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Ten items you should have in your camera bag

By dpreview staff on Oct 4, 2013 at 18:02 GMT
Microfiber cloth
1 2 3 4 5 6 11

Microfiber cloth

They're not sexy, but microfiber cloths are among the most useful accessories you can have in your camera bag. As well as cleaning off dust and dirt from your equipment, you can also use a cloth to wrap lenses and other small accessories to prevent them from being scratched when they come into contact with one another. 

Comments

Total comments: 287
123
WarrenKK
By WarrenKK (6 months ago)

1. magnesium fire starter, 2. sturdy garbage bag, 3. fishing line and 4. hook, 5. water purification tablets, Air Force signaling mirror, 6. Leatherman tool (in checked baggage in case I fly), 7. Spectra cord, 8. duct tape, 9. compass, 10. Ruger LCP (not if I fly). Some of this stuff would work in the city too.

1 upvote
Riquez
By Riquez (6 months ago)

Are you expecting a Zombie apocalypse?

1 upvote
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (6 months ago)

not every one shoots in the boonies

1 upvote
wazu
By wazu (6 months ago)

I can agree with the duct tape.
Everybody knows if it can't be fixed with duct tape, then you're not using enough duct tape.

4 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (6 months ago)

Another TEN ESSENTIALS person, I see.

0 upvotes
ToolMan78
By ToolMan78 (6 months ago)

Duct tape is great, till you need to remove it. I wouldn't touch any of my gear with it. Gaffers tape is a better choice as it leave no residue after pulling it off.

0 upvotes
guamy
By guamy (6 months ago)

Crazy glue works best to. Add in your bag a cooking canisters a couple of them too.

0 upvotes
Rally Man
By Rally Man (6 months ago)

I've got all those items for my G1X, except for the air blower, don't need that.

1 upvote
arhmatic
By arhmatic (6 months ago)

What about *balls?

- to sleep in the thunderstorm alone on the mountain, surrounded by wolves, just to take the perfect shot the following morning? --- and such...

2 upvotes
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (6 months ago)

Why do most articles have you click each picture to read each item on the list? Why not make it one long page so you can click it once & just read, not "next, next, next, next, next, next, nex....."

3 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

This is actually the first article we've ever published in this 'flippable' format.

1 upvote
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (6 months ago)

(Barney) I know, not trying to gripe at you guys personally, so much as that style is one I see a lot of places & I don't like it. I hate clicking next 8011 times like that. I would really like it if in such cases a "view all" option was available.

3 upvotes
Simon Joinson
By Simon Joinson (6 months ago)

I'm not sure 'most' means what you think it does

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

No problem, feedback is good. We're experimenting with all this, so I'll pass it on.

2 upvotes
digitall
By digitall (6 months ago)

I agree (even if this is the only case in which dpreview have used it). The format is irritating and pointless. Indeed, less attractive. The internet should be quick to use. For a relatively simple article one should be able to review the whole at a glance, perhaps with items set out in tabular form. The BBC News website takes the annoyance one step further by overlaying captions on top of pictures instead of underneath. One has to click a button to see images without overlaid semi-transparent captions.

1 upvote
berni29
By berni29 (6 months ago)

I agree, ditch this one. All on 1 or 2 pages for this.

0 upvotes
offshore13
By offshore13 (6 months ago)

+1, agree on a single page presentation as much as possible

0 upvotes
HelloToe
By HelloToe (6 months ago)

Another vote for all on one page.

For that matter, I wouldn't mind it if you dumped thumbnails entirely. They're a good idea for really huge galleries, but for most things, it's just put them all on one page. Every time I check out one of the photo features on http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/ I wonder "Why can't they all just do this?"

0 upvotes
white shadow
By white shadow (6 months ago)

Agree with above.

Just put everything in one page. Most irritating to have to go on clicking to read small pieces of information.

0 upvotes
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (6 months ago)

I'm pleased that so many people agree with me. Heck call me crazy (I'm not complaining, just observing) I wouldn't even mind the option for the camera reviews being on 1 page, the whole 25-30 pages all of it, like how DcResource used to do it. (And everyone is going "what are you nuts," ha ha ha.)

Regardless, though, yes the main thing is that a LOT of articles I read do this multi-page layout, especially ones like "10 best ways to lose weight" etc, why do I have to click 10 photos? I just want to know the "top 10", just give it to me already. Quit with the "next, next, next, next" bunch of nonsense.

0 upvotes
straylightrun
By straylightrun (6 months ago)

They do multiple pages for more ads. Websites don't host themselves for free. Unless you're paying for this service (which you're not) stop complaining.

0 upvotes
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (6 months ago)

I don't care about that. Ads may pay for the site to some extent, but I don't come to the site to read the ads, I come to read the CONTENT. Otherwise you might as well have nothing but the ads on the page period. Regardless of my not being the one to pay for it, I STILL think it should be done for what's best for the readers, not the ad companies. Otherwise, there will be no readers, and thus no one to read the stinking ads in the first place.

Comment edited 27 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

If we did all content in single pages, (putting aside the fact that I really don't think anyone would enjoy reading content like that) our traffic would drop like a stone, we'd lose a huge chunk of our revenue as a consequence, and we'd have to close the site ;) Sad but true!

1 upvote
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (6 months ago)

(Barney) With regards to REVIEWS, I am fine with that, I was "reaching for perfection" as it were. My MAIN point was this article & ones like it where you are barely getting started when suddenly you're nagged to click "next" already. The reviews, you actually get quite a bit of reading in before having to "next," so it's fine really.

The realities of how things are paid for notwithstanding, I don't visit sites to read the ads & don't like excellence tainted out of concessions made for advertising. I like things "pure" that way, such is why I also don't like watermarked images or when sports stadiums are named the "AT&T Comcast Center" or whatever & logos are all over everywhere on the playing floor. What next, superimposed ads on bald player's heads?

Regardless, as I said earlier I thought it would be NICE for the reviews to have single-page as an OPTION, I was just being overly ambitious, dreaming etc. It's ones like this where it's taken to an extreme that I'm talking about.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

I sympathise, but when you say "Ads may pay for the site to some extent" the reality is that for now, almost all of our revenue comes from advertising because we don't charge for access to our content. Projects like GearShop will help in the long run, but for now, that's the reality (and all of our free-to-read competitors are in the same boat).

0 upvotes
straylightrun
By straylightrun (6 months ago)

larrytusaz, just get over yourself mate. first world problems.

Comment edited 11 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Antsl
By Antsl (6 months ago)

What about rewriting this story with consideration to different genres of photography... not the generic "one bag fits all" mindset that this author has used. Seriously... how many people would get much use out of a tripod that is 6-inches tall... or a flash unit that can only be used on camera in TTL mode. And adding a smart phone or tablet to the bag!? Seriously! Start over please!

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

The article is about drawing attention to small, useful items that every now and again could get you out of a jam. None of these things will take up much space - that's the point.

5 upvotes
David Hart
By David Hart (6 months ago)

Any camera bag list that does not include a Lenspen is severely lacking. They are 1000x better than microfiber cloth in my opinion. Every time I've use microfiber cloth it just smudges the glass, while the Lenspen gets it clean!!!

11 upvotes
Yukon Photog
By Yukon Photog (6 months ago)

100% agree, there is never a time I have my camera that I do not have a Lenspen with me.

1 upvote
DotCom Editor
By DotCom Editor (6 months ago)

I'm excited to learn from this piece that I need neither camera nor lenses in my camera bag. It really lightens the load.

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

First line of first paragraph of first slide:

"What's in your camera bag? A camera (hopefully) and maybe a lens or two, but that's probably not everything that you need"

6 upvotes
DotCom Editor
By DotCom Editor (6 months ago)

Yeah, I read that, of course. The slide show should stand on its own, however. That's just a pure editorial oversight.

0 upvotes
Scott Everett
By Scott Everett (6 months ago)

I think you are confused. The first slide of the slideshow contains the editorial text you have stated should exist in the slideshow.

2 upvotes
Takahashi
By Takahashi (6 months ago)

DotCom Editor, you're being ridiculous.

3 upvotes
Englishman in France
By Englishman in France (6 months ago)

I usually have in my cupcake crumpler; x2 bottles of water, x2 apple purée, 2x3 pack of biscuits, wipes, x2 kiddies jumpers. Oh, almost forgot, an E-M5. I can't have anything bigger than micro four-thirds at the moment !

2 upvotes
FrankS009
By FrankS009 (6 months ago)

Makes sense to me. Happy stomach and happy brain make better photographs. Nice thing about m4/3rds is that you have room for all that in your bag. Maybe not the portable fridge...
F.

Comment edited 12 minutes after posting
1 upvote
pictureAngst
By pictureAngst (6 months ago)

Thank you, a really useful article

5 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

:)

1 upvote
Takahashi
By Takahashi (6 months ago)

It is, and gave me a smug moment when I realised I already have everything listed in my bag, bar the small flash. :)

0 upvotes
Robert Schambach
By Robert Schambach (6 months ago)

Sorry but a really useless article.

3 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

;(

2 upvotes
dholl
By dholl (6 months ago)

disagree. i've been out photographing for about 8 years now, but still there was something on this list which is a new idea (to me): namely bringing business cards not to promote yourself, but to assuage any potential issues with the more paranoid members of society (an issue which seems to be getting worse every year).

Comment edited 27 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Takahashi
By Takahashi (6 months ago)

Robert, how, exactly is this a "useless" article? Seriously, don't just go lazily chucking such a comment out there, explain what you mean.

3 upvotes
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (6 months ago)

Takahashi & Barney

Don't feed the trolls!

0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (6 months ago)

Phone: Photographers' Ephemeris; SkySafari; personal lists in Notes re: no-parallax-point for various lenses, best f/stop for astrophotography with various lenses, etc.

In camera bag: large plastic bag and tie for camera rain protection or condensation protection. 4 spare batteries if I am shooting with the Sigma DP2 Merrill ;) , 1 spare if I am shooting with the Canon. LENS HOODS - why oh why do people not use them? CPL in screw-in filter case, appropriate step-down rings. Rubber band to grab edge of filter. Intervalometer-style wired remote, "nodal slide", and weightlifters' fingerless gloves if carrying tripod. Microfiber cloth.

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (6 months ago)

Funny how complexity builds on complexity. You need a phone that can display your instruction manuals because feature creep has made it impossible to memorize everything in your camera's 350 page instruction manual.

Fair enough, but how about an article on the 10 things a photographer should never bring with them. I'll start. (1) A bag that could only be a camera bag (2) a camera strap that says NIKON or CANON in 2 inch high letters, (3) a 70-200/2.8 lens that's so heavy you can't walk, (4) a card or tag with your home address, (5) lens cleaners that prevent "fogging", (6) telextenders greater than 2X, (7) off-brand memory cards, (8) tripods & quick releases that use plastic at key points....

The advice about the business card is good. I've had to show mine to everyone from private security to federal marshals.

1 upvote
Akpinxit
By Akpinxit (6 months ago)

"(2) a camera strap that says NIKON or CANON in 2 inch high letters" - good one
I'm wearing mine inside-out

1 upvote
offshore13
By offshore13 (6 months ago)

"2" mine also, never use as much as possible the canon strap. "3" I don't have it yet... "8" guilty am I, I just use a cheap tripod

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Takahashi
By Takahashi (6 months ago)

"(3) a 70-200/2.8 lens that's so heavy you can't walk"

Exaggerate much? How does a 1.5KG weight constitute immobility? Where is the logic in suggesting people *shouldn't* carry what is arguably the most capable, versatile lens ever created?

1 upvote
GeorgeD200
By GeorgeD200 (6 months ago)

I would add headphones and an ipod. Sometimes I don't even turn it on, but it stops people walking up and talking to me. "My uncle has a nice camera like that!" or "Getting any good pictures today?" Ugg.

0 upvotes
larrytusaz
By larrytusaz (6 months ago)

If you are in the middle of a for-pay professional shoot, that's understandable. Otherwise, what's the big deal with people expressing a "chatty" type of interest in your hobby? It's called community & socializing. Heck I walk up to such people all the time, it's simply chit-chatting with others possessing the same sorts of interests. It's not a big deal, it's just being friendly.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
GeorgeD200
By GeorgeD200 (6 months ago)

I talk to people all day long in my work, and I use photography to escape from that. It takes time for me to get into a creative frame of mind, and people talking to me about my gear disturbs that.

0 upvotes
Jack Simpson
By Jack Simpson (6 months ago)

D@mn, I've only got the extra battery and (spare) charger in me bag :o But, in lieu, of the others, I have my laptop and a card reader :) Just missing something with Mr. Brittons name on it :D

0 upvotes
Akpinxit
By Akpinxit (6 months ago)

why a cardreader AND laptop ?

0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (6 months ago)

Often in my bag or on my person in various pockets, not related to actual photo process:
"TEN ESSENTIALS" - yes, I am a hiker and landscape/ wildlife photographer. For a day hike: 1. compass and basic paper map (also keep a photographed copy of the map and trailhead info on the camera), 2. headlamp with extra set of batteries, 3. energy bars, 4. water bottle(s) (with or without lightweight filter kit depending on length of hike and availability of water), 5. sun hat (doubles as shade for your LCD), mosquito headnet if the season for it, sun block, bug spray 6. rain jacket 7. first aid - duct tape and bandages for blisters, soap flake, spare socks! 8. knife 9. few sheets of kleenex/TP/hand-towel in a baggie 10. trash bag. In hunting season, 11. lightweight fluorescent orange mesh vest

Soon to be added: space-blanket bivy bag for emergency; tracking service ("Spot") emergency beacon

1 upvote
SwampYankee
By SwampYankee (6 months ago)

hope you are not shooting in NYC Will Edwards because that will get you 2-3 years in jail. On the up side it is now safe to walk Central PArk, at nigh, with your camera, because there are no guns in NYC . Don't believe me ask Plaxico Burress. Carry a handgun? go to jail. People keep flying into NYC with their handguns saying they forgot. Takes years before they go home

1 upvote
onlooker
By onlooker (6 months ago)

> because there are no guns in NYC

ROFLMAO

4 upvotes
Will Edwards
By Will Edwards (6 months ago)

It's not in my camera bag, but if in the city in the middle of the night or for sunrise shots, I carry a 9mm, and I know how to use it. If out in the woods, it's a 45mm. And I am not talking about camera lens.

Comment edited 54 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Conjure
By Conjure (6 months ago)

:-(
I am really happy to live in Europe.
I am really lucky to live in Europe.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
brn
By brn (6 months ago)

Or at least not where the heck Will lives.

5 upvotes
Old Ed
By Old Ed (6 months ago)

Wow, 45mm is pretty serious stuff! Do you ever use the fragmentation shell or canister shot options?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/45_mm_anti-tank_gun_M1942_%28M-42%29
You could take out a SWAT armored personnel carrier with one of those; but you'd be in a whole lot of trouble if you did!

2 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (6 months ago)

> I am really lucky to live in Europe.

You get to get out more. I spend the first half of my life there. You can keep it.

And I do love Vienna, btw. My favorite city in Europe. But any talk that Europe is safer that 99% of America is delusion.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
white shadow
By white shadow (6 months ago)

You can't blame Will Edwards.

He is an old man living in WA, United States and likes going out in a motorbike. There has been many crazy people out there who may shoot you. Even school kids do that in their own schools.

Most recently, a woman just go amok driving her car around in Washington, injuring two policemen.

There maybe more people going crazy if the budget shutdown goes on longer.

1 upvote
ripleysbaby
By ripleysbaby (6 months ago)

2 slices of Marmite on toast.

3 upvotes
Horshack
By Horshack (6 months ago)

Mace for when someone tries to steal your expensive camera.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (6 months ago)

black gaffer tape
torch (with red color for operation in the dark)
notebook computer w/ wireless link (+smartphone)
...
a BB gun to shoot anyone obscures sight.

2 upvotes
Denver Wedding Photographers

Seriously funny article.

My only question for the author would be, is there anything in that list that would not be obvious to a photographer, pro or otherwise?

0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

Judging by the mostly positive comments from other readers, I'd guess yes.

6 upvotes
Denver Wedding Photographers

Well then, I bow to your intuitiveness.

It's a good list, albeit a little akin to telling a hiker to wear good shoes.

1 upvote
Takahashi
By Takahashi (6 months ago)

Some folks here really need to get over themselves. Stop assuming that every article is written for *you*. There are a great many people reading this who would benefit from it. Three years ago when I started out, I didn't have most of this stuff in my bag. I do now, and use most of it on a regular basis. For anyone starting out, this list could be invaluable.

2 upvotes
Photo Pete
By Photo Pete (6 months ago)

A white plastic bin bag.

Acts as a rain cover for the camera, something to kneel or lie on to get low down angles of view and also serves as a white reflector. Rolls up nice and small too.

1 upvote
Ferling
By Ferling (6 months ago)

Unless it's you and the great outdoors, bags are a liability (for folks to trip), or an easy chance for theft. When doing run and gun (weddings, events or in the crowd), I wear a dual sling and a Tamrac MBX belt system. I carry two bodies: 5D with wide angle, and 7D with 70-200. The belt has a pocket for a macro or prime, a 550EX (quantum battery clipped to the side), and one for small accessories (battery, cards and cloth). I also carry a water bottle, and sun glasses (which you forgot to mention). I also carry a smart phone, but use a blue tooth for hands free coms. Even though I might wear a badge or pass, there's no doubt whose come to do the shooting, (in fact I've gotten access simply walking through :) ).

When I'm not working, I only take a single body (empty card and full battery charge) and randomly select a lens (usually a vintage I got from eBay), which makes some outings a little challenging for fun.

0 upvotes
Skipper494
By Skipper494 (6 months ago)

Eleven. You forgot the toilet paper.....

9 upvotes
Conjure
By Conjure (6 months ago)

1 camera
2 lenses
3 tripod
4 spare battery
5 2nd sd-card!!! (sometimes i forget my 1st sd-card at home)
6 insect repellant
7 cigarettes
8 condoms
9 Aspirin, tooth-brush ...
10 and don't forget the camera bag at home!

7 upvotes
DaytonR
By DaytonR (6 months ago)

7.cigarettes ? ,
8.condoms ?

what sort of shoot will those be for ? :)

0 upvotes
Conjure
By Conjure (6 months ago)

every shoot could be full of surprises. especially if you don't expect them. be prepared!

2 upvotes
luigibozi
By luigibozi (6 months ago)

hwhat?! insect repellant condoms?! ~8-:{(

0 upvotes
white shadow
By white shadow (6 months ago)

Yes, condoms, if you need to have a quickie with the girl you just met in the bush while waiting for the sunset.

The insect repellant would be useful when your butt is expose.

Isn't life interesting with all the possible surprises?

0 upvotes
kixigvaq
By kixigvaq (6 months ago)

Not unusual to meet willing females on commercial shoots.

0 upvotes
DDWD10
By DDWD10 (6 months ago)

A good 10-stop ND filter and mini tripod.

1 upvote
jmkoh
By jmkoh (6 months ago)

Good list. I always have water and ibuprofen because my back always ends up hurting lugging the backpack around.

1 upvote
romebaby
By romebaby (6 months ago)

What bag is that pictured?

1 upvote
justinwonnacott
By justinwonnacott (6 months ago)

a folding macbeth colour reference or a grey card, a giant ziplock baggie or two, money, pens , notebook , two band aids , some antacids , an aspirin or two, sometimes a pair of sox and thin gloves. I write my name in ipermanent maarker on the inside of the bag with an email address and a reward offered for its return. Smartphone is in the jacket, not the bag.

2 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (6 months ago)

You dont really need a spare batter with an DSLR.. ive gone over 2000 shots on one batter on my D700.. depends how much you chimp.

For memory cards.. its good to off load your photos and clear out your card on a routine basis, rather than waiting for it to be 100% full.. i.e. you dont want to be walking around with 60GB of photos in your camera. So unless you are using low capacity cards for no reason, then you dont need a spare either.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
DesmondD
By DesmondD (6 months ago)

A spare battery is the first thing I get with a new camera. Things can go wrong and batteries can fail even if you think they are charged. A spare battery tops the list!

5 upvotes
caver3d
By caver3d (6 months ago)

Try two spare batteries. If you ever shoot in Antarctica or the Arctic like me, you will soon find out why.

1 upvote
SkiShooter
By SkiShooter (6 months ago)

When it's cold outside (eg. freezing or lower), battery life goes way down. Definitely need a spare battery, and it's better to keep the spare battery in a pocket close to your body. When the one in the camera loses it's juice, switch to the warm one and if you warm up the one you just took out of the camera for a while, you can probably get more use from it again later.

1 upvote
ReganH22
By ReganH22 (6 months ago)

I've had a brand new memory card give out in the middle of shooting with it for the first time. Luckily I had a back up card. I recently had a battery give me issues on my 5D. No big deal, I just put in the extra battery I had in my bag and kept shooting. With the small footprint of a battery or memory card, it almost seems silly not to be prepared.

1 upvote
Alan Brown
By Alan Brown (6 months ago)

Jogger. Wow you like sailing by the seat of your pants... you can get away with it most times.

If your photography isn't that serious I suppose it doesn't matter to you if you don't come home without anything. Thins happen. Insurance doesn't take the photo for you.. it just replaces the broken hardware.

You are one chilled out person

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (6 months ago)

Ive done a ton of week long and weekend trips with one fully charged battery and a memory card. That gives me 1500 shots no sweat.. and ive shot in all sorts of weather conditions... and Im still on my original D700 battery from 2008.

DSLRs basically consume no power when not shooting (while still on). Its only since the new mirorrless cameras with tiny batteries and power slurping EVFs, live view, LCDs, WiFi, NFC, etc, etc.. that spare batteries are now required. And, DSLRs turn on instantly.. meaning you dont need to put in power consuming 'sleep' mode .. just turn it off. Amasing, boring old technology.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (6 months ago)

I use 8 and 16 G SDHC/SDXC cards, I prefer to have multiple spares.

1 upvote
wansai
By wansai (6 months ago)

The spares are dual use for if you run out of juice or the main card or battery fails. It happens.

it is the same reason shooting professionally you have a spare body. It makes great work as a secondary lense shooter but its purpose is if your primary fails, you still have a working camera to keep shooting.

1 upvote
69chevy
By 69chevy (6 months ago)

Your bag should have what YOU will need in it. If you don't know what that is, why do you even have a bag?

If I were forced to carry a bag (I don't carry one now), I would have no use for the tiny tripod, the rocket blower, the poncho, the remote release, the little cloth, the polarizer, or the little flash.

5 upvotes
Henry Falkner
By Henry Falkner (6 months ago)

In my perception, that tripod is a fashion accessory, possibly suitable for a pocket P&S in a dire emergency, but not for a DSLR.

1 upvote
robbo d
By robbo d (6 months ago)

If your serious about image quality landscapes or shooting in Low light, then it's a must.....depends on what your shooting. Not everyone has hands as steady as yours.....

0 upvotes
NancyP
By NancyP (6 months ago)

Henry means, Bring a REAL tripod, dammit! Or at least a monopod...

1 upvote
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (6 months ago)

Hot shoe spirit level.

Roll of plastic to lie down on.

Sensor cleaning pen.

Insect repellant.

Compass.

Yes, I'm a landscape photographer.

12 upvotes
Sanford
By Sanford (6 months ago)

I would add earplugs, spare reading glasses, and pen and paper.

1 upvote
El Puma
By El Puma (6 months ago)

Big plus on the reading glasses. Also, keep copy of the camera manual in PDF format on your smart phone or tablet.

0 upvotes
SkiShooter
By SkiShooter (6 months ago)

How about a small P&S to help prevent you from completely missing a shot while you try to switch lenses, change batteries, or attach a flash unit in a pinch? Also, when I'm shooting sporting events, I'll often use the DSLR for the action shots, and a P&S for spectators and shots before and after the event. Up close, people tend to act much more natural and are less intimidated by a P&S. Image quality may suffer a little, but you are often more likely to get the shot that you want.

1 upvote
kona_moon
By kona_moon (6 months ago)

I'd add hand wipes (individually packaged wet ones are nice) to the list - you don't want to touch your camera with BBQ sauce smothered hands.

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (6 months ago)

It was all going well until I read the word 'smartphone'. A useful tool, they say, in that it helps with composition and calculating depth of field... WHAT?
C'mon: a mobile phone is always in everyone's pocket and it's useful in case of an emergency; but saying a smartphone is useful for helping with compositional basics and calculating depth of field is pushing things too far. If you can't compose and determine depth of field by looking into the viewfinder, chances are you suck as a photographer. In such case the iPhone won't help your case.

6 upvotes
Steven Grimm
By Steven Grimm (6 months ago)

I agree with your second paragraph, but sun-tracking apps alone are worth bringing a smartphone along in my opinion. If you geotag, a smartphone can serve as a GPS tracklogger in a pinch. The phone can act as an advanced remote trigger. And given that cameras are starting to support transferring images over Wi-Fi, a phone will let you upload your most critical images to a remote server while you're still out in the field.

I know you were just objecting to those specific uses, but I think they're the least interesting things a smartphone is good for.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Nigel Wilkins
By Nigel Wilkins (6 months ago)

You've better eyesight than me if you can judge depth of field through a viewfinder! The app tells you the hyperfocal distance if it's not marked on the lens as well.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (6 months ago)

Nigel, I can hardly imagine how frightfully difficult it must have been to photograph before they came um with this DoF calculator app.

1 upvote
Klarth
By Klarth (6 months ago)

Oh yeah... Poor Ansel Adams. He didn't have an Iphone.

1 upvote
Nigel Wilkins
By Nigel Wilkins (6 months ago)

Klarth, Adams used a large ground glass screen & 10x loupe. He could see his depth of field.

ManuelVilardeMacedo, I never said it was difficult, people used scales & tables & still do, which amounts to the same thing. I said I couldn't see depth of field through the viewfinder of a small camera like 35mm, let alone APSC. Can you? Do you know the hyperfocal distances for every focal length/aperture combination you have?

I obviously suck as a photographer because of the techniques I use...my images mean nothing in your opinion. Talking of which, do you have any to show?

Just because you don't need an app, doesn't mean it's not useful.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Nigel Wilkins
By Nigel Wilkins (6 months ago)

ManuelVilardeMacedo, just for reference, I've added some of my best work to my gallery for you to judge if I suck as a photographer...please feel free to comment.

0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (6 months ago)

Nigel, why did you take my remarks personally? Why did you feel insulted when I ridiculed the use an iPhone for composing pictures and calculating DoF?
I use a 35mm film camera and lenses with DoF scales and I just trust my eyes and my experience to have a notion of how shallow or wide depth of field will be. I try to keep things as simple as possible. Photography is a visual art, not a science.
I don't feel any need to show my pictures on DPR. I hardly see the point of posting pictures here, amongst pics of cats and cork panels. Besides, DPR is quickly degrading into a mobile phone website and I don't want my pictures involved in the process. Call me bigoted and arrogant if you like.
Your pictures are of exceptional quality, by the way. If you feel the app is helping you photograph better, well... whatever floats your boat. But I guess you used to make beautiful pictures before the aforementioned app was on sale. Am I wrong?

0 upvotes
Nigel Wilkins
By Nigel Wilkins (6 months ago)

"If you can't compose and determine depth of field by looking into the viewfinder, chances are you suck as a photographer"

I take it personally because you described me. I can't judge depth of field in my landscapes by looking through the viewfinder.

I use my iPhone with a depth of field app, mainly because it works & works very well. If scales are available on lenses, I use them, but on my EOS M, with it's zoom lenses, there's nothing. DoF can be judged on the LCD, but it takes much longer to get right & it's easy to make mistakes.

I don't think you're bigoted or arrogant, I just think your statement is wrong.

Thanks for your comments on my photography, it's very much appreciated. It's why I do photography.

Posting images can actually help people understand where you're coming from. For example, if yours were mostly portraits, I would suggest determining accurate DoF might be less critical than for someone who wants everything sharp from 12" to infinity, as I often do.

1 upvote
Nigel Wilkins
By Nigel Wilkins (6 months ago)

BTW, my iPhone also tells me sunrise times...this is absolutely critical to me :-)

0 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (6 months ago)

You guys are too young to remember when all photographers carried a Kodak Professional PhotoGuide which included pages and pages of depth of field tables, filter factors, color correction info, calculators, film stock descriptions...it was amazing what they packed into those little books.

0 upvotes
Wye Photography
By Wye Photography (6 months ago)

By way of comparison, what do I have in my camera bag apart from the Hasselblad, lens (sometimes two), cleaning cloth, film? Nothing!

No batteries, no meter, no cards, no tablet, no smartphone, no tripod, no remote, er no camera bag (at times).

For me it is so liberating. I love it. I am thankful I don't have to carry around all that supporting equipment (that's just begging to get lost or stolen).

2 upvotes
Davidfstop
By Davidfstop (6 months ago)

Looks like the poster between you and me chickened out and removed his post, so this next line doesn't make sense now. Bu I'll stick with it anyway :-)

I'll go with "Tough" and add, "Adventurous free spirit" !

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

he was 'moderated'.

3 upvotes
Wildbegonia
By Wildbegonia (6 months ago)

Barney, I like the euphemism.

1 upvote
HeyItsJoel
By HeyItsJoel (6 months ago)

Meh. I would have gone with a gorilla pod instead of just a mini-tripod. Kill 2 birds with 1 stone.

5 upvotes
PStutzman
By PStutzman (6 months ago)

I'd add a small white balance reference card.

1 upvote
DesmondD
By DesmondD (6 months ago)

You missed "A Camera"! :) Just kidding, it's a good list.

1 upvote
DaleOdell
By DaleOdell (6 months ago)

You forgot the two MOST important things: duct tape & a Swiss Army knife!

5 upvotes
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (6 months ago)

I make sure always to have a Swiss Army knife on my keychain, but good point. And duct tape is incredibly useful... I use it to tape down the pop-up flash on my DSLR.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
steampressed
By steampressed (6 months ago)

Substitute gaff tape for duct tape.

+Matte Black (unless you're building makeshift bounce cards)
-Sticky Residue

5 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (6 months ago)

The pop-up flash is incredibly useful, you shouldn't dismiss it like that. When set to minus values, it is great for fill-flash and for chasing color casts out of your pictures. More importantly it's essential for triggering the great Nikon and Canon flash systems.
Also, never put duct tape on a camera, it leaves residue that's very difficult to remove. Photographers shouldn't even carry duct tape. It damages almost everything you use it on and is incredibly unprofessional. Spend the extra $20 or $30 for proper gaffer's tape.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
eajames
By eajames (6 months ago)

That's a pretty good list. Adding relevant PDF manuals to your phone can help in a pinch; also the phone's compass and ephemeris apps come along for the ride.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
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