

3 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Apr 17, 2013)

The Coolpix A is actually 299 g, loaded: a small difference, but I know you care about small differences.

The Ricoh is incredibly light and compact.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Apr 17, 2013)

And only Fuji among them has half-decent AF?

1 upvote
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (Apr 17, 2013)

Yes, there are little typos in the DPR specs above.
Mother company says:
– Shutter speed: 1/4000 – 30 sec., Bulb, Time
– Also, built-in manually adjustable ND filter

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Apr 17, 2013)

It's 300 seconds. The ND filter is mentioned in the preview.

Those aren't typos - they're perfectly copied errors from the spec sheet we were given.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (Apr 17, 2013)

Indeed? Thank you. Then maybe Pentax Ricoh development team in Japan only know the true specs? :)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Apr 17, 2013)

Ricoh GR has a loyal albeit small fan base, curious to know what's the magic of the GR series?

0 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Apr 17, 2013)

It's a design thing.

GR is Ricoh's high grade brand of lens. GR Digital is a compact body designed to enjoy the lens through photography.

Usually, compact bodies take their cues from consumer electronics and the photographer spends a lot of time fighting with poorly placed and/or poorly thought-out controls.

Ricoh gets it right. Putting the right controls in the right place and implementing them from a photography perspective. Once you customise the controls for your shooting style (or set multiple configurations if you use multiple styles) you're good to go.

Your mind is free to contemplate the photography, not the camera operation.

It's a very simple concept, but can make a huge difference in enjoying photography. It's not magic, and the real mystery is why more camera makers can't get it right!

There's lots of small design details too that you come to appreciate in actual use. Like the recessed strap lugs mean there are no snagging points when you stow and un-stow the camera.

13 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Apr 17, 2013)

Now, for almost the first time, you don't need to sacrifice great IQ to enjoy the richer shooting experience. A great day for Ricoh fans.

Now, those who strive towards great IQ don't need to tolerate/compensate a sub-standard shooting experience. A great day for a new wave of soon to be Ricoh fans.

All in all, a great day for photography I think.

9 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Apr 17, 2013)

But it doesn't say Nikon or Leica on it. How can this be?

1 upvote
guyfawkes
By guyfawkes (Apr 18, 2013)

@qwertyasdf,
In addition to Najinsky's positive comments, I would also add in a specific response to your question that the fan base precedes the digital GR's and goes back to the very first film GR-1.

In a very compact body, it was full frame 35mm with a very high quality 28mm true focal length lens, built in optical v/f (what else in those days?) and a small built in flash. And it was well built. I still have mine and have just treated it to a brand new pouch as the original got very worn and disheveled.

1 upvote
LarryLatchkey
By LarryLatchkey (Apr 18, 2013)

you have to hold it to understand. it's incredibly well balanced and has superb handling.

1 upvote
vodanh1982
By vodanh1982 (Apr 17, 2013)

Whoever bought a Coolpix A will want $300 back.

3 upvotes
Jimmy jang Boo
By Jimmy jang Boo (Apr 17, 2013)

And there will a few people who bought X-100s who will want $500 back.

4 upvotes
qwertyasdf
By qwertyasdf (Apr 17, 2013)

I bought a Sigma DP1M and would happily let Sigma keep my money lol

3 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 17, 2013)

I would bet most who bought the x100 wanted the viewfinder and 35/2 lens, so I doubt they are drooling too much.

4 upvotes
JacquesBalthazar
By JacquesBalthazar (Apr 17, 2013)

I would not mind trading in my wonderful A for this even more wonderful GR, and lose 300 bucks.

1 upvote
viking79
By viking79 (Apr 17, 2013)

If they bought an X100 for a 35mm f/2 lens they would be disappointed. If you mean 23mm f/2 lens (35mm f/3 FF equivalent) they should be fine. RX1 has a 35mm f/2. Just being a pain, I get your point, but please say 35mm equivalent f/2 if you phrase it that way.

I agree, X100(s) has its own merits, extra f/stop, optical finder, etc, and Sigma DPxM series at least has a special sensor going for them, will appeal to some base ISO users that want that. Nikon A just looks overpriced now :)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Apr 17, 2013)

"POW!" Hear that? The sound of wood hitting a leather covered baseball out of the park. Grand slam home run from Ricoh, what a nice surprise.

What a price on this, gotta get one. I've used and am a big fan of Ricoh's GR's (all of them less the GR II) and have to say this is exactly what Ricoh needed to do with this camera. I hope its as big of a hit for them as it should be. Lookout Sony, Sigma, Nikon, Ricoh just took out out of the tournament with this one.

C

13 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Apr 17, 2013)

It's 100% killer of Coolpix A.

5 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 17, 2013)

Maybe we will find some on sale, soon. That always turns a boring product into a more exciting one.

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Apr 17, 2013)

Looks like a Sony-NEX but sounds like a Nikon-A.

It would have liked to see a manufacturer offer something different from what is already out there, namely the ~30mm viscinity of the Fuji X100s and nikon-A, like a f/1.4 50mm equivalent.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 46 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Fazal Majid
By Fazal Majid (Apr 17, 2013)

Nope, looks like a film-era GR1v. If anyone is copying, it is Sony.

11 upvotes
The A-Team
By The A-Team (Apr 17, 2013)

A 50 1.4 equivalent would hit the spot.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Apr 17, 2013)

Only so many ways to make a tiny box with a light hole.

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Apr 17, 2013)

What's perfect for one person is useless to another. I doubt many people would get excited about a camera with a permanently attached 50mm lens but you never know. The oracle himself, Ken Rockwell says that 28mm is a useless focal length. I cannot think of a better endorsement for this Ricoh.

1 upvote
guyfawkes
By guyfawkes (Apr 18, 2013)

I was about to say KR's is only one voice, and one I often don't support, then I re-read your post. And see what you really meant. Nice one, as we say in the UK.

0 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Apr 17, 2013)

This would make a perfect backup camera for shooting landscapes. Tempting little camera.

6 upvotes
Nigel Wilkins
By Nigel Wilkins (Apr 17, 2013)

Or even a primary landscape camera if you need to travel very lightweight!

2 upvotes
Airless
By Airless (Apr 17, 2013)

LOL NIKON...Coolpix A is already obsoleted by the same camera for $300 less and it looks nicer too.

6 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 17, 2013)

Yes, because all those landscape shooting Nikon DSLR users are going to be rushing out to get access to the GRD 12-bit DNG files. lol.

2 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Apr 17, 2013)

Oh the horror of 12-bit files. And DNG; there's an obscure file format.

1 upvote
RStyga
By RStyga (Apr 17, 2013)

To all those who persistently kept propagating the nonsense argument that x camera has to be large because it has a large sensor!

8 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Apr 17, 2013)

Very true. Amazing that Ricoh got the big sensor in there, and that they chose the RIGHT sensor as well.

Carl

0 upvotes
KingDon
By KingDon (Apr 17, 2013)

It's a single focal length lens with F2.8 lens. Fuji has F2.0 lens and OVF and EVF combo.

That accounts for size difference.

3 upvotes
Dave Luttmann
By Dave Luttmann (Apr 17, 2013)

You would have had me with a 35mm FOV

1 upvote
Albino_BlacMan
By Albino_BlacMan (Apr 17, 2013)

Ricoh's been doing the 28mm since like 1990 so I think you're unlikely to get that... sorry

10 upvotes
theranman
By theranman (Apr 17, 2013)

It'll auto-crop to to 35mm if you want.

6 upvotes
Craig Atkinson
By Craig Atkinson (Apr 17, 2013)

28mm is more popular in Japan and to my mind a better FL for street work

2 upvotes
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Apr 17, 2013)

I have a GRDIII and it is a little great camera. But I am one of those who would love to see 35/2.8. I know that there is the (really great) X100s, but I just love the interface and fit&finish of the Ricoh GRD and GXR cameras.

1 upvote
Mousetrapper
By Mousetrapper (Apr 17, 2013)

I have been with Ricoh since the Gr1s, Gr1V film days. Had the GRDII and III, skipped the IV in favor of the GXR and also have a Sigma DP1M. The GR is a welcome upgrade and I will not have to think twice about it. It is bound to hurt Nikon sales for the Coolpix A - and vice versa - but hey, the more the merrier right? I see the current GR as the way I would have hoped it to be a few years back - but that said it is NEVER to late to better the long term concept of GR series. I don't think I will drop my SD1M as it will be hard to beat for low ISO land/cityscapes but we'll see. Both the GR and Coolpix A seem to be much better all round compact fixed lens cameras, for sure.

1 upvote
Total comments: 103