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Nikon Df combines classic design with modern technology

By dpreview staff on Nov 5, 2013 at 04:00 GMT
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Nikon has announced the Df, which combines the design and controls from its classic film cameras with the modern technology of a digital SLR. The Df's body resembles that of Nikon's F-series 35mm cameras, complete with dials for shutter speed, aperture, and exposure compensation. Inside, the Df borrows the full-frame CMOS sensor from the D4 and the autofocus system from the D610. One thing you won't find on the Df is a movie mode.

The Df will be available in your choice of silver/black or black starting in late November, for a price of $2749 (body only) or $2999 / £2749 (with 50mm F1.8 lens).

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Press Release:

FALL IN LOVE AGAIN: NEW Df D-SLR IS UNDENIABLY A NIKON WITH LEGENDARY PERFORMANCE AND TIMELESS DESIGN 

Photo Pros and Enthusiasts Alike Will Embrace the Lightweight FX-Format Df D-SLR, Which Strikes the Ideal Balance of Classic Iconic Style and Advanced Imaging Technology

MELVILLE, NY (November 4, 2013) The new Nikon Df is a modern classic designed for those who have felt a connection to their camera, who revel in the idea of going out to photograph an unfamiliar location, and who know the effort and ultimate satisfaction that is part of getting the shot. Announced today, the Nikon Df is a unique, advanced-level D-SLR that harmonizes Nikon heritage and modern performance in a lightweight and very capable FX-format camera. The new Df pays homage to the enduring style and controls of Nikon’s distinguished “F” series of 35mm film cameras, yet features technology similar to Nikon’s professional flagship D4 D-SLR. Released alongside the similarly styled AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Special Edition lens, Nikon’s newest FX-format D-SLR presents a versatile and reliable option to help passionate photographers truly achieve their creative vision.

“Nikon cameras have played an important role in documenting world history for the better part of 50 years, and have earned their position as a reliable tool that pros and enthusiasts can count on. The  Nikon Df represents much more than a storied legacy of cameras; it’s more about giving the user a chance to truly enjoy the experience of taking amazing images,” said Masahiro Horie, Director of Marketing and Planning, Nikon Inc. “The design is unwavering, and the features are the latest in Nikon imaging technology. The Df brings together the best of yesterday and today for advanced full frame photographers.”

A Classically Styled, Thoroughly Modern Masterpiece
From a robust feel, to mechanical dials and finely detailed craftsmanship, the Df embodies the very best of Nikon’s photographic legacy. The classically styled camera recalls design cues such as a recognizable pentaprism and top cover, which is now constructed of durable, lightweight magnesium alloy. The top of the camera features elegant yet sophisticated mechanical controls for settings, letting users feel the tactile reassurance of adjustments, such as a familiar click stop for shutter speed adjustment. Additional dedicated dials also control ISO, exposure compensation, release mode and exposure mode, while modern controls are also easily accessible. The intuitive control layout allows for quick and confident setting adjustment, yet retains a solid operational experience that “feels like a Nikon camera.”

The Df has been designed with an emphasis on familiar intricate details made famous from previous generations, including the leather-textured top and grip, along with the body mounted shutter button with a threaded release port. The design also recalls the slenderness of the previous generation’s cameras, making this the smallest and lightest FX-format camera in Nikon’s lineup.

It isn’t all about good looks though, as this enduring design is coupled with legendary performance to create a very capable and extremely appealing FX-format offering for professionals and enthusiasts.  The 16.2-megapixel FX-format CMOS sensor of the Df is inherited from Nikon’s professional flagship D-SLR, the D4. The large 36 x 23.9mm CMOS sensor is praised for its ability to produce amazing image quality in a wide variety of lighting conditions. Whether shooting landscapes, wildlife or weddings, the frames captured with the Df exhibit amazing clarity, accurate color and a broad dynamic range. In addition, Nikon’s exclusive EXPEED 3 image processing engine helps propel image quality, yielding images with a natural color and depth, all while enhancing subtle and nuanced tones.

Additionally, like the professional Nikon D4, the Df performs well in a wide variety of challenging lighting conditions with an exceptionally wide ISO range from 100 to 12,800, expandable to a staggering ISO 204,800. The combination of low noise and wide range make this an appealing camera to take on the challenges faced by photojournalists and event photographers, as well as those who enjoy the pursuit of extracting otherwise impossible images using natural light.

 A Feature Set for Passionate Photographers
The Nikon Df is engineered to enhance the experience of taking photos and represents a culmination of decades of experience and feedback from photographers in the field, the studio and the sidelines. From its proven AF system to modern connectivity and legacy lens compatibility, the Df contains the century’s best photographic features for an enjoyable all-day shooting experience.

  • AF System: The convenience and precision of Nikon’s 39-point AF system is proof-positive of the benefits of modern technology. With 39 selectable AF points throughout the frame for precise focus, the Df also features nine cross-type sensors, and seven AF points capable of working down to f/8. Users can also choose from a variety of AF area modes to match their shooting style: 9-point, 21-point, 39-point, 39-point with 3D Tracking and Auto Area AF.
  • Get the shot with 2016-Pixel 3D Matrix Metering and Scene Recognition System: This Nikon system analyzes each shooting scenario and determines proper camera settings, resulting in even exposures, accurate white balance and precise AF. To capture action sports, wildlife and other fast moving subjects, the Df has a continuous burst shooting rate of up to 5.5 frames-per-second (fps).
  • Compose with a 3.2-inch LCD Display and Glass Pentaprism Viewfinder: Users can easily compose through the high-resolution LCD screen or the bright optical viewfinder. The LCD screen has 921K-dot resolution, making it easy for users to adjust additional settings, review images or compose using Live View. Using the glass optical viewfinder, users will enjoy 100 percent accuracy and a bright field of view. What’s more, the shooting data presented through the viewfinder has also been updated and digitized.
  • Connect and Share Instantly: Another modern touch allows users to connect and share their images instantly using the optional WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter1. By connecting to a mobile device, users can download and share images or remotely fire the camera.
  • Features for Creativity:  Photographing dramatic monochrome or vivid landscapes is easier with Nikon’s Picture Controls, which allow for the customization of color, saturation and tone. The Df also features built-in High Dynamic Range (HDR) to combine multiple shots with enhanced tonal range, and two to five-frame auto-bracketing. For maximum control, images can also be captured in JPEG, TIFF or RAW file formats.
  • Support for a Storied NIKKOR Legacy: In addition to being compatible with all current AF, AF-S, DX and AF-D NIKKOR lenses, the Df is also compatible with classic Ai and non-Ai NIKKOR glass. Thanks to a new metering coupling lever located on the bayonet, the user has the ability to once again enjoy their lens collections with renewed functionality. Full-aperture metering is also supported.
  • Accessory System Support: The Df is compatible with Nikon’s Creative Lighting System (CLS), letting users take advantage of i-TTL exposure or fire multiple units remotely using a Speedlight commander. To remotely trigger the shutter, the camera also supports the new WR remote system, as well as the threaded AR-3 cable release, which screws in to the shutter button in the traditional style.

A Classic FX-Format Special Edition NIKKOR Prime
The new AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Special Edition lens is the result of classic NIKKOR styling combined with today’s optics to create the ideal focal length companion lens for the Df. The design honors original NIKKOR Ai lenses, with colors, texture, and an aluminum mounting ring that is mated to the style of the Df. This lens is ideal for everyday portraiture, landscapes and casual photography, but offers a wide aperture and seven-blade diaphragm for natural image blur and a dramatic depth of field. Despite the timeless design, the 50mm f/1.8G is created with modern AF-S design benefits to give photographers rapid response, quiet operation and excellent sharpness and clarity throughout the frame. 
                                                                               
Price and Availability
The Nikon Df will be available in late November 2013, invoking classic Nikon silver and black color schemes. The suggested retail price (SRP) of the Df (body only) will be $2,749.95*, while the Df and 50mm f/1.8 Special Edition lens kit will have a SRP of $2,999.95*. The AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G lens will be sold separately for a SRP of $279.95*. For an additional flair of nostalgic style, Nikon is also offering black or brown leather carrying cases, the CF-DC6B and CF-DC6S (pricing and availability to be announced).

Nikon Df specifications

Price
MSRP$2749.95 (body only), $2999.95 / £2749.99 (with 50mm F1.8 lens)
Body type
Body typeMid-size SLR
Body materialMagnesium alloy
Sensor
Max resolution4928 x 3280
Other resolutionsFX: 3696 x 2456, 2464 x 1640; DX crop: 3200 x 2128, 2400 x 1592, 1600 x 1064
Image ratio w:h3:2
Effective pixels16 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors17 megapixels
Sensor sizeFull frame (36 x 23.9 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorExpeed 3
Color spacesRGB, AdobeRGB
Color filter arrayPrimary color filter
Image
ISOAuto, 100 - 12800
White balance presets12
Custom white balanceYes (4 spots)
Image stabilizationNo
Uncompressed formatRAW + TIFF
JPEG quality levelsFine, normal, basic
File format
  • JPEG (EXIF 2.3)
  • RAW (NEF)
  • TIFF
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampNo
Number of focus points39
Lens mountNikon F
Focal length multiplier1×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3.2
Screen dots921,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeTFT-LCD
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (pentaprism)
Viewfinder coverage100%
Viewfinder magnification0.7×
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program Auto
  • Shutter Priority
  • Aperture Priority
  • Manual
Built-in flashNo
External flashYes (via hot shoe or PC sync)
Flash modesAuto FP High-speed sync, front-curtain sync, rear-curtain sync, redeye reduction,
Flash X sync speed1/250 sec
Drive modes
  • Single-frame
  • Continuous high
  • Continuous low
  • Mirror-up
  • Quiet shutter
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive6 fps
Self-timerYes (2, 5, 10, or 20 secs)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±3 (2, 3, 5 frames at 1/3 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV, 2 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (2 or 3 shots in 1/3 or 1/2-stop intervals)
Videography features
MicrophoneNone
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC card
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (mini-HDMI)
WirelessOptional
Wireless notesvia WU-1a wireless mobile adapter
Remote controlYes (Cable release, wireless remote)
Physical
Environmentally sealedYes
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionEN-EL14/EN-EL14a lithium-ion battery and charger
Battery Life (CIPA)1400
Weight (inc. batteries)760 g (1.68 lb / 26.81 oz)
Dimensions144 x 110 x 67 mm (5.67 x 4.33 x 2.64)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingNo
GPSNone
GPS notesvia GP-1 or GP-1A adapter
189
I own it
392
I want it
83
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 313
123
Waldman Jordaan
By Waldman Jordaan (5 months ago)

I'm sure this is an awesome piece of kit, but I cannot help to think of Bart Simpson's grandpa every time I look at the silver version. Is it just me, or do you see it as well?

Comment edited 35 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (5 months ago)

Classic Retro.... is only to proof that the owner is OLD !!!

with old bound feeling on things in the past

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 32 seconds after posting
1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

It's a retro styled box, not retro tech. See the D4 sensor inside.

0 upvotes
le_alain
By le_alain (5 months ago)

Yes,
something ELSE !

0 upvotes
Higuel
By Higuel (5 months ago)

Get less, pay more!

It even does NOT have aperture ring! or split focus screen, or even as big viewfinder as the F3!!! (Not to mention the price of a good camera those days!)

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

Aperture rings are on lenses--say for example the manual focus Zeiss lenses for these bodies.

As for a splitscreen, with the D700 one could send the body into Nikon for a swap. So are you sure that you can't do that with this body?

0 upvotes
Dr Aref
By Dr Aref (5 months ago)

I think Nikon had to compromise to put a 16MP FX sensor to make it more compatible optically with the old generation lenses (both for resolution as well as to reduce the effect of angular incidence on the sensor micro-lenses at the periphery).

1/8000 sec shutter should have been included. There can't be any excuse not to include it in a 2700$ body.It is a wrong decision made by Nikon as they also did with the 1" sensor mirrorless cameras.

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

And I think, along with others, that Nikon chose this sensor because of its lowlight high ISO capacity.

And I know, not think, that the D700 sold for years at a very similar price. Also the D700 still aint cheap used today.

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (5 months ago)

DPR wrote: "Nikon has announced the Df, which combines the design and controls from its classic film cameras with the modern technology"

There is nothing "modern technology" about a 16 mpix camera able to do just 5 fps with 1/4000 maximum shutter - and without video. Any video. It resembles cameras like 5D from 2005.

But proper controls are great!

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

Boring--people will buy this camera solely because it's the sensor from the very lowlight capable D4.

Fast shutter speeds just aren't that important for cameras not shooting sporting events.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (5 months ago)

The sensor has the same noise as D600 and D800 adjusted to 16 mpix (or both resized to a same resolution). But worse read noise, so worse DR at low ISO (similar to Canons). Nothing special. See DxOMak.

0 upvotes
LarryK
By LarryK (5 months ago)

So use your phone.

I've got a 5D, and you'd be hard pressed to confuse the two.

I can count the times I've needed 1/8000 and more than 5 FPS on my fingers.

At least it doesn't have a miserably slow flash sync.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

peevee1:

Despite what some like to claim one can not resample, or adjust noise, out of the sensor. The D800 starts to have problems above ISO 3200. It's still useable, but takes work. Above about ISO6400 with the D800 one starts to run into magenta and cyan banding in dark shadows. The D600 is useable at higher ISOs than the D800, but this same cyan magenta banding appears at about ISO10000.

Whereas the D4 is nearly noise free at ISO 6400, perfectly useable at ISO12800, and then still well useable through ISO20000. Above that a different kind of banding starts to show up in the D4. But it's a banding that can be worked around.

Beyond that I'm not going to make any claims for the D4 because I've not used it above ISO 25800.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (5 months ago)

"Despite what some like to claim one can not resample, or adjust noise, out of the sensor."

What a BS. If you don't know how the distribution of noise changes during resampling, learn some math.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

peevee1:

"distribution of noise changes during resampling", bull, then NR would be really easy.

also you completely ignored the point about magenta and cyan blotches and bands.

The Df's sensor is much less problematic through at least ISO 25,800.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

peevee1:

I tried the resample approach to NR, because of your insistence. Found a noisy, but sharp, Samsung NX100 ISO 3200 raw; with ACR 8.2 extracted it to tiff with almost no NR, then tried the resample thing in Photoshop. The result of resampling: A smaller image with the same noise problems.

So confirmed, resampling does nothing for noise control.

0 upvotes
Babka08
By Babka08 (5 months ago)

This camera demonstrates that dslr's have "come of age", like when laser printers hit 600dpi and specifications didn't matter anymore.

There's really very little the manufacturers can do to "up" the ante on technology in cameras now. Thus nostalgia. And welcome relief for consumers.

It's pretty though. Makes me reminisce on my first slr, Nikon FG. Sigh. But I'm keeping my Pentax K5 (also 16mp!!!) with the gorgeous, retro, nostalgic, metal limited lenses. Hey, wait, Nikon just caught up with Pentax, er Ricoh! Good show, Nikon.

1 upvote
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (5 months ago)

It makes perfect sense that the filthy rich purists are more likely to drop big cash on a sexy exclusive camera that the Joneses don't have if it DOESN'T have video (although it has HDMI) or wireless (even though those feature probably cost pennies), but for $2750 this thing dosn't even have 1/8000 shutter speed! I am sure some purist will get their shorts in a knot just because it has live view. Interesting that Nikon decided to fill the void that Hasselblad failed to fill.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

1/8000 is a relatively new thing for SLRs.

This is not a rebaged Sony.

The D700 body sold for pretty much exactly the same price for years, and the Yen was lower against the US dollar.

0 upvotes
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (5 months ago)

"1/8000 is a relatively new thing" ???
The Nikon F-801 (N8008) was made in 1988 and had a 1/8000 second shutter, 1/250s flash sync, and 3.3 frames per second (includes moving the film). It is now $40 on ebay. I guess 25 years of development for Nikon is "relatively new".

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

V--

And in 1990 not all SLRs did 1/8000 of sec, so my point remains the same.

0 upvotes
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (5 months ago)

My point is 25 years ago NIKON had it and today for $2,750 they actually go backwards.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (5 months ago)

@HowaboutRAW - so are you saying that cameras should base their current specs on what was available 25 years ago!!!

To compete in today's market, it really helps to have specs that are competitive with today's cameras. Or if it doesn't, it should at least have a low price. One or the other. Df doesn't do either one, so it's not surprising that (according to Nikon Rumors), the demand for the Df appears to be low. Maybe Nikon likes the Df being a low volume product. But Nikon's recent financials aren't great, so the timing is bad:

"Nikon Corp cut its full-year unit sales forecast for high-end cameras for the second quarter in a row on Thursday [Nov. 7, 2013], as a dramatic fall in demand among photography hobbyists that began last year accelerated faster than expected. The company posted a 41 percent drop in operating profit to 21.9 billion yen ($222 million) for the six months ended September, saying overseas demand for pricy single-lens reflex models had remained depressed."

1 upvote
ABM Barry
By ABM Barry (5 months ago)

If you don't like the capitalist economies just go back to North Korea they will love your broke mentality there.
Idea!, .. Work smart, put an effort in, move to a different income bracket, change your perspective, then simply buy it if you want it and will put it to use. In Cambodia, it's the cost of 10 basic dwellings, ... Perhaps a different perspective again?
All your comment dose in reality is show everyone exactly where Your mind is.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

T3--

No, I'm saying that shutter speeds of 1/8000 aren't that important for many.

And 1/4000 of sec was the normal on many bodies as late as 2002--that's 12 years ago, almost, not 25.

So it is very unlikely that a "slow" shutter speed will be a deciding factor in sales of this body. In fact not even a consideration in most sales. What would be a consideration for some people: slow or inaccurate AF.

In other news, many camera companies are struggling, maybe not Leica anymore. This having to introduce seriously new gear every 18 months is expensive. So it aint simply Nikon having trouble.

0 upvotes
Anastigmat
By Anastigmat (5 months ago)

Nikon should be applauded for making this camera. There are, however, a couple things that could have been better. For example, the top plate looks plasticky, and is probably plastic. The FE camera, which is likely the camera the Df is aping, had a metal top plate. The PC flash terminal should have been put somewhere that is less conspicuous, because the camera looks ugly if you lose the cap for that terminal. The hand grip is too small. They should have made it bigger to be useful or just get rid of it. The mechanical shutter release cable also makes no sense. No one has those anymore, and they are a pain to use. I would love to see a DLSR camera that has interchangeable viewfinders, just like an F5, but with digital sensor. That would be a truly useful camera and not just a gimmick.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (5 months ago)

The top plate, and much of the Df are magnesium alloy, not plastic. And all the dials and buttons are weather sealed with O-rings (copy paste url below for image).

http://photographylife.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Nikon-Df-Magnesium-Alloy-Construction.jpg

The grip could have been deeper, but the combination of the current grip and the raised ridge on the rear means that it should be quite comfortable to hold.

http://media.digitalcameraworld.com/files/2013/11/Nikon_Df_price_release_date_specs_Df_SL_back.jpg

The "gimmick" characterization I don't agree with at all as in practice accurate as MF on all DSLRs is not difficult. It likely has AF confirmation in the VF, and in instances where you need to be 100% sure of accurate focus, LiveView with magnification is easy enough to do. But clearly Nikon had to choose to support AF lenses with a bright matte finder, and interchangeable focussing screens would have significantly raised the price.

0 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (5 months ago)

"I would love to see a DLSR camera that has interchangeable viewfinders, just like an F5, but with digital sensor. "

Yup. Despite all the advanced technology in these cameras, no one except Fuji with the hybrid viewfinder is thinking anew. These are all iterations of technologies and modules already available.

2 upvotes
probert500
By probert500 (5 months ago)

My guess is that Sony - who's sensors Nikon uses - wouldn't license their newest FF sensors for this camera. That's why it has a midrange sensor that's in no way comparable to the A7/r sensors.

I can't see the appeal of this thing. The sonys are less expensive, use the best sensors made, and if you want to use your nikon glass you can.

baffling.

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

This is the sensor from the D4 made by Renesas, and it's better in low light than the Sony sensors in the A7/R bodies. So it's a highend sensor that Nikon chose for an obvious reason.

It is debatable if Sony makes the best sensors, see Renesas, Toshiba, Aptina, and yes Sony does make good sensors.

0 upvotes
ArunasS
By ArunasS (5 months ago)

In a way it's a nice camera, however D600/610 is not worse for a lot less. It's all about feeling and looks. OK, I could be possibly interested, if the size and weight is somewhere like my old lovely FM3a.

1 upvote
Anastigmat
By Anastigmat (5 months ago)

The FM series works without a battery. So, if you are working in a jungle with 100% humidity and all the electronics have gone south, you can still take pictures. There is no way any DSLR can duplicate that.

1 upvote
LarryK
By LarryK (5 months ago)

They oughta put the winding lever back on, connect it to a small generator, and store the energy in a carbon nano-tube capacitor, then we can stop this slavish dependence on batteries.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (5 months ago)

@Anastigmat - nevertheless, it hasn't kept the best photographers from doing great photography even in the harshest conditions. Just ask NatGeo photographers who regularly shoot in such extreme conditions with their battery-powered gear, from the jungles of the Amazon to highest peaks of Antarctica. Heck, they're even shooting video in these conditions!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRKsFAPpxgY

Here are the photos (shot with DSLR) from that expedition, shot by Cory Richards:

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/antarctica-climb/richards-photography

So I have to laugh when people bring up the notion that DSLRs can't handle severe, tough conditions (unlike-- supposedly-- old film SLRs). They can, and they do. And it doesn't get any worse than those conditions!

Besides, in such harsh and demanding conditions, it can be a BIG advantage to not have to pop open the back of your camera every 36 shots to unload and load film!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
kty
By kty (5 months ago)

this camera could be a win if nikon had priced it reasonably ($1000)
most of the negative comments would also vanish

2 upvotes
kty
By kty (5 months ago)

Greed will bring Nikon down. Just like Leica.
They first misssed the mirrorless train with their overpriced 1-system and now it is the retro fullframe train they miss because of the absurd price tag.

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

There's a long waiting list for Leica bodies and lenses. (M+S).

I think you've confused Leica circa 2003 with Leica in 2013.

Also look up the D700, used in good condition it's still selling for $2000.

0 upvotes
kty
By kty (5 months ago)

Long waiting lists or high used prices doesn't indicate succes.
Leica was in the past one of the big players. And now...
The current two bigs Canon and Nikon are both loosing market shares to Panasonic, Sony, Olympus and co. every year.
Mirrorless system sales already surpassed DSLR sales in Japan this year.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

kty--

Really you think in say 1985 Leica sold as many R+M bodies as Nikon sold F3 bodies? Very unlikely.

You're right Leica no longer enjoys as broad a market penetration as it once did, but it's still plenty sought after, and that's the only point I was making. Nikon has probably been out selling Leica for SLRs since 1960. (And yes Leica makes a DSLR.)

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
mermaidkiller
By mermaidkiller (5 months ago)

Screen dots 921 (without the useless trailing zeroes after the decimal point) ? Number of dots in diagonal ?
Why not expressed in w x h (e.g. 640x480) as every screen ?

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (5 months ago)

It is not a decimal point, it is a comma - thousands separator here in the US.

But I agree, would be much better simply in real full-color pixels.

Comment edited 49 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Ian SS
By Ian SS (5 months ago)

Why compare this camera with a D610? Df is for people wanting retro feel, no movie mode simply because it is retro (or get a Canon for movies), it is Nikon marketing at work.

2 upvotes
kty
By kty (5 months ago)

It is not "that" retro.
F4, F3 and FM are masterpieces of design.
This chubby Df here dosen't have the same appeal.

0 upvotes
Ian SS
By Ian SS (5 months ago)

Agree, I would like it to be thinner like my F3/T but it is unlikely with display and all the electronics inside, this is as close as it can get until someone makes something better. This is like Fuji making rangefinder cameras, it is not the same but close enough.

0 upvotes
steelhead3
By steelhead3 (5 months ago)

I see a gold, no problem. With this much interest from the Nikon AARP crowd, it can't be anything less.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (5 months ago)

What is the point of this camera? Dials for old people and looks like an old camera with a slim handgrip like a P&S. And just 16 MP? nikon must be banking that people think fewer pixels is better which isn't the case when the image sensor is as large as the 35mm sensor is. And no video? If they really wanted to make it vintage, they would have removed the rear LCD screen. This may appeal to some old people, and then they'll probably get tired of the cumbersome controls and go back to their d800 or d600/610.

4 upvotes
LarryK
By LarryK (5 months ago)

Why make cameras for the young, They're so rude.

0 upvotes
RStyga
By RStyga (5 months ago)

While implying the compactness of retro SLR design it is still the size/weight of a 6D (which is great if Nikon can admit it), and uses a 16MP (excuse me?) full-frame sensor, priced at $2750! So, a potentially great FF DSLR (I like the design a lot, save for the excessive height) got messed up (I won't use a stronger word) by Nikon's marketing Dept. It's not the first time they cripple the crap out of a product to avoid internal competition. Expect a DF-2 to get a decent resolution FF sensor + video and be prepared to spend $3500 for it (or thereabouts). Pitiful marketing wit...

3 upvotes
Tim the Grey
By Tim the Grey (5 months ago)

I'll take one, thanks. I grew up with this sort of thing, only with Olympus badges.
As for video? Who CARES?
If I want video, I'll buy an HD camcorder for less than a tenth the price. Or just use my phone.
Proper dials, MMMMMMMmmmmmmmmmmmmmm....

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
probert500
By probert500 (5 months ago)

If you don't want video don't hit the little red button. The a7 sonys have modern sensors and knobs and can be used with almost any lens.

0 upvotes
DaytonR
By DaytonR (5 months ago)

More than $2000 and they couldnt even throw in a movie mode ? In this day and age ! Unbelievable - it kinda looks good though :)

3 upvotes
J2Gphoto
By J2Gphoto (5 months ago)

Retro? Looks space aged. That is one ugly camera.

7 upvotes
oselimg
By oselimg (5 months ago)

This so called"retro" trend must be a very effective way of milking the vain and the shallow. Why not make even older looking cameras and put even more absurd prices on them.

Comment edited 43 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
Gesture
By Gesture (5 months ago)

But so many of those older cameras did marry form and function. It doesn't seem like anyone can rationalize or simplify the modern digital camera. In some respects, the Pentax K-01 is one of the best efforts so far. But Pentax went back to conventional DLSRs.

1 upvote
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (5 months ago)

I was thinking the same thing. Next will be D-TLR camera so you can buy two of every lens, one for the sensor and one for viewfinder, coupled of course. Just so you can look really cool behind the camera.

0 upvotes
bmcdad
By bmcdad (5 months ago)

This is a niche product that will disappoint.

4 upvotes
jackspra
By jackspra (5 months ago)

Makes no sense to omit video.

7 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (5 months ago)

Of course it does. Who really buys a DSLR to shoot video?

I buy a DSLR (especially FF) to take high quality still images. If I REALLY want video, I will buy a dedicated video camera, such as the BlackMagic offerings. Otherwise I will use my mirrorless camera (MFT/NEX). But NOT my DSLR.

And if you REALLY want video in your DSLR, well, you have LOTS of other options to choose from.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (5 months ago)

"Who really buys a DSLR to shoot video?"

A *lot* of people. I think a large chunk of DSLR sales are now going to people specifically buying a DSLR for video, and who have little or no interest in photography. Every wedding videographer I've worked with in the last few years at weddings is shooting video with DSLRs.

The crazy thing is that Nikon is actually charging you *more* for the privilege of owning a DSLR that doesn't have video! In other words, "no video" is actually a feature that you're paying extra for. Even though it's probably just disabled in the firmware. It's a crazy gimmick. But people who don't like video will just lap it up, and say that it's worth every extra dollar!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

T3:

In all honesty of course those purists who shoot video with DSLRs then need to use an external audio recorder. So that adds a layer of complication to shooting decent video with a DSLR--easier shallow DOF though.

Comment edited 49 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (5 months ago)

T3: I would like to see a breakdown as to how many people actually use a DSLR primarily for video. I am betting the numbers are quite low.

I own 3 FF DSLRs and do not use any of them for video. I use them exclusively for stills. In fact, I have just added a BlackMagic camera to my arsenal for shooting video.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (5 months ago)

@GodSpeaks - I'd like to see a breakdown of how many videographers and movie makers would actually go out and buy DSLRs if DSLRs didn't do video. I am betting the numbers are quite low. Every wedding videographer I've worked with in the last few years at weddings is using DSLRs. That whole market is now mainly using DSLRs.

I'd also like to see the breakdown of photographers who have been in any way hurt or injured because of video in DSLR. I'm betting none.

The truth is that photographers who hate video in DSLRs are really just being defensively territorial. They hate the fact that the use case for DSLRs has been broadened and widened beyond the purely photographic community thanks to video. They hate that DSLRs are now being used to shoot music videos, commercials, indie movies, family birthday parties, vacations, wedding, etc. Oh, the sacrilege! How bare people use DSLRs for anything other than just photos! How dare DSLRs offer consumers more value for their dollar!

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
1 upvote
T3
By T3 (5 months ago)

You guys sound like the old grumps who want to go back to having cell phones that only made phone calls. You guys want a phone that has no camera, no video, no music playback, no internet, etc. Just phone calls! Because retro is cool, and that's how you think phones should be! Well, I think that train has long left the station, and people like a little bit more flexibility and capability with their devices whenever possible. Why? Because people like to decide for themselves which features of a product to use and how. And if there are some features they don't use, then they just don't use them, rather than forcing that particular feature to be removed for the sake of "purity" or just for the sake of denying someone else from having the option.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
1 upvote
wyoming
By wyoming (5 months ago)

It looks very like my FM2N, someone bet if it will also last as long?

Comment edited 47 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
knize10
By knize10 (5 months ago)

A Fuji wannabee, too little too late as always with too many camera makers.

3 upvotes
dw2001
By dw2001 (5 months ago)

seriously, why all these piece of sh1t looking retro cameras? I bet they will break even when selling the first of these cameras for that price. stripped down technology for a ridicoulus price. why would anyone buy this?? for the looks? go buy a hasselblad instead.... jeeez...

6 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (5 months ago)

Nikon Df Sample Images

http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/df/sample.htm

Enjoy. :-)

0 upvotes
bmcdad
By bmcdad (5 months ago)

Not impresssive at all.. look very grainy to me..

1 upvote
LarryK
By LarryK (5 months ago)

You may need an eye exam.

0 upvotes
Dodi73
By Dodi73 (5 months ago)

I haven't understood yet if the x-sync is 1/200 or 1/250s. There are two different specs online.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (5 months ago)

Nikon's website says:

"X=1/200 s; synchronizes with shutter at 1/250 s or slower"

0 upvotes
AD in KC
By AD in KC (5 months ago)

I've owned an FM, an FM2 and an FM3a in years past - so I've probably got a target on my back for one of these silly things. But, no thanks. The original FM was a lean, rugged, straight-forward photo-taking instrument. This thing is nostalgia bait for snagging doctors' and bankers' dollars.

8 upvotes
yudi4vfx
By yudi4vfx (5 months ago)

I love the dials for shutter speed, aperture, and exposure compensation. :-)

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (5 months ago)

I hate the fact that they are all locked, forcing you to depressing locking pins in order to use them. That will get annoying very quick. And with the PSAM mode dial, you have to "lift and rotate" it in order to use it. It's rather ironic because people are thinking that these dials will simplify changing your settings, when in actuality, the way Nikon has implemented it, it makes it more complicated and will slow you down.

2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

T3:

You may want to check about locking dials.

0 upvotes
KariIceland
By KariIceland (5 months ago)

THREE GRAND?! No thanks!

1 upvote
ARMM
By ARMM (5 months ago)

While I agree that this is a nice try by Nikon, 3 grand for basically a D4 without the weight and size and 7 grand price tag? Why not.

1 upvote
JackM
By JackM (5 months ago)

Why not? Because you could get a better D610 for $1000 less. Unless you really want to use old lenses.

4 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (5 months ago)

@ARMM

If you think the Df is "basically a D4" you have no idea what you are talking about. Just having it's sensor doesn't make this a D4 and for most people this camera would be better with either the D610 or D800 sensor. The D4 sensor is only better if you shoot high dynamic range scenes at 800+ ISO regularly.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

JackM:

There are some who'd want this sensor over that in the D610. Also the D610 is more like 800usd less expensive.

This Df also likely, not confirmed, has a very bright VF.

0 upvotes
Yanko Kitanov
By Yanko Kitanov (5 months ago)

Lovely design!

0 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (5 months ago)

man....this could have been a new flasgship but you guys made it like a toy?! why? it has such a beautiful body and inside is semi-pro stuff....WHY?!?!?!

this is disappointing!

2 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (5 months ago)

I guess it is not difficult to guess the reason: It is over-priced for its time and people are mad because Nikon's attempt to rip consumers off just by adding a retro-style interface looks TOO OBVIOUS.

0 upvotes
JackM
By JackM (5 months ago)

D610 makes waaaaay more sense. 24mp + video for $1000 less.

18 upvotes
blue_cheese
By blue_cheese (5 months ago)

at least the D610 will now be known as "the one that makes sense" rather than the "one that fixed the shutter problem". I bet this camera cost near nothing in R&D dollars given the amount of technology re-use. It was probably meant to sell a couple of units to the vain and scare the sensible into a D610

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (5 months ago)

JackM:

And in 2013 if I had to pick between a D700 and a D610, I'd pick the 5 year old body, if I could find one in good condition.

0 upvotes
Denis of Whidbey Island
By Denis of Whidbey Island (5 months ago)

Well, I own a D800 and am contemplating adding a second body. I just don't see why I would choose the Df over another D800 or D800E. And I'm probably the target audience, having owned the F, F2, F3, F5 when they were new.

3 upvotes
Leiduowen
By Leiduowen (5 months ago)

I wonder why you skipped the F4...

0 upvotes
Denis of Whidbey Island
By Denis of Whidbey Island (5 months ago)

The F4 seemed too much like a beta test. I knew a guy with one and used it but it had that neither fish nor fowl quality.

1 upvote
probert500
By probert500 (5 months ago)

Get the a7r - still 36mpx in a small light body.

0 upvotes
km25
By km25 (5 months ago)

I will say it again, when I bouhgt my first Nikon I bought the Nikkormat, because I was un able to aford the F. This is like the Nikkormat cost more money, because it has less. Six monhts from now these cameras are going to be sold for $1500.00, with lens and extras.

0 upvotes
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (5 months ago)

May your words become reality! :-)

0 upvotes
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (5 months ago)

"Six months from now these cameras are going to be sold for $1500.00, with lens and extras."

Actually they won't because anyone who can afford to throw this much money away on something so vain won't be desperate to sell it later either. It will sit on their display shelf from day 3 on and stay there.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Kuanbek
By Kuanbek (5 months ago)

Its just Nikon equivalent of Toyota FJ Cruiser. Fully modern camera in retro skin. Time will tell if there is market for it but if car market is any indication, it shall be popular.

1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (5 months ago)

Nikon just created a camera that none of their competitors will ever dare to compete against. Freaking Brilliant is what this is.

2 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (5 months ago)

I'd say it already competes with the Fuji X, Leica M, Olympus OMD and to some degree the Sony A7

3 upvotes
J2Gphoto
By J2Gphoto (5 months ago)

How does it compete when it is more than twice the price and does less?

2 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (5 months ago)

@mpgxsvcd
It's more like Nikon decided break even or lose money on a retro body for the brand awareness and perception it will create.

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (5 months ago)

One small step for a camera company and one giant leap backwards for the photography industry.

7 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (5 months ago)

Nikon is going to make more money off of this than they did with the 1 series.

3 upvotes
blue_cheese
By blue_cheese (5 months ago)

In business, the only way to make a wrong into a right is to make a bigger wrong

2 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (5 months ago)

I can't wait till they hack it to turn the video back on. It is probably capable of 4K @ 60 FPS RAW video but Nikon turned it off for now.

2 upvotes
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (5 months ago)

Maybe the DF2 will do that plus built in flash with CLS!! :-)

0 upvotes
stevens37y
By stevens37y (5 months ago)

no button to start it :)

0 upvotes
blue_cheese
By blue_cheese (5 months ago)

highly unlikely, a 4K codec will probably be in about 4 years from now. The camera is probably 1080p@30fps

0 upvotes
Frank C.
By Frank C. (5 months ago)

someone beat that camera with a fugly stick

0 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (5 months ago)

This is Nikon's last ditch effort to hold on to their most loyal customers before those customers pass away.

7 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (5 months ago)

I would love this camera if I was born 30 years earlier than I actually was.

2 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (5 months ago)

Nikon is brilliant. They created a new market without investing in new technology.

3 upvotes
blue_cheese
By blue_cheese (5 months ago)

The problem with this "new" market is that it has a short shelf life

1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (5 months ago)

This is the perfect camera for those people that know how to take great pictures but are too stubborn to learn how to do it with today's technology.

2 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (5 months ago)

Hardly, for better or worse this camera is unashamedly a modern DSLR and anyone who "doesn't know" how to change settings on an LCD screen is going to have a bad time.

3 upvotes
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (5 months ago)

You guys do know that they simply turned video off with firmware, stuck it in a "Classic" body, and then charged more for it right? I know they will sell these cameras to someone.

However, Hasselbad stills sells cameras to people as well.

6 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (5 months ago)

Cute! A little to bulky to get the full illusion of a retro camera. And a little too expensive. But .. apart from that … looking good.

0 upvotes
noirdude
By noirdude (5 months ago)

True! It looks good from the front but bulky from atop.. Nikon should fix the design.. make it 9 focus point instead of 39.. use the sensor from D800 instead of D4.. then they can come out with a more reasonable price.

0 upvotes
Maverick_
By Maverick_ (5 months ago)

As cameras go, this thing is sexy. Very nice design! I would have liked tilted screen, but I understand their desire to keep it as classic as possible.

1 upvote
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (5 months ago)

Agree, i like the retro look as well.. But too crippled in features.. No Built in flash and no video..

1 upvote
Total comments: 313
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