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Marco Bohr investigates 'hipster photography'

By dpreview staff on Oct 20, 2013 at 11:00 GMT

What is 'hipster photography'? Photographer Marco Bohr has written a blog post in which he attempts to define what he calls 'a new genre of photography which is apparently produced, promoted and disseminated by trend conscious people who are in contemporary visual culture referred to as hipsters'. In his post, Bohr argues there is a distinction between a photograph of hipsters and a photograph by hipsters. He aims to deconstruct these images flooding our visual culture and see beyond the thick black-framed glasses, quirky haircuts, and geeky watches. 

Bohr includes a handful of representative 'hipster' images in his blog, none of which are attributed or credited in any way. This particular (controversial - for obvious reasons) image is used in hundreds of blogs and articles discussing 'hipsters' but none of them (that we've been able to find) identify the original photographer.

UPDATE: Photographer is Danielle Yagodich - thanks JD Thomas for his detective work.

Bohr identifies common themes in so-called 'hipster' photographs - 'hipster photography depicts a curiously carefree world where people generally look happy joined by other people who look happy [...] this is presumably a fairly democratic world where beautiful people of any color, race or sex can be depicted in a photograph as long as they are also young.'

As such, Bohr argues, this genre of photography 'lends itself amazingly well to the advertisement of a product' since 'although hipsters [depict] a carefree world, in general they carefully pick or curate the consumable objects they wish to be surrounded by.' He explains 'consumption in a sense emphasizes that the subject is a living thing that needs nourishment or stimulation in order to carry on being cool. It reads as the fuel for coolness.' 

In our caption to the image used above, we mention our failed attempt to find the original creator of the photograph, despite the fact that the picture has been used countless times in countless places on the Internet. This raises an interesting point about authorship and one which is frustratingly unaddressed in Bohr's analysis. Bohr mentions Tumblr in passing, but doesn't investigate one of its key legacies - the growing perception on the part of the online 'social' community that images are things to be used and can be freely shared without compensation or attribution.

Bohr says of hipster photographs that '[the] photograph must be shared in order to justify its existence and indeed the existence of the person taking the photograph' but we're not convinced about the second part of that sentence. If 'hipster' photography has any defining characteristics, surely one of them is that it prioritizes distribution and appropriation over authorship, or even longevity. But that's another question, for another day. 

As always, let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Comments

Total comments: 105
Bervilat
By Bervilat (6 months ago)

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m4g0twulEm1rwniqvo1_500.jpg

0 upvotes
Stealthy Ninja
By Stealthy Ninja (6 months ago)

I liked hipster photography before it was popular.

3 upvotes
nowo1978
By nowo1978 (6 months ago)

"Trend conscious people" - what a euphemism ...

2 upvotes
Rick Knepper
By Rick Knepper (6 months ago)

Why is this image "hip"? It's a moron smoking a cigarette with a costume on.

1 upvote
Adamaflex
By Adamaflex (6 months ago)

Says the stuffy old man

1 upvote
b craw
By b craw (6 months ago)

"Hipster" is a problematic term because it is a mildly derogatory term nearly always used too generally from the outside. Also, it is important to not conflate "hipster" with the majority of young photographers. As a teacher of many photographers in their late teens or early twenties, I've found that while stylistic mannerism is often present, many of these photographers mine the rich history of photography (often more so than older students) and in many cases progress toward integrating influence in pretty sophisticated ways. They have come to age in times of pervasive cultural and media quotation and the dematerializing of older more clearly defined boundaries of photographic genre(s). Also, while many others, young and old, rush to worship at the altar of constantly emerging technologies (not that there is anything necessarily wrong with that), it has often been young photographers to cast balance in use of older methods, mining with dedication the creative potentials of film and various analog camera formats, thusly maintaining a vein of legitimacy to traditional approaches redeployed in the present.

[By the way, one poster positioned the beginnings of "hipster" in the 1990's. While the true etymology of the term (or similar terms) might be impossible to trace exactly, synonyms or an equivalent notion most likely date back to the early twentieth century, if not earlier. "Hip(ster)" came into common use in the mid-1950's and grew with popular culture applications relating to the Beat Generation, media rebels such as James Dean, and Mods connected in British and American music of the 1960's.]

4 upvotes
b craw
By b craw (6 months ago)

Also, I've witnessed, since the beginnings of Flickr, distinctive trends in influence. Just one example was/is the interest taken most prominently in photographers (some obscure or nearly forgotten) such as American Francesca Woodman by young "hip" photographers in Europe - most concentrated in Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, and Russia. In turn, this fed/feeds interest among young American photographers seeing the photos demonstrating this influence on the Internet from a half a world away. Re-emergence of attention payed to Woodman and others in academic contexts has had a great deal to do with growing interest by young photographers.

3 upvotes
leversandgears
By leversandgears (6 months ago)

The issue here is that Bohr equivocates hipster photographers with conspicuous consumption and a seeming inability to produce 'actual' work free from the semiotic influences of mass-media upbringing.

You could say the hipster attempt at subverting the iconography (first picture of a semi-nude woman wearing a Homer Simpson mask) of culture in various ways harkens back to Absurdism and the inability to accurately define ownership of a pervasive monoculture in general.

However, this rejection of the conventional carries itself to the extreme in these examples. The point of work like this is that it has no point and is rife with conventionally defined compositional or fidelity defects.

What I find disheartening about the post is that Bohr cut his teeth studying Japanese photography and mentions nothing about the stylistic influences of Nobuyoshi Araki or Shoji Ueda - not to mention any western photographers of the same bent (especially Terry Richardson).

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
leversandgears
By leversandgears (6 months ago)

Furthermore, the objective of the 'hipster' genre is to reject conventional definitions of semiotic or iconographic ownership over a specific representation for the purpose of deriding such systems. Reappropriation, sampling, or whatever you want to call it then becomes the entire motivation for producing such work.

Instagram appeals to a certain aesthetic because it has a market following. It is no less a valid means or form of expression than the massive set-pieces produced by Annie Liebovitz or Henri Cartier Bresson's intentional use of black and white film as a primary medium. High-speed low-drag techno-fetishists want a specific thing, while another group cannot be bothered to figure anything out more complicated than pushing button to receive bacon.

The foundational flaw in the article is that it is click-bait to draw views to Bohr's blog through the creation of a non-controversy. It certainly does not lie with the rise and fall of a trend mocking conventional culture.

3 upvotes
leversandgears
By leversandgears (6 months ago)

tl;dr - I agree with the substance of your post.

2 upvotes
pfzt
By pfzt (6 months ago)

me too ;)

2 upvotes
b craw
By b craw (6 months ago)

leversandgears: whereas my comments were only intended as tangential, your commentary is an acute analysis. I enjoyed it very much. Look forward to hearing more from you.

1 upvote
b craw
By b craw (6 months ago)

Modernism (small m) has always found a counterpoint in absurdism. Dadaism was the first art-historically recognized punch to the belly. This was decidedly political. Fast forward to the latter half of the twentieth century and resistance is exemplified in a fractured mosaic of youth-based movements, some political and some non-political. With the exception of the (what some might call) Pollyanna(ic) lenanings of the counterculture movements of the late 1960's and early 1970's, this becomes an increasingly nihilistic affair (and that is not to imply the perjorative). Consistently music, based on access, grows as the currency youth philosophy. "Live fast, die young" become proverbial. And much of this was based on very real failings of consumerism to deliver a worthwhile ethos. [skip forward through the cultural touchstones of Punk music, Grunge music, etc] Younger culture now presents a very different face. And much of it, while not necessarily aware of arc of the failings of modernism, still exhibit inherited disregard for systems extant. A marked difference (compare it to the rebellion and nihilisms before it) is that the individuals we see in these photos, while only a rough confederation of sympathies, demonstrate a Warholian assimilation of the dominant culture, mixed and reflected back upon the status quo in the image of tge snake eating its own tail. It is what it has been for several generations, a pointed f$&k you - but there exists no need to escape in a zen-like acceptance that no escape is possible, or perhaps even preferable. So let's rock until it ends.

1 upvote
RFC1925
By RFC1925 (6 months ago)

Thought it was an interesting write-up.Worth a read.

1 upvote
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (6 months ago)

On the bright side.... at least we won't have to hear about Emos anymore.

The Hipsters wear the same skinny jeans, and also get pierced and tattooed, but they are much less suicidal and depressed.

And the retro glasses are a more interesting look.

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Shunda77
By Shunda77 (6 months ago)

Is this a joke?
Ya can't just make stuff up "Marco".

1 upvote
TheChefs
By TheChefs (6 months ago)

Did I seriously try to waste my time reading this? To me there's only 1 conclusion, Danielle Yagodich takes better photos than the boring Marco Bohr stuff. That's all I need to know.

1 upvote
Eurodynamica
By Eurodynamica (6 months ago)

Better titled: "A man with a $49 camera demonstrating why a $300 camera would be wasted on him"

3 upvotes
mingleby
By mingleby (6 months ago)

Hipster = "Apple-device" user, yes?

So surely it would be at least a $449 camera!

8 upvotes
ShatteredSky
By ShatteredSky (6 months ago)

Why always those unnecessary stabs at Apple users? It is annoying and boring. You find your "hipster" / nerd / normal user / etc type on all brands. Except you meant to be sarcastic ...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
rpm40
By rpm40 (6 months ago)

But apple really IS a hipster brand.

It's fine, I have an iPhone, and I'm decidedly not. But apple knows it, and they embrace it. Just look at the latest iPhone commercials, with a string of hipsters, each hipper than the last, answering their phones, their glasses keep getting thicker, their pants tighter, their moustaches handle-bar-ier.

It doesn't mean you need to be a hipster to use one. I work at a law firm where a good 75% of our attorneys use them, and it is decidedly not an uber-hip crowd. Still, you can't deny the obvious- Apple has embraced the hipster as part of their image.

3 upvotes
ShatteredSky
By ShatteredSky (6 months ago)

As I said, it is not only Apple who is guilty of that. The problem is more that a lot of people want to be / appear hip. And it was stated above that the Apple device user is a hipster, not the brand itself.

0 upvotes
Kirk Bruner
By Kirk Bruner (6 months ago)

Are there still hipsters? I thought they were over already. From the tone of this article, it seems the writer is talking more about advertising than photography. It's not really an article about style as much as one on demographics. Meanwhile, as hipsters are hitting thirty now, their influence days are numbered. Even Instagram itself is less a spread of something new than it is a dollop of nostalgia. It is, after all, a set of computer-controlled filters devised to turn perfectly good photos into what look like old snapshots left on a garage shelf for fifteen years. Yeah, it was fun for a minute when it was new, but it's gone on now for years and it hasn't really become anything else. It's kind of like the mp3. Lousy fidelity for the sake or portability. Why does the mp3 persist now that storage is making it possible to use actual wav. files? There's not even any nostalgic value to that. I think the article really describes what is simply the current version of the Pepsi generation.

6 upvotes
fortwodriver
By fortwodriver (6 months ago)

Sounds good to me! It's advertising that set this all in motion. As the current generation of "hipsters" get closer to "hip-replacement-sters" advertising will appeal to the next group of 20-somethings and it'll start all over again. First with Instagram and then with whatever ends up being the next visual flavour of the month.

0 upvotes
reginalddwight
By reginalddwight (6 months ago)

I see this recent trend of photography nothing more than a byproduct of readily accessible "hipsta" filters on apps like Hipstamatic and Instagram, with photos then shared through social media to allow them to go "viral" and become an internet "meme".

What once was old is new again.

Such is the circle of life.

5 upvotes
fortwodriver
By fortwodriver (6 months ago)

Besides, in the 70s and 80s as a kid I remember having a camera. It was a Kodak 110 Instamatic. Later on I had a fixed lens 35mm compact camera with no meter. At least the 110 had a meter - but you had no idea what it was doing.
They took pictures that, in less than ideal light, came out looking an awful lot like Instagram shots! As kids we couldn't afford "good" cameras like Nikon Fs or Canon A series cameras.

Anyway, we took our "cheap" cameras everywhere we went and casually snapped away, relying on the latitude of common negative film to get us through our lack of control over exposure.

These types of articles bring out the hate in people every time. Mainly because everyone owns large, complicated cameras with lots of functionality and fancy themselves arm-chair critics. My family and friends were always amazed and surprised how our photos came out given the simple cameras we had access to.

5 upvotes
fortwodriver
By fortwodriver (6 months ago)

Did this all happen in New York in the 60s and 70s?

2 upvotes
sh10453
By sh10453 (6 months ago)

No. The "hipsters" thing started in the early 1990's, and was a big thing in 2010.

Comment edited 14 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
b craw
By b craw (6 months ago)

Not sure if you are being sarcastic. But if you are not, the term actually dates back to at least the late 1950's and came into more popular use in the 1960's, applied to many young people following new British and American rock music (including the Mods movement), Beat writers, artists, rebels in film and popular media, counterculturists, etc. And if we look beyond the term specifically to synonymous attribution we can include other historical groups, such as Flappers, Dandies, etc.

0 upvotes
Palimpsest
By Palimpsest (6 months ago)

DPR and Bohr's articles bring to mind the Sokal Hoax except they probably believe their nonsense. Sad...

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
SeeRoy
By SeeRoy (6 months ago)

Just to let you know that at least one other person knows what you're referring to. I do like a spot of transformative hermeneutics aka the higher bullsh1t.

0 upvotes
groucher
By groucher (6 months ago)

There's a lot of it about - the Tate Modern thrives on it.

1 upvote
Prairie Pal
By Prairie Pal (6 months ago)

This whole "look at me I'm photographing freaky people" got lame real quick a long time ago.

4 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

I feel the same about "look at me I'm photographing homeless people" and "look at me I'm photographing normal people" and "look at me I'm photographing babies" and "look at me I'm photographing corporate people" and so on...

7 upvotes
mcshan
By mcshan (6 months ago)

Nothing hip about smoking.

Nothing worse than someone who is all about "look at me I'm different".

8 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

"look at me I'm different"

Isn't that what EVERY photographer does? Do you take photos that look like everyone else's? Probably not. You want people to see your photos as unique do you not?

Furthermore the girl is a model. She may not even smoke. And I doubt she walks around in headdress any more than a jewelry model walks around wearing a $10K diamond tiara. This is the photographer's concept.

7 upvotes
Ferling
By Ferling (6 months ago)

"This is the photographer's concept." Correct. One merely has to look at the body of the photographer's work to see that's her style of shooting. The whole purpose is to draw attention, and it's apparently working.

2 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

In the end isn't that what most photographers want? People to recognize our work?

There are few artists I know that created simply for the sake of creation. Two off the top of my head Vivian Maier and JD Salinger

3 upvotes
Ferling
By Ferling (6 months ago)

There's no crime in enjoying and sharing ones craft. Hired or otherwise.

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

I think as a photographer she is very talented.

As a comparison look at the work of the author of the article.
http://www.macobo.com/

Boring at best.

0 upvotes
Ferling
By Ferling (6 months ago)

I also looked at his works after reading, and I do agree.

My biggest issue with many posters on this site is that few bother to read and do further research before commenting. It's the ten second review. Which is worrisome, as few bother to understand the "why" vs. the "how" in the craft these days.

Fortunately, to save my sanity, I always have real work sitting on some CF cards, and I need to get back to work. :)

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

I think if anyone wants to make a dismissive comment about the work of the photographer of the girl in the headdress they should post a link to their own images and explain why their work is superior to hers.

Put your money where your mouth is.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

It may be hard for you to grasp but not everything comes down to being superior, JDThomas. You can be a superior drinker or smoker or advertiser or salesman or CEO or lackey and still not be that great. That picture for example is brilliant and perfectly executed (especially if you believe it is a self-portrait), as are most pictures in Playboy magazine. And still many obviously have good and interesting reasons to dislike it.

1 upvote
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

It's not a self portrait. Do you read things thoroughly "Freedom Lover"?

This isn't a freaking advertising conspiracy.

Maybe it's hard for you to grasp that this is a person's concept of art. I bet if you were man enough to post an example of your work I could pick it apart and find some nefarious scheme to undermine humankind and "advertise" your lifestyle decisions.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

"It took me TWO clicks to find the model in the image."
"Edit: That's actually the PHOTOGRAPHER'S flickr site."
Maybe you could make up your mind and tell us the whole story when you know what you want to say?

And maybe watch a little bit less "Alex Jones", calm your obsession with the "hispter lifestyle" and "conspiracy theorists", make peace with the "evil 20 year old girl" and assorted fantasies and worries of being "man enough" and "superior". You don't need to be a bully to be liked.

0 upvotes
ignatio
By ignatio (6 months ago)

@JDThomas Well done sir but I don't think Marco Bohr his work is boring. It's not hipsterfancycolourfulhappyjoyjoy but well executed and thoughtful photography...

0 upvotes
mcshan
By mcshan (6 months ago)

@JD "I think if anyone wants to make a dismissive comment about the work of the photographer of the girl in the headdress they should post a link to their own images and explain why their work is superior to hers.

Put your money where your mouth is."

The single dumbest post of this entire thread. Talk about a stretch. My first laugh of the morning.

1 upvote
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

It took me TWO clicks to find the model in the image. I'm sure she could tell you who the photographer is.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/21709126@N06/4832268336/in/photolist-8n1D2j-8mHSyH

I'm really not convinced you ACTUALLY tried to find the original photographer. Sloppy journalism DPR.

Edit: That's actually the PHOTOGRAPHER'S flickr site.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Well done, JDThomas, how did you find out?

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

Google image search turned up my friend's website. He is a friend of the model.

Real sneaky spy stuff. Obviously the government set me up to meet this guy 5 years ago because they knew this article would be posted.

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

Well done sir, we did indeed try (and skimmed through hundreds of urls of sites bemoaning/celebrating/mocking hipster images), but we were trying to find the photographer, rather than the model - you get points for imagination.

0 upvotes
Karaya
By Karaya (6 months ago)

" Bohr mentions Tumblr in passing, but doesn't investigate one of its key legacies - the growing perception on the part of the online 'social' community that images are things to be used and can be freely shared without compensation or attribution."

This really bothers me. You can meet a lot of interesting people on the net (I met my wife there!) but, at the same time, the internet brings out a lot of the worst in people. It allows them to be rude and arrogant without any consequences and encourages an attitude of entitlement - that they can amuse themselves with an endless supply of free content without giving anything back. My pbase galleries have had 607301 views yet what does this do for me as a photographer? I get much more satisfaction out of showing real prints to real people - shaking their hands, talking to them and seeing the reactions on their faces when they see my photos as opposed to a hit counter showing how many lurkers from around the world have perused my galleries.

1 upvote
justmeMN
By justmeMN (6 months ago)

Hipsters try to be cool, which by definition, is uncool.

12 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (6 months ago)

I try to be uncool. Is that cool?

3 upvotes
Ben Raven
By Ben Raven (6 months ago)

Exactly (!) justmeMN, exactly !

Hugo808: NO ! (tho I of course get your well put sarcasm)

Just be.
TRYING to be anything ? Well . . . then again, who am I to say?

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Perry Kivolowitz
By Perry Kivolowitz (6 months ago)

Meh. Every generation thinks they are cool.

5 upvotes
Karaya
By Karaya (6 months ago)

True that!

1 upvote
BartyLobethal
By BartyLobethal (6 months ago)

Yeah, but only *mine* actually is...

1 upvote
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

Worthless drivel.

What makes photography by hipsters any worse than photography by a soccer mom at the neighborhood block party? Or a hip-hop kid with a camera at a house party? Or a sorority girl with a camera at a soiree? Or a geek with Google glasses at an internerd convention? Or anybody in any of the hundreds of different subcultures with a camera?

Somehow hipsters taking bad photos is worse than the millions of crappy photographers on flickr doing the same exact thing?

Sounds like the dude that wrote this is somehow jealous of the hipster culture. Maybe he aspires to be one, but was shunned?

4 upvotes
facedodge
By facedodge (6 months ago)

lol hipster.

11 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

I'm way too old to be a hipster.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

I hope they did not shun you too :-)

1 upvote
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

I'm a concert photographer. I shoot music festivals across the country. And I live in Austin TX. I'm surrounded by hipsters.

I have no aspirations on being a hipster, but I don't shun their artistic endeavors because I don't share their point of view or take part in their lifestyle.

1 upvote
Conan
By Conan (6 months ago)

I think you're entirely misjudging the tone of the article. I found nothing in it disparaging to these photographers.

2 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

It's marginalizing their photography because they are part of a subculture that everyone seems to revile yet many try to emulate.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

"They are part of a subculture that everyone seems to revile"
Looks like you have your own conspiracy theories, JDThomas. Are you a grade B kook? :-)

Comment edited 59 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

That wouldn't be a conspiracy theory. That would be a personal observation. You should really think things through before you post.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

JDThomas, you think you are "surrounded by" people "everyone seems to revile".
That sounds an awful lot like a "tin-foil hat"'s paranoid fears of persecution :-)

1 upvote
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

OK, Alex Jones. Whatever you say. Watch out for those evil 20 year old girl photographers colluding with secret ad agencies subverting the photography world with their images promoting the "hispter lifestyle"...

0 upvotes
mcshan
By mcshan (6 months ago)

Hipsters in Austin, Texas. Funny stuff.

1 upvote
DanielFjall
By DanielFjall (6 months ago)

Olympus MJU II loaded with lomo film. Shoot anything! That's hipster photography.

5 upvotes
Nishi Drew
By Nishi Drew (6 months ago)

I thought hipster photography was just the simple process of tinting the blacks blue and occasionally adding ruined film blotches and fake flares on a random photo, magically transforming a shot that even the creator would admit as being worthless... into something else...

9 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (6 months ago)

Shallow pseudocool.

1 upvote
KariIceland
By KariIceland (6 months ago)

Hipster photographs like that "native" american girl are even lower and worse than papparazzi. NO Merit at all & racist to boot.

5 upvotes
Sean65
By Sean65 (6 months ago)

Your ignorance is outstanding.

7 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (6 months ago)

You should visit the south Holland during our carnival tradition. People dress up as indians (and a lot of other characters) and get very drunk. Yes we are a bunch of racists in the low countries. Dressing up is a tribute, by the way, not an insult.

5 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

That picture has been crafted by advertising experts. It is iconic and tells a lot about the culture and myths of the USA. You will not forget it and it implants messages like dark cool and smokers being connected with ancient and powerful roots and being desirable (beautiful healthy young woman). The agency, script writer, director, photographer and the model have likely been well paid by the industry keen to make it appear as having a casual unknown origin (astroturfing). Paparazzi work in a similar setting. Similarly striking photographs with agendas are often pushed to the top at DPreview competitions and in other photography magazines.

2 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

@freedomlover: That's quite a conspiracy theory you got going there.

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Is astroturfing and subliminal advertising a conspiracy theory?

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

That was said in jest, but the idea that that particular image has been planted by an ad agency somewhere for nefarious plans has a bit of a tin-foil hat sound to it...

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Or maybe the world of photography, advertising and publishing is not as innocent as you would like to make it look. Your attempt at smearing is not that funny.

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

Lighten up. Do you really think there's an ad agency out there trying to turn everyone into a hipster by putting this picture on the internet?

Or maybe I'm one of THEM and I'm trying to throw people off the scent by marginalizing your deductions because they are true?

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

You can contact the photographer and ask her if she planted this photo in collusion with an ad agency. You can find her on Flickr:

http://www.flickr.com/people/wethelivingphotography/

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

They are using hipster themes to advertise smoking and a hipster life-style.
And your ongoing attempts at smearing are still not that funny.

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

It's a young girl who photographs her young friends. What's wrong with that? So her friends smoke. I smoked in my youth as well and have photos too. There's no ADVERTISING going on.

I've got photos on my flickr site of people smoking in a 50's noir style. I wasn't ADVERTISING smoking or advocating a "50's lifestyle".

Isn't she FREE to pursue her own artistic visions? Would you like to put a stop to her creating her own art? FREEDOM LOVER?

You REALLY are a tin-foil hat wearing conspiracy theorist loony.

1 upvote
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

And sure, why not:
"Dear LivingPhotography, did you sign a non-disclosure agreement and did you get paid?"
Such arrangements are not unusual.

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

Haha. You are a grade A kook.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

JDThomas, personal attacks are usually a sign of a lost argument. Do you have any idea why Carver got the impression you were shilling for a large corporation?

0 upvotes
JDThomas
By JDThomas (6 months ago)

Yes. Secretly I am out to convert everyone to the evil hipster empire. I am in the employ of American Apparel. The "American" in American Apparel stands for "government".

"We've come for your children Chuck" - Beetlejuice.

0 upvotes
Mike Philippens
By Mike Philippens (6 months ago)

I just hate it when people (over)analyze EVERYTHING in their path. What's the use? Does humanity benefit from the above ramblings? What's the significance of it?

I can't understand it. The pointlessness of it. Just let someone photograph what he/she likes. Enjoy it. If you don't like it, move on. Don't try to be interesting by expressing your cluelessness.

4 upvotes
mmitch
By mmitch (6 months ago)

Is this a joke? Seriously DPR please improve the content of your articles.

3 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (6 months ago)

DPR is now like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get ;)

4 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (6 months ago)

One man's relevant content is another man's Lumix review and vice versa.

0 upvotes
stephenpatterson
By stephenpatterson (6 months ago)

you want to be different, look cool and be clever? then put out the cigarette, get rid of the stupid head ware and come running with me for 120 Km a week.

0 upvotes
GaryJP
By GaryJP (6 months ago)

The determination to be cool and replace emotion with feigned indifference has been part of teen culture at least since the Beats. As you get older it gets more and more amusing how each generation thinks it has rediscovered its parents' teen behaviour.

18 upvotes
StevenMajor
By StevenMajor (6 months ago)

Marco Bohr: The newest face of stupid.

4 upvotes
ronniemac
By ronniemac (6 months ago)

'democratic world where beautiful people of any color, race or sex can be depicted in a photograph as long as they are also young'

Not so democratic for those outside current perceptions of 'beauty' and youth.

Well, as a not so good looking and ageing hippie, I guess I've had my day and should step aside now. ;{)

Comment edited 57 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Johannes Zander
By Johannes Zander (6 months ago)

Don't worry. Sooner or later hipsters will get older and be something of the past.

0 upvotes
FreedomLover
By FreedomLover (6 months ago)

Thank you DPReview staff, well written as usual. So it's about people who care mostly for appearance, must be forever cool, feelings are replaced by a permanent show, young and beautiful, a media driven cult of disposable high income corporate whores thinking they are independent and smart.

14 upvotes
ju_ju
By ju_ju (6 months ago)

An attempt to re-invent, intellectually it appears bland. Far to conservative. It is innate and you cannot get away from that,it is in the attempt to take ownership of something that has always existed.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
babalu
By babalu (6 months ago)

Brilliant analysis !!! eeh... I fully disagree !! ... humm ... does this mean anything I find belongs to me ? No need to look for the owner ? Does it further mean that possession is by the audience, not the artist ? eeh... well, peace to all (reminds me of the hippie era; nothing new under the sun).

0 upvotes
InTheMist
By InTheMist (6 months ago)

Um, what?

1 upvote
Toccata47
By Toccata47 (6 months ago)

Umm...that's the point. She isn't, she's a hispter. Oh, and hipsters and conservatives can't exist in the same subset. Thanks for gw, btw...

0 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (6 months ago)

What did I just read?

11 upvotes
Brett Bradford
By Brett Bradford (6 months ago)

The correct answer is "Who the hell cares?".

0 upvotes
Total comments: 105