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Stunning images of things invisible to the naked eye

By dpreview staff on Nov 1, 2013 at 08:00 GMT
Stunning images of things invisible to the naked eye
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Stunning images of things invisible to the naked eye

Subject Matter: Chrysemys picta (painted turtle) retina (400x)

Technique: Differential Interference Contrast

Source: Nikon

Comments

Total comments: 21
peevee1
By peevee1 (5 months ago)

Stuff you can't take with your smartphone. ;)

0 upvotes
Wildbegonia
By Wildbegonia (5 months ago)

What a feast of images and discovery from an earthly universer! Winter sleepless nights awaits me.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Segaman
By Segaman (5 months ago)

Really impressive, almost like if it was from another planet.
Wonderful nature

0 upvotes
jlb333333
By jlb333333 (5 months ago)

Brilliant. Breathtaking.

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (5 months ago)

living parameceums are quite large, like amoebas, and thus are not entirely invisible to the naked eye, it is only the close-up details that escape naked-eye scrutiny ... even with good vision

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Ignace
By Ignace (5 months ago)

Super cool !

0 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (5 months ago)

Invisible beauty, beautiful textures and colors.

2 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (5 months ago)

Scanning tunneling microscope can photo atoms already. OK, the atoms are just dots, but, individual atoms are distinguishable.

0 upvotes
jondh
By jondh (5 months ago)

Hope someday we will be able to photograph atoms

1 upvote
babalu
By babalu (5 months ago)

It will always be a blurred image, due to the speed of the electron(s) circling that atom kernel . You'll need one hell of a fast shutter to capture them electrons just emerging from the curve...
not to speak of a damn fast lens, and a flash sync speed to match
:-))

0 upvotes
Frank C.
By Frank C. (5 months ago)

atoms are just strings of energy

0 upvotes
Stitzer23
By Stitzer23 (5 months ago)

Need more bokeh :-)

1 upvote
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (5 months ago)

Fascinating.

May photography live long and prosper.

.

5 upvotes
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (5 months ago)

Great. Thanks

0 upvotes
babalu
By babalu (5 months ago)

#12 reminds of Keith Haring .

2 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (5 months ago)

Indeed it does!

0 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (5 months ago)

mind blowing images. saw it two days back.

0 upvotes
babalu
By babalu (5 months ago)

..speaking of microminiaturization ... we're still eons away of even beginning to get close to nature's ways . A lesson in humbleness .

2 upvotes
rurikw
By rurikw (5 months ago)

Mind-blowing. Hard to imagine a more valid, worthwhile (and demanding) use for photography.

5 upvotes
Rylee Isitt
By Rylee Isitt (5 months ago)

This is the type of photography I eventually settled on. The equipment is expensive to say the least, and I so far only go up to 20x magnification. For higher magnifications I need a better microscope, the one I have couldn't begin to compete. But for 20x and below you don't need a microscope at all, just attach microscope objectives to a camera directly.

The optics and camera are cheap, compared to the rigging you need, because it helps to be able to precisely position both camera and subject on micrometer scales.

And then there's the whole matter of preparing the specimen so that it's clean and posed properly. Not trivial at all.

And focus stacking is a very common technique, so you will wear out your camera's shutter much more quickly than you would with other types of photography!

0 upvotes
gefrorenezeit
By gefrorenezeit (5 months ago)

Great views of the unviewable. :)

0 upvotes
Total comments: 21