Previous news story    Next news story

Lowepro introduces Flipside Sport 20L AW weather-resistant backpack

By dpreview staff on Mar 11, 2013 at 17:59 GMT

Lowepro has announced the Flipside Sport 20L AW weather-resistant backpack for adventure-oriented photographers. Priced at $179.99, the Flipside 20L can hold two pro-level DSLRs, two lenses, a tripod/monopod and a flashgun. Made of lightweight materials and breathable padding, the bag features expandable pockets for treckking poles and 1.5L bottles. The Flipside is also available in two smaller sizes with Orange/Light Grey and Galaxy Blue/Light Grey color options.

The Flipside Sport AW is built for active photographers providing multiple exterior attachment points to expand carrying options.

Comments

Total comments: 40
douglassalteri
By douglassalteri (Apr 11, 2013)

Am I the only one who finds the chest strap pulls apart at the slightest tug. The sliding ridge on the straps needs some sort of stopper on the ends to stop the straps flying apart under stress.

0 upvotes
Davosun
By Davosun (7 months ago)

Yeh, I just got this bag, and the chest strap came straight off. great bag, but not happy about the strap. Will be taking it back, especially since it was not cheap

0 upvotes
MPA1
By MPA1 (Mar 12, 2013)

Any time I see yet another backpack, I look forward to seeing them on the second hand listings pretty quick when those who think they are the answer realise that they cannot get at their gear and shoot quickly!
Backpacks are the answer to far less people than the number of them on the market would suggest.

0 upvotes
Artak Hambarian
By Artak Hambarian (Mar 12, 2013)

Flipside series addresses that one particular issue: by design it allows access to the gear without completely taking off the bag. Certainly it is not the same as a sling shoulder bag, but I have found this principle rather functional, especially when putting the bag on the ground is impossible - mud, swamp, cactus, etc.

1 upvote
MPA1
By MPA1 (Mar 13, 2013)

I don't think you'd get that setup as illustrated out of that bag without putting it down. You'd struggle to get the straps back on too once that behemoth camera was in your hands!
I think the design is mainly intended to stop you having the dirty side against your back rather than to speed access.
Unless you're hiking I think backpacks are a waste of time, personally.

0 upvotes
Artak Hambarian
By Artak Hambarian (Mar 13, 2013)

Well, I would suggest trying it out. I have two bags in that series, see my post below. Certainly, you are right - the most of the benefit you will get when you are hiking. If a slope is such that you can not put your bag on the ground is another case. A glacier is yet another case.

0 upvotes
Florent Chev
By Florent Chev (Mar 14, 2013)

MPA1: I think your post is a waste of time.
Seriously, backpacks are not the ideal answer for everyone, but still a useful one. And Flipside bags are among the better designed I never used. As it was written before, you don't have to lay your bag on the ground. You can you it as a small table along your hips. Enough to change lenses and reorganize the bag. Great!

0 upvotes
FelixC1999
By FelixC1999 (Mar 16, 2013)

I use a flipside and I bought it for security. Since the only way to access the compartment is by taking off the bag, that means any thieves would also have an issue if I had it on in a crowded area such as a foreign subway system.

0 upvotes
InTheMist
By InTheMist (Mar 12, 2013)

Fits a 300/2.8, plus more lenses and/or backup body, hydration system, iPad pouch and very secure tripod storage with access while belted in!?
Shut up and take my money.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 14 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
richard cohen
By richard cohen (Mar 12, 2013)

Any time I see a new 'active' photographer pack the first thing I check for is hydration support. Any bag that doesn't fit a 100oz bladder in my book falls short of the mark...which unfortunately is the case with these packs. They can hold a 1.5l bladder in a side pocket which is not nearly enough for a serious hiker or mtn biker. plus it looks like you will have to buy that bladder (non-standard size) seperately. So for me this doesn't work, and i'll keep my Clik Elite bag for those times when I want to bring my camera while being out on the trail all day.

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
yakiman
By yakiman (Mar 12, 2013)

Good for LowePro. They are trying to get it right. I have worn out a CompuTrekker AW on many hiking adventures and worn out my back too. I currently use an Osprey Stratos 34 and wrap my camera in an extra jacket or just hang it around my neck. I hand carry a tripod. Not ideal but the suspension system is a back saver. Sierra Designs and Gregory have the same system which is light years ahead of any camera pack that I know of. I became a believer when I tried one the first time. I keep hoping for a camera pack crossbred with a true adventure backpack; suspension, hydration, camera gear and space for essentials.

0 upvotes
Alberto Tanikawa
By Alberto Tanikawa (Mar 12, 2013)

The only thing that I don't like about Lowepro are the zippers that they insist on using. They always break or snag. The bags are top notch - I have lots of them, from Slingshot, Flipside, to Pro Trekker, but all share this same zipper deficiency - the Pro Trekker doesn't suffer from snagging, but the splash guard on them got eaten by the zipper on first use, and eventually lost all splash proofness. YKK zippers are the best, and Lowepro competitors have been using them for a while. C'mon Lowepro, switch to YKK already!

Comment edited 38 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Artak Hambarian
By Artak Hambarian (Mar 11, 2013)

After using around 20 or more bags from a number of manufacturers (Think Tank, Tamrac, Naneu, Domke, National Geographic), my strong opinon is that Lowepro is so far the best in the largest of situations. My favorit is now the Flipside 400 AW as it is more comfortable and roomy than the Flipside 300 (BTW both have weather covers) due the normal padding of the waist belt and big comparment for food and a light jacket. But the 300 is also used since it is very small and looks great too. Both have substantial padding that are suitable for mountains. The new sports series I am sure should find its customers - forget about having just one or even few bags: you cant wear the same clothes in all seasons/situations and be happy. My next most used bag is the Domke F1, but am thinking of one of Magnum series bags.

4 upvotes
Scottish Kev
By Scottish Kev (Mar 11, 2013)

Forgive me if this has already been covered but I spent a long time looking for a backpack that would carry camera gear and hiking gear, as when you are out in the wilds you dont have "just" your camera gear and then wear everything else. This bag like many out there only does camera gear.

Why dont more bag manufacturers actually design bags to carry camera gear and personal gear.

Oh and I did find a 1 or maybe 2 manufacturers who do what I think is a sensible back pack for hiking/carrying personal gear and I bought one but it was stupidly expensive (such is this camera/hobby/addiction ah well) but it does an awesome job!

:)

13 upvotes
gzig
By gzig (Mar 11, 2013)

http://www.lowepro.com/rover-pro-aw
?

3 upvotes
Jim Evidon
By Jim Evidon (Mar 12, 2013)

The Tamrac Adventurer series does have the capability to carry camera equipment nicely nested plus an upper compartment for personal items. I have the Adventurer 9. There are also larger models.

0 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (Mar 12, 2013)

Yes, where do I put crampons, my ice axe, carabiners, and the all-important bear spray? And lunch of course.

3 upvotes
jtan163
By jtan163 (Mar 12, 2013)

Here here!!
When I go bush I need at least 20-30L of capacity for personal gear.
Insulation jacket, rain jacket, water (2-4L by itself), first aid kit, food. I'm a big guy so my fleece would take 6L of a bag by itself.
That means my camera bag need to be 40-50L
It's very apparent that most camera bag manufacturers think hiking is an afternoon stroll in a resort or municipal park.
I've given up on camera bag makers for non urban use.
I just use a normal pack, and add a Crumpler Haven.
Lens go in wraps or simple nylon staff sacks - protection from scratches, but not from knocks. However the rest of my gear provides some padding.
No quick access.
These look OK for use with a proper pack:
http://fstopgear.com/product/mountain/icu

However I ave concerns about their actual backpacks.
They are rear opening, i.e. the panel that goes against your back opens to reveal the camera gear."
given that I don't really see how they can have an efficient frame/harness.

5 upvotes
jtan163
By jtan163 (Mar 12, 2013)

This is the pack I use:

http://store.kifaru.net/navigator-4000ci-p42.aspx
Best suspension I have used and I've had quite a few packs.
But $500+ it's not ceap and it's a heavy weight in it's own right.

1 upvote
Petka
By Petka (Mar 12, 2013)

My solution for serious backpacking with DSLR: just a normal hiking pack (Osprey or Arc'teryx in my case) and camera gear wrapped in spare clothing and maybe a light waterproof stuff sack. All camera specific padding and compartments add weight and take away precious space. I have done several month's worth of hiking with Canon 5D gear or a XH-A1 video camera this way in a 34 liter pack.

0 upvotes
clcochrane
By clcochrane (Mar 12, 2013)

Any camera bag manufacturers listening? From the number of 20-30 litre backpacks for non-photographers out there, surely we are not the only ones who need to carry 20-30 litres of clothing, food and equipment AS WELL as our camera, tripod, lenses, filters etc. I cannot understand why there aren't more backpacks suitable for storing at least 20l + photographic gear, it's very frustrating. To venture into the mountains in the UK & Ireland without extra clothing and food is downright dangerous!

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Spudiot
By Spudiot (Mar 12, 2013)

You mean like these bags?

http://fstopgear.com/product/mountain

2 upvotes
TakenUserName
By TakenUserName (Mar 12, 2013)

For Christmas, I got my daughter the Lowepro Sport 200 AW backpack (not the sling). It has dedicated camera compartment with side access and an upper compartment for other gear with top access. The only complaint is the top compartment goes all the way with a thin channel to bottom behind camera compartment that small stuff can slide down into. HOwever, while rear access has security concerns, flipside requires removing - slowing own her hiking friends who would not wait. Slide access allows on the go access, and with skill can swing backpack forward with one de-strap for front access and platform for lens change, etc. Currently she uses it for snowshoeing treck through the Alps, works well, and she doesn't get left behind. Plus, high visibility orange is nice.

0 upvotes
plasnu
By plasnu (Mar 12, 2013)

Good point.

0 upvotes
Scottish Kev
By Scottish Kev (Mar 12, 2013)

Gzig – Yup that one made my cut to the last couple of back packs but I didn’t chose that one in the end.

Jim – I did look at Tarmac but I never found the adventure ones. Maybe I didn’t look that hard but all my google searches and they never came up.

Jtan163 – WOW! That’s an incredible pack! And more expensive than the pack I bought! Eek! I ended up buying a pack that could be used for hiking and could also “fit” on an airplane…sort of.. 

Petka – I used to do that but I just didn’t trust my gear from unwrapping and wasn’t easy to get too.

Spudiot – YUP! I bought a loka :D its awesome!

TakenUserName – That is an awesome looking pack!! That would have saved me some cash! Ah well! :D You live and learn

0 upvotes
richard cohen
By richard cohen (Mar 12, 2013)

Clik Elite is about the only game in town for you. I focus on hydration capabilities because if you can't carry enough water you can't use the pack for very long. Only Clik has camera packs that can take a 100oz bladder plus camera and other gear. Cool company as well.

0 upvotes
Funduro
By Funduro (Mar 12, 2013)

Have alook at this backpack/camera case combo.
Mindshift Gear I believe they are related to Think Tank.
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/134466492/rotation180-photo-backpack

0 upvotes
InTheMist
By InTheMist (Mar 12, 2013)

I also use the Rover like gzig recommended. 300/2.8 requires a bit of creativity to fit it in the "camping" part of the pack tho, and forget about fitting it in the waterproof side.

0 upvotes
TakenUserName
By TakenUserName (Mar 13, 2013)

richard cohen - Also add the Lowepro sport 200 aw to the list of those with hydration. While I earlier described it as a "negative" with small items sliding down the narrow part, what I should have said is that that area was designed to accept a Camelback bladder. It is without that bladder in place that it leaves the space between the back and camera compartment that small things can slide down. Also, without the bladder in place, an iPad or small laptop (14' or smaller) fit nicely in that area.

0 upvotes
facedodge
By facedodge (Mar 11, 2013)

Just got a Kata 3n1... It can be converted from sling to backpack

I use it like a back pack, but love how it opens on the side. All you have to do is remove a shoulder strap and carry the bag like a highschool kid and you can access the side pockets easily. Great for changing lenses on the go.

I use it with a spider holster and it's been the most amazing combo.

1 upvote
toomanycanons
By toomanycanons (Mar 11, 2013)

I had Flipside 300 for a few months but finally sold it. It just didn't work for my style. I need a camera out to use, not inside a pack. Flipping it around didn't work smoothly. Carrying a tripod back there was a joke.

It was well made but just didn't work for me. I now put the gear I need, including tripod, into a Dakine Nomad (it's a hydration pack but I leave out the bladder). The tripod doesn't flop around and it's an easy off and on to get the other stuff I have in there (lenses and whatnot). Mostly it's a much better alternative to carrying the tripod.

0 upvotes
Dan Nikon
By Dan Nikon (Mar 11, 2013)

Nice to see this!
I use the 15L version for my 5 lens 4x5 kit and ski big terrain with it. I also use the 10L version for my Hasselblad 6x6 kit for the same task. The lack of padding in the straps is a wee bit of an issue but I never overload my packs to begin with preferring to leave room for other needed items like food, water and clothing.

Now if they could only make a water resistant and non-wetsuit like pouch like the Zing, life would be grand!

0 upvotes
Lux Painter
By Lux Painter (Mar 11, 2013)

And another fail as photo backpack.

Thin, unpadded shoulder straps, no good back support.

Maybe 2-3 more generations and the manufactures get it right.

0 upvotes
Cane
By Cane (Mar 11, 2013)

Does it come with a Sherpa?

1 upvote
Denis of Whidbey Island
By Denis of Whidbey Island (Mar 11, 2013)

I've been using a Flipside 300 for maybe two years. It holds enough gear to hit my weight limit, and is quite functional but has two flaws: no built-in rain cover is #1. #2 is the tripod holder on the side that rests on the ground; you have to remove the tripod or it rolls over when you put it down. Well, there's also the skinny waist strap and weak connections for the sternum strap. Even with those complaints, it's a keeper.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
hanoman
By hanoman (Mar 11, 2013)

It's too small. I would like to have space for a jacket/sweater and some food as well

4 upvotes
atlien991
By atlien991 (Mar 11, 2013)

I also desire some kind of food compartment. It's not 1813. Food and water can be compartmentalized with complete safety. Bags all seem to lack this.

3 upvotes
Dan Nikon
By Dan Nikon (Mar 11, 2013)

I know what you mean, but...just do what I do and don't fill it to capacity with camera gear. I hated how heavy and over padded Lowe photo packs used to be, but this line is really getting there due to how much weight they trimmed off over the years.

Even in a regular pack you have to pack things together like food, water and clothing, this is no different in some ways...

0 upvotes
ScottRH
By ScottRH (Mar 11, 2013)

Water and camera in one pack is a bad idea. No thanks, I carry them separately.

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
Dan Nikon
By Dan Nikon (Mar 11, 2013)

I use both the 10L and 15L packs full time professionally, never have an issue with a leaking Camelbak bladder. Just don't fill them 100%...

2 upvotes
Total comments: 40