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Nikon launches 16MP DX-format Coolpix A and P330 enthusiast compacts

By dpreview staff on Mar 5, 2013 at 04:01 GMT

Nikon has unveiled its first DX-format compact, the Coolpix A, alongside the enthusiast-focused Coolpix P330. The Coolpix A fits a 16MP APS-C CMOS sensor with no optical low-pass filter behind a 28mm equivalent, F2.8 prime lens. The Coolpix P330, meanwhile, gains a 1/1.7" sensor and Raw-shooting capability, over its predecessor. The Coolpix A will cost around $1100/£1000/€1100, while the P330 will retail for around $380/£350/€380.

We've had the opportunity to use both the Coolpix P330 and the Coolpix A, and have prepared hands-on previews, based on those experiences.

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Press Release:

NIKON’S NEWEST ADVANCED PERFORMANCE COOLPIX CAMERAS PROVIDE INCREDIBLE QUALITY AND CONTROL FOR THOSE SERIOUS ABOUT CAPTURING STUNNING IMAGES

World Renowned Optics and a Host of Innovative Technologies, Including the Use of a DX-Format Image Sensor, Provide Users with Premier Compacts for Shooting and Sharing

MELVILLE, N.Y. (March 4, 2013) – Today, Nikon Inc. announced two new advanced performance COOLPIX cameras, built for the customer seeking the best image quality possible with the convenience and ease-of-use of a compact camera. The Nikon COOLPIX A is the first COOLPIX to incorporate a DX-format sensor, similar to those found in many of Nikon’s coveted D-SLRs, which provides the highest image quality possible from a compact point-and-shoot. Additionally, the small yet powerful COOLPIX P330 fits comfortably into a shirt pocket, yet gives users the confidence to capture beautiful imagery through amazing optics, low-light capabilities and creative control.

"The introduction of the COOLPIX A, as Nikon’s flagship COOLPIX camera, provides uncompromised image quality and incredibly sharp detail in a compact point-and-shoot camera. As the first COOLPIX to use a DX-format sensor, the COOLPIX A will exceed expectations for its unsurpassed performance," said Bo Kajiwara, Vice President of Marketing, Planning and Customer Experience, Nikon Inc. "The COOLPIX A, along with the COOLPIX P330, demonstrates the forward-looking direction of the Advanced Performance COOLPIX line, and packs all of the benefits of Nikon’s optical heritage and imaging experience into a compact, yet powerful package."

Advanced Performance COOLPIX Cameras with Wi-Fi® Connectivity
For those who never settle for second best, this new duo presents the optimal choice to consistently capture high-quality images and HD video with outstanding clarity and detail. Thanks to their exceptional CMOS imaging sensors and world-class NIKKOR lenses, these cameras deliver brilliant photos amidst the action, even in low-light conditions. With compact designs and advanced feature sets that allow users to easily grow and improve their image or video shooting skills, these new COOLPIX cameras provide creative control and connectivity options for the photographer in everyone. These new cameras also join the ultra-zoom COOLPIX P520 and performance powerhouse COOLPIX P7700 in Nikon’s series of COOLPIX Advanced Performance cameras.

Once a still or video has been captured, both cameras let users share images instantly with family and friends when connected using the optional WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter*1. This accessory pairs with the free downloadable Wireless Mobile Utility application1, which enables users to transfer their images and videos to compatible smart devices and tablets for easy sharing and viewing with others.

The COOLPIX A: Nikon’s First DX-Format COOLPIX Camera Unlike any other COOLPIX camera, the new COOLPIX A is equipped with a DX-format CMOS sensor that enables users to achieve superior image quality previously only possible with a Nikon D-SLR. The combination of this 16.2-megapixel DX-format sensor and ultra-sharp prime NIKKOR lens firmly positions the COOLPIX A as the reigning flagship camera in the COOLPIX line.

The all-glass 18.5mm (28mm equivalent) prime lens has an f/2.8 aperture, allowing users to shoot with a shallow depth of field to blur backgrounds for professional-looking photos. Even when the sun goes down, the lens offers the ability to turn a fleeting glance into a flattering moonlit portrait with just a press of the shutter. Always ready for the spontaneous moment, the camera’s quick AF performance and 4 frames-per-second (fps) burst help users to consistently capture any moment with outstanding image quality.

For those who want to push their photography skills, the versatile COOLPIX A also offers advanced settings to allow shooters to have complete creative control to master nearly any shooting situation. With multiple Scene Modes, a familiar manual focus ring, full manual exposure controls (P,S,A,M), and the ability to shoot RAW/NEF image files, even a simple snapshot can be transformed into artistic expression.

Additionally, the COOLPIX A offers a variety of accessories to enhance the shooting experience, including the DF-CP1 Optical Viewfinder, the UR-E24 Adapter Ring for attaching lens hoods and filters, and the HN-CP18 metal Lens Hood, which helps protect the surface of the lens and restricts light from passing through without negatively influencing images. The camera also has a full size hot shoe port that makes the camera compatible with various accessories such as Nikon Speedlights.

The COOLPIX P330: Big Performance from a Tiny Camera

Nikon Coolpix P330 with 1/1.7", 12.2-megapixel backside illuminated (BSI) CMOS sensor and super-sharp f/1.8 lens

The COOLPIX P330 offers a useful 5x wide angle to telephoto (24mm-120mm, 35mm equivalent) zoom and cutting-edge features in a sleek, portable design for exceptional images and HD video. The P330 has a 1/1.7-inch, 12.2-megapixel backside illuminated (BSI) CMOS sensor that offers users the ability to confidently capture vibrant photos with low noise. Additionally, the super-sharp f/1.8 lens is the fastest in the COOLPIX line, rendering photos and Full HD 1080p video with striking clarity in a variety of lighting conditions. The lens also includes Vibration Reduction image stabilization to further reduce the effects of image blur when shooting handheld. Designed for the user who wants a sophisticated camera with the option of an advanced feature set, the COOLPIX P330 includes manual controls (P,S,A,M) and can now capture NRW/RAW images.

The P330 also enables users to enhance their photography with the inclusion of various Scene Modes, as well as Nikon’s Easy Auto Mode for capturing beautiful imagery during scenic vacations, celebrations or everyday moments, all with the convenience of a small, portable size. Additionally, the camera incorporates Full HD Video with stereo sound, engaged with just a simple press of the dedicated video record button.

This high-performance camera also comes with built-in GPS capabilities so photographers can easily log even their most exotic travels by pinpointing the exact latitude and longitude where the image was captured.

Pricing and Availability

The COOLPIX A will be available in March 2013 for a suggested retail price (SRP) of $1099.95*2 and will be offered in Black and Silver. The DF-CP1 Optical Viewfinder will be available for a suggested retail price of $449.96*2, and the UR-E24 Adapter Ring and HN-CP18 Lens Hood will be sold together for a suggested retail price (SRP) of $129.96*2; accessories will be available in March 2013. The COOLPIX P330 will also be available in March 2013 for a suggested retail price (SRP) of $379.95*2 and will be offered in Black and White.

In order to give consumers a more effective way to understand the benefits of each COOLPIX camera and to help users determine the best camera to fit their lifestyle, Nikon has segmented the COOLPIX series into five categories: Advanced Performance, Fun & Innovative, Ultra-Slim Zoom, Comfort Long Zoom and Budget Friendly. For more information about these and other COOLPIX cameras, please visit www.nikonusa.com

*1 WI-FI SPECIFICATIONS AND COMPATIBILITY
This camera’s Wi-Fi® capability using the WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter can only be used with a compatible iPhone®, iPad®, and/or iPod touch® or smart devices running on the Android™ operating system. The Wireless Mobile Utility application must be installed on the device before it can be used with this camera.
For compatibility and to download the application, please visit:
For iPhone®/iPad®/iPod Touch® <https://itunes.apple.com/en/app/wireless-mobile-adapter-utility/id554157010> For AndroidTM Google PlayTM <https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nikon.wu.wmau>
Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, iPad and iPod touch are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.
Android and Google Play are trademarks of Google Inc. Wi-Fi® and the Wi-Fi CERTIFIED logo are registered trademarks of the Wi-Fi Alliance.
All Nikon trademarks are trademarks of Nikon Corporation.

*2 SRP (Suggested Retail Price) listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time.

Nikon Coolpix A specifications

Price
MSRP$1100/£1000/€1100
Body type
Body typeLarge sensor compact
Sensor
Max resolution4928 x 3264
Effective pixels16 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors17 megapixels
Sensor sizeAPS-C (23.6 x 15.7 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 2000, 3200 6400, (12800, 25600 with boost)
Custom white balanceYes
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW
File format
  • JPEG
  • RAW (NEF)
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.)28 mm
Optical zoom1×
Maximum apertureF2.8
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Center
  • Tracking
  • Face Detection
Digital zoomNo
Manual focusYes
Normal focus range50 cm (19.69)
Macro focus range10 cm (3.94)
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDNo
Screen size3
Screen dots921,000
Screen typeTFT LCD monitor
Viewfinder typeOptical (optional)
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/2000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Programmed auto (with flexible program)
  • Shutter priority
  • Aperture-priority
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • Beach/Snow
  • Blossom
  • Candlelight
  • Child
  • Close-up
  • Dusk/Dawn
  • Food
  • High Key
  • Landscape
  • Low Key
  • Autumn colors
  • Night Landscape
  • Night Portrait
  • Party/Indoor
  • Pet Portrait
  • Portrait
  • Silhouette
  • Sports
  • Sunset
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range11.50 m
External flashYes (via ISO 518 hot-shoe with sync and data contacts and safety lock)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-Eye, Slow-sync
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Best Shot Selector
  • Multi-shot 16
Continuous drive4 fps
Self-timerYes (2, 5, 10 or 20 sec)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±5 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing (at 1/3 EV steps)
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (30, 25, 24fps), 1280 x 720p (30 fps), 640 x 480 (30, 25, 24 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
WirelessOptional
Wireless notesvia optional WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter
Physical
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionNikon EN-EL20 Lithium-Ion battery
Battery Life (CIPA)230
Weight (inc. batteries)299 g (0.66 lb / 10.55 oz)
Dimensions111 x 64 x 40 mm (4.37 x 2.52 x 1.57)
Other features
GPSOptional
GPS notesGP-1

Nikon Coolpix A additional Images

Nikon Coolpix A Nikon Coolpix A
 Nikon Coolpix A with DF-CP1 optical viewfinder
 Nikon DF-CP1 optical viewfinder

Nikon Coolpix P330 specifications

Price
MSRP$380/£350/€380
Body type
Body typeCompact
Sensor
Max resolution4000 x 3000
Image ratio w:h4:3
Effective pixels12 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors13 megapixels
Sensor size1/1.7" (7.44 x 5.58 mm)
Sensor typeBSI-CMOS
Image
ISOAuto 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 2000, 3200, 6400, 12800
White balance presets5
Custom white balanceYes
Image stabilizationOptical
Uncompressed formatRAW
File format
  • JPEG
  • RAW (NRW)
  • 3D images: MPO
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.)24–120 mm
Optical zoom5×
Maximum apertureF1.8 - F5.6
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Tracking
  • Face Detection
Digital zoomYes (2x)
Manual focusYes
Normal focus range30 cm (11.81)
Macro focus range3 cm (1.18)
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3
Screen dots921,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeTFT-LCD
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeNone
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed60 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Programmed auto (with flexible program)
  • Shutter priority
  • Aperture-priority
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • Beach
  • Backlighting
  • Black and White copy
  • Candlelight
  • Close-up
  • Dusk/Dawn
  • Fireworks show
  • Food
  • Landscape
  • Museum
  • Night Landscape
  • Night Portrait
  • Panorama
  • Party/Indoor
  • Pet Portrait
  • Portrait
  • Silhouette
  • Sports
  • Snow
  • Sunset
  • Special effects
  • Scene Auto Selector
  • 3D photography
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range6.50 m
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous L
  • Continuous H
  • Continuous H -60 (60fps)
  • Continuous H -120 (120fps)
  • Pre-shooting cache
  • Best Shot Selector
  • Multi-shot 16
  • Interval time shooting
Continuous drive10 fps
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 sec)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
  • Spot AF-area
Exposure compensation±2 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing (at 1/3 EV steps)
WB BracketingNo
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (60, 50, 30, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720p (30, 25 fps), 640 x 480 (30, 25fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
Videography notes1080 (60i, 50i, 30p, 25p, 24p)
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
WirelessOptional
Wireless notesOptional WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionNikon EN-EL12 Lithium-Ion battery
Battery Life (CIPA)200
Weight (inc. batteries)200 g (0.44 lb / 7.05 oz)
Dimensions103 x 58 x 32 mm (4.06 x 2.28 x 1.26)
Other features
GPSBuiltIn

Nikon Coolpix P330 additional images

 Nikon Coolpix P330   Nikon Coolpix P330
37
I own it
35
I want it
2
I had it
Discuss in the forums
51
I own it
11
I want it
2
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 109
12
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 20, 2013)

Rumours:

I can't wait for the Coolpix B to come out!

(45mm equivalent, f/1.4 lens)

I'm guessing that one will sell better than this.

0 upvotes
Moob
By Moob (Mar 12, 2013)

OMFG @ the price!

1 upvote
Gesture
By Gesture (Mar 7, 2013)

Nice platforms, but ... if you have to ask the price ...

0 upvotes
nikoj
By nikoj (Mar 7, 2013)

The only thing this camera (coolpix a)has over the X100 or XE-1 with 18mm F2 is "pocketability".. How much do/can we want to stuff more crap in our pockets? I, for one don't have any more room after my wallet, cellphone, keys, and change. I have no problem toting a little larger, but a light camera in a small messenger type of bag - much more comfortable than stuffing another device/thing in my pocket.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 20, 2013)

Good news: this fits into a small bag too! ;-p

0 upvotes
Rich H
By Rich H (Mar 7, 2013)

Definitely priced high.

However, very close to what I am looking for. I am looking for the highest quality camera I can find, that has good low-light performance, that is small. I travel every week and want to have something with me. My D700, D3X, and pounds of lenses sit at home because they are too heavy.

Will wait for the resources.

0 upvotes
cinemascope
By cinemascope (Mar 6, 2013)

NX1000 + 16mm f2.4 + 20-50mm for $550 on BH. You could buy two of those kits for exactly the same $1100 and I bet there is no pratical size difference. Or buy the kit above plus the lovely 30mm f2 plus a fourth lens of your choosing and still have change for an evening at the pub.
Nice camera though and I think the 28mm FL is perfect for point and shooters, who buy pocket zooms but take 98% of their shots at widest setting anyway.
I was looking for a large sensor camera with wifi for my wife, this Nikon just made me happier to go with the Samsung two lens kit plus the 30mm.

1 upvote
Ale1210
By Ale1210 (Mar 6, 2013)

Dear Nikon,
nearer, but not enough, yet.
I'm still waiting for a high quality / DX / mirrorless / interchangeable lenses / magnesium alloy body: "The" streetphotografers' perfect body.
Thanks

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
dorff
By dorff (Mar 6, 2013)

The A is not a system camera. There are quite a few other options that offer much better value for money. Why didn't Nikon just put in the 24MP sensor that they already have? The D3200 is way lower in price with many more parts and a better sensor. Go figure! My bet is 12 months from now, there will be heavy discounts on this thing. Buy early, and you will probably suffer buyer's remorse a while from now.

4 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Mar 8, 2013)

The only 24 mp camera we've seen from Nikon with no AA-filter is the new D7100. And people think the A is expensive, how much do you think it would have been with the top-of-the-line D7100 24 mp sensor in this camera? The 16mp Exmor is one of the best performing DX sensors ever and it's still in use in tons of cameras, see K5 IIs, NEX-5R and NEX-6, et al.

And you're really going out on a limb with your 12 month prediction of discounts. Aren't ALL cameras discounted in 1 years time?

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
malcolm82
By malcolm82 (Mar 8, 2013)

Why would removing the AA filter make this camera more expensive? It is not a feature it is just a new marketable trend of the controversial idea that this is better. The AA filter was added for a reason, they did not do it because it would make camera's cheaper to produce.

1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Mar 20, 2013)

The idea is to not leave any money lying on the table... I'm sure they'll be doing (ie: be forced to) plenty of periodical price adjustments, until demand picks up and to keep it in balance with manufacturing capacity.

I agree with malcolm about the AA filter. But pushing the higher resolutions does make it possible to remove it (over the 24mp mark).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
dstarr3
By dstarr3 (Mar 6, 2013)

While I'm not yet in the market for one yet, I'm very, very happy to see that camera manufacturers are jumping on the bandwagon of putting bigger sensors in smaller cameras. This can only lead to good things.

0 upvotes
PicOne
By PicOne (Mar 6, 2013)

Hmmm.. similar spec to the old Olympus Stylus Epic.. Not sure its the same price though. Must be the sensor's price.

0 upvotes
Patrick Mac
By Patrick Mac (Mar 5, 2013)

I'm sure I'm an outlier in this case, but if they had given it a 24mm F2.0 lens I would actually be really interested since this otherwise ticks many of the boxes I care about.

2 upvotes
Damo83
By Damo83 (Mar 5, 2013)

Guessing the Coolpix A viewfinder costs more to manufacture than one of either the sensor or the lens. Interesting.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (Mar 5, 2013)

Between RX100 and X100s, who do you think will buy Coolpix A at $1100?

4 upvotes
Karroly
By Karroly (Mar 5, 2013)

For people who don't care about video capabilities, Sigma DP1 Merrill - same sensor size/resolution without Bayer & AA filters, same lens - costs "only" $799 on Amazon...

1 upvote
Everlast66
By Everlast66 (Mar 5, 2013)

For people who care about video - the RX100, more compact and lighter, zoom lens and 60p vs 30p on the Coolpix A

0 upvotes
Karroly
By Karroly (Mar 6, 2013)

@Everlas66,
You're right, but I was trying to compare apples with apples...
RX100 has smaller sensor size with higher pixel count (crazy to me but others may be happy with it) and zoom versus prime lens.

0 upvotes
JacquesBalthazar
By JacquesBalthazar (Mar 5, 2013)

Very very tempting.

I was kinda waiting for a GRD V along those specs, but this is available in a couple of weeks.

So what do we have now: this Nikon; the Fuji X100s and leica X2 (35mm equiv); the NEX 5,6,7 with the coming 20mm pancake; seems samsung has something as well (not familiar with them), and then the m4/3 crowd with their own pancakes....

Great choices!

Interestingly, the Nikon seems very well priced compared to the X2, but a bit too expensive compared to the Fuji (spec vs spec). I have a NEX 7, so the coming pancake would give me a cheap (in terms of incremental spend) but very good coat pocketable camera. Still,that Nikon looks real small, and I like that, and I like the absence of AA filter, and I kinda trust Nikon more than Sony to produce nimble, reactive, efficient bodies and great lenses....

Guess this thingy kills the prospect of APS GRD V... Cannot be smaller...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Mar 5, 2013)

I see only one BIG plus - size and weight. With 28 mm and 16 MP APS-C without AA filter - it's VERY cool, inconspicuous tool for street photography. But it's all.
The lenses must be f2 for street.

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Sad Joe
By Sad Joe (Mar 5, 2013)

This is a most interesting move by Nikon (well done Nikon - wish Canon were this brave) I look forward to next years version with interchangeable lenses !

1 upvote
alaskaman1919
By alaskaman1919 (Mar 5, 2013)

Still making the small viewing area???? Nikon must also live in the dark and think everyone goes for MP's..get real with this price and stil no TTL.

0 upvotes
KonstantinosK
By KonstantinosK (Mar 5, 2013)

Hmmmm, nice! But it's still RX100 for me! Thanks Nikon, anyways. Nice to have the option. Maybe next time around.

0 upvotes
samhain
By samhain (Mar 5, 2013)

28mm f2.8? Lol.
Maybe for $500-$600, but $1k? No way. Not with that slow lens and odd focal length.
And $450 for the OVF!?! That's a trip.
Well... Atleast their trying.

1 upvote
matty_boy
By matty_boy (Mar 5, 2013)

id agree on price but lets be honest, Leica havent done too bad with a very similar set up for even more money (24mm vs 28mm). This will be Nikon's biggest problem - they are pushing it into Leica territory. As for your focal length comment, get real. 28mm an odd focal length... to whom ? more photos are taken with that focal length than any other (iPhone, Galaxy phones...) also its probably the widest you can go before you get complex distortion, especially in such a compact lens ... id say its a classic set up - 28mm compact.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
1 upvote
IrishhAndy
By IrishhAndy (Mar 5, 2013)

What a stupid camera. Overpriced and just one useless focal length.

2 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Mar 5, 2013)

They will produce A2 later with 36 mm and A3 with 50 mm. :) It's business.

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Mar 5, 2013)

28mm is the standard focal length for both for street photography and landscape photography. 35mm is much too long for street photography, which is why the legendary Ricoh GRD uses 28mm.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
matty_boy
By matty_boy (Mar 5, 2013)

useless focal length ... really ? the most used focal length of modern times. If you cant use 28mm you are screwed...

Check flickr for example, the number one camera on flickr has a focal length of 28mm

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Mar 6, 2013)

"Check flickr for example, the number one camera on flickr has a focal length of 28mm"

Well, that doesn't necessarily mean people with even wider FoV's wouldn't use them instead for, say, street photography. 99% of DSLR kit lens start at 28mm equiv, forcing casual users (ones not wanting to purchase another lens) to use 28mm as the widest setting. (the most notable exceptions being the Sony 16-50PV (nex-6 and the forthcoming 3N) and the very pricey Pana 12-35)

0 upvotes
matty_boy
By matty_boy (Mar 6, 2013)

"forcing casual users" ha, thats funny. I find that there is a small but significant group of photographers (mainly from modern digital photography) who are obsessed by ultra wide lenses which, to be perfectly honest, have very limited applications. this obsession is akin to that with mega pixels - the wider the better. traditionally 28mm was about as wide as you would want to go and i still think that is the case. Surely people who want a wider lens will actually hunt one out and not be "forced" to use a longer one.

0 upvotes
Osvaldo Cristo
By Osvaldo Cristo (Mar 5, 2013)

It looks the camera a lot of posters are looking for according their critics for the previous models I read exactly here, in the front page of dpreview:

DX sensor, macro capabilities, reasonable WA, fast lens, crazy high ISO, raw capabilities,... oh surprise: I found again lots of complains!!!

Where is the crowd that asked that??

2 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Mar 5, 2013)

No any interesting thing at all. Not bad, but mediocrity. No any spices. It doesn't attract.
You list things that it's standart for photo camera. The lens is not fast, by the way.

1 upvote
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Mar 5, 2013)

the body looks boring.. if they designed it retro...then at least it will be interesting to look at and use.. it looks like the P330.. looks generic..

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
SunnyFlorida
By SunnyFlorida (Mar 5, 2013)

Another pricing failure for nikon, why would anyone pay over $1k for a DX sensor compact and limit their choices to one lens when other DX interchangeable compact cameras like the Samsung NX210 or Sony Nex with can be had with a sinmilar lens for under $1k??

3 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Mar 5, 2013)

It's all about the size. This camera is almost EXACTLY the same size as the RX100 but has a larger APS-C sensor.

To those clamoring for a zoom lens, all I can say it try shooting with great cameras like the X100 or GRD IV and see if they don't improve your images dramatically.

0 upvotes
Shamael
By Shamael (Mar 6, 2013)

Sony's latest NEX3 is that small as well, has same sensor base and costs 500$ with the 16-50 lens, and, is an IL system. Here you get a fixed lens for more than the double price, for me a joke. Nikon sucks,

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Mar 6, 2013)

"Sony's latest NEX3 is that small as well, has same sensor base and costs 500$ with the 16-50 lens, and, is an IL system. Here you get a fixed lens for more than the double price, for me a joke. Nikon sucks,"

Yup, I'm looking forward to the 3N too. The 16-50PZ is a GREAT kit of lens.

0 upvotes
malcolm82
By malcolm82 (Mar 7, 2013)

I agree it cannot be worth more than the nex 3 with kit lens.

0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Mar 5, 2013)

My GXR+A12 28/2,5 is smaller.

Coolpix A could be much interesting if it would be 24/1.8-2 and WR.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Mar 5, 2013)

It's thicker. GXR+a12 is 56mm thick vs 40mm for this Nikon.

1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Mar 5, 2013)

This looks like another attempt by Nikon to make their DSLRs look like a WAY better option.

5 upvotes
SunnyFlorida
By SunnyFlorida (Mar 5, 2013)

+1 by comparison Samsung NX210 or Sony Nex with similar primes can be had for under $1k , why would I pend over $1k and limit myself to just one lens?

1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Mar 5, 2013)

If you only shoot at 28mm then this would be a dream come true. I like shooting at 28mm occasionally not exclusively though.

2 upvotes
Danlo
By Danlo (Mar 5, 2013)

I would choose the fuji x100s any day over this.. Bad choice of focal length Nikon.

1 upvote
Danlo
By Danlo (Mar 5, 2013)

Yes a real 28mm focallenght (42mm equivalent) and I would have preordered today. But NOT with a stupid 18.5mm (28mm equivalent)! SO STUPID NIKON!

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 5, 2013)

No, definitely nothing "stupid" about it, Danlo. It is merely a 28mm equivalent focal length fixed lens. Who you calling "stupid," anyhow? And why?

Now, maybe you are dying to get a 42mm fixed lens camera for your $1,100 -- okay then, you -- and who else?

2 upvotes
Yves P.
By Yves P. (Mar 5, 2013)

Looks EXPENSIVE :-)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
straylightrun
By straylightrun (Mar 5, 2013)

Why?

1 upvote
moretoys
By moretoys (Mar 5, 2013)

It would make more sense if the Coolpix A was announced on April 1st.

2 upvotes
Ulfric M Douglas
By Ulfric M Douglas (Mar 5, 2013)

That optical viewfinder is beautiful.

2 upvotes
sempull tampush
By sempull tampush (Mar 5, 2013)

Yeah. Fourhundredandfiftybucks beautiful.

3 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Mar 5, 2013)

very expensive

0 upvotes
MrTaikitso
By MrTaikitso (Mar 5, 2013)

Having owned a Sony f717, Panasonic GH2 and now an NEX 5R, living without an articulating display is simply impossible. I was walking along a canal the other day and a bunch of canoeists came speeding past. To capture the action, I set the drive mode to Spd Priority Cont, shutter to 1/1250 and angled the display upwards so I could shoot from the ground level for maximum dramatic impact.

Further, the 50/60p video means you can capture action and grab frames if 10fps isn't good enough, even if only at 1080P resolution.

So, why neither feature on either of these new Nikons?

0 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (Mar 5, 2013)

So let's make a camera that looks like a $300 compact, but costs 3 times as much.

2 upvotes
TFD
By TFD (Mar 5, 2013)

Camera makers appear to be unique in their desire to go backwards, wierd retro rangefinder cameras, fixed focal length odities like this Nikon, black and white only cameras. Sort of unlearning everything from the 1950's before the SLR, auto focus, etc.

I am waiting for manual only focus cameras, a digital twin lens reflex digital camera, mechancilly timed shutters. match needle metering and the re-introduction of flash cubes.

Of course if these oddities were at least cheap they could have a place but paying $1100 for an oddity is just silly.

2 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Mar 5, 2013)

The rangefinder is a tried and true design, nothing weird about it.

As a former Rolleiflex user, if they made a digital version, I'd buy it in a second. Few cameras are as pleasurable to use as the Rolleiflex. Great optics, terrific waste level VF, excellent 6x6 square format.

There is nothing odd about a fixed focal length camera and cameras like the GRD and X100 are about as good as it get's for general photography. They reduce photography down to it's most basic elements starting with a sharp prime and great IQ. What's not to like? As far as price, because cameras like these serve a smaller market, they are more expensive.

2 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Mar 5, 2013)

What’s weird or retro about a fixed-lens compact with a straightforward design emphasising control and quality?

If milled-alloy control dials are old-fashioned, I’m all for old-fashioned.

The truth is, a combination of happenstance and great design efforts decades ago meant camera design was a solved problem by the eighties. In most cases, the new design freedoms made possible with digital were awful, and now photographers are asking for their cameras back – leading to things like the return of aperture rings around the lens barrel.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 5, 2013)

TFD must be 18-years or something around there. Nothing wrong with that, of course, but there was time and history before you came around, you know. Having used turret-style film cameras with 3 C-mount lenses on them, for instance, I can tell you that I could switch from WA to NORMAL to TELE primes inside of 1.5 seconds and w/o looking at the camera, and without removing one lens and affixing another one in its place. But I guess you call that old-fashioned and nonsensical, too, right?

1 upvote
skytripper
By skytripper (Mar 5, 2013)

Is there really a significant market for an $1100 pocket camera with a fixed 28mm f/2.8 lens? Personally, I don't get it.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Mar 5, 2013)

Will that mean mean that you won't be BUYING one, either? Does Nikon know this sad dose of news already, I wonder?

0 upvotes
LarryLatchkey
By LarryLatchkey (Mar 5, 2013)

I like the concept and love 28mm, but where have ergonomics gone in camera design?!! All these smooth, boxy, unbalanced bodies! It's ok and cool for a €200 "lifestyle" ixus, but it's impossible to comfortably hold a slippery thing like a PEN or a Canon S100. Samsung or Ricoh do really design MUCH better camera bodies than this.

0 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Mar 5, 2013)

It has a large, textured, sharply protruding finger-grip. I think it would take a determined effort to get it to slip out of your right hand.

The Canon S100 has a grip in roughly the same place. You might be thinking of the more recent S110, which is indeed fairly slippery in the hand, though not excessively so.

1 upvote
LarryLatchkey
By LarryLatchkey (Mar 8, 2013)

(Yes S110...) Ok, I was exaggerating a little. But in direct comparison an EX2 or Fujis X10/20 feels more designed for one handed use and somehow I feel it is more fun to use them.
On the other hand you're right that a rubberised strip makes a difference. The GH3 for example has a nicely shaped grip but feels slippery as it is smoth hard plastic.

0 upvotes
tornwald
By tornwald (Mar 5, 2013)

1100. wow. I stil remember some people being amazed how 'expensive' the Sigma DP 1 & 2 where. You can now have these camera's with far better IQ for a few hundred bucks less. Can we safely conclude now that these Sigma's are or steal, or that Nikon has lost it's mind?

4 upvotes
pschia
By pschia (Mar 5, 2013)

What? At that price and no VR for the Coolpix A? Seems that Nikon is following in Sony's footstep in shortchanging their customers out of image stabilisation for their premium compact cameras.

0 upvotes
Ed B
By Ed B (Mar 5, 2013)

Wow! What is Nikon thinking?

I know I'm just repeating what others have said but $1100.00 for a fixed 28 mm 2.8 lens just isn't going to be a big seller.

2 upvotes
rjx
By rjx (Mar 5, 2013)

Especially with the Fujifilm X100S being released this month.

11 upvotes
sempull tampush
By sempull tampush (Mar 5, 2013)

28mm F/4, actually...

0 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Mar 5, 2013)

Let’s just call it an 18.5 mm f/2.8.

A great lens for this kind of camera, if it lives up to Nikon’s promises (no sure thing).

0 upvotes
wootpile
By wootpile (Mar 5, 2013)

I'm a fan of Nikon. But I don't get it. Price and fov is really weird.
And Where Is The Flip-Screeeen??

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Mar 5, 2013)

Ugh, 28mm equiv? Did they not see how "well" the Sigma DP1 sold?

And no 18.5mm f2.8 will not "allow users to shoot with a shallow depth of field to blur backgrounds for professional-looking photos"

18mm f3.5 is what all the kit lenses can do, this gets me a whole 2/3 a stop of "professional" photo ability.

4 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Mar 5, 2013)

Maybe Nikon will go the Sigma route and make a few more focal length fixed but hopefully faster and less dated and and and and

2 upvotes
xc1427
By xc1427 (Mar 6, 2013)

@tkbslc
you totally get the point.
This camera is not meant to sell well, but aimed at true photographers who do not need bokeh to let their photo look "professional".

0 upvotes
Combatmedic870
By Combatmedic870 (Mar 5, 2013)

??? Why? A 28mm 2.8 lens?

Why cant some one release one of these with a 32-35mm(50mm) F1.8/2 lens.
I just want one with a 50mm equiv!!!!!!!!!!

:(

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Mar 5, 2013)

Amen, bro. Amen.

1 upvote
mgrum
By mgrum (Mar 5, 2013)

size, a faster lens will be bigger and/or more expensive

0 upvotes
Michael_13
By Michael_13 (Mar 5, 2013)

@Combat
Why not take a PEN + 25mm/F1.4 instead?

Makes more sense in imo.

3 upvotes
Kurt_K
By Kurt_K (Mar 5, 2013)

$450 for the optical viewfinder? Wow.

6 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Mar 5, 2013)

For the cost of the body and viewfinder I could have the X-E1 and a nice lens

8 upvotes
Retzius
By Retzius (Mar 5, 2013)

I am willing to bet that this lens formulation (18.5mm f2.8) for DX format makes an appearance as the long awaited DX wide angle prime lens for their DX SLR line.

0 upvotes
xc1427
By xc1427 (Mar 5, 2013)

I bet not. A 18.5mm f2.8 prime in DX format sounds very nice to a semi-pro/pro, but not to a normal consumer, who determines what product will be on the market.

0 upvotes
Maarten
By Maarten (Mar 5, 2013)

Not possible I think since the flange-to-sensor distance for F mount is much larger. You'd need a new optical design. I want some DX primes however!

0 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (Mar 5, 2013)

You would have to be brain dead to buy this over the Fuji X100S or even the older X100! :O

12 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Mar 5, 2013)

Or a Nikon fanboy

7 upvotes
alfredo_tomato
By alfredo_tomato (Mar 5, 2013)

It is ugly as home made sin, but I like it. Let's hope it delivers.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 5, 2013)

$1,100 for the Nikon A? I was liking a lot about the specs till I read that part.... um whoa. Guess Nikon is going for those who like the RX1 but not the price, but still... The Ricoh GRD IV is 28mm fixed, with really good image quality for less than half that price.

The P330 looks appealing, nice zoom range, bright aperture, decent sized sensor (I'm a fan of the 1 1/7" sized sensors), and much better price as well I'm sure.

0 upvotes
Martin_PTA
By Martin_PTA (Mar 5, 2013)

Add to that the view finder, adapter ring & hood, and you can almost buy two d7000 bodies! I suppose this flood of new devices packaged in every conceivable format & size help sell more sensors, which in turn aid in lowering productions costs. I hope they sell many, but I won't be one of the buyers!

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Mar 6, 2013)

"$1,100 for the Nikon A? I was liking a lot about the specs till I read that part.... um whoa."

Hope it'll drop in price as quickly as, say, the P3x0 series of Nikon, making them really cheap, given their capabilities.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Mar 5, 2013)

What? Canon did something before anyone else did and now others are playing catch up? This even flies in the face of so many people who talk about Nikon being the standard by which their version of "innovation" should be judged. Wait, is the fast lens or decent macro focus going to be the differentiator? Nevermind that it's a fixed focal length lens and costs a lot more than the G1 X did even at launch.
In all fairness it's another entry into a great segment of cameras that I think a lot of people have been waiting a long time to really take off. I don't think the Nikon 1 or Sony RX100 or RX1, or even the G15 and similar cameras, ever hit the mark for me. I can see why some people wanted the RX100 and as a G1 X owner I obviously see its usefulness, but I'm not a fixed-lens shooter and no zoom with a big sensor for that price doesn't seem like it's shooting for the upper end of the mainstream....seems like another boutique camera.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Mar 5, 2013)

I hope people notice the popup flash on the A is almost identical to the G1 X and complain about it just as much.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Mar 5, 2013)

Hey, RX100 does have zoom, no worse than your G1X, only more light, compact, faster and cheaper.

0 upvotes
Summit_pg
By Summit_pg (Mar 5, 2013)

Hopefully this means that Nikon can finally kill off the ignorant '1' lineup of cameras.

4 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Mar 5, 2013)

I can't see the 1 system's target market of people upgrading from compacts rushing out to buy >$1000 cameras with fixed 28mm equiv primes.

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
12 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Mar 5, 2013)

Exactly Richard

0 upvotes
Summit_pg
By Summit_pg (Mar 5, 2013)

Sorry, I should have been clearer. I was referring to the good sign that Nikon is squeezing in a DX sensor into smaller cameras. You are totally right about there being different market segments. I just can't help but feel that the '1' series is a mistake like the good old Pronea line.

1 upvote
matty_boy
By matty_boy (Mar 6, 2013)

but forgetting statistics/bokeh obsessives. the 1 series outsells its nearest competitor 2:1 - they sell as many 1 series as the rest of the CSC market added together. Id say you may know what you like but you clearly dont understand the consumer market like Nikon does...

0 upvotes
Total comments: 109
12