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Sigma sets out its stall at CES - including lens pricing and SPP mono mode

By dpreview staff on Jan 8, 2013 at 07:00 GMT

Sigma has published details of what it will be showing at the CES show, including pricing details for two of the lenses it announced at Photokina 2012. The 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM, part of the company's 'Contemporary' line of lenses, will retail for around $499. Meanwhile the 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM, which falls into the company's 'Sports' category, will sell for around $3,599. The company has also given details of a monochrome processing mode that it's added to its Sigma Photo Pro processing software for its Foveon-sensored cameras.


Press Release:

Sigma Corporation of America announces new products at Consumer Electronics Show 2013

LAS VEGAS — Jan. 7, 2012Sigma Corporation of America a leading researcher, developer, manufacturer and service provider of some of the world’s most impressive lines of lenses, cameras and flashes, will be exhibiting at the 2013 Consumer Electronics Show at booth 7904 in Central Hall at the Las Vegas Convention Center from Jan. 8 to 11.

At the event, Sigma will introduce the DP3 Merrill compact camera and a new feature set for Sigma Photo Pro software that will expand users’ editing options for black and white imaging. The latest lenses from the Global Vision lineup will be on display, and attendees will be invited to the booth to shoot with the SD1 and DP2 Merrill cameras to enter to win a new Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM lens.

“Our involvement at CES this year will reaffirm our commitment to photographers,” said Mark Amir-Hamzeh, president of Sigma Corporation of America. “We will showcase our Global Vision lens lineup, the new Sigma Photo Pro black and white photo editing mode and our latest DP Merrill compact camera, the DP3, which completes the DP Merrill camera set with its 50mm F2.8 lens. We’ll also let people photograph with the SD1 and DP2 Merrill cameras in our booth so they can get the full Foveon sensor experience.”

Sigma’s brand new product announcements include:

  • DP3 Merrill: As the next generation in Sigma’s DP camera lineup, the DP3 Merrill features a high-performance, 50mm f2.8 lens (a focal range equivalent to 75mm on a 35mm SLR camera) that is ideal for mid-telephoto and macro range shooting. Equipped with the Foveon X3 direct image sensor, the DP3 Merrill ensures outstanding resolution and a natural rendering with rich gradation that results in a 3D feel. Other highlights include an advanced user interface and the capability of seven-frame continuous shooting. When paired with its DP Merrill predecessors, the DP1 and DP2, the trio is a complete compact camera tool set. For the full press release about the DP3 Merrill, click here. Pricing and availability is yet to be announced.
  • Sigma Photo Pro Monochrome Mode: This new black and white editing mode in the Sigma Photo Pro software processes the RAW data of the Sigma Merrill series for the creation of monochrome photography. Sigma’s full-color capture system produces richly detailed monochrome images with a wide dynamic range from highlight to shadow. It creates ultra high-resolution images even at high ISOs with minimal noise. In this mode, photographers can expect smooth, beautiful gradations, and editing options that include a new Color Channel Mixer and a Film Grain Effect. Since Sigma’s cameras do not use blur filters, and since the image sensors capture full image detail at each pixel location in the image, the Merrill camera series is uniquely positioned to produce great color, and black and white imagery. This feature set will be available in Sigma Photo Pro version 5.5, which will be available for download via the Sigma site. Images made using this monochrome editing tool will be displayed at the CES booth. For the full press release about this feature set, click here.

New products that were previously announced as part of the Global Vision restructuring and will be on display include:

  • 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM: This new lens from the Contemporary line is 30 percent smaller than conventional models, and features two “F” Low Dispersion (FLD) glass elements with performance equal to fluorite, and one Special Low Dispersion (SLD) glass element. Sigma and Canon mounts will be available this month, Nikon mounts will be available in February, and Sony and Pentax mounts will arrive in March. For the full press release, click here. The 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM will be available for the street price of $499.
  • 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM: This new lens from the Sports line will include Sigma’s Optical Stabilization (OS) function, a Hyper Sonic Motor (HSM), and two FLD and one SLD glass elements. With a new dust- and splash-proof design, this lens will also have a focus limiter, which incorporates inner focusing and zooming that does not require a change to the length of the lens for focus and zoom. Sigma and Canon mounts will be available in February, and Nikon mounts will arrive in March. For the full press release, click here. The 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM will be available for the street price of $3,599.
  • USB Dock: In the industry’s first USB dock, photographers are able to update the lens firmware and adjust parameters such as focus through the Sigma Optimization Pro software. Additionally, AF speed, focus limiter and OS functionality will be customizable via the dock for the Sports line of lenses. For the full press release, click here. Pricing and availability is yet to be announced.

Sigma Corporation of America’s booth activities at this year’s CES include:

  • Sigma’s CES Fashion Studio: Stop by the Sigma booth each day of the show to shoot with the SD1 Merrill or DP2 Merrill cameras. The studio will feature alternating high-end models in 1950s and 1960s or couture garb, and guided tutorials with Sigma Pros. All participants will walk away with a Sigma T-shirt and their images on a Sigma flash drive.
  • Sigma 35mm F1.4 sweepstakes:  By participating in the Sigma CES Fashion Studio, attendees will be entered to win a new Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM lens in a camera mount of their choosing. The winner will be randomly chosen at the end of the show. Click here for contest rules.

Comments

Total comments: 47
therickman
By therickman (Jan 12, 2013)

Sigma is really impressing me lately. The first few lenses I bought 5 years ago had major QC issues and had to exchange a few times to get 'good' ones. The last 2 Sigs I bought were perfect out of the box.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 13, 2013)

Okay, thanks. I am looking for optics for videography, and fortunately now Sigma has four different professional cinema and video style lenses with internal zooming mechanisms. So, no pumping front, telescoping inner barrel, trombone style suction operations.

I grew up with inner zoom mechanism zooms on Super 8 and 16mm film cameras, followed by video camcorders, so for me to see these pumping in-and-out zoom jobs is a sad and scary sight. Fortunately Sigma knows this and starting with the 8-16mm zoom, now have zoom optics with both internal focusing and internal zooming.

Thanks, Sigma! Now I just need to find a video-friendly APS-C or FF 135 sensor digital camera to mount your zoom lenses on. Too bad I cannot use the Sigmas too good on the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3.

0 upvotes
JNR
By JNR (Jan 11, 2013)

As for Pentax, Ron, kind of a double whammy in that the lens is full frame (not a current Pentax format), and few of us in Pentax are pro sports shooters who would be willing to pay $3,500+. Best to let Sigma support the higher volume lenses in Pentax mount so the company doesn't consider abandoning the mount totally.

0 upvotes
AEP2
By AEP2 (Jan 10, 2013)

The weight of the 120-300f2.8 lens is TBD. I guess Sigma is having a hard time finding a scale, or they are embarrassed by how much it weighs.

0 upvotes
RonHendriks
By RonHendriks (Jan 9, 2013)

No Pentax mount for the 120-300mm lens? Com on Sigma en deliver us that fine lens.

0 upvotes
rithex
By rithex (Jan 9, 2013)

No Sony mount? lame.

1 upvote
audijam
By audijam (Jan 13, 2013)

what?! you are using sony?! lame~~

1 upvote
RStyga
By RStyga (Jan 9, 2013)

Yes, "Photo Pro Monochrome Mode", a great way to deal with the mediocre, if not downright poor, high ISO IQ, especially in colour accuracy...

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

Yes indeed, and this practice of turning a bad color picture into rather passable black & white must have started way back in the 1930s, when some of the movies that were partially or totally shot in color were deemed to be so awful looking at the end, the studio had decided to turn the whole mess into B&W with B&W release prints.

And based on the God-awful colors (or lack of) of some of today's 100% digitally manipulated theatrical movies, one would definitely be better served by tuning out the messed-up colors and watch the thing only is monochrome.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

DP3 Merrill camera: looks mighty interesting, not for video, though. I had a Casio brand digital camera in 1998 that did 640 x 480 video, for cripe's sake.

17-70mm F2.8-4 zoom: yummy. I guess there are w hole lot more Sigma cameras out there than Sony cameras, which is why Sigma will bring out this lens w. a Sony mount 2 months after the Sigma mount version, ha-ha-ha.

Love the 72mm front element diameter on this thing. Gotta love the APS-C form factor lenses, best bargains in the world today. If this thing was for the much smaller image circle Micro 4/3rd cameras, it would cost 2x as much, easily.

1 upvote
tbcass
By tbcass (Jan 12, 2013)

There's a total lack of logic for you (assuming your post is serious). The reason why the Sigma mount is supported while some others are not is because, drum roll, it's a SIGMA lens and of course the company is going to support their own cameras!!!!

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 13, 2013)

Well, for starters I made my comment as an obvious jest, and second of all, logic has got nothing to do with anything. If Sigma was serious and logical, they would not push their own mounts over someone like Pentax and Sony, because last I checked there were a whole lot more Pentax and Sony branded interchangeable lens cameras out there than Sigmas. Really.

Why is Sigma even in the camera business, anyhow?

Glad to be of assistance, though, tbcass.

0 upvotes
Peter Heckert2
By Peter Heckert2 (Jan 8, 2013)

So they do not release this remarkable lens -as announced- in a Sony Alpha mount?
This is very good news, because then I will not have to pay and purchase it ;-)

Anyway, what is the weight of the lens? Cannot find it anywhere.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

http://www.sigmaphoto.com/shop/120-300mm-f28-dg-os-hsm

I guess they hadn't put this baby on the scales yet. But hey, with a whopping 105mm front element and almost a full imperial foot in length, if you has to ask the weight, you probably cannot afford to carry it in your bag, anyhow. :-))

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Jan 9, 2013)

should be heavier than 300/2.8 primes, say 3 to 3.5 kg.
the old one was 3 kg.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

Sigma 50-500mm telephoto zoom is just under 2 kgs.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Jan 8, 2013)

I hope internal and overall build quality is even better.

0 upvotes
nekrosoft13
By nekrosoft13 (Jan 8, 2013)

The 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM will be available for the street price of $3,599. :(

0 upvotes
StyleZ7
By StyleZ7 (Jan 9, 2013)

Streetprice from Sigmas mouth rarely is the same as streetprice on the street :)
Usualy in real life Sigma lenses are cheaper.

0 upvotes
Photonix
By Photonix (Jan 8, 2013)

From the information available it appears that the "Sport" version of the 120-300mm uses exactly the same glass, coatings, and optical formula as the lens it replaces. As best I can tell, here are the differences:

New external cosmetic treatment (S badge, smoother body lines, different finish treatment)
New foot design.
Compatibility with USB Dock (tweak focus, set focus limit, focus speed, OS mode)
New external switch than can be configured with software.

I am not sure I would pay $600 for these new features when the prior version can be had for $3K and deliver identical image quality (which I can say first hand is extremely good). I am pleased to see Sigma starting to produce some really fine glass and give the big boys something to think about. Can't wait to see how this lens with a 1.4x teleconverter compares to Canon's new $11,000 200-400mm f/4.

2 upvotes
nekrosoft13
By nekrosoft13 (Jan 8, 2013)

the Canons 200-400 is a joke. I don't care if the sigma is a bit slower and slightly lower IQ.

Canon really went insane with prices latelly.

3 upvotes
Chris Cuennet
By Chris Cuennet (Jan 8, 2013)

The global construction has to see nothing more with former Sigma... It is very clear that for the same optical quality, he is frustrating to have to pay out 600 dollars more, but nothing than in hands and in the use, the Global Sigma concept is worth the game!!! We are not far from Canon L
And nevertheless it remains one 300mm / 2.8 of great quality for less than 3600 dollars!!!

0 upvotes
Chris Cuennet
By Chris Cuennet (Jan 8, 2013)

The global construction has to see nothing more with former Sigma... It is very clear that for the same optical quality, he is frustrating to have to pay out 600 dollars more, but nothing than in hands and in the use, the Global Sigma concept is worth the game!!! We are not far from Canon L
And nevertheless it remains one 300mm / 2.8 of great quality for less than 3600 dollars!!!

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

Nekorsoft, I agreed: Canon is a joke lately (past 3 years, more or less).

0 upvotes
3a
By 3a (Jan 9, 2013)

For the price, sigma delivers one heck of optical quality. by the new lineup, if they have improved the overall quality and reliability its gonna be a winner. i hope the price goes to the 3K$ range.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

Their old/existing lenses have the same exact model names as these new lenses just announced at CES 2013, so good luck knowing what one would be getting exactly, and how to tell the current model from the new one. On top of that, their own web site does not have any classification for ART lenses and CONTEMPORARY lenses and SPORT lenses, none of that totally dumb classification. What a mess you had dealt yourself, Dear Sigma. Further, even though they have a number of zoom lenses with INTERNAL ZOOMING MECHANISM (the front lens element does not telescope in and out, trombone style), when I called them and asked specifically which models are internal zoom, they could not give me such a list -- they said they don't have it! Sigma, you guys should be listing this crucial information for all of your lenses -- like IF = Internal Focus, how about IZ = Internal Zoom. Not everyone one wants to be stuck with a constantly creeping zoom lens when bending forward or backward.

1 upvote
jwang88
By jwang88 (Jan 9, 2013)

Is fixed F2.8 vs. f2.8-f4 the only difference between the existing lens with the same zoom power and this just announced S new lens ?

John

0 upvotes
StephenSPhotog
By StephenSPhotog (Jan 8, 2013)

I'd love to see more companies move some of their variable aperture lenses from 3.5-5.6 to the 2.8-4 territory.

7 upvotes
3a
By 3a (Jan 9, 2013)

i guess u would want the price range to stay @ 100-200$s too.

0 upvotes
StephenSPhotog
By StephenSPhotog (Jan 9, 2013)

No. I'd pay more for it.

Why would you guess that?

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
3a
By 3a (Jan 9, 2013)

3.5-5.6 are the cheap lenses which beginners buy. if manufactures move the 18-55s and 18-105s to 2.8-4 range, the price goes up and it wont be appealing to beginners anymore.

0 upvotes
StephenSPhotog
By StephenSPhotog (Jan 9, 2013)

3.5-5.6s aren't always cheap lenses that beginners buy, there are other 5.6s out there. And some beginners aren't looking to get the cheapest thing.

Also it'd be nice for some more upgrade options for those beginners other than super zooms or pro level constant aperture zooms.

0 upvotes
CarVac
By CarVac (Jan 8, 2013)

The dock is a cool idea, but I wonder how it actually connects with lenses for different mounts... I'm sure they've thought that through, though.

0 upvotes
qianp2k
By qianp2k (Jan 8, 2013)

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2010/9/21/sigma100300

It's pretty confused that back to 2010 Photokina, Sigma announced first version of this lens (and still being sold at $3K in US). Now Sigma announced second version in 2012 Photokina but with virtually (or actually)the same name without using version II. Heard some problems in the first version and hope this version is much improved in both QC and IQ and wait and see if its IQ and AF speed can compete to Canon and Nikon 300/2.8 IS/VR.

1 upvote
BelePhotography
By BelePhotography (Jan 8, 2013)

Maybe they want us to start using their "S" for sports to differentiate it from the older lens. That's how it's marketed as S 120-300 ;-)

1 upvote
tommy leong
By tommy leong (Jan 8, 2013)

yeah
and the way they announce it, without any reference to the previous versions, make it sound like this is the FIRST

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

A worldwide conspiracy by evil multinational corporation Sigma, can we agree on that? ;-)

0 upvotes
StyleZ7
By StyleZ7 (Jan 9, 2013)

The same with 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM.
I own the first version, and in future it will get more and more confusing when you will search for one of the versions but will be misdirected to another :(
Why they just didn't add to the naming this A/C/S or number II?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

C = Contemporary? You've gotta be kidding, Sigma, right? A contemporary camera lens? Well, if it is built in 2013, it is certainly going to be 'contemporary,' duuuuh.

"A" for Art and "S" for Sport? Really, Sigma? Wow, those of us who want a tele lens or tele zoom but are NOT into the high arts nor into competitive sports must feel pretty rotten by now.

The other thing with Sigma, they have a moniker "IF" for INTERNAL FOCUSING, okay. But, some of their zooms (8-16mm, 70-200mm) also have INTERNAL ZOOMING, whereby the front lens element does not pump in and out like a trombone when one is zooming. And these types would not have the nasty zoom creeping, either. Unfortunately, Sigma does not make any notation to these lenses, and when I called them, they told me they "don't have the resources" to look through their own lenses and tell me which ones have internal zoom mechanism and which ones do not.

Maybe these are symptomps of "growing pain," but really, Sigma is not a new company.

1 upvote
arpikusz
By arpikusz (Jan 8, 2013)

The 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM is a dead link. :(

0 upvotes
tashley
By tashley (Jan 8, 2013)

If they made an EVF I'd have one of these DP3s in a flash - but a non-stabilised 75mm equivalent lens shot at arms' length on a body that doesn't 'do' high ISO? I don't think so. The idea is heading in the right direction though.

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Rob Bernhard
By Rob Bernhard (Jan 8, 2013)

If you've seen the video from The Camera Store on youtube with Nick Devlin, he treats the DP Merrill cameras like field-cameras. Put it on a tripod, stop-down, keep the ISO low and you'll get fantastic results. Yes, there's something off about using a point and shoot on a tripod all the time, but if image quality is the ultimate goal with a portable camera, this is the correct route.

Also, no one holds cameras "at arms length." Watch how people use cameras with LCD's and you will see they are quite stable with elbows tucked in. People used TLR's for years without smashing them into their faces.

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Jan 8, 2013)

If you're serious enough to spend for one of these, using a tripod seems realistic. But, absent a tripod, there's no comparison with a TLR or the way a TLR is held. I've gotten pretty used to holding point and shoot cameras with arms extended but it's certainly not ideal. Maybe it's my eyesight, but I can't read a book pressed against my nose, either.

0 upvotes
Chekr
By Chekr (Jan 8, 2013)

I wish that Sigma made m43 bodies, the resolution in b+w would stomp over anything from panasonic or olympus

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

Funny you say that, as I'm sort of expecting Micro 4/3rds to just go away one fine day. Certainly for lenses, Sigma's APS-C image circle lenses are at least as good if not better than the poor line-up of Panasonic and Olympus M4/3 lenses are, and at decidedly lower prices than the duopoly priced M4/3 lenses are. And for zooms, other than a few very pricey exceptions, M4/3rds are basically nowhere.

1 upvote
arejukas
By arejukas (Jan 9, 2013)

Doubly funny that you would say that, since the Sigma APS-C lens designs in the m4/3 mount versions seem to perform better when used with the smaller sensors.

The 19mm f2.8 is so good on my OMD as a 38mm equivalent that I almost skipped the M.Zuiko 17mm f1.8 when it was released.

Luckily I changed my mind and no longer need to deal with the more noticeable CA issues I tend to see with the Sigma.

Overall, I like both lenses though, and for less than half the price, Sigma packs in a lot of quality per dollar.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2013)

Agree with you on the Sigma lenses performing swimmingly, but how many lenses does Sigma make with Micro 4/3rd mounts, really? Most of the 3rd party M4/3 lenses are single focal primes, not zooms. So, Panasonic and Olympus can charge highway robbery prices for their zoom lenses. And since one type has IS in-lens and the other does not, good luck in mixing and matching lenses on a Panny or Oly camera.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 47