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Nikon issues service advisory on D600's dust issue

By dpreview staff on Feb 22, 2013 at 18:47 GMT
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Nikon has released a service advisory for its D600 digital SLR. Based on user complaints, it addresses the widely-reported issue of dust and dirt accumulation on the camera's sensor. In the advisory, Nikon has belatedly acknowledged that at the point where dust becomes visible in images, 'removal may be difficult using normal measures' and advises customers who have exhausted conventional cleaning options to 'consult your nearest Nikon service center', whose technicians will 'examine the camera thoroughly, and service it as needed.'

Although the statement is short on detail - noticeably it offers no explanation of why the D600 specifically is affected in this way, it's good to see that Nikon has finally acknowledged that some D600 owners have indeed seen real problems with dust accumulation on their sensors, which are outside of the normal scope of expectations when using modern DSLRs. 

We noted this issue in our in-depth review of the D600 last year (and have been asking Nikon for more information ever since), but apart from a general statement explaining that sometimes, DSLR sensors need cleaning, today's service advisory is the first time that Nikon has publicly addressed the problem.

Is your D600 in need of attention? See the links below. 

This is what our D600's sensor looked like after one month of use. We covered this issue in our in-depth review of the D600, last year. Click here to read more

US customers click here to read the Service Advisory

European customers click here to read the Service Advisory

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Comments

Total comments: 240
12
Amhalpern
By Amhalpern (9 months ago)

I am about to send my D600 back for the 2nd time in 6 months. The camera had the shutter mechanism replaced but the spots are back and worse than before. I think when I get it back this time I will sell it on Ebay and switch to either Sony or Canon. I know all DSLR's have some dust issues but this is unacceptable. The sensor should not need to be factory cleaned every 2 months. Nikon either will not tell us what is really causing the issue or they just have no clue even after all this time. I have lost my faith in Nikon after 40 years. Shame on them.

1 upvote
Aparajita
By Aparajita (8 months ago)

I have the same issue. I think we all need to unite on this issue & take it consumer complaint plat form in our respective countries.
I have been trying to find the Nikon Japan Director's email to send him the trail of mails that have been exchanged between me and Nikon & how shameless they have been. Do let me know what you think of my suggestion

1 upvote
Body wise
By Body wise (7 months ago)

I have the same experience. 40 years use of Nikon. And what do you receive for long term loyalty -- bumpkis. This is symptomatic of all large corporations -- deny everything. Take no responsibility. Assume you "are the best" and you take it or leave. Sony has finally suffered from this hubris.

The dust problem is persistent. It does not resolve after the first 1000 activations. Incidentally, warranties are useless.

0 upvotes
piboo
By piboo (11 months ago)

I gave up on the D600 after the 3rd try in November. The second and third never left the house - inside shooting only, in a clean environment, but it made no difference. Same areas as the above photo, in all three cases, although significantly worse for two of them. I have been waiting for a response from Nikon, but one more along the line of "we've found the problem, replaced the faulty whatever", so that I could try it again - it was a magnificent camera for the price. This response from them is a disappointment.

1 upvote
Aparajita
By Aparajita (10 months ago)

Have the same issue. Am in India & would like Nikon to replace my D600. It's killing the thousands of frames in my timelapses. very disappointing.

0 upvotes
Chris Solum
By Chris Solum (11 months ago)

I have had my D600 since Oct'12 and it is ready for 4th sensor clean with only 300 shots and 60 sensor marks- over one month since last 3rd clean. Nikon service [Sydney] did it under warranty for the first time after a major tirade from me. I have started providing a sensor map with spots marked. Using only one 28-300 lens throughout. The camera has the same use as D200, D300S and continuing use of a D7000 all of which need/needed sensor cleaning max.twice a year on average. I love the use and results of this camera but this is such a critical issue,esp. with enlarging for printing. Nikon's failure to address the issue and then put out their insulting service advisory dents their image tremendously. Nikon have bungled big time on this one. Sent email complaint Mon.March 29 to service centre and still have no reply. They must be buried in D600 sensors I reckon :)

2 upvotes
Paul Storm
By Paul Storm (Apr 23, 2013)

I just bought a D600 yesterday and after shooting about 50 images the sensor was riddled with dustspots. i returned it to the retailer. He offered to replace but after opening another two D600 boxes, on inspection all cameras had dust spots on them, after attempting to blow them and BRUSH them off they were still there. The D600 is at Nikon's service center now with the following service descrtiption "SENSOR CLEANING - SPOT ON SENSOR" What an understatement!!

It is shocking that nothing has been done even now! Nikon's CEO should step down in my opinion.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Aparajita
By Aparajita (10 months ago)

Agree totally.

1 upvote
Aparajita
By Aparajita (8 months ago)

Pl do share if you get the director Nikon Japan email address. he needs to know what his company is doing. Think his name is KIMURA, Makoto.
We need to get united on this stand

0 upvotes
Jing Ko
By Jing Ko (Apr 22, 2013)

Nikon service centre in Mississauga finally gave me refund after fighting with them for 4 months.

2 upvotes
Jing Ko
By Jing Ko (11 months ago)

Here was what I did to get the refund:

1 Don't attempt to get the refund right away. Rather, send the camera for repairmen a few times at the beginning. The rule of thumbs is to return the camera once every two weeks, so your record is fresh and remembered by the support.

2. Ask a specific technician to serve you in your first visit. When you return the camera for subsequent repairmen, call him/her to serve you. This again helps the support to remember you.

3. Keep the repairmen doc and pictures of dust spots after each fix, bring them up repeatedly on each visit to show that they have yet fixed the issue.

Here was what they did for my case:

On the 1st and 2nd visit, they cleaned the sensor and checked the shutter.

On the 3rd visit, they replaced the shutter and cleaned the sensor.

On the 4th visit, they admitted to me that it was a manufacturing defect, and decided to refund me.

On the 5th visit, returned the camera to them and got my refund cheque.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
davidbarbour
By davidbarbour (Apr 10, 2013)

Bought two new D600's for an assignment in north two weeks ago....tested both cameras....in the first hour of the first day, I noticed dust spots in the sky on LCD, got worse over the 4 day assignment....two days of cloning....see spots in landscapes in the sky....took both cameras back, picked up my D700's that I traded in...40 years with Nikon, never an issue.....sorry this camera needs to be recalled....I think they have made enough money over the years to recall and fix the problem on the line and give everyone a camera worthy of their great reputation...I will stay with Nikon but they need to deal with this....

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Aparajita
By Aparajita (Apr 23, 2013)

bought my d600 just a few months back.... the spots are killing my timelapses... cant possibly clean each of the frames that go into the timelapse. Sadly am not a professional photographer who probably was making monies out of all this. Feel terribly cheated :(

1 upvote
jpaul53
By jpaul53 (Apr 5, 2013)

My experience with D600 dust issue.
I found sensor dust problem with my new Nikon D600, and sent the camera to Nikon service center in New York, thinking of a quick turnaround. The online status of repair turned to B1 repair category, "Parts Hold", the same status for a week now. I keep calling them asking for an expected time (ETA), and nobody seems to know.
I spoke to the dealer where I purchased, and they said to get the camera back from Nikon, and return it to them for a replacement or money back, since their 30 day return date is closing.
Requested Nikon to return without repair, and they won't return it without repair, nor give me an ETA. Apparently, it is against their policy to return cameras without getting them back to Nikon standards. A catch 22 situation.
Many of my planned events are in Jeopardy now.The pictures of D600 are great though, but for this problem.
It would have made Nikon in good standing, if they were little more responsive and proactive to this problem.

1 upvote
dennishancock
By dennishancock (Mar 1, 2013)

On a recent issue with Nikon related to quality issues with their professional line of lenses, I'm noticing here--again-- Nikon took a long time to address this D600 dust issue. In my mind Nikon has a public relations problem, and for my related issue as a dedicated customer I've found my esteem for them has dropped three notches. I don't know if I artificially held a higher regard for them or they really have slipped, but in my mind Nikon is running in the middle of the pack as a company dedicated to clarity, precision, and reliability. And still pointed backwards. Sorry to say.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Feb 28, 2013)

According to Bryan Cady's poll there are still many with high serial numbers who suffer from this defect:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3339415?page=2#forum-post-50329883

As long as Nikon thinks a whitewash and coverup is cheaper
they will not fix it.
Only we can make them pay for their arrogance.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
map1273
By map1273 (Feb 28, 2013)

Got mine a couple weeks ago, not a speck, and still not a speck. Either they fixed the problem or I was lucky and got a good model. I'm sure there are probably bad ones still floating around somewhere. Make sure you buy one from a reputable place and you'll probably be alright.
http://mark-papke.artistwebsites.com/

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 27, 2013)

Mass-hysteria

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 28, 2013)

Still... another one bites the dust. No matter, we still have like 1360 models of cameras to choose from, folks.

0 upvotes
soundtrip36
By soundtrip36 (Feb 28, 2013)

Or almost a "Mass-problem"

http://www.flickr.com/groups/d600club/discuss/72157632004966262/page2/

0 upvotes
Peter Gabriel
By Peter Gabriel (Feb 27, 2013)

I have never had any issues with dust on my D50 or D90 sensors. It really bothers me that Nikon does not clear up this issue. I want to buy the D600 to get the FF sensor, but I will not spend that amount of money on a camera that may or may not have issues from day one or after a certain amount of shutter releases. This is sad Nikon.

2 upvotes
fg888
By fg888 (Feb 26, 2013)

Some facts are still unclear to me.

1. In what % (or %%) of d600 camera’s was &/ is this issue actually occurring? i.e., what is the chance if I buy such an expensive (for me) camera of being “hit” with the problem too?

2. Has the “root cause” of the issue been fully / partially resolved? i.e., is a late build (= high S/N) d600 model now less prone to (or immune from-) this problem compared to an early build (= low S/N) d600?

3. Finally, I see nothing in the official NIKON statement about an offer of replacement camera while my “dirty” d600 is in (and thus “unavailable” to the user) for service? Anyone got experience on this?

8 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Feb 26, 2013)

Exactly... When i sent my camera in the first time to get "cleaned" i asked them if they could assure me that my oil/dust problem would be resolved.. I had to ask a few times, but they never commented on that specifically.. They couldn't even assure me they could resolve the problem i was sending it in to get fixed for.

This is because they either don't want to admit there is a real problem, or they just don't know what it is, or they are trying to basically let the issue ride out until people stop complaining about it. I think that's juts appauling for a company producing top tier photography tools. It's obserd....

I found being rational with their front line to be such a waste of time too. They really (at the time) had no interest in assuring customers that they were capable of resolving this issue or that they were even looking into it..All i wanted to hear:.. "We know of the issue, and we are working on a solution" .. Many of you know they just deny there was a knwon issue.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 28, 2013)

Rapid answers to fg888:

1. You should not have these pesky troubles if you never power up your camera in the first place. Basic risk avoidance.

2. The root cause has definitely been identified -- folks who actually were using their D600s for stuff.

3. Defective D600s will definitely be replaced while they are in the shop for repair -- but only for those Nikon users who have purchased their D800 replacement in the meanwhile.

2 upvotes
Jing Ko
By Jing Ko (11 months ago)

Nikon did give me an option to either refund or replace another camera. I chose to get the refund.

0 upvotes
fibonacci1618
By fibonacci1618 (Feb 26, 2013)

Not a comforting response from Nikon as it leaves so many questions unanswered, especially whether the splattering issue will be resolved after the camera is serviced by Nikon.

I suspect that very often the legal departments in these companies have a large say in how an issue is handled or resolved. They wouldn't want to take on a liability that may result in the model series being a loss maker, given that margins are probably already thin. In addition, there may be settlement arrangements behind curtains between a part manufacturer and Nikon that impacts on how the issue is handled or resolved, e.g. quietly replacing the shutter mechanism if a unit is sent in for servicing, without any admission that the part was faulty. The alternative of a recall of the entire line or series is a lot more costly for them, & gives rise to warranty or other liability issues.

It's clearly a QC issue that could have been detected and resolved if sufficient time and trouble was spent before launch.

9 upvotes
Klindar
By Klindar (Feb 25, 2013)

This sort of problem is wide-spread in the industry. Canon has recently reported almost the same thing for a couple of its DSLRs so I doubt anyone will avoid the issue by brand hopping. Mt D800 has remained perfectly clean but my Panasonic LX5 has oil spots and - no way to get in there yourself. A colleague with an LX5 also has oil spots too. He didn't notice them in his pictures until I pointed them out. Now he is miserable.

This is the digital camera's Achilles heel. With film you get a new sensor surface with every advance. With digital stuff just accumulates.

Best wishes,
k.

3 upvotes
ifi
By ifi (Feb 25, 2013)

Can you name the Canon DSLRs?

4 upvotes
rrccad
By rrccad (Feb 26, 2013)

recently? you mean back in 2009?

http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/news/EOS_oil_spots.do

oh look how canon handled it .. think there would be much angst / comments if nikon did the same?

7 upvotes
Klindar
By Klindar (Feb 26, 2013)

My point is that dust/oil spots are a common problem and not just with Nikon. This is a weakness in digital photography fundamental to the technology. My Sony snapshooter has picked up a few spots as well over the years. I am by no means attempting to defend Nikon's customer relations policy which so often involves attempts at "saving face" and evasion of accountability.

1 upvote
gabriel foto
By gabriel foto (Feb 25, 2013)

My D600 does NOT have a problem. I am now at 4200 exposures and with all this writing about dust and what-else I checked again today.

Please let me make it clear that I have never seen any dust in my D600 pictures. This certainly has something to do with two things:

1) is the fact that I use f-stops between f/1,4 and f/8 (- I have occasionally during my lifetime used f/11 but have never seen the reason for using f/16 or smaller - anyway, that's just me and I am sure your habits may differ)

2) my D600 basically doesn't seem to collect dust. Bought on the day of release, S/N 6038904. No dust today either.

It surprises me to see so much negativity over what certainly is an issue for some but certainly not for everybody who actually owns the camera.

Very few seem to have understood the greatness of the D600. It brings out qualities in my images I had never dreamed were possible, from ANY camera. In fact, so much that I started writing a blog about it; nikonsystem.blogspot.se

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Feb 26, 2013)

You could change some of that "negativity" by exchanging your good D600 with one from the people here who have one continuously splattering oil on the sensor :-)

12 upvotes
fierlingd
By fierlingd (Feb 26, 2013)

Yeah i have to agree with FreedomLover. Your lucky that you don't have the problem, but for the people who do, it's not fun.. (and there are a lot of us). We should be able to shoot greater than f8 without worrying... and yes i do own one. Don't forget this is a $2000 camera right?... Early adopters got stung and are paying for Nikon's QA costs and have been bluntly ignored for a legit wide spread problem.

Don't be surprised by the negativity, you would be upset too if you wanted to take serious photos but then had to photoshop oil spots out of your photos. Currently the only solution here is to wet clean the sensor frequently until hopefully it calms down... That's *not* fun man.. Nikon doesn't even recommend you clean your own sensor.. they suggest you send it in at your own cost/time even..

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
NightPro
By NightPro (Feb 26, 2013)

Hello, I think you got gifted unit :) That's why no sensor I issue. Actually it's Thank God factor lol...

I just joking man, I think your serial no it's seem to late Unit as start with 6.
I am here, Singapore S/N Start with 3 got sensor issue within not more then 200 SC that' I get the raw from Oil Sensor Owner.

1 upvote
fbuis
By fbuis (Feb 28, 2013)

Agree with FreedomLover, fierlingd, NightPro.

And one thing that I would like to say: During the time to send your camera for examining at Nikon, you could not take photo if you have only one camera!

Anyway, lucky D600 users that Nikon is trying to resolve the 'dust' problem on the D600 camera. Thinking about many D7000 users had ever the same problem years ago!

1 upvote
TFD
By TFD (Feb 25, 2013)

Nothing new here, both of my Sony A700 have the same problem it is not dust and requires an agressive wet cleaning - i am guess all cameras have this problem.

Both the shutter and mirror move both have something to keep them moving, oil, grease who knows. Also do not forget that heat, changes in air pressure could cause out gassing.

There are too many moving parts in all DSLR to not create a problem.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Feb 25, 2013)

Can you show us pictures from both cameras please, TFD ?
How is an "aggressive" wet cleaning done exactly ?
And how aggressive is good before you permanently damage the sensor or its filter ?

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Mystery Gardener
By Mystery Gardener (Feb 25, 2013)

I have shot with my DSLR for 9 years (using 5 different lens, 3 of them zoom lenses) and I had to clean the sensor 2 (two) times in that entire span (38,000 clicks). The D600 problems are a result of more than just ordinary dust caused by usage of the unit.

6 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 28, 2013)

Q: "How is an "aggressive" wet cleaning done exactly?"

A: Oh, that's easy. First, spray a double doze of high-test Windex, and then rub hard with the paper towel until it all goes away. Pure magic.

0 upvotes
Debankur Mukherjee
By Debankur Mukherjee (Feb 25, 2013)

Nikon's reliability is coming close to Chinese products......Nikon did the same thing with P7000 which was a defective coolpix and they upgraded it to P7100 which is much better...If Nikon continues to do so then its helping Canon to take up the market......they should have called all the D600 with the issue and serviced / replaced it with a new one.....its reputation that counts.....we all use our hard earned money to buy such expensive stuff......

4 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 28, 2013)

My lady friend has the L120 P&S from them, it runs on 2x AA batteries. When you pop in the batteries on the bottom and close the compartment cover, the spring from the inside puts tremendous pressure on the battery that then forever will try to push the door open. Well, it finally did it. The battery compartment latch broke.

Called Nikon, they told me something about an $80 repair and 3 weeks. So instead of that, she is no using duct tape to hold the door close. Nice design. Nikon.

0 upvotes
Deleted1929
By Deleted1929 (Feb 25, 2013)

Who PAYS for this "service" ?

It's all very well Nikon issuing a notice, but what they don't say is whether they pay for the service or the user does. ( And I won't even ask about delivery costs. )

I'm also baffled why the European notice has a different wording to the US one. Is "cut and paste" a difficult concept for Nikon ?

5 upvotes
ivan1973
By ivan1973 (Feb 25, 2013)

Its definitely not from the production. Many of user reported having this after some usage. Its a design issue. e.g. parts rubbing and releasing micro fragments. The fragments is something that may not be removable by the ultrasonic sensor cleaner.

4 upvotes
soundtrip36
By soundtrip36 (Feb 25, 2013)

Here is the link about the D600 with pictures showing that there's scratches between the shutter curtain and the mirror box:

http://www.petapixel.com/2012/11/22/theory-nikon-d600-sensor-spots-caused-by-scratched-shutter-curtain/

My D600 before had this marks but I didn't notice it after I bought it since there are no reports regarding this issue when I acquired it. By the way I bought my unit probably a week after it was release.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Feb 25, 2013)

PetaPixel is not a reliable source for any kind of useful information. They come up with crazy theories that have little supporting evidence to drive traffic to the site.

1 upvote
soundtrip36
By soundtrip36 (Feb 25, 2013)

Maybe... but I also came across in nikon rumors:

http://nikonrumors.com/2012/10/23/nikon-d600-sensors-dust-spots-caused-by-a-gap-around-the-shutter.aspx/

1 upvote
d10694
By d10694 (Feb 24, 2013)

It's not s dust issue. It's a quality control issue.

1 upvote
57even
By 57even (Feb 25, 2013)

It may be, or it may be a specification issue. Either way it should have been checked in pre-production. Nikons are becoming quite prone to dirty sensors (D7000 for example).

1 upvote
roustabout66
By roustabout66 (Feb 24, 2013)

Why does this continue to be called a "dust" issue? From what I have read here it seems to be some sort of lubricant (oil) or debris from parts rubbing (scraping) against one another. There were pictures in one post (sorry I don't have the link) showing what appeared to be contact marks inside the mirror box. If it were simply "dust" why does it seem to accumulate at the same spot on the sensor? While cleaning oil and debris from the sensor may be a pain, I would think the real issue is what impact will this debris have long term on the shutter and mirror mechanisms. Will we see a rash of repairs down the road similar to the infamous D70 BGLOD?

7 upvotes
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 24, 2013)

And why only on the sensor and not the rest of the inside? Why does the lubricant oil/grease only smear the sensor causing dust to stick? Are there any photos of spots around the shutter or inside the mirror house? Links?

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
roustabout66
By roustabout66 (Feb 24, 2013)

Yeah, that is exactly my point. Crud on the sensor is easy to detect since it shows in pictures. I would think crud in the shutter train would only be seen if you dis-assemble the shutter mechanism...same with the mirror mechanism.

You bring up an excellent point, is it also getting inside the camera where you can not see it?

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 24, 2013)

But if you take off the lens you can see it. Specially the mirror. And according to the discusssion that is going on since some time, it should look like a buttered sandwich.
Should we get the cheese and ham out or the maybe better the vacum cleaner?

2 upvotes
Prairie Pal
By Prairie Pal (Feb 24, 2013)

One of my wet cleanings resulted in 3 black blobs on the SIDE of the swab which clearly did not come off the sensor itself. This announcement is a smoke screen to take the pressure off Nikon's faily sales.

4 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 24, 2013)

Nikon should issue a RECALL!

I smell class action by owners and consumer protection associations. I hope this happens, because this is inexcusable, especially for a company that used to have such a good reputation.

NIKON, GET YOUR HEAD OUT OF THE SAND!

6 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Feb 24, 2013)

Recalls are usually only initiated if there's risk of bodily harm or death. Last time I checked nobody was maimed or killed by sensor gunk.

On what grounds would you propose a class action suit be filed?

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 24, 2013)

"Recalls are usually only initiated if there's risk of bodily harm or death. Last time I checked nobody was maimed or killed by sensor gunk. On what grounds would you propose a class action suit be filed?"

Finally, we have someone here providing the official Nikon corporate position, so thanks for that, JD.

3 upvotes
Tom Schum
By Tom Schum (Feb 24, 2013)

These hi-res sensors see ALL!
Also a serious issue with my Sigma SD1.
Will try (again) to set up a sensor cleaning service with Sigma USA.

0 upvotes
ScottRH
By ScottRH (Feb 24, 2013)

Nothing new here: "Function, Schedule, Quality. - Pick two".

Nikon did not pick Quality. Same with D800/E.

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 24, 2013)

Faulty design, or faulty manufacturing?
Is this thing made in China? that would certainly explain if tolerances (precision in manufacturing) are not up to spec.

1 upvote
muratime
By muratime (Feb 24, 2013)

now I understand well, why there was high demand to my D700 when I put it on sale from internet.. :) due to high demand but not high price offerings I decided to keep it yet... I just need this great Sigma lens 35mm f1.4 :)

by the way, I remember sensor stain issue with Pentax K-5 which I replaced it with Nikon D700 and decided not to go any adventure other brand again (my fist one was Nikon D40 the good oldy or old goody)..
However I see sh.t happens.. even for such big brands, tomorrow to Canon maybe.. so still there is no alternative to Nikon or Canon yet!

Anybody interested with my D700? :)) haha lol

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
ScottRH
By ScottRH (Feb 24, 2013)

+++ D700. I can't wait until it's replacement is announced this year !

0 upvotes
starwolfy
By starwolfy (Feb 24, 2013)

Just a tought for Fuji...which never recognized the sticky aperture issue with its Fuji X100.
Mine is still blocked a full aperture...and I think will remain as such for my FIRST and very LAST Fuji product that I've had and will ever buy in my all Life.

I got sucked the same with an ACER computer in the past. I will never buy an ACER product again.

I know you can face problems with any brand...but at least there are brands which recognize their mistakes and take responsibility for it. Those are the brands I prefer to invest in, despite it cost me more sometimes.

4 upvotes
chopsteeks
By chopsteeks (Feb 24, 2013)

Looked @ X100 in my local store.

The demo unit the store had was in perpetual focus hunt inside the store.

Then owner suspected that the demo was just defective. So he pulled a new one.

Same results.

Never looked @ Fuji again.

0 upvotes
Ahmet Aydogan
By Ahmet Aydogan (Feb 24, 2013)

I don't think you're ever going to find a manufacturer to satisfy your expectations. Admittedly, I worked for Fuji years ago and as such I had access to many models. Since then I've sho Fuji almost exclusively including 10 different PS models, 2 different "bridge"cameras, 4 S3 bodies and 4 S5 bodies, an X100, an X10, and X Pro 1 and most recently, 2 XE1 bodies. Out of all those cameras, only on S3 needed services because the CCD died and Fuji repaired it at no charge. Dismissing an entire brand because you've had bad luck with one model is premature at best.

1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 24, 2013)

I fail to understand why you didn't bring it in for servicing. It seems to me that when you bought it you surely felt good about the camera and that it was worth investing in and keeping. If you have a car that breaks, you fix it, whether on warranty or not - it shouldn't be any different for your camera. I'm just saying - personally, I don't like the x100 because of the 23mm lens - I'd prefer 35 or so - but that doesn't mean I don't see clear. And btw... this should have been posted under Fuji, should it not?

1 upvote
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 24, 2013)

Further more, I never heard that they use oil in cameras. They use a special grease which is quite a different thing, and even IF they did grease a little too much, they´d do it with a few and not hundreds of cameras.
NO! I think the main problem with this camera is a bunch of extremely envious Canon users who are constantly trying to degrade Nikon. (There are several postings who ad 6D for example). And that´s why I´ll stick to Nikon.
The probs with D600 will soon be solved. Whatever the REAL prob is.
Period!

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
starwolfy
By starwolfy (Feb 24, 2013)

I own a Nikon D7000 but I am not a Nikon fanboy nor a Canon one. I think nobody can be in deny regarding this "issue". It's not the biggest issue ever...but it's still an issue.

5 upvotes
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 24, 2013)

1) I am not a "fanboy" either. I actually also own a Canon. And when it comes to cameras I still prefer a european make and film.
2) Yes it is an issue. But what is it really about? Dust, oil or competition between manufacturers?
Ive had both dig cams for almost 3 years and never had worse probs than the cam could fix itself. None of them has ever been in the repairshop. But the more I read about the D600 the more probs the D7k seems to have.But also true, after 2,5 years and more than 10k shots the D7k could do with a check and a bit of cleaning since I only use fixed lenses and change frequently. The other one is hardly used now adays so it doesn´t matter anymore.
And the reason for sticking to Nikon has more to do with lenses than anything else. Too many to trade for another brand. Too much money to loose.

1 upvote
rrccad
By rrccad (Feb 25, 2013)

really? that's why lensrentals even commented that after every D600 went out it had to be sensor cleaned after being returned to lensrentals unlike any other camera that they carry?

even dpreview commented on the issue (are you saying their are biased to canon?) and even in the article states they have repeated asked nikon for their position on it.

soon be solved? even in your nikon forums, there's question over what is being solved by nikon support - just cleaning or are they actually fixing something.

blaming it on users of other cameras is pretty weak. even moreso than this service announcement.

4 upvotes
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 25, 2013)

@ rrccad
Why so angry?
Is the Canon "fanboy" in you revolting?
PHOTOGRAPHERS have been fighting dust since they invented the whole thing. Dust is everywhere in the air. Have you checked the inside of your lungs?
"Lensrentals" sounds like a company that rents out equipment. They usually get dirty gear in return.
OF COURSE IT WILL BE SOLVED SOON! They are loosing money on this crap! Is that hard to understand?

0 upvotes
rrccad
By rrccad (Feb 26, 2013)

they would also lose more money by issuing a statement that actually puts blame on where it should be - on them.

why are you so angry that you have to turn it onto a "fanboy" QQ fest?

this impacts the entire industry .. if someone purchases a DSLR and has a bad experience, odds are they will go to a mirrorless or just decide their camera phone is good enough.

so this isn't a nikon versus canon but something that really reflects on the entire industry as a whole.

dust randomly gets placed on the sensor - correct. splatters sampled from dozens of different bodies show it almost to be in exactly the same spot .. body independent .. want to calculate the odds of that occurring in nature?

and i'm sure shouting will help .. i mean that really goes a long way to prove your maturity :)

3 upvotes
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 27, 2013)

@ rrccad
Get a partner! You got too much dust inside your pants. ":)"

0 upvotes
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 24, 2013)

I never had any probs with my D7k, and I was one of the first to buy it in Sweden. That is, from the first batch.
I also doubt that it should be oil since oil is rather sticky and when it dries, it sticks to the surface like glue. In that case you can´t clean it anymore. You´ll have to change the filter/sensor etc completely. The parts are just too sensitive to "rubbing". Even a wet clean has to be done very carefully.

0 upvotes
fbuis
By fbuis (Feb 24, 2013)

Lucky you having a D7000 without the 'sensor dust' issue, mine was been with.

I claimed to the camera seller but he did not admit this issue, I wrote to Nikon France to resolve this problem, they said all I have to do is sending my camera body to their after-sales service to examine the camera (I must pay the shipping).

Finally, after reading many complains of D7000 users on the web, someone told me that 'sensor dust' problem was coming from the oily shuttle mechanism, meaning that was OIL spots on the sensor and not the dust - even sending the camera to Nikon for cleaning, this issue will back again after hundreds shoots (without changing lenses).

Instead of sending my camera to Nikon, the postal shipping cost was same price as a Photographic Solutions Survival Kit - I bought the cleaning kit and DO-IT-MYSELF, after 4 time to clean the sensor, that was better.

Surely that no one like to buy and bring home a new 'dusty' car to clean himself!

3 upvotes
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 24, 2013)

I don´t think they use oil inside cameras for one single reason. It runs. That´s why they use grease. But of course,theoretically, the grease can be made bad and be too liquid. But I still wonder if that is the problem since it´s only on the sensor. If it was oil/grease then the whole inside would be smeared with it. Like the mirror house for example.
Also, the sensor can still get dusty even if you never change lens. My Canon prooves that since I only got the ceap box zoom.

0 upvotes
blaster182
By blaster182 (Feb 25, 2013)

I had the same issue of oil or whatever sticky liquid on my D7000 sensor too. I bought the camera in December 2010.

I noticed a lot of spots in August 2011 first. After I had to clean it up after every 100 or so shots using the Dust-Aid Wet Cleaning Kit, I finally sent the camera in to Nikon Germany via my retailer in March 2012. Nikon (or its service point) fixed it within a few weeks free of charge and I've experienced no problems since.

I remember that the service was billed as "AF module fixed" or so: No relation to the obvious quality problems of the mechanics that troubled the camera.

1 upvote
Axmuradi
By Axmuradi (Feb 24, 2013)

I had a bad issue with spots on my new D600. After a lot of cleaning attempts and frustration I now have what appears to be a clean sensor! I took several hundred jpegs of a blue sky and used in camera sensor clean 5 or 6 times until I could no longer see any dust (oil) spots. I used continuous shooting to rapidly take the pics thinking that this would encourage any splatter or residue to be flung onto the sensor until there was no more left! I'm hoping this has resolved the issue for me permanently. Thought this may help others to try the same "fix".

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Feb 24, 2013)

Your story is quite funny :-)
You are solving our problems in a blink.
Would you like to show us the originals ?

3 upvotes
Axmuradi
By Axmuradi (Feb 24, 2013)

Spots are back! Disappointed. Apologies for leading down this garden path.

3 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (Feb 25, 2013)

Thanks for your honesty, Axmuradi.
Nikon will clean it for you, again and again,
if you are willing to wait.
Many tried wet cleaning and failed,
the lubricant is designed to stick.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Vignes
By Vignes (Feb 24, 2013)

When you need to produce a new camera in short time to be competitive, something has to break and I guess its quality that broke. It’s the expectation of users that drives the makers. There is just too much of lab compare and micro comparison plus users who just read into this results, criticise and drive makers to accelerate their product release. I think the blame is wider than just the makers.
Every time a camera comes out, you can see one of the fan clubs (Canon/Nikon, now maybe Sony) criticising the other makers to catch up. Not to forgot the pro-reviewers. Oh, this camera has fall short of one megapixel…
Imaging tech R&D is high tech business and it involves precision engineering. Then you have the users who want the mechanical precision of the Film days with new IT tech with lower price.

3 upvotes
dccdp
By dccdp (Feb 24, 2013)

Really? I wonder, who started this habit of releasing new models each year? The only reason for it was that vendors wanted to make even more money by transforming cameras in disposabe gadgets. Make more, sell more, and encourage an environment of fans and gadget freaks that will buy your incremental and cosmetic changes as if they were ground-breaking inventions.

So, don't blame the "victims" ;-) ("fans") for the manufacturers' greed. And who cares if quality drops? Consumers will buy the next model anyway, and in two years nobody will remember that that particular version of the (basically the same) camera had an annoying flaw.

4 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Feb 24, 2013)

@dccdp

Agreed.

The cameras are already good enough. I shoot my GH2 at 8 instead of 16 megapixels, because the IQ is virtually the same.

I don't like the size or weight of these big DSLRs, but I would consider buying one if I thought it had a reasonable chance of lasting ten or more years.

1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 24, 2013)

This is manufacturing-101. Nothing gets more basic or simpler than this problem! When you design a product, you check clearances, and use the correct lubricants (whether solid, liquid or gel, and in the right amounts). With modern materials science, you have access to much more materials, much better information. With CAD you can check clearances and collisions before you even make it, and you are able to create more precise products than ever before. And manufacturing, testing, measurements, and quality control, with knowledge and experience, are better than they have ever been in the history of mankind. There is absolutely no defending this defect.
And you don't even know for how long this camera was in the planning... the top end products don't change nearly as frequently as the lower end ones.

3 upvotes
Petka
By Petka (Feb 24, 2013)

I suspect the oil is coming from the shutter assembly. It might be a new design and nobody had the mind to do a longer test to see if there is an oil spray problem in it, or the units are assembled with too much oil or with oil not sticky enough. Careless design project control in any case. Problem might go away with time after excess oil has splattered away or dried a bit, but taking the camera for cleaning for a few times is annoying, especially if you have to pay for it.

During the film era this would not have mattered at all, as oil did not accumulate on anything.

3 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Feb 24, 2013)

this leaking oil has been a problem since D7000 came out, my D800 also has the same issue. I think I might buy back Canon SLR soon.

4 upvotes
fbuis
By fbuis (Feb 24, 2013)

That was the same problem with the first launch of the D7000 almost 2 years ago, my D7000 sensor picked up many black points on the left, I told this problem to my camera seller, he did not admitting this issue by accusing that the dust coming from changing lenses... Later, I got known that the black points were OIL and not dust.

Just want to pass to FX camera to purchasing a D600 body but hesitate by many complains from D600 users.

5 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 24, 2013)

I'm not a canon fan at all - I always viewed them as charging a premium for just the name. However, if this issue is truly as widespread on so many of their higher-end models as people here are reporting, it is definitely a motivation and very valid reason to move on to the competition.

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Wilmark
By Wilmark (Feb 24, 2013)

"We covered this issue in our in-depth review of the D600, last year."
From the review final page "We're working with Nikon to understand (and further test) this issue and we'll update this review accordingly as we use the camera over time."

First off the problem seems to be OIL and NOT dust. Big difference. The other point is that I see you did consider this issue in your D600 review and yet you awarded it your GOLD AWARD. I cannot see how one can recommend this camera with this problem - it was prevalent in the model you tested, yet you gave it one of your highest ratings for a DSLR. Now you will understand why I never look at DP review for buying choices, I just come for news. How can anyone trust your reviews, when you have highly recommended a camera that probably has a serious design flaw, even when you picked it in your test model. Your high rating is that with oil or without? (a la Mc Donalds combo)

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
30 upvotes
Noogy
By Noogy (Feb 24, 2013)

Exactly the point I made when they rated there Canon 6d silver, not to contest the silver but to challenge the gold for the D600. And while we are at it, Nikon when will you formally admit an internal packaging design mistake, in semicon speak? Come on guys it is bleeding obvious.

4 upvotes
Vignes
By Vignes (Feb 24, 2013)

There seems to be many who are moving away/selling D600 and buying the 6D because of this issue - reading from some of the comments in Dpreview. Would this be a global reaction?

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
starwolfy
By starwolfy (Feb 24, 2013)

I have to agree with wilmark that if under real field condition the camera spreads oil everywhere...then it seriously deteriorated it's overall IQ...despite this IQ being very good once you clean your sensor...again and again.

2 upvotes
starwolfy
By starwolfy (Feb 24, 2013)

Vignes...I have a D7000 and was thinking of swiching FF with this D600...but I got stoped by this issue, mainly.
Since now they announced the D7100 and improved so many things from D7000...I know feel I did the right thing not to invest into a D600. The more I see the D600...so more I see a simple D7000 with only an FF sensor in it. That is not an improvement and when I see what is ready for the D7100 I feel this D600 is a pure joke in the end...especially at its price.

3 upvotes
Tyr-Sog
By Tyr-Sog (Feb 24, 2013)

The D600 is leaps and bounds better then the D7000. From, ergos to IQ to AF capabilities. The D600 was never a "FF shoved into a D7000 body" as so many claimed, it was a entirely new platform. It borrows the D7Ks AF modual but that's about it and it's obvious that is has been tweaked. As far as ergos, it can now be said that the D7100 is a crop sensor floating around in a D600 body as it is now the same shell be most accounts.

The lubricant/dust issue is no different then what I experienced with my D7000 so when it arises I'm an expert in dealing with Nikons lack of quality control(my choice, I new about the issue).

Was the D600 worth the price premium over the D600? No question for me, hell yes!

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Feb 24, 2013)

Love the site design, but their judgement is clearly influenced by advertising revenue.

3 upvotes
JakJenner
By JakJenner (Feb 24, 2013)

I agree with Wilmark. How dare reviewers mislead possible buyers by rating a product with such an obvious flaw so highly. This does not serve their readers at all.

5 upvotes
digitallollygag
By digitallollygag (Feb 24, 2013)

At least Nikon finally acknowledged this D600 issue. I'm not sure the Company ever admitted anything about so many of those D80 cameras that "developed" mysterious sensor spots after a few thousand clicks of the shutter.

I'll bet dust is pretty easy to deal with on the new Google Glass...

1 upvote
ScottRH
By ScottRH (Feb 24, 2013)

Now lets see if they save face and issue a service advisory for the D800/e for auto focus issues.

5 upvotes
soundtrip36
By soundtrip36 (Feb 24, 2013)

I had a D600 before but sold it eventually because of this issue. At first I never mind the dust in the sensor because I can clean it right away but when the oil spot shows, I'm getting frustrations in cleaning the sensor. And Nikon service center here charge for cleaning eventhough I bought the units from them, though the price of their cleaning is haft the price against the grey units that wasn't bought from them. That was before they admit that the dust are coming from the inside and not because in changing lenses. Now they have free cleaning service for 2 years until the warranty expires. I hope I didn't sold it in the first place.

But before I acquired these D600. I never looked at the LCD for every image I took. When the dust starts to appear, I have this insecure feeling in every image I took and feel like I have to look at the LCD and IQ every time I press the shutter.

3 upvotes
starwolfy
By starwolfy (Feb 24, 2013)

Then if you feel stressed by your camera I think you took the right decision to sold it. I hate when I cannot trust my equipment.

2 upvotes
WT21
By WT21 (Feb 23, 2013)

I don't understand all the negativity. Nikon has put out a tech advisory, and seems willing to repair. I think that's a good thing. Much like the mirror fix on the Canon 5D classic.

1 upvote
nz769r
By nz769r (Feb 24, 2013)

Nikon knew of this problem early in the release of the D600 and yet was mute. Nikon needs to treat its customers with the respect that they rightly deserve and stand behind their product from Day 1 -- not Day 180.

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
14 upvotes
Vandyu
By Vandyu (Feb 24, 2013)

I've been a Nikon fan since buying my Nikon FA film SLR back in the '80s. I've had a D50, D70s and D80, which I still have. I've read of the frustrations of D7000 owners with oil drops and now problems with the D600 and D800. Something is seriously wrong and as much as I might like to upgrade to the D7100, I sure wouldn't do it until I could reasonably expect it to not have these kinds of dust and oil problems. Maybe Canon and Sony have their unique problems, but I think Nikon is starting to suffer some credibility problems as a leader in the field.

5 upvotes
edfo4
By edfo4 (Feb 23, 2013)

This is disappointing from two aspects. The first is that a newly designed (and expensive) camera would have this problem. I have a Canon 5d (an original) which has never been cleaned and which has no dust removal function and it has less dust than the DPR D600 photo shows. I expect that I change lens at about a typical photographe'rs rate.The other is how poorly Nikon has responded. Surely they could have been more responsive and responsible toward their customers.

11 upvotes
Holger Drallmeyer
By Holger Drallmeyer (Feb 23, 2013)

People, buy a film camera and change the "sensor" with every frame :)

7 upvotes
JstarImaging
By JstarImaging (Feb 24, 2013)

And I get masses of dust on each frame I scan!

2 upvotes
MrMojo
By MrMojo (Feb 23, 2013)

Well, what I have learned from this debacle is that I should wait at least six months before I buy a new camera or lens. And not just from Nikon; this sort of thing also happens to other companies.

One of the great things about the Internet is that it is easy to find actual user reviews about gear that has been used for a period of time under a variety of conditions. Most editorial reviewers do not have the luxury to shoot thousands of images over a period of weeks...

If you get sucked-in by the marketing hype these days you are sometimes doing beta testing for the manufacturer.

14 upvotes
starwolfy
By starwolfy (Feb 24, 2013)

My dad has been saying this to me for the last 20 years.

0 upvotes
luigibozi
By luigibozi (Feb 23, 2013)

Also related to dust, check this out:
http://luigibozianu.blogspot.ca/2013/02/wiping-dust-off-this-book.html

0 upvotes
Greg Henry
By Greg Henry (Feb 23, 2013)

Disappointing comment.

Reminds me of Apple. When the "antennae gate" issue occurred with the iPhone 4 and Bill Gates emailed someone to "just don't hold it that way". Now there is this obvious problem with the camera and Nikon basically says, "Just blow it".

I'm not turning this into a Nikon vs Canon debate, but way back when I decided to up my gear to DSLRs, I knew three people who used Nikons, and while they loved their cameras, they *hated* Nikon customer/tech support - all three of them. I decided to try out Canon because I value good support almost as much as the gear itself, and when I had a problem I was amazed how incredibly professional and good Canon's support was, while I continued to hear horror stories from my friends about bad experiences having to deal with Nikon, even today.

No doubt the D600 takes great photos and Nikons are on par with Canon in terms of cameras, but dismissive statements about an obvious issue don't give customers confidence in the product.

7 upvotes
mandm
By mandm (Feb 23, 2013)

Greg, why would Bill Gates of Microsoft tell anyone how to hold an Apple phone?

3 upvotes
MrMojo
By MrMojo (Feb 23, 2013)

Greg, it was Steve Jobs who made the comment that you attribute to Bill Gates...

4 upvotes
Holger Drallmeyer
By Holger Drallmeyer (Feb 23, 2013)

No wonder no one likes Microsoft, they get blamed for everything. Even iPhone issues :-D

9 upvotes
AntUK
By AntUK (9 months ago)

The thing with the iPhone 4 antenna issue is it wasn't a show stopper. Even on the rare occasion I induced it it still didn't drop the call. And the issue was mute if you put a discrete Apple cover around the rim of the handset.

If the Nikon D600 issue was so easily remedied there wouldn't be as big an issue and I'd have purchased one by now.

On top of that, Apple addressed it. Nikon never did.

0 upvotes
Morpho Hunter
By Morpho Hunter (Feb 23, 2013)

OM-D EM-5 user looks smugly on - Olympus doesn't "do" dust ...... never has done

2 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 23, 2013)

Yeah they just cook their books.

5 upvotes
ScottRH
By ScottRH (Feb 23, 2013)

The D600 and D800/e should be recalled.

9 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 23, 2013)

Why? There is no reason to do a recall as no ones safety is at risk. Plus the number of affected cameras can't be more than like 30% or so. Also new D800s currently coming off the assembly line appear to have the issues fixed. The most that makes sense is letting customers send in their cameras for a free repair.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Holger Drallmeyer
By Holger Drallmeyer (Feb 23, 2013)

Josh, when you send in a camera for repair it's called a "recall" just to inform you ;)

3 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 24, 2013)

No it's not. A recall is issued for a specific lot or production run almost exclusively for safety reasons. Telling people they have the option to send in a camera to have a minor manufacturing defect if they happen to have it fixed is not a recall.

If the were like "cameras with serial numbers xxxxx through yyyyyy have an issue and need to be sent in for a refund or repair" that would be a recall.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 24, 2013)

They repair the cams and recalled the faulty batteries.
Right?

1 upvote
StanRogers
By StanRogers (Feb 24, 2013)

That was a safety issue (the high-energy-density batteries had an annoying tendency to get dangerously hot and potentially burst into flame -- the exact same circumstance as the recent Boeing fleet grounding caused by its lithium batteries, and the same as the laptop battery fiasco from a few years back). Similarly, the Canon body coating issue on the T4i/650D was a health and safety issue. Product recalls are all about health and safety.

1 upvote
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 24, 2013)

@StanRogers exactly.

Recalling either camera would actually be a disservice to the vast majority of Nikon's customers who bought these cameras as they have no problem and would feel compelled to send in their camera anyway because it is "recalled." it would also guarantee a loss instead of a profit for Nikon on both cameras which in this economic climate could be fatal. Small manufacturing issues like this are why warranties exist. They are not cause for a recall. If Nikon is fixing D600/D800s under warranty which they are or at least trying to, why is a recall even need or desired if not for no other reason than malice or revenge toward Nikon out some misguided feeling of self entitlement?

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Micky Nixgeld
By Micky Nixgeld (Feb 24, 2013)

@ stanrogers
Cheers but I know about the batteries. The question was about language. I´m not born english.
Thanx anyway

0 upvotes
Zerblatt
By Zerblatt (Feb 25, 2013)

Not my D800, it has no issues
Why should I send it back?

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
1 upvote
bluevellet
By bluevellet (Feb 23, 2013)

I'm surprised dust is still a problem with DSLR's. Even more so with cameras at that high price range.

5 upvotes
Caleido
By Caleido (Feb 23, 2013)

When you change lenses, eventually you get dust on your sensor. This will always be the case.

However, in this case the particles come from within the camera itself. I'm slightly disappointed in Nikon. But still, ordered my D600 yesterday.

1 upvote
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 23, 2013)

It is a testament to how good of a camera the D600 is that people are stilling buying D600s and risking getting one with this problem.

1 upvote
bluevellet
By bluevellet (Feb 23, 2013)

I've been changing lenses for years. Other manuifacturers have solved the dust issue long ago. Nikon is apparently still behind the curve.

7 upvotes
Picturenaut
By Picturenaut (Feb 23, 2013)

I'd really suggest DPR to amend their reviews with a production quality rating that's updated regularly. Pretty sure that some glorious gold award material would be less shiny after a while.

It's a real pity with Nikon nowadays. We really want to update the D300 in our Nikon gear at home. But this (once highly praised) camera makes enough trouble, so we are not prepared to risk any more annoyance. D800? AF issues. D600? Smeared sensors. In fact, our D300 proved to be much more prone to dirt on the sensor than our Canon DSLRs.

Looks like the old times of superior quality cameras from Nikon such as the legendary FM series are definitely over (we still have 3 FM-2 bodies, one worked even in the Siberian at -40 °C without any trouble). Currently I really prefer my Canon DSLRs with their less fancy sensors (in terms of DXO) because they simply do what they have to do without any smearing or snorting around.

19 upvotes
ScottRH
By ScottRH (Feb 23, 2013)

Agree. We are waiting for the D300/s replacement AND the D700 replacement. the D7100, D600, D800/e are not that at all. I hope that the QA in Nikon restores itself when the D300/s and D700 replacements are announced.

3 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (Feb 23, 2013)

Don't hold your breath for those D300/D700 replacements.

1 upvote
russbarnes
By russbarnes (Feb 25, 2013)

Scott, ALL of your comments are the most naive utterly deluded words in this whole thread. Thanks for the laughs.

0 upvotes
joyclick
By joyclick (Feb 23, 2013)

Is it typical 'Nikon Arrogance?"

11 upvotes
d10694
By d10694 (Feb 23, 2013)

I would have hoped by now, that all the camera manufacturers would have figured out how to make cameras that work all the time without leaving dust / oil / whatever, wherever.

5 upvotes
taintedcamera
By taintedcamera (Feb 23, 2013)

Some manufacturers did "figured out how to make cameras that work all the time without leaving dust / oil / whatever, wherever."
Nikon has the integrity to not go the Canon route, and steal ideals and rework patents directly from Olympus products.

Thats if Canon could ever be as successful as Olympus with their dust cleaning sensor system.

0 upvotes
Jon_Doh
By Jon_Doh (Feb 23, 2013)

The problem returns after you've sent the camera in to Nikon for a cleaning. They need to man up and admit it's a problem and come up with a fix and issue a recall.

Several years ago if this type of thing happened you knew Nikon would step up to the plate and take care of the problem and their customer. What happened?

4 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Feb 23, 2013)

They would never issue a recall for something like this. The most they would do is say send it in if you want and we'll fix it for free.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 240
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