Previous news story    Next news story

Dell announces UltraSharp monitors that cover 99% of AdobeRGB gamut

By dpreview staff on Feb 14, 2013 at 20:09 GMT

Dell has announced its 27" U2713H and 24" U2413 LED monitors designed for color critical applications like photo editing. These latest flagship models promise 99% coverage of the AdobeRGB color space, feature a 12-bit internal processor and 14-bit LUT (lookup table) for software calibration. The U2713H and U2413 are currently available at prices starting at US $999/£802/€829  and US $599/£490/€519 respectively.

The company has also launched the 30-inch U3014 monitor and its first ultra-wide monitor with a unique aspect ratio of 21:9 - the 29-inch U2913WM as an alternative to dual monitors.


Press Release:

Dell Updates Flagship Line of UltraSharp Displays with PremierColor Monitors and New Ultra-wide Model

The U2913WM is Dell’s first 29-inch ultra-wide monitor with a unique aspect ratio of 21:9, providing an alternative to dual monitors.
February 2013: Dell today announced the availability of three flagship monitors designed to provide users with an exceptional visual experience and outstanding screen performance. The new U3014, U2713H and U2413 displays each offer one of the industry's highest-quality and most advanced technology experiences, with uncompromising screen performance, precise, consistent colors, great usability and a wide array of connectivity options. The U3014 is Dell’s largest screen size to date, while all three monitors come with PremierColor for true-to life, accurate, customizable colors that cover industry standards. Dell also announced a Single Monitor Arm (MSA14) and Dual Monitor Stand (MDS14), the first arm and stand optimized for Dell monitors with Dell Quick Release mounts. 
  • Dell UltraSharp monitors with PremierColor offer outstanding color accuracy, precision and performance
  • Dell UltraSharp U3014 30-inch, U2713H 27-inch and U2413 24-inch monitors are designed for color-critical work 
  • Dell Single Monitor Arm and Dual Monitor Stand provide an optimized set-up for productivity and comfort
  • Dell UltraSharp U2913WM enables productive multi-tasking with an ultra-wide format
Dell UltraSharp U3014 30-inch Monitor with PremierColor
Users will experience outstanding color accuracy, precision and performance with the Dell UltraSharp U3014 30-inch monitor with PremierColor. The U3014 is Dell’s flagship high performance monitor with a 16:10 aspect ratio, suitable for the fine level of detail required for color-critical work such as CAD/CAM, graphic design, desktop publishing, gaming or media creation. In addition, users will experience stunning high-definition details and the ability to view more onscreen content with 2560 x 1600 resolution. More than just a high performance monitor, the U3014 offers flexible viewing options, versatile digital connectivity and is designed for exceptional efficiency with an eco-design that meets the latest environmental standards like EPEAT®, ENERGY STAR® and TCO Certified Displays.

Dell UltraSharp U2713H 27-inch and U2413 24-inch Monitors with PremierColor
Engineered to equip you with the best for color-critical work, the Dell UltraSharp U2713H 27-inch and U2413 24-inch monitors with PremierColor offer rich, vivid, lifelike images right out of the box. Users will experience remarkably consistent, precise, and accurate colors calibrated at the factory to support 99 percent AdobeRGB and 100 percent sRGB coverage with a deltaE of less than 2; each monitor arrives with a certified report to indicate its exact color calibration. A 12-bit internal processor enables a whopping 1.07 billion colors, superb color reproduction and gradation onscreen. For even more precise color calibration, the Dell UltraSharp Color Calibration Solution software provides access to the 14-bit LUT so users can calibrate the monitors to several popular color spaces. Dell recommends the optional X-Rite i1Display Pro colorimeter (sold separately) for generating custom color profiles.

Dell UltraSharp U2913WM 29-inch Ultra-wide Monitor
In addition to the updated Dell UltraSharp U3014, U2713H and U2413 monitors with PremierColor, Dell recently announced the U2913WM 29-inch Ultra-wide monitor featuring a unique aspect ratio that takes multi-tasking to a whole new level. The U2913WM is Dell’s first 29-inch ultra-wide monitor with a unique aspect ratio of 21:9, providing time-conscious, multi-tasking workers with a great alternative to dual monitors. For additional space, users may simply replicate or extend content to additional monitors using DisplayPort 1.2. After a productive day at work, a wide Full HD, visually stunning color accuracy and a breathtaking panoramic view can redefine an evening’s entertainment experience.

Dell Single Monitor Arm and Dual Monitor Stand
The Dell Single Monitor Arm (MSA14) and Dell Dual Monitor Stand (MDS14) are designed to improve the viewing comfort of users and enhance user productivity. The MSA14 articulating arm can help maximize viewing comfort and improve productivity. Its multi-adjustment capabilities including height adjustability, tilt, swivel and pivot features let users move the monitor to the desired position and collaborate more easily. It can easily be attached to the U3014, U2713H, U2413 and select Dell monitor panels with a simple snap to the Dell Quick Release mount at the back of the monitor without needing screws. With the MDS14 dual monitor stand, users can snap on two Dell monitor panels with the Dell Quick Release mount and enjoy improved productivity and a clutter-free desktop. Tilt, swivel, height adjust and horizontally slide the monitors on the stand to customize to preferred viewing angles. The U-shaped monitor stand also frees up productive desk space in front of the monitors and reduces cable clutter with a cable management slot on the stand riser.

“The Dell UltraSharp series offers one of the industry's highest-quality and most advanced technology experiences,” said George Toh, Marketing Director of Dell Displays. “We are thrilled to update the UltraSharp family with the U3014, U2713H and U2413 displays, along with our first Dell-branded single monitor arm and dual monitor stand. The displays and accessories offer users an outstanding visual experience and the versatility to boost productivity and multi-task with ease.”

Pricing and Availability
Dell UltraSharp U3014 is coming soon worldwide starting from USD$1499. Dell UltraSharp U2713H & U2413 monitors are currently available worldwide starting at USD$999 and US$599, respectively. The Dell Single Monitor Arm is currently available starting from US$149, and the Dual Monitor Stand is currently available starting from US$169.

Comments

Total comments: 123
boon_ong
By boon_ong (Feb 21, 2013)

Having the wide gamut display, is it still necessary to calibrate the monitor using the tool by either spyder or i1 display?

0 upvotes
Ed_arizona
By Ed_arizona (Feb 18, 2013)

Just got a 24" U2713 as a free replacement due to the older kit monitor was shipped broken to me, Sweet picture, crisp colors and text WOW..thanks dell for free upgrade :o)

1 upvote
Jim in AZ
By Jim in AZ (Feb 18, 2013)

Hope it doesn't have the usual crappy anti-glare matte that makes it impossible to distinguish noise from the matte artifacts.

0 upvotes
John P.
By John P. (Feb 18, 2013)

From the specs:

Panel Type, Surface:
AH In-plane switching, anti glare with hard coat 3H

1 upvote
Adam Filipowicz
By Adam Filipowicz (Feb 18, 2013)

Ordered 3 of the U2413, cant wait to use them!

1 upvote
oheggo
By oheggo (Feb 17, 2013)

Received a new U2713Hb from Dell as a replacement for my new U2711 with some problems. IMO the anti glare coating are better on the U2713, but it is a lot worse in terms of viewing angle issues. With this monitor size you will see uneven density and color shifts (yellow/blue) even if you are positioned right in front of the U2713. I would not recomend it for critical Photoshop work even if it covers 99% of Adobe RGB.

0 upvotes
Jim in AZ
By Jim in AZ (Feb 18, 2013)

Glossy clear coating is the only way to go for photo editing.

0 upvotes
plasnu
By plasnu (Feb 17, 2013)

Professionals choose either non-wide-gamut Dell / Apple for Web,

and/or

Wide Gamut EIZO for printing.

Only novice will buy those Dell Wide Gamut monitor for always slightly shifted color.

1 upvote
cagen
By cagen (Feb 17, 2013)

u2713h don't had great uniformity of luminance than u2711.
See the below u2713h's review page.

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/dell_u2713h.htm

0 upvotes
pootle
By pootle (Feb 16, 2013)

I've just bought a 2713H and the wide gamut is very useful as you can see what you have compared to what you will get with srgb viewing and make informed choices about how to squeeze into sRGB. The resolution / pixel pitch is really great, and windoze is still usable (which is probably not true of a retina style display. Even on apple machines retina displays can be a problem as many apps are not geared up for such high resolutions yet (including Aperture as I understand it).

My only problem with the 2713H is incompatability of the USB ports with some ASUS motherboards (you need to use the USB connection to load the lut / calibrate with either x-rite standard or the dell variant software).

Timescapes preview looks absolutely stunning at native resolution and shows up 1080P something wicked. Roll on 4k!

0 upvotes
Vlad Didenko
By Vlad Didenko (Feb 17, 2013)

Are you saying you already have it delivered and using it?

0 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Feb 17, 2013)

How strange, I've been using Aperture with a retina Mac for months now. Not only is it fully supported, the images look absolutely stunning thanks to the high density, allowing 4 times the detail to be seen over regular screens.

It's getting harder and harder to distinguish those being paid to badmouth Apple (see "I earn a fortune from home" type adverts) from those who just didn't bother learning about the things they like to talk about.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
4 upvotes
pootle
By pootle (Feb 17, 2013)

@Vlad, yes it arrived Wednesday last week - has been available in the UK for a few weeks now I believe

@Najinsky, I have no apple axe to grind one way or the other, I have a friend with all apple kit and he was saying that the user interface in aperture doesn't work well on hi res screens as it doesn't rescale properly (the piccies do look great once you get there though as you say).

2 upvotes
JKP
By JKP (Feb 15, 2013)

I can't see where they get "UltraSharp" from. My LG W3000H is also 30-inch and has the same resolution 2560x1600. And it is already several years old. Cost ~900€ back then.

1 upvote
Rick Knepper
By Rick Knepper (Feb 15, 2013)

I'll stick with NEC and their 30" for $1799 (at B&H). If Dell street prices the U3014 for $1100, that might be worth considering.

1 upvote
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Feb 15, 2013)

This is a copy of Dell's press release. OK, what's DPR value-add? Perhaps they (the masters of holding the cams right side up) could tell us which laptops support these great resolutions? Yes, start with the DisplayPort and take it from there...

4 upvotes
Gareth_R
By Gareth_R (Feb 15, 2013)

As a leading website for digital photography reviews and information I have no problem with dpreview posting the Dell press release, or any press release related to digital photography for that matter. The value-add is that the information has been made available for users to read if they choose. I would not have known about the release if it wasn't for dpreview.

15 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Feb 16, 2013)

Too bad, Gareth, you need to have it served to you, spin and all. Otherwise you might have learned there are other 27" IPS monitors with 1080+ resolution at half the Dell's price. Do I really have to tell you they are all made in Chiiina?

2 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Feb 15, 2013)

2560x1080 ...

I have two good 4:3 screens and a hight of 1024 now. Thats more or less the same pixel area. So ... this is not an investment that feel necessary. I am waiting for half the pixel pitch. 2000x5000 or so would be nice :-)

1 upvote
lovEU
By lovEU (Feb 16, 2013)

4608 x 1440 px is what I'd suggest
(2 x 1440 px coming with16:10 resp. 32:10 ratio, 1440 px due to manufacturing)

0 upvotes
Vlad Didenko
By Vlad Didenko (Feb 15, 2013)

Interesting. Up until the announcement the U2713H was available on the Dell site for SOHO users pre-order at $850 for a couple weeks already. Now the "sale" is no more and the price is as listed.

2 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Feb 15, 2013)

I have a Philips television with this screen format, and I have to say that it's wonderful.
So for wide screen video work it might come in handy to see the end result. As a photographer myself I don't see the real use for it. The 99% Adobe RGB might come in handy for the extreme color critic.

0 upvotes
Daniel Kkesi
By Daniel Kkesi (Feb 15, 2013)

It is written that Dell UltraSharp U3014 is for color critical work, however only U2713H is mentioned to have 99% ARGB coverage. Are the two monitors different in color reproduction/panel/calibration/etc? Am I missing something here?

1 upvote
Photog74
By Photog74 (Feb 15, 2013)

The U2413 also features 99% Adobe RGB coverage.
I'm also surprised they don't say this about the 30" model.

1 upvote
Ed_arizona
By Ed_arizona (Feb 18, 2013)

I have the U2713 and it has presettings adobe RGB & SRGB

0 upvotes
John Ellis
By John Ellis (Feb 15, 2013)

Does it really help for the overwhelming most of us who view our pictures on just average laptops and sharing them on the web or printing them on inkjets that cannot come close to showing all the color? Would certainly be nice if it could be appreciated and I guess in commercial work it might. Am I right?

0 upvotes
Hclarkx
By Hclarkx (Feb 16, 2013)

You are right. Viewing jpegs or images from the internet requires only an sRGB monitor as both are, or should be, just sRGB. Unless you are working with images you expect to print with an AdobeRGB capable printer or a printhouse that accepts them, these monitors are in fact a bit of a nuisance. These may have an sRGB mode as have some other recent Dell monitors, and if they do, you will definitely want to use that mode for viewing jpegs or browsing. Or just buy a good sRGB monitor if you don't do AdobeRGB photo editing and printing.

0 upvotes
carlk
By carlk (Feb 18, 2013)

Only if you do critical printing.

0 upvotes
falconeyes
By falconeyes (Feb 15, 2013)

Great displays as these new DELLs seem to be ...

I won't buy into them before I see 24", 27" and 30" external RETINA displays arrive (which double the resolution for photo work w/o making the UI unusable).

Of course, it may require Apple to support Retina for external monitors (maybe done already but nobody can test) and Sharp to ramp up their IGZO panel production.

Interesting in this context: http://sharp-world.com/corporate/news/121128.html

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Photog74
By Photog74 (Feb 15, 2013)

Does the 14-bit LUT mean these monitors are hardware calibratable?
This article suggests that you calibrate your monitor rather than the video card but recommends NEC monitors that are usually a lot more expensive than a Dell:

http://blog.neocamera.com/calibrate-your-display-not-your-video-card/

Of course it's from 2009 but the question remains - does the 14-bit LUT place this 2013 Dell model in the same league as a 2009 NEC in terms of display calibration?

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
dervish_candela
By dervish_candela (Feb 15, 2013)

as TFTCentral noted, yes, hardware calibration is possible, but only with the mandatory "optional X-Rite i1Display Pro colorimeter (sold separately)" and their dell-branded software.

1 upvote
Photog74
By Photog74 (Feb 15, 2013)

Cheers!

I wasn't aware that the folks at TFT central have already reviewed the new monitors. I've just checked out their website and indeed found this:

"One thing which separates this screen from many mainstream monitors... is the support for hardware calibration. Users can program the monitors 14-bit Look Up Table (LUT) if they have the appropriate software... The software part of is easy, Dell provide their own free... software... allow[ing] the user to access the hardware LUT to calibrate the screen in two available modes.. The second part is not so easy... as you require a compatible calibration tool to work with this software and allow hardware calibration. Oddly Dell... have locked this so that you can ONLY use the X-rite i1 Display Pro colorimeter. Other devices are NOT compatible at all, including the i1 Pro spectrophotometer, i1 Display 2, ColorMunki, Spyder series or any other colorimeter."

That is very clearly written and answers my question. Thanks!

4 upvotes
wazu
By wazu (Feb 15, 2013)

This is why I ordered the LG 27EA83D instead, since it is the same LCD panel (LG is manufacturer) and LG have not locked out other calibrators.

2 upvotes
Photog74
By Photog74 (Feb 18, 2013)

Do you know what the LG equivalent of the U2413 is?
For my use, a 24" screen is better than a 27" one.
Thanks!

0 upvotes
E Dinkla
By E Dinkla (Feb 21, 2013)

The i1Display Pro is the second best colorimeter available in the market and way better than the i1Display II colorimeter or the i1 spectrometers for monitor calibration and profiling. The price differences to other models that perform worse is not that high.
http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/Calibration/MonitorCalibrationHardware.html

0 upvotes
Karl Summers
By Karl Summers (Feb 15, 2013)

These new models are pretty nice, but the U3011 and U2711 are still great values at $1099 and $999, respectively.

1 upvote
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Feb 15, 2013)

Really, now, speaking from experience?

0 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Feb 15, 2013)

It's so ridiculous. Smartphones provide us with 300dpi and even more while PC monitors deliver an abysmal low dpi count.

5 upvotes
luchs
By luchs (Feb 15, 2013)

Unless the software has been designed for high dpi count, it won't help you. Think how small the regular icons of 22*22 pixels will be! I would currently not use a monitor with more than 120dpi - 96 is still ideal.

2 upvotes
Photog74
By Photog74 (Feb 15, 2013)

I agree. 300dpi is all nice and well if you can easily magnify into the page, as on a smartphone or tablet with multitouch and gesture support - but with a regular PC operating system and non-touchscreen interface, a 300dpi screen would be a nightmare.

1 upvote
feraudy
By feraudy (Feb 15, 2013)

The viewing distance for a monitor is not the same as for a smartphone, for one. Secondly a smartphone screen is much smaller: it might actually be hard to scale up.

6 upvotes
RumpelHund
By RumpelHund (Feb 15, 2013)

Agree, overcoming the 72dpi barrier is the thing to go to, moving 35MP onto 30" and making prints (almost) obsolete. Sure there are technical obstacles to overcome (bandwidth, scaling, fonts...) but the 72dpi is where we will wonder how people settled for such low resolutions in the past. Hopefully soon...

2 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (Feb 15, 2013)

> overcoming the 72dpi barrier

There are still 72 ppi monitors on the market? I haven't seen anything below 96 in quite a while.

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
1 upvote
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Feb 16, 2013)

luchs wrote: "Think how small the regular icons of 22*22 pixels will be! I would currently not use a monitor with more than 120dpi - 96 is still ideal."

Wow...people still think this way? Even after Apple long ago released HiDPI monitors with normal-sized icons?

Think about it like this: When you read a paper catalog, it was printed at 300dpi, but no one ever complains that the pictures or text are too small. There is nothing about high-resolution monitors that will cause objects to be too small...unless you are using an operating system that is not capable of compensating. High resolution object size is a solved problem, it was solved in print, and print came before the web screwed up everyone's idea of how resolution works.

1 upvote
Fox Fisher
By Fox Fisher (Feb 17, 2013)

I can clearly say that none of the repliers here saw retina display in action (the one that 15" macbook have) first of all you can change the size of the icons from the OS with ease. Second of all, at retina resolution, pixels are so small that you can actually scale the resolution down perfectly to 1440x900, 1680x1050 and to the original retina resolution. This downscale does not cause blurring like regular lcd's do at all.

0 upvotes
Fatality
By Fatality (Feb 15, 2013)

By the way, to all the people who are planning on buying a new monitor.. Instead of buying one 30" monitor, I recommend getting two monitors in dual-head configuration -one 24" IPS and a second smaller cheap TFT monitor. Keep all of your tools on the TFT monitor (except the color palette) and do all of your processing and color work on the IPS monitor. It's less expensive this way and it's also better on the eyes since you can always turn off the second monitor if you don't need the extra screen real estate, plus you can conveniently adjust the position/angle of the second monitor. I'm using this setup since 2000 for 3D, digital imaging and illustration work, it's working really well for me..

(some advice to novice users) :)

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Feb 15, 2013)

In theory a good advice. I tried it myself but ...
When using a drawing tablet (Wacom) a big amount of "drawing estate" of the tablet is used for the 2nd monitor. Leaving less for the primary monitor = reducing resolution & precision.
Even though I run a dual monitor config I restricted the tablet drawing estate to the primary monitor.

3 upvotes
Stusteelhead
By Stusteelhead (Feb 15, 2013)

Something i just found out recently with my wacom (i use a three monitor setup) is you can map the tablet to cover a portion of your second (and third monitor) so i place the photoshop tools in this region so i can still each them with the pen.

2 upvotes
Fatality
By Fatality (Feb 15, 2013)

@gl2k

Well, the "drawing estate" depends on a lot of things..

1. The size of your wacom tablet, of course..

2. The resolution or the orientation (vertical/horizontal) of your second monitor..

3. Your style.. What I mean by that, is how an individual draws, for example if they make large or small strokes.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Fatality
By Fatality (Feb 15, 2013)

@gl2k

I have a wacom tablet too, 6x11, an indispensable tool.. :) It's setup with a 1080p as the primary and the second one is 1280/1024. For the tablet size I have, this works very well for me (horizontally 1280+1920) -this is equivalent to a 3200x1024/1080 single monitor, now that's a lot of screen real estate. Personally I do small strokes, so I don't have to move my arm around on the tablet a lot, if I need to add some specific detail -I zoom on the image anyway. However, if I had two 1080p side by side horizontally (1920+1920), maybe my tablet would be too small, unless I would spin the second monitor 90 degrees vertically (horizontally 1080+1920) or lower the resolution on the second monitor..

So I guess gl2k, you can try spinning the other monitor, lower the resolution of the second monitor, or just get a bigger wacom tablet.. :)

1 upvote
luben solev
By luben solev (Feb 15, 2013)

I have an even better idea for those with lots of money & desk space. Get the 30" monitor which has a vertical resolution of 1600 pixels if my memory serves me correctly. Also get a 20"-22" 1600x1200 monitor and then set it next to the 30" one, but in portrait orientation. This way their vertical pixels match.

Then have the whole 30" monitor for the image and the smaller monitor will have plenty of height required by all those layers, or history, or actions etc.

How does that sound?

1 upvote
Hclarkx
By Hclarkx (Feb 16, 2013)

I've used exactly this setup for many years. Having the smaller sRGB TFT monitor allows me to see proper color of sRGB jpegs and sRGB web content and also check sRGB files I produce from RAW AdobeRGB files. My 24" AdobeRGB monitor (older 96% of AdobeRGB monitor) does not have an sRGB mode and switching to that mode on the newer monitor several times each day would seem to be a nuisance

Comment edited 30 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
TLD
By TLD (Feb 16, 2013)

Nice idea. Just wondering how you would arrange things if upgrading to one of these when you already own a 30 inch 1920*1200 display? Get a bigger desk? I am also in mind of how big a deal it apparently was for Adobe to accommodate Retina displays.

0 upvotes
JaFO
By JaFO (Feb 17, 2013)

I've been using a dual monitor setup at work for writing code and is indeed awesome.
As such I even wonder why you'd even want a single 30" screen.

I'm sure you could get 2 really nice screens for the price of a single high end 30" variant.

0 upvotes
garyknrd
By garyknrd (Feb 15, 2013)

I have a cheap Dell laptop. And am amazed at the processing in Raw i get. I am going to buy the 27" just because of the excellent laptop. I am seriously getting into high quality bird photography. Do you guys think this is a good move? Can I expect much better processing with PS-5?
Gary

www.flickr.com/photos/avianphotos

0 upvotes
RoccoGalatioto
By RoccoGalatioto (Feb 15, 2013)

are you sure that the video card in your laptop can handle the new monitor?
http://galatiotophoto.blogspot.com

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 15, 2013)

Make sure your laptop can support a monitor with resolution of 2560x1440. If its a current laptop, you should have a DP or display port on it. Looks like a HDMI but its thicker.

0 upvotes
garyknrd
By garyknrd (Feb 15, 2013)

Hey thanks for the heads up. Mine does not have the port. I will make sure my next laptop has it. So will put off the purchase until I upgrade.

0 upvotes
Photog74
By Photog74 (Feb 15, 2013)

What's the maximum resolution supported by DVI and HDMI please?

0 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Feb 16, 2013)

Max resolution depends on the bandwidth capability of the interface.

The max resolution of single-link DVI is 2.75 megapixels according to Wikipedia. For resolutions above that, you can use dual-link DVI, which has been required for many years for 27- to 30-inch monitors. Apparently the max resolution of dual-link depends on the source, cable, and sync.

The max resolution of HDMI depends on the version of HDMI your equipment uses. If I'm reading Wikipedia right, HDMI 1.4 can reach 4096x2160 if limited to 24 frames per second.

Since DisplayPort is more flexible than HDMI, including being an open standard unlike HDMI, DisplayPort is what higher-end laptops and Microsoft Surface use.

0 upvotes
J. Bach
By J. Bach (Feb 15, 2013)

Hopefully the U2413 will calibrate better than the U2410. I have both a U2410 and the older 2407. I use the Eye-One display 2 to calibrate both and the 2407 gives more faithfull color than the U2410 - prints from the labs I use with the labs' icc profiles for soft proofing look just like the image on the 2407 and not the 2410 and both displays are calibrated to the same color temperature. The U2410 has more color controls than the 2407, but changing an RGB value by 1 % in the color controls on the U2410 can change the color temperature by 200 degrees. I missed the return date (dell only gives 21 days now instead of the 30 they use to give) and Dell never responded to my concerns.

0 upvotes
Pictus
By Pictus (Feb 15, 2013)

You need a better calibrator and some tricks, solution at http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50756245

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Nikon007
By Nikon007 (Feb 15, 2013)

My advice has always been "stay away from wide Gamut unless you know what your doing". For me it's not worth the hassle to see colors no one else can. You don't see it in print, your clients don't see it, on the web they can't be seen. So what good is it? It's great for a dedicated graphics station but for general use it causes many folks a lot of head aches. So if WG is your cup of tea go for it. If your not sure do your research first, there are lot of threads on this subject going back for years and nothing has really changed.

13 upvotes
Octane
By Octane (Feb 15, 2013)

So I assume you are also shooting JPG in small size instead of RAW?

3 upvotes
Scorpius1
By Scorpius1 (Feb 15, 2013)

Wide gamut is better for processing,you can easily output for web in sRGB... besides RAW is colorspace agnostic

1 upvote
XeroJay
By XeroJay (Feb 15, 2013)

I couldn't agree more. I just sold my U2410 and bought a U2713HM (not wide gamut). The bottoms line I that we live in an sRGB world, and working with wide gamut can get confusing at the best of times. There isn't a single OS that manages it well enough, and the sRGB emulation mode will only add to the confusion, since the OS still thinks its wide gamut.

4 upvotes
RoccoGalatioto
By RoccoGalatioto (Feb 15, 2013)

I agree. Most clients look at the photos on cheap office type monitors.
http://galatiotophoto.blogspot.com

2 upvotes
RC Bear
By RC Bear (Feb 15, 2013)

I also Agree with you comment. I am using a Dell Precision M4600 with WG LED display. To be honest. Yes. the color on the monitor is excellent. But when your program don't support color management, you will have a hard time deciding which is the correct color to represent when your client see your images. We alll live in a sRGB world. So, Is better off to get a very good sRGB IPS monitor.

4 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 15, 2013)

What about if you print?

0 upvotes
Thorbard
By Thorbard (Feb 15, 2013)

This makes me feel better about buying a slightly cheaper IPS monitor (ASUS PA238Q). Its good enough for what I want and it doesn't cause me any additional problems.

0 upvotes
dervish_candela
By dervish_candela (Feb 15, 2013)

it is irrelevant if it's WG or not - my U2711 worked totally fine switched into sRGB mode.
basicaly these DELL babies are the only sane option for an average photography joe on the market, and no amount of WG pro/contra discussion is going to change that. Buy NEC? no thank you, I can buy 2 Dells. Downshift into shady $500 internet Korean stuff? No thank you.

this time around it's even better, those who need any advice on gamut would just buy the cheaper consumer U2713HM option and automatically stay out of trouble.

0 upvotes
Jacques Cornell
By Jacques Cornell (Feb 15, 2013)

You may not see it in prints from a lab, but photo inkjet printers have been able to print way beyond the sRGB colorspace for quite a while now.

1 upvote
Dianoda
By Dianoda (Feb 15, 2013)

Another option - buy the wide gamut display, enjoy it, do your color management thing on it, edit on it, etc., and then have a second monitor that saturates just sRGB and use it for multitasking/menus and color proofing sanity checks of your output. You can enjoy benefits of the expanded colorspace that wide gamut delivers from your main, and the convenience of sRGB only from the second monitor.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Nikon007
By Nikon007 (Feb 16, 2013)

I have been following these discussions for years and no one has ever given me a good reason to go WG. I do shoot raw and process in LR, so the benefits of WG color space are still there and some day in the future when almost everything is properly color managed I will go to a WG monitor.

As far as ink jet printing (the better photo printers) goes there is a very small visible difference when the content is favorable to WG and you don't need a WG monitor to get those benefits although it would help to see what your getting before you print. If I remember right LR has a feature to see what is out of gamut before printing even if you don't have a WG monitor. Like a lot of folks I don't do much printing anymore and when I do I get them done at Costco. On rare occasions I will order larger HQ prints from West Coast Imaging or Black River imaging. Ink Jet printing just is not cost effective for me anymore. The main point is I never see the benefits of WG that I know of.

0 upvotes
plasnu
By plasnu (Feb 17, 2013)

Agreed. Buy Wide gamut as a second monitor for printing is a good idea, but choose EIZO anyway.

0 upvotes
Essai
By Essai (Feb 15, 2013)

I have a Dell u2711 and its the best monitor I ever had.

There is no way Im going back to 1920x1080 now...

2 upvotes
gendem
By gendem (Feb 15, 2013)

I've had the 2713H for a few weeks now. Anti-glare is much, much better than the 2711 that I had before this. The best thing about this monitor, however, is that it comes with a factory uniformity calibration, making it very, very even across the entire screen. Highly recommended.

3 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (Feb 15, 2013)

By "Anti-glare is much, much better than 2711", what specifically do you mean? Less grainy?

0 upvotes
gendem
By gendem (Feb 15, 2013)

Yes, the 2711 was really grainy. On white/light it almost shimmered. It was really distracting. The 2713H is more like the matt screen on an older macbook pro. Even, effective, and not distracting at all.

Also, there is a big diff between the 2713H and the 2713HM. Buyer beware!

1 upvote
Pasha001
By Pasha001 (Feb 15, 2013)

Oh yeah but there is one MINOR problem: uniformity correction cannot be used with monitor LUT calibration. This is no NEC.

1 upvote
onlooker
By onlooker (Feb 15, 2013)

> On white/light it almost shimmered.

That's exactly the impression I get, and it bothers me. I am still in the return period. If the new one is much better, I will go for it.

Strange that glowing reviews I read of the 2711 never mentioned that crazy effect.

0 upvotes
gendem
By gendem (Feb 15, 2013)

Dunno what you're referring to Pasha, but mine calibrated up just fine with that uniformity option on.

1 upvote
onlooker
By onlooker (Feb 15, 2013)

> mine calibrated up just fine with that uniformity option on

Did it calibrate with uniformity option on in AdobeRGB and sRGB modes, or just in "Standard" and somesuch?

0 upvotes
Pasha001
By Pasha001 (Feb 15, 2013)

> mine calibrated up just fine
Using what LUTs? Were you using CAL1/CAL2 or your videocard LUTs? See also: http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/dell_u2713h.htm

0 upvotes
gendem
By gendem (Feb 15, 2013)

Preset mode is Custom Colour, calibrated using an I1 Display Pro. I can't speak for all monitors, only mine. But mine is the best I've used. FWIW YMMV IANAL etc etc.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 15, 2013)

"Strange that glowing reviews I read of the 2711 never mentioned that crazy effect."

It has been discussed in several reviews; for example, http://peterhallam.com.au/dell-u2711-anti-glare-review/

0 upvotes
Pasha001
By Pasha001 (Feb 16, 2013)

> Preset mode is Custom Colour
Exactly! Monitor LUTs calibration is available only in "Color Space" preset so you were using video card LUTs calibration and not monitor LUTs calibration. That's why you could use uniformity compensation.

> mine is the best I've used
Nobody would argue that there are worse monitors than these Dells :).

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
RPJG
By RPJG (Feb 15, 2013)

The 21:9 monitor is not "unique". Presumably they use the same panels as the already-available LG monitor (http://www.lg.com/hk_en/monitors/lg-29EA93).

3 upvotes
photogeek
By photogeek (Feb 15, 2013)

Note that like any wide gamut monitor this will be BAD for general web browsing and stuff. Images without a color profile (or any images at all in browsers which don't support color profiling) will appear heavily over saturated.

0 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (Feb 15, 2013)

Usually take a few clicks to switch the Dell monitor from AdobeRGB to sRGB.

1 upvote
Photog74
By Photog74 (Feb 15, 2013)

That's right, these monitors have both Adobe RGB and sRGB modes.

1 upvote
andi123
By andi123 (Feb 18, 2013)

That's no longer an issue since at least Firefox and Chrome support color management just fine.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
HFW
By HFW (Feb 15, 2013)

I've been monitor shopping for 6 months to a year and haven't found the monitor I need yet... however this looks promising. Apple has their Thunderbolt technology which is not compatible with my mid 2010 17" MacBook Pro... is this model line of monitors Apple friendly?

0 upvotes
web6Reg6
By web6Reg6 (Feb 14, 2013)

I'm still using my Dell 2405fpw and so far it hasn't missed a beet.. Mind you the 30" and the 29" are very tempting....

1 upvote
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (Feb 14, 2013)

I spotted these monitors in their ads last week and will likely buy the 24 inch monitor, which at $599 is a good choice considering the apple monitors stand alone unit are $999. Maybe apples monitors are a bit better spec wise, but this is a good price for almost similar colour performance I think. Great controls, and lumens can be set from 350 high end to 50 minimum. This monitor has multiple inputs, HDMI and DVI and miniport for multiple uses for video or photo editing.

0 upvotes
Fatality
By Fatality (Feb 15, 2013)

If you're shopping for monitors, I recommend you checkout Viewsonic, they make excellent professional IPS monitors at very good prices. I have been using one for the past 3 years (bought my 23" for $330 back then, now they cost about $270), and I find the color accuracy, viewing angle and brightness is excellent (plus they have 0 dead pixels guarantee). I highly recommend them..

As for apple monitors, they are used by designer/artist noobs and fashion victims. The surface of their screen is reflective, you can see the reflection of yourself and the background while working on them. Totally unacceptable..

2 upvotes
Adrian Van
By Adrian Van (Feb 15, 2013)

I have a 27 inch imac and yes some minor reflection on it, but it does not distract me at all in edting, as I have it in room with dim lighting. Many professional use this 27" imac. I checked the Viewsonic site as mentioned, and cannot find any info on calibration for monitor. I had a Viewsonic LCD before and had difficulties getting the Lumen setting low enough (too bright) to match my printing house recommendations. The 24" Dell offers the right calibration. So, if you are printing inhouse only from your own printers, Viewsonic is very much fine to use. Sending out of house print jobs, Dell (with a Windows CPU) is a better choice to meet industry standard 100 or 120 lumen settings with proper calibrated software. This is why a Pro would buy a more expensive monitor, so see what a print house sees. The 24 inch Dell looks ideal in this regard.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
SirSeth
By SirSeth (Feb 14, 2013)

So buying a 2410 looks to be a good deal for those on a budget? I'd be curious to know what other older monitors are good for photography. My "problem" is that 12 years ago I bought a really high quality graphics CRT and it's still a great monitor. So it's a bit large for the screen real estate by today's standards, but it's just really accurate and nice to look at so I haven't upgraded. When I do, I'll probably be looking at something like the 2410 at less than $400.

1 upvote
Fatality
By Fatality (Feb 15, 2013)

Sir, first thing you should do tomorrow morning is to take your CRT and toss it in the dumpster (better yet, dispose of it properly) and then go to a store and buy an IPS monitor. You will not regret it! The image on the new monitor will have better tonal range, it will be more crisp, vibrant, and without any distortions. I know this will be hard to do, because I done it myself, I had a perfectly working professional flat CRT monitor that I threw out.. I was really sad when I was throwing it out, I even put a big note on top of it "working", hoping someone would pick it up and use it.. lol but I have no regrets now, because the IPS image quality is superb, I could never go back to CRT. If you want a very good IPS monitor at a good price, get Viewsonic, they're excellent. I have one, and I'm very very pleased with it.

3 upvotes
hindesite
By hindesite (Feb 14, 2013)

There is a really useful review at http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/dell_u2413.htm

Of particular interest is the comparison with the U2410 and U2412M monitors, and an explanation of the features that each provide. You don't always need the latest and best - the wide gamut available on the U2413 may actually be a disadvantage for many users.

5 upvotes
ron wrucke
By ron wrucke (Feb 14, 2013)

It's taken Dell five years to get back to almost the quality they built into their 2408WFP monitor in 2008? That old 24" monitor had a Delta E of 1.7 before calibration (1.3 with) and the color gamut was over 100% of the Adobe RGB standard (http://www.anandtech.com/show/2518/5). These new Dells sound pretty good with a price that won't break the bank ..

1 upvote
Shirozina
By Shirozina (Feb 14, 2013)

Old News - the U2713H and U2413 at least has been available to buy for about a month now......

0 upvotes
hindesite
By hindesite (Feb 14, 2013)

Not in NZ, apparently. But at least the U2410 is heavily discounted at present.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 14, 2013)

If your shopping for monitors, make sure you buy a IPS panel. The other common type that is very bad for color and view angle is called TN.

Dell Ultrasharp monitors use LG panels; these are the same panels used in apple's best monitors. They are also used by HP pro line monitors.

I have two U3011's. (decoded name: Ultrasharp 30" 2011) They are huge. The 27" has more pixel density but its 16:9 (Less Height than 16:10; 2560x1600 vs 2560x1440)

5 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Feb 14, 2013)

Dude, everybody knows about IPS already.

3 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 14, 2013)

Thanks for your valuable feedback Jesper, it adds so much to the conversation and i'm sure everyone is in awe of your superior knowledge. Your mom and dad must be so proud of you.

20 upvotes
raincoat
By raincoat (Feb 14, 2013)

A little knowledge is a very dangerous thing

2 upvotes
Dvlee
By Dvlee (Feb 14, 2013)

@M Jesper.Not everyone knows every technical spec about every device. I'm far from stupid or technically illiterate but I have no idea what IPS or TN stand for.

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Feb 14, 2013)

There's a simple way to remember which type of display is best suited for photography, has the widest angle of view, etc. It's the most expensive one.

2 upvotes
BigBen08
By BigBen08 (Feb 15, 2013)

So which is better for photography, ISP or LG panels?

0 upvotes
dbateman
By dbateman (Feb 15, 2013)

@BigBen08, LG is a manufacturer of LCD pannels.
ISP is the best or similar best to the competing type of display which I can' t remember of the top of my head. Check out Wikipedia if your interested. The LG pannel is used in the same Apple monitor, the HP ZR30z, the Dell 3011 and one other. Interestingly the cost of these varies by $500, for the same IPS panel, just different inputs.

1 upvote
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 15, 2013)

You can pick up a nice 24" IPS panel for around $300. I like dell brand monitors. Apple, HP, Dell tend to use LG panels but they do use different layers of films on them. Some will be full gloss, my U3011 are matte. If you get a 27 or 30", keep in mind you can not use the full resolution with HDMI (HDMI is limited to 1920x1080 or a tad more). You need dual link DVI or displayport. So you might have to upgrade your graphics card.

0 upvotes
BigBen08
By BigBen08 (Feb 15, 2013)

@dbateman: thanks for the info.

0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (Feb 15, 2013)

No offense Mssimo but I think you are confusing the hell out of people that doesn't follow display technology.

My Dell Ultrasharp is S-PVA and there are also PLS and MVA monitors out there not to mention the various type of IPS from cheap E-IPS to high end H-IPS.

I think it is better to say this is a great monitor with great color and viewing angle and buy it if you have the money and demand the best. To get technical is like telling people to buy BSI 1/1.7 or bigger sensor when shopping for compact camera. You'd be driving them nuts.

0 upvotes
Jeff Peterman
By Jeff Peterman (Feb 14, 2013)

I hope the new monitors have the 16:10 aspect ratio of their existing 24" photo monitor and not the more common 16:9 aspect ratio. The squarer format is much better for photo work.

4 upvotes
OniMirage
By OniMirage (Feb 14, 2013)

16:10 seems to be getting phased out. 21:9 is niche as well.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 14, 2013)

You will always find 16:10, but it will be a business class monitor for Pros.

0 upvotes
Dianoda
By Dianoda (Feb 14, 2013)

I've been working on a Dell U2711 (16:9, 2560x1440) for more than a year now - I think vertical resolution is a more important factor that aspect ratio. I say this because I also have a 24" 1920x1200 monitor, which I used for my photo editing prior to the U2711 - but the extra 240 vertical pixels (not to mention the extra 640 horizontal pixels) of the U2711 make it much nicer to work on. Toolbars go on the side of the screen anyways, so I don't really mind having the extra horizontal space.

2 upvotes
Jeff Peterman
By Jeff Peterman (Feb 14, 2013)

If the monitor is big enough, then vertical resolution can compensate for the 16:9 aspect ratio.

2 upvotes
PicOne
By PicOne (Feb 15, 2013)

Nobody really ever mentions this.. but the aspect ratio of the monitor would be best defined as ideal by what software you use, and how you've customized your screen views. Ie. where do you put your menus and toolbars, etc. and how do these effect the resulting available space for the photo to be viewed and edited?

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 15, 2013)

"You will always find 16:10, but it will be a business class monitor for Pros."

In 30" only. Not a single 24/27" monitor is 16:10 any more.

0 upvotes
DFPanno
By DFPanno (Feb 16, 2013)

Wrong - Eizos are 16:10

0 upvotes
pootle
By pootle (Feb 16, 2013)

oops

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Total comments: 123