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Just posted: Hands-on preview of the Canon EOS 100D/SL1

By dpreview staff on Mar 21, 2013 at 05:00 GMT
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We've just posted a hands-on preview of the Canon EOS 100D/Rebel SL1. Distinguished by its impressively small form factor, the 100D's 18MP CMOS sensor, 3" touchscreen LCD and 1080p30 video resolution will be familiar to followers of the Rebel series. Canon's hybrid phase/contrast detect AF system has been tweaked, however, to provide much greater scene coverage. Has Canon managed to maintain its customary handling experience in the smallest DSLR it has ever made? Click on the link below to read our preview and find out.

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Comments

Total comments: 379
123
JohnMatrix
By JohnMatrix (Mar 21, 2013)

Good grief Canon.

You market the "the world’s smallest and lightest DSLR* camera" (note, I couldn't find what the * was referring to in the press notice)

But then you still don't offer a 20-22mm EF-S pancake lens to go with it? Most (all?) of the mirrorless system offer a pancake with a standard FL (35-40 equiv), but not you.

No, you try and flog your crop SLR customers a 40mm pancake designed for FF. (I don't recall 65mm SLR lenses being that popular back in the day!).

And don't get me started on the lack of a fast (f/1.4), modern, EF-S standard prime after all these years!

Still, this new camera will sell like hotcakes to the masses so what do you care. :)

15 upvotes
davidonformosa
By davidonformosa (Mar 21, 2013)

Canon needs a few more pancake lenses to go with this body. Surely it wouldn't be too hard to modify the EOS-M 22mm f/2 to fit the EF-S mount. Also if they want to really take the business away from the MILC sector they need to re-engineer the zoom to make it more compact.

0 upvotes
meland
By meland (Mar 21, 2013)

Unfortunately lens design is not quite as simple as you seem to believe. Remember you have the space occupied by the mirror so all lenses for this have to have a much longer back focus than they would for an EOS-M or other mirrorless body.

3 upvotes
rrccad
By rrccad (Mar 21, 2013)

it would be an entirely different design to account for the registration distance change.

0 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Mar 21, 2013)

"The focusing speed of the updated hybrid phase and contrast-detect design remains unchanged, which unfortunately means that it still lags behind current mirrorless cameras from Sony, Olympus and Panasonic."

- Thanks Canon for your LACK of progress in the contrast AF department. I can now happily stay with the super OM-D.

17 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Mar 21, 2013)

Like you were going to swap back anyway.

0 upvotes
haiiyaa
By haiiyaa (Mar 21, 2013)

How does it kill micro four thirds? whats the idea of having a small dslr if the lenses are huge

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
18 upvotes
Winston Loo
By Winston Loo (Mar 21, 2013)

The Panasonic G5 or GH3 and the Olympus EM-5 eats this for breakfast ! Gosh even my E-PL5 can do 8fps and is smaller and have smaller / lighter lenses..

10 upvotes
acidic
By acidic (Mar 21, 2013)

You know, if Canon could make a few more pancakes but limit the mount to EF-S for compactness, they might be on to something here. The 40mm STM is fantasically small on my 5D2. If there were even smaller EF-S pancake primes in 20mm and 60mm ranges, it could make for an interesting kit for those already invested in EF gear. If I weren't already heavily invested in m4/3 gear (in addition to Canon FF), then I would certainly consider jumping in.

0 upvotes
IrishhAndy
By IrishhAndy (Mar 21, 2013)

This kills micro four thirds but it is not really good.

1 upvote
haiiyaa
By haiiyaa (Mar 21, 2013)

How does it kill micro four thirds? whats the idea of having a small dslr if the lenses are huge

9 upvotes
Abhijith Kannankavil
By Abhijith Kannankavil (Mar 21, 2013)

even the micro four thirds aren't that small to have a clear advantage over these

2 upvotes
Xellz
By Xellz (Mar 21, 2013)

most lenses are a lot smaller, especially with longer reach difference becomes quite huge. Try to compare for example any small sized body like pens with panasonic 14mm pancake. Can't match this.

3 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (Mar 21, 2013)

Micro Four Thirds lenses are a *lot* smaller.

The 45 f/1.8 is a superb portrait lens, and you can lose it in the sofa. The 14/2.5 is a good wideangle prime, and the 20/1.7 is very good; both are *tiny*.

0 upvotes
maxola67
By maxola67 (Mar 21, 2013)

It's less the Panas-GH3!
What's next Canon step relating to lenses size?
I remember Oly made the same mini- DSLR(e-420) with no success.

1 upvote
the reason
By the reason (Mar 21, 2013)

Its a ff mount. Lenses will remain the same size. You cant fight physics

0 upvotes
sunnycal
By sunnycal (Mar 21, 2013)

You can fight it, Canon did with its DO lenses. It is just that it is hard to win!

0 upvotes
acidic
By acidic (Mar 21, 2013)

While its mount can take FF lenses, it also takes EF-S lenses specifically made for APS-C. Still bigger than m4/3, but considerably smaller than lenses for FF.

0 upvotes
Rad Encarnacion
By Rad Encarnacion (Mar 21, 2013)

I believe the "next step" in lens sizes were the EF-M lenses for the EOS-M, but that mirrorless needed an adapter to mount EF-S and EF lenses.

But this 100D... this one can mount the "Sigma Launcher" (200-500mm) natively, even if the camera could technically fit inside the lens barrel. Not that anyone should, but there you have it.

1 upvote
BJN
By BJN (Mar 21, 2013)

It's the lenses that make all the difference when comparing system bulk and weight. APS-C lenses are larger and heavier than equivalent Micro Four Thirds optics. But if you don't need a full system and fast optics, a small DSLR might just make you happy.

0 upvotes
R Thornton
By R Thornton (Mar 21, 2013)

Ever seen Pentax pancakes?

1 upvote
Entropius
By Entropius (Mar 21, 2013)

The failure of the Oly mini-DSLR's was mostly due to Olympus' marketing fail rather than anything wrong with the product. The E-410 and 420 didn't sell that well because the 510 and 520, with a little bigger body and with (very good) IBIS, came out alongside them. The E-620 (the next version), with an only slightly larger body but IBIS, a bigger viewfinder, and a 12MP sensor, had a fair bit of success, at least compared to the under-marketed Four Thirds line as a whole.

I've still got an E-510 in my pack -- it takes lovely images.

0 upvotes
Ray1684
By Ray1684 (Mar 21, 2013)

Canon now needs to release a string of mini lens to go with this little DSLR :)

1 upvote
Total comments: 379
123