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Nikon AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm F3.5-4.5G ED and 800mm F5.6E FL ED VR

By dpreview staff on Jan 29, 2013 at 04:01 GMT

CP+ 2013: Nikon has announced the AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm F3.5-4.5G ED full-frame wideangle zoom and the AF-S Nikkor 800mm F5.6E FL ED VR, a super-telephoto prime that comes with its own dedicated teleconverter. The 18-35mm is a consumer-grade wideangle to extend the options available to buyers of the company's more affordable D600 model, and will cost around $750. The 800mm lens, which uses fluorite glass, will cost around $18,000 and comes with an exclusive, matched 1.25x teleconverter that gives a 1000mm F7.1 combination.

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Press Release:

EXACTING PRECISION FROM NEAR OR AFAR: NIKON’S NEWEST NIKKOR LENSES OFFER OPTICAL BRILLIANCE AND VERSATILITY FOR FX-FORMAT SHOOTERS

AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm F3.5-4.5G ED

Nikon Continues to Expand Upon the NIKKOR Lens Lineup with the New AF-S NIKKOR 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR Super-Telephoto Lens and AF-S NIKKOR 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED Wide-Angle Lens

MELVILLE, N.Y. (January 28, 2013) – Today, Nikon Inc. introduced the AF-S NIKKOR 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR super-telephoto lens and AF-S NIKKOR 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED ultra-wide-angle zoom lens, designed to assist FX-format photographers in capturing their subjects with clarity and precision. Specifically engineered for sports, wildlife and photojournalists, the 800mm f/5.6 offers the longest focal length of any NIKKOR autofocus (AF) lens, affording photographers the opportunity to get closer to their subject with extreme telephoto capability. Additionally, the compact and lightweight 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5 is an ultra-wide-angle lens option with a 1.9x zoom range is an  ideal focal length for landscape photography and other wide-angle applications.

“The addition of the AF-S NIKKOR 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR super-telephoto lens and AF-S NIKKOR 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED wide-angle zoom lens to the FX-format NIKKOR lens lineup reaffirms Nikon’s commitment to the optical excellence and versatility that professional and enthusiast photographers have come to expect from Nikon,” said Bo Kajiwara, Vice President of Marketing, Planning and Customer Experience, Nikon Inc. “Whether shooting on the sidelines under stadium lights or composing a landscape in the early morning sun, the newest additions to the NIKKOR line of lenses provide the ability to shoot stunning still images or HD video with amazing sharpness and clarity.”

The Elusive and Iconic Image is Never Out of Reach

AF-S Nikkor 800mm F5.6E FL ED VR

The new AF-S NIKKOR 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR super-telephoto lens provides professional photographers the opportunity to get close to a subject with the longest fixed focal length lens in the NIKKOR family. Designed for the needs of sports, wildlife and news photographers, the 800mm features a maximum aperture of f/5.6 and gives FX-format photographers the chance to capture intense detail and textures that fill the frame from a distance. Included with the new lens is the matched AF-S Teleconverter TC800-1.25E ED which has been developed exclusively for the 800mm f/5.6 lens. This is the first Nikon teleconverter to employ an ED glass element, and extends the maximum focal length 1.25x to 1000mm (1500mm when used with a DX-format camera) and maximum aperture to f/7.1 while maintaining full AF performance on D4, D800 series and D600 FX-format D-SLR cameras.

Originally trialed and tested under the demanding conditions of the 2012 summer games, the AF-S NIKKOR 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR maintains the handling, optical performance, vivid color reproduction and exceptional clarity that professional photographers rely on. This is the first Nikon lens constructed with two fluorite glass elements, combined with two ED glass elements and a Nano Crystal Coat, to help ensure outstanding performance with minimal chromatic aberration and flaring, all within a durable lens body. The addition of fluorite elements allows for consistently excellent optical characteristics while keeping the lens balanced and lightweight. The lens is comprised of 20 elements in 13 groups, and is one of few Nikon lenses to utilize an electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism that enables seamless mechanical control and enhanced stability in auto exposure control during continuous shooting. Vibration Reduction (VR) image stabilization is also implemented, with the equivalent of approximately four stops faster1 shutter speed correction.

An Ultra Wide-Angle Wonder for FX-Format Photographers
Nikon’s newest ultra-wide-angle NIKKOR offering, the AF-S NIKKOR 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED, features a useful wide-angle focal length of 18-35mm (1.9x zoom equivalent). This FX-format lens is ideal for  large group shots, architecture and photographing or shooting HD video in tight interiors. Performance is optimized for ultra-high-pixel-count D-SLR cameras including the Nikon D800 series and D600, while providing close focus up to .92 feet (approx. 11 inches). The 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5 presents a new, lightweight wide-angle option for FX-format D-SLR shooters.

The AF-S NIKKOR 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED packs NIKKOR quality and performance within an extremely compact and lightweight 0.85 lb. (385g) body, making it easy to carry while on location or on-the-go. Constructed with 12 elements in 8 groups, Nikon’s newest wide-angle lens features a seven-blade diaphragm that allows for beautiful and precise image blur, ED glass to help ensure outstanding performance with minimal chromatic aberration while Nikon’s Super Integrated Coating (SIC) reduces ghosting even in backlit situations. Two focus modes are available including M/A (AF with manual override) and M (Manual) in addition to a Silent Wave Motor (SWM) that enables quiet AF operation.

Price and Availability
The AF-S NIKKOR 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR, supplied with the AF-S Teleconverter TC800-1.25E ED, will be available in April 2013 for the suggested retail price (SRP) of $17,899.95*. The AF-S NIKKOR 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED will be available in March 2013 for the SRP of $749.95*. For more information on these and other NIKKOR lenses as well as other Nikon products, please visit www.nikonusa.com.

*SRP (Suggested Retail Price) listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time.

Specifications, equipment and release dates are subject to change without any notice or obligation on the part of the manufacturer.

1CIPA Standards

AF-S Nikkor 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED specifications

Principal specifications
Lens typeZoom lens
Max Format size35mm FF
Focal length18–35 mm
Image stabilisationNo
Lens mountNikon F (FX)
Aperture
Maximum apertureF3.5 - F4.5
Minimum apertureF22.0 - F29.0
Aperture ringNo
Number of diaphragm blades7
Aperture notesrounded blades
Optics
Elements12
Groups4
Special elements / coatings2 ED glass elements, three aspherical elements
Focus
Minimum focus0.28 m (11.02)
AutofocusYes
Motor typeRing-type ultrasonic
Full time manualYes
Focus methodInternal
Distance scaleYes
DoF scaleNo
Physical
Weight385 g (0.85 lb)
Diameter83 mm (3.27)
Length95 mm (3.74)
SealingYes
Zoom methodRotary (internal)
Filter thread77 mm
Hood suppliedYes

AF-S Nikkor 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR specifications

Principal specifications
Lens typePrime lens
Max Format size35mm FF
Focal length800 mm
Image stabilisationYes (4 stops claimed)
Lens mountNikon F (FX)
Aperture
Maximum apertureF5.6
Minimum apertureF32.0
Aperture ringNo
Number of diaphragm blades9
Aperture notesrounded blades
Optics
Elements20
Groups13
Special elements / coatingsTwo flourite elements, 2 ED glass elements, includes protective glass
Focus
Minimum focus5.90 m (232.28)
AutofocusYes
Motor typeRing-type ultrasonic
Full time manualYes
Focus methodInternal
Distance scaleYes
DoF scaleNo
Physical
Weight4590 g (10.12 lb)
Diameter160 mm (6.3)
Length461 mm (18.15)
SealingYes
Filter thread52 mm
Filter notesrear slip-in filter holder
Hood suppliedYes
Tripod collarYes
73
I own it
19
I want it
2
I had it
Discuss in the forums
1
I own it
27
I want it
0
I had it
Discuss in the forums
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Comments

Total comments: 143
ageha
By ageha (Jan 31, 2013)

The 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED was a good idea!

0 upvotes
memee_meen
By memee_meen (Jan 31, 2013)

So? Finally Nikon using fluorite element i though their ED element can replace the fluorite.

0 upvotes
rrccad
By rrccad (Jan 31, 2013)

I'm just curious to find out where they are getting their lens blanks from. as far as I know .. there's only a handful of companies that produce synthetic fluorite large enough to be used as anything other than very small lenses. Takahashi and Canon are two of the ones I know of .. and I haven't seen anyone else use fluorite in large elements outside of these two companies. until nikon's 800mm.

it would be amusing if it came out that they were buying their blanks from canon.

which honestly wouldn't suprise me, canon is probably one of the few companies in the world that can produce quality fluorite blanks for lenses.

0 upvotes
LSE
By LSE (Feb 12, 2013)

that's just wishful thinking. Nikon has been using that material on its steppers and microscopes for many decades now. there is nothing special about making large blanks, only time and money both of which Nikon has.

of more interest is the FLD glass, which is cheaper and has the same properties of CAFl2 but none of the manufacturing costs.

the sun is setting on the ages of this material as the end all be all. and it is neither exclusive to canon or any manufacturer.

0 upvotes
Nigel Ward 2
By Nigel Ward 2 (Jan 30, 2013)

Camera World are already taking orders on the new 18-35mm lens for £669 !
That's SIX HUNDRED AND SEVENTY POUNDS for an f/4.5 at 35mm lens!

The world has gone mad.

2 upvotes
babola
By babola (Jan 31, 2013)

The problem is that with recent advancement in digi cams the f/4 is becoming now the "new" f/2.8. So expect many more lens products built around the ~ f/4 aperture and costing a pretty penny.

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Lupti
By Lupti (Feb 4, 2013)

Gone mad? Not really. Considering the price of Canon 17-40mm F4 L which is a similar lens at similar price tag I don´t see a problem here.

0 upvotes
GPW
By GPW (Jan 30, 2013)

Canon 800mm F5.6 IS USM EF is selling for around $11,000 at Camera Canada, so whats up with Nikon pricing their 800mm at almost 18,000? It might be time for this PO BOY to reconsider an change!!!

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Jan 30, 2013)

On average, Canon super telephotos are more expensive than Nikons, see 300 2.8 VR vs IS, 400 2.8, 500 f4 and 600 f4 VRs vs IS, etc.

The newest Nikon 800 5.6 includes a matched TC, so that may add to it's cost. None of it makes a bit of difference to me, because this lens would clearly be a rental at best.

But changing systems, at a time when Nikon's making the best performing DSLRs in the world, based on the price of one super telephoto may not be wise. But whatever's best for you, good luck.

1 upvote
GPW
By GPW (Jan 31, 2013)

$7000 is a lot to pay for a TC. It is going to be a rental for me too, just don't get the crazy price, compared to a canon 800mm.

0 upvotes
Shifty2031
By Shifty2031 (Jan 31, 2013)

Have you seen the MTF charts for the Nikon 800? It wipes the floor with Canon's version - which it should, being what? 3 years more recent than the Canon. What I don't understand is how Nikon have managed to make it heavier than Canon's when Canon's latest superteles are so appealing due to their lack of weight!

0 upvotes
rrccad
By rrccad (Jan 31, 2013)

@marike6 - the product prices you are comparing also has vastly different weights in between them - canon being made around 1.5 to 2.5lbs lighter than the equivalent nikon lens - partly due to more expensive fabrication (according to canon anyways)

for example, the canon 600/4 is nearly the same weight as the nikon 500/4.

0 upvotes
Stanchung
By Stanchung (Jan 30, 2013)

The 800mm is very nice but is not for everyone.

The 18-35 is a for people who want less weight? Seriously?

Nikon never followed up with a better DX zoom after 17-55. A little more range on the longer end would be nice. Stick to 77mm diameter, no variable aperture zoom please. [There's the 16-85 already.] Choose what's possible-f2.8. 3.5 or f4. VR optional.

Make it a keeper- no excuses Nikon.

0 upvotes
Tap0
By Tap0 (Jan 30, 2013)

The 18-35 is an FX zoom, not sure why you are talking about DX zooms.

3 upvotes
jujuman
By jujuman (Jan 30, 2013)

I've got the 16-85 DX lens. I think it came out after the 17-55 and its pretty darn good for the price........

0 upvotes
phil_k
By phil_k (Jan 30, 2013)

I'm also excited about the electromechanical diaphragm on the 800mm - I'd love to see that technology trickle down to more affordable products. Nikon continues to amaze me that they remain competitive even with an over 50-year-old lens mount that has a much smaller diameter than their competitors and which still relies on a mechanical diaphragm linkage.

0 upvotes
joe_leads
By joe_leads (Jan 30, 2013)

The 'new' diaphragm isn't that new, it was introduced with the PC-E lenses > 5 years ago, it is the 'E' in PC-E. They have introduced many G, Non-E lenses since then, and I think they will continue to do so for a while, and put the 'E' only where a mechanical aperture has drawbacks. Why? The Nikon mount is about compatibility, and the 'E' breaks compatibility with all cameras introduced prior to the D300.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
phil_k
By phil_k (Jan 30, 2013)

Re: the fluorite elements on the 800mm, yes Canon has used them since the 1970s, before some of their drawbacks had been mitigated. Fluorite is fragile and changes characteristics as the temperature shifts. Which is why the old Canon FL teles focused past infinity - you couldn't have a hard infinity stop as was common in the manual-focus days, as this would shift on such lenses depending on the atmospheric conditions. That's not a very big deal in the age of AF.

Presumably Nikon gained experience with Fluorite optics in recent years with their ultra-high-res photolithography equipment used in silicon chipmaking. This is an area that Canon also competes in, but Nikon's ArF immersion scanners are far more advanced than Canon's. At those molecular-level resolutions, the optics must work in the UV spectrum, as the wavelength of visible light is too long to resolve the detail that they need to resolve. That's where fluorite optics come in. (Just like on the renowned UV-Nikkor lenses)

0 upvotes
M DeNero
By M DeNero (Jan 30, 2013)

Canon always cites fluorite as a reason for whitish paint on superteles. Keeps temp down. How did Nikon get around that?

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
1 upvote
LSE
By LSE (Feb 12, 2013)

Canon paints their stuff white because of branding. if they were really concerned about temperature they would be fully reflective (aka silver mirror like surface).

0 upvotes
phil_k
By phil_k (Jan 30, 2013)

Re: the 800mm, of course it's not meant for mainstream customers. It's a "halo" product, used primarily by professionals. All manufacturers of top-quality equipment have them, there are very few companies in the world who can build such things. (or sell them, for that matter)

They help to establish the reputation of the manufacturer, and they often have a positive impact on the opinion of the kind of high-end users who have a lot of influence over the status of a brand, and its potential customers.

I must admit, the MTF on the 800mm is amazing. And when Canon's equivalent is already ~$14,000, $18,000 isn't really dramatically different, especially since it comes with a dedicated teleconverter.

2 upvotes
Nigel Ward 2
By Nigel Ward 2 (Jan 30, 2013)

Give me a decent (and cheap) FX 35mm f/1.8 or even f/2 and I would much prefer it to the 18-35mm

2 upvotes
jhinkey
By jhinkey (Jan 30, 2013)

Now they need to re-make the 28-105/3.5-4.5AF-D to include VR and better IQ and I'd be all set for a light weight FX kit that would be 18-35 + 28-105 + 70-200f/4.

Not gonna happen any time soon though . . . .

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Jan 30, 2013)

What would be the point when they already have the new 24-85 VR?

0 upvotes
Paul B Jones
By Paul B Jones (Jan 29, 2013)

And I thought the Canon 800mm was expensive!

1 upvote
GPW
By GPW (Jan 29, 2013)

The 800mm lens is a company lens or for the very rich. Nikon is heading in the wrong direction in my opinion in terms of expensive lens and sub-par cameras(build quality and MP's). How many 800's are they going to sell, at that price,really and who wants a 36mp camera at 4 fps(huge files), not the average consumer. People have been screaming for an upgrade for the 80-400 and an upgrade for the d300/s and Nikon seems to not give a rats ass about what the average consumer/prosumer wants.

2 upvotes
thx1138
By thx1138 (Jan 29, 2013)

Given Nikon's inability to even be able to supply the current superteles, one can only wonder how few of these insanley expensive 800's they will even manufacture, let alone sell. I agree, it's the last lens they needed to worry about in thier line-up. Producing a a D300s replacement and updating the average at best 80-400 and possibly introducing a 400 f/5.6 VR would be infinitely more sensible from a market perspective.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Jan 30, 2013)

Nikon just released and delivered the excellent 70-200 f4 VR, a lens users have been asking for. They have been releasing lenses and updating their lineup faster than any other company.

The 800 5.6 is not for amateurs, but for professional nature/wildlife shooters. It is designed to keep pace with Canon, who offer the 800 5.6L, and to raise Nikon's profile at sporting events like the Olympics.

Such complaints are puzzling as both companies have larger and more varied lens selections than any other manufacturer in the world. Don't worry, Nikon's not going anywhere and the 80-400 VR or 300 f4 VR will be coming soon to a camera store near you soon.

As far as "subpar" 36 mp cameras (lol), nobody said it was FOR the average consumer. If it's not right for you, Nikon likely has another body that meets your needs and expectations. If not, there are are other companies with more choices now than at any time in history.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
GPW
By GPW (Jan 30, 2013)

Except Canon costs around $800 less

0 upvotes
LSE
By LSE (Feb 12, 2013)

this is a high end lens for a market that will bear the price. not for your mom and aunt.

0 upvotes
JamesVo
By JamesVo (Jan 29, 2013)

Lots of complaints about this seemingly pedestrian UWA zoom. I'm guessing there is method in the apparent madness.

Nikon has now completed a line of decent entry level AF-S FX consumer zooms (18-35, 24-85 VR and 70-300 VR). This means they can introduce an entry level FX body at a much lower price point than D600 by omitting the built-in AF motor, top LCD, substituting VF prism with mirrors and using a less expensive AF module. So look for a D3200/D5200 type entry level FX body sometime in the future.

There is also the complete range of f2.8 zooms and a mid priced range of f4 zooms that deliver image quality good enough for many pros. In the last few years a nice range of f1.8 and f1.4 FX G AF-S primes has also appeared (seemingly illogically) alongside the older AF-D equivalents.

As soon as that new entry level FX body arrives, Nikon will be able to offer the image quality of FX format to a huge range of novice and less-affluent photographers.....wait and see.

3 upvotes
jhinkey
By jhinkey (Jan 30, 2013)

Nikon is all about making money - so they make lenses they feel they can sell as well as lenses that will keep the Tokinas, Sigmas, and Tamrons from grabbing lens market share.

If this performs on par with my 17-35AFS at equiv. apertures then I likely will get one to save the weight. If it doesn't perform better than the 17-35AFS then Nikon will not get my $$.

Why the 800mm? Only Nikon knows why that lens instead of others that surely need updating.

1 upvote
Nigel Ward 2
By Nigel Ward 2 (Jan 30, 2013)

I doubt if it will match the old 17-35mm, and all new Nikon lenses appear to have some really serious vignetting, I think they are getting a bit lazy, expecting everything to be sorted out in Lightroom afterwards...and focus speed?
The only thing I won't miss is the flare pattern on the 17-35mm, but I'm not holding my breath to see if it will be much improved. We will see.....

Comment edited 32 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Jan 30, 2013)

Why the 800 5.6? That's an easy one. Because Canon makes one.

1 upvote
Caleido
By Caleido (Jan 29, 2013)

Since when is 3.5 a small aperture? The difference with 2.8 is not even a full stop. If you want the play with DOF, you're looking at the wrong lens.

So you want the exact same features as the 14-24mm or 16-35mm, but at a lower price? Are pigs flying today?

3 upvotes
Suave
By Suave (Jan 29, 2013)

Sure, if you willing to overlook the fact that at 35 it's 4.5, it's wide.

2 upvotes
jhinkey
By jhinkey (Jan 30, 2013)

f/4.5 at 35mm is fine with me most of the time and I suspect many other folks that will take the weight savings over something faster and much more expensive. For landscapes most of the time (except at night) I'm at f/5.6 anyways . . .

3 upvotes
Suave
By Suave (Jan 29, 2013)

For a lens that doesn't go to 16, does't have VR, and doesn't open to 2.8 $750 is a whole lot of money.

2 upvotes
joejack951
By joejack951 (Jan 29, 2013)

That's funny because even the third party Tokina 16-28/2.8 retails for $850. Neither Nikon or Canon make a full frame 16mm-capable zoom for under $1200 let alone one with VR or f/2.8. On which current lens are you basing your argument that $750 is too much for this lens?

2 upvotes
John Fleming
By John Fleming (Jan 29, 2013)

Where is the replacement/upgraded 80~400 VR lens that people have been waiting years for? Instead they come out with an $18K 800mm lens that the average person can't afford to buy.

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
LSE
By LSE (Feb 12, 2013)

what makes you think the average person has a need for this even if they could buy it? when have you seen the average person carry a bazooka sized lens around. even if it was 100 dollars, this lens is aimed at the working pro that needs it. clearly you don't understand it.

0 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (Jan 29, 2013)

Buy a Sigma 50-500mm and slap it on a crop sensor and you have your 800mm for about a grand. ;)

1 upvote
ageha
By ageha (Jan 31, 2013)

That would be a 750mm,,,

0 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (Jan 31, 2013)

Or 800mm on a Canon crop body. Diff between 750 and 800 is hardly noticeable.

0 upvotes
LSE
By LSE (Feb 12, 2013)

if reach is your goal, use this lens plus its TC on a Nikon CX body and that will be unbeatable by any system in the world.

0 upvotes
WalterF
By WalterF (Jan 29, 2013)

While the 18-35 AF-S certainly is a good addition to the range, a 17/3.5 AF-S N for the same price would be much more intresting.

0 upvotes
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (Jan 29, 2013)

The 18-35mm is not a particularly exciting lens. Small maximum apertures and no VR (although VR is probably not necessary in a short zoom.)

But for a multi-platform lens (suitable for full-frame DSLRs) and good optics, it's quite affordable at $750 US, $799 in Canada. MUCH more affordable than the 16-35mm f/4 which is $1250.

Since the D600 is an affordable full-frame camera, it seems that Nikon is making lenses for this type of DSLR. The first one was the 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED VR. Makes sense, I suppose.

2 upvotes
io_bg
By io_bg (Jan 29, 2013)

It also makes sense for having no VR and variable aperture.

0 upvotes
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (Jan 29, 2013)

I guess I will need to rent the new 800mm lens when I need one, because $18,000 is slightly above my budget. (Unless I am buying a car). I assume that LensRentals.com will have it in stock by the spring. (The 600mm f/4 rents for $332 for four days, so the 800mm lens will probably rent for $500).

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Simon97
By Simon97 (Jan 29, 2013)

After reading the posts here makes me sad to realize this site has some of the biggest dopes and "Brand Bois" I've seen on any photo site. Shameful.

4 upvotes
snow14
By snow14 (Jan 29, 2013)

wow $18000 for the 800mm ,are they trying to make up for the nicely priced d800 and i am talking about the few good copies with no AF issue

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Jan 29, 2013)

Does one day ever go by where there isn't a troll post about real or imaginary D800 AF issues?

1 out of 51 AF points on some early D800s was slightly soft, and months later it's morphed into "the D800 can't focus". If you can find a camera with better than the D4 AF module of the D800, go buy it. Until then, give it a rest.

8 upvotes
bikinchris
By bikinchris (Jan 29, 2013)

It only morphs when someone has an agenda of sowing fear uncertainty and doubt about a competing product. FUD is used by underground marketers to try to paint a competitors product as being somehow 'less' than your own. If you have NOTHING that will sell your own product, you try to tear down the one of the competitor. It doesn't matter if that FUD is true, only if you can make it stick.

4 upvotes
Bill Rees
By Bill Rees (Jan 29, 2013)

Glad I didn't wait for this lens and just got the Tokina 16-28mm f/2.8 which I love. The price is too high for what amounts to a slow, consumer wide-angle zoom.

2 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Jan 29, 2013)

The Tokina 16-28 is a very good lens but it's big and heavy, similar in size and weight to the Nikon 14-24 2.8. A 950g Tokina vs 385g for this lens is a big difference for some.

And for an UWA lens, that most landscape photographers are going to be using locked down on a tripod, the extra 2/3 EV of the f2.8 zoom is probably not a big deal.

5 upvotes
Bill Rees
By Bill Rees (Jan 29, 2013)

True but my point is it's over-priced.

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Jan 29, 2013)

As far as price, it's a Nikkor with tons of exotic glass. Besides, UWA zooms, especially ones designed to cover FF, are rarely inexpensive.

Nikon's new 6.7-13 f/3.5-5.6 VR UWA zoom for the Nikon 1 comes in at $500, so the price of this lens is consistent with the rest of their lens lineup from CX to FX.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Wael Hussain
By Wael Hussain (Jan 29, 2013)

18-35 mm and 3.5 aperture
short range and small aperture !!!!
how bad for Nikon
i prefer to buy sigma lenses; cheaper and better options

3 upvotes
viking79
By viking79 (Jan 29, 2013)

what's wrong with an 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5 for full frame? On an APS-C camera that is like a 12-24mm f/2.3-3. Still complaining? Seriously, most wide shooters will likely be at f/5.6-11 anyway on a full frame camera. If you want a 2.8 lens, get the 14-24mm f/2.8 or a 17-35mm f/2.8 or whatever else. If you want 18-35mm on APS-C camera, get an 18-55mm kit lens. This is a cheap full frame ultra wide.

3 upvotes
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (Jan 29, 2013)

??? .... Actually, on an APS-C camera, the 18-35mm lens will be a 27-52.5mm equivalent.

0 upvotes
Antony John
By Antony John (Jan 29, 2013)

I thiink he meant that the 12-24 on a crop sensor is the same as the 18-35 on FF.

2 upvotes
StanRogers
By StanRogers (Jan 29, 2013)

What the viking was saying is that the equivalent lens for an APS-C camera would be something like a 12-24mm, not that this lens will act like a 12-24mm on APS-C.

(I see Antony John beat me to it.)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
paulski66
By paulski66 (Jan 29, 2013)

He's saying the 18-35 on FX is roughly equivalent to using a 12-24 on DX.

Comment edited 14 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Tom_A
By Tom_A (Jan 30, 2013)

I recommend to first see how the tests come out. Very often Nikon is quite a bit better than Sigma in that respect.

0 upvotes
The A-Team
By The A-Team (Jan 29, 2013)

Glad I can get the Canon 17-40L (wider, longer, and faster, better built) for the same price :)

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
Dan Corlateanu
By Dan Corlateanu (Jan 29, 2013)

Too bad it only gives decent results on a 12 mpx and below. Good enough for Web though.

9 upvotes
Ken Johnes
By Ken Johnes (Jan 29, 2013)

but it wont fit on a Nikon cam.;-))

1 upvote
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Jan 29, 2013)

well most nikon lenses don´t even reach 12mpx resolution.....

3 upvotes
StephenSPhotog
By StephenSPhotog (Jan 29, 2013)

Wait! 12mp is only good enough for the Web?! Damn.

Someone needs to tell all those people still using the Nikon D3s and other older pro level cameras!

8 upvotes
shahid11235
By shahid11235 (Jan 30, 2013)

12MP is GOOD ENOUGH for WEB?
OMG! In which planet am I living?!!

0 upvotes
Devendra
By Devendra (Jan 30, 2013)

canon trolls supporting each other

0 upvotes
LSE
By LSE (Feb 12, 2013)

much rather get the 16-35, wider, has IS, better built and better IQ than the old canon 17-40 which is honestly long in the tooth and not suitable for high MP uses. off course, the low resolution demands of canon bodies make it ok.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Scorpius1
By Scorpius1 (Jan 29, 2013)

Time for my EF800 to hit ebay,I am in for this new Nikkor 800

1 upvote
TimK5
By TimK5 (Jan 29, 2013)

No VR on the 18-35?

= Fail!

3 upvotes
pc168
By pc168 (Jan 29, 2013)

Well, VR is almost a must have feature

0 upvotes
joejack951
By joejack951 (Jan 29, 2013)

Canon must really = FAIL as they don't have any ultra-wide angle lenses with VR.

0 upvotes
JordanAT
By JordanAT (Jan 29, 2013)

Are your hands really so unsteady that you can't shoot a WA without VR? Perhaps some basic skills classes are in order. There are few subjects where motion blur won't control an image a 1/20-1/30s, and that's a safe shutter speed for an unsteady photographer at those FL.

0 upvotes
StyleZ7
By StyleZ7 (Jan 29, 2013)

Just bought an old Canon 20-35 USM lens for $200, which performs quite nice.
I am happy to see, that new lenses are still made in this class, but I am more happy, that I shouldn't spend 4 times more money for probably 10% better image quality ;)

4 upvotes
Dan Corlateanu
By Dan Corlateanu (Jan 29, 2013)

funny how people try to justify their own purchases and commitment to a brand :) Let me guess, you bought if after reading Ken Rockwell's review.

5 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (Jan 29, 2013)

I would say it will be quite a bit more than 10%, but ofc hardly 400%. Dimnishing returns kick really fast in this high end category.

But then, these lens are not designed for regular folks but pros which make their living with those lens.

Old Nikkor 20-35mm f2.8 is quite usable lens today too.. (I guess maybe better than Canon counterpart).

0 upvotes
StyleZ7
By StyleZ7 (Jan 29, 2013)

Dan, no - I bought it just because it was available for such price in good condition, and I needed a lens for migration period to fullframe. And this is no justifiying, just an observation..
No offense to Nikon too. Definetly if new identical Canon lens would come out, the price would be even higher.

And Mescalamba - Pros do have faster and much more expensive glas :)

0 upvotes
shahid11235
By shahid11235 (Jan 30, 2013)

Isn't it good to get a 20-35mm lens only at $200 for a full-frame camera? All that matters is a QUALITY IMAGE, not IMAGE QUALITY. And that Canon 20-35mm oldie won't remain far behind in terms of IQ, I guess.. :)

2 upvotes
ngollan
By ngollan (Jan 29, 2013)

So far so uninteresting. A slow wide zoom and a purely professional lens.

I have been talking quite a bit with a friend who's going to get Canon equipment, and honestly, Nikon has a lot of catch-up to play when it comes to their lens lineup. There may be many great lenses, but there is, e.g., nothing to beat something like a EF 4,5-5,6/100-400 L IS USM, with the only remotely competing lens predating AF-S and VR.

There don't seem to be any modern lenses in the "amateur" telezoom range, and Nikon seem to have phased out interesting, differentiating, lenses like the DC primes.

All in all, I hope that they are going to use the 80th anniversary of the Nikkor brand to modernise their lineup and re-enter the market for affordable, interesting lenses.

0 upvotes
ngollan
By ngollan (Jan 29, 2013)

@ZAnton Nikon only relatively recently updated their "normal prime" offerings, and from the looks of it, the driving factor behind that was the missing AF motor in a lot of bodies they had sold. Canon, in contrast, has no such legacy that would require such an update.

Both companies probably have a bunch of smelling corpses in their lineup, but right now the Nikon announcement at hand is rubbing theirs in my face ;-)

(I'm using Nikon by the way, just to maybe clear that up…)

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Jan 29, 2013)

You're using Nikon yet you are crowing about a variable aperture, push-pull zoom, the 100-400 L.

Of all the lenses for be envious of.

4 upvotes
ZAnton
By ZAnton (Jan 29, 2013)

@ngollan
it is not the question WHY Nikon has updated their standard lenses, but that they HAVE it done, and Canon - doesn't.

1 upvote
ngollan
By ngollan (Jan 29, 2013)

Well, it's a particular piece of kit that would absolutely be in my budget, but which I can't seem to get "on-brand". Sigma has something in that range, but they have that certain stigma (pun not intended, but while we're here…).

Carrying fast, long primes around, while certainly cool in some ways, is definitely not something even most enthusiasts would do, considering that those pieces tend to cost more than the cars required to move them. So yes, I am crowing about the lack or age of some products.

@ZAnton, reasons aside, this is a Nikon article, so I'm crying about their lineup ;-)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Higuel
By Higuel (Jan 30, 2013)

ZAnton, i wish canon would improve their stinking 50mm f1.8 for something decent!!! I wish they make a 35mm DX f1.8 at he same price!!! Etc etc etc!
The only crap canon did was creating new wide angle primes with IS and increase the price for DOUBLE!!! x_x
If only sigma would start making affordable lenses again! (not that i regret increasing the construction quality!!!)
I wonder how much more those companies will keep inflating prices?!?!? :(

we can only dream someday samyang will put auto-focus in their 85mm f1.4 and create a smaller cheaper 35mm f2.0 or a 50mm f1.4 AF!!! XD

0 upvotes
Kabe Luna
By Kabe Luna (Jan 29, 2013)

I'm mystified by the 18-35/3.5-4.5 – a focal length range that was exciting when introduced back in 2000 but today seems terribly pedestrian. And for the premium, and having to suffer the variable max aperture, it'd better be optically pristine.

2 upvotes
ngollan
By ngollan (Jan 29, 2013)

The new lens weighs only a bit over half as much as the 17-35/2.8 and is more than a centimetre shorter.

On the downside it's a tad longer and heavier than the (clutch AF) lens it's replacing, so yes, it better be one sharp piece of glass.

0 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 29, 2013)

Well, I have had excellent service from the 12-24 DX lens since I got it 4 years ago, rarely need the extra WA FLs available from other lenses. This is a very light and small lens, 3cm shorter than the 16-35 and 300g lighter. I bet it'll sell well to D600 users that want a WA zoom but are not into heavy-weight glass.

0 upvotes
pc168
By pc168 (Jan 29, 2013)

18-35 FX looks good. If I'm not having the 16-35 VR ... may give it a shot.

0 upvotes
HansJN
By HansJN (Jan 29, 2013)

Just skipping over the text I first read that "Nikon has launched a new 18-35 ... $18000". Ouch ;-)

3 upvotes
Pradipta Dutta
By Pradipta Dutta (Jan 29, 2013)

You mixed up the price of the 800/5.6 with that of the 18-35. The zoom is suggested to be retailed at $750.

1 upvote
sebastian huvenaars
By sebastian huvenaars (Jan 29, 2013)

Well thank you captain obvious ;)

6 upvotes
Antony John
By Antony John (Jan 29, 2013)

Pradipta he said he was 'skipping' and made a mistake - just like you did.

1 upvote
nikonboi
By nikonboi (Jan 29, 2013)

Anthony, I like 'skipped' milk and I 'skim' over the text.

0 upvotes
AngshuArun
By AngshuArun (Jan 29, 2013)

@ dpreview: Please post about latest Tokina launches of 70-200mm f/4 (FX) and 12-28 f/4 (DX) lenses with Nikon mount

10 upvotes
avbee
By avbee (Jan 29, 2013)

new 18-35 looks better than old vers.

0 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Jan 29, 2013)

I need to announce bankruptcy once this lens is released in India. Also Nikon 800mm f/5.6 lens is the most exciting announcement of 2013 so far.

0 upvotes
jhinkey
By jhinkey (Jan 29, 2013)

Well, at least the MTF charts of the 18-35 look much better than the older version.
Let's hope that stopped down a stop it's pretty sharp across the frame.

Comment edited 13 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Jan 29, 2013)

Hmm the new 800mm or a new car? One thing is for certain, the lens is not likely to depreciate in value like a new car will :).

4 upvotes
gl2k
By gl2k (Jan 29, 2013)

I would guess that this lens is as difficult to get as a new Lamborghini.

0 upvotes
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Jan 29, 2013)

a new lambo is not hard to get at all....

0 upvotes
Teila Day
By Teila Day (Jan 29, 2013)

... new or used, they are about as easy to get as a Honda.

0 upvotes
sunnycal
By sunnycal (Jan 29, 2013)

Can anyone comment on 18-35 MTF chart. It looks kind of "meh". Somewhat better then its predecessor but nothing to be excited about.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Trollshavethebestcandy
By Trollshavethebestcandy (Jan 29, 2013)

You could spot aliens on the moon with this on the Nikon 1
Seriously who will buy this? National Geographic? Spy agencies? Use the metabones speed booster and gain a stop better for only $600 :-)!!!!

0 upvotes
jhinkey
By jhinkey (Jan 29, 2013)

Somewhat better? I think it looks much much better.
Is it good enough - I guess we'll find out.

0 upvotes
KentG
By KentG (Jan 29, 2013)

Yes and why would I favor this over the older Sigma EX 17-35/2.8-4 or the Tamron SP AF 17-35/2.8-4 Di when I can get either of them for 1/3 the price and they are faster.

2 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Jan 29, 2013)

@KentG I'm guessing you'd favor the new Nikkor because it was designed for modern FF sensors and will likely beat the older Sigma and Tamron lenses in the borders, corners, and if I had to guess, in the center.

2 upvotes
rhlpetrus
By rhlpetrus (Jan 29, 2013)

@KentG: I have had both Nikkors, pro and consumer grade, and 3rd party lenses, and the Nikkors never disappoint, that's a good reason for me.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Jan 29, 2013)

AF-S Nikkor 800mm f/5.6E FL ED VR
(Not compatible with the D2 series, D1 series, D200, D100, D90, D80, D70 series, D3000, D60, D50, D40 series, 35mm film cameras)

Works with the Nikon 1 series......Score!!!

4 upvotes
NowHearThis
By NowHearThis (Jan 29, 2013)

Wow and with that 2.7x crop factor that's....2700mm with the 1.25x extender. You no longer need to be in the same zip code to be a peeping tom.

6 upvotes
Guidenet
By Guidenet (Jan 29, 2013)

It's not non-compatible with those cameras. It just won't auto-focus at f/7.1 with that converter on there. That's what they're talking about. Without the converter, it should AF on any of them and with the converter just might, or focus manually. Besides, if you can afford a lens of that price, you can afford one of the newer cameras that can AF at f/8.

17 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Jan 29, 2013)

"It's not non-compatible with those cameras. It just won't auto-focus at f/7.1 with that converter on there. That's what they're talking about. Without the converter, it should AF on any of them and with the converter just might, or focus manually. Besides, if you can afford a lens of that price, you can afford one of the newer cameras that can AF at f/8."

Seriously.

2 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Jan 29, 2013)

Guidenet, you’re wrong (despite 12 people ‘liking’ your comment – they’re all wrong too).

This lens uses an electromagnetic diaphragm, like Canon lenses, which older Nikon cameras don’t support. Thus there’s no way to control the aperture using a camera older than the D3.

4 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Jan 29, 2013)

All AF-S lenses do, Samuel. And every Nikon DSLR works just fine with it, or prefers it actually.

1 upvote
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Jan 29, 2013)

That’s not quite true, M Jesper. Take an AF-S lens off the camera and flick the little lever at the rear. That mechanical connection operates the diaphragm. (It’s true the f-number is selected on the camera.)

Only a couple of Nikkors have electromagnetic diaphragms, such as the PC-E Nikkor 24mm f/3.5D ED. But since these lenses nonetheless retain an aperture ring on the barrel, they can be manually operated with some cameras (in a very complicated fashion).

This new 800 mm lens lacks the aperture ring, and lacks the mechanical connection to allow the attached camera to stop down the aperture mechanically. Thus it works only with recent cameras that can send electronic signals to stop down the lens, which is ‘pro’ cameras from the D3 onwards.

2 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Jan 29, 2013)

By the way, that’s what the E stands for in ‘PC-E’ on the recent tilt-shift lenses, and what the E stands for in ‘f/5.6E’ in the name of this new super-telephoto lens.

2 upvotes
Guidenet
By Guidenet (Jan 29, 2013)

Thanks, M Jesper. Of course. Moreover, none of the new releases says anything about an incompatibilty. It just talks about the autofocus issue at 7.1 and the cameras that can AF at that aperture. That's all there is I can see, Samuel. Do you read something else into it? Besides, as we've all thought, if you're going to afford that price of admission, you probably have the level or camera which can AF at f/8. I could have purchased seven to ten cars when I purchased my first for the price of this lens today, not considering "real" dollars. ;-) It's certainly out of my range of what I'm willing to spend, and I'd like one.

1 upvote
mantra
By mantra (Jan 29, 2013)

hi
why is not compatible with a d200?
it doesn't focus @ f7.1 but should focus @ 5.6 ?

thanks

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
io_bg
By io_bg (Jan 29, 2013)

Mantra, it's not compatible because your D200 won't be able to operate the lens' diaphragm. Just read Samuel Dilworth's detailed posts above.

0 upvotes
shahid11235
By shahid11235 (Jan 30, 2013)

Samuel, thanks for making things clear! Your comment was really helpful.

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Jan 30, 2013)

Electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism is incorporated for enhanced stability in auto exposure control during continuous shooting even when the teleconverter is used (Not compatible with the D2 series, D1 series, D200, D100, D90, D80, D70 series, D3000, D60, D50, D40 series, 35mm film cameras)

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Jan 29, 2013)

Wow, never seen a more perfect MTF chart!!

http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/lens/singlefocal/Telephoto/af-s_800mmf_56g_fl_ed_vr/index.htm

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
9 upvotes
Roland Schulz
By Roland Schulz (Jan 29, 2013)

Dammed!!! This thing will either burn or cut your sensor into pieces!! STUNNING!!!

1 upvote
Jun2
By Jun2 (Jan 29, 2013)

$17,899.95, wow

2 upvotes
Scorpius1
By Scorpius1 (Jan 29, 2013)

Suggested retail and street price and two very different things..

0 upvotes
SergioSpain
By SergioSpain (Jan 29, 2013)

exactly, when you consider how few of these will be available, you'll be lucky if you only have to pay MSRP

0 upvotes
StephenSPhotog
By StephenSPhotog (Jan 29, 2013)

Man, just imagine if Canon had announced a $18k lens...

It's ok for Nikon but Canon, don't you dare.

0 upvotes
StanRogers
By StanRogers (Jan 29, 2013)

Canon has "gone big" in the past as well. The 1200mm/5.6 originally listed at about $90K, but the only one I actually saw with a price tag on it was $120K. (The others belonged to agencies not interested in selling under any circumstances. Canon built to order, it took a year or more to get it, and if you really, really needed one there was no alternative.) Heck, even Sigma's not above charging in the $30K range...

0 upvotes
Devendra
By Devendra (Jan 29, 2013)

time to sell my sigma 300-800mm f5.6 and get this.. not!

3 upvotes
font9a
By font9a (Jan 29, 2013)

Wait, the 18-35 doesn't have <N>?

4 upvotes
babola
By babola (Jan 29, 2013)

Nope.
It's a consumer grade lens, very similar in construction and features to the 'pedestrian' 24-85mm kit lens that comes with D600.

0 upvotes
rrccad
By rrccad (Jan 29, 2013)

odd .. i thought nikon claimed that flourite had no advantages .. and was inferior ..

"Nikon developed ED (Extra-low Dispersion) glass to enable the production of lenses that offer superior sharpness and color correction by minimizing chromatic aberration.
Put simply, chromatic aberration is a type of image and color dispersion that occurs when light rays of varying wavelengths pass through optical glass. In the past, correcting this problem for telephoto lenses required special optical elements that offer anomalous dispersion characteristics - specifically calcium fluoride crystals. However, fluorite easily cracks and is sensitive to temperature changes that can adversely affect focusing by altering the lens' refractive index."

I hope they fixed that little problem they were having with flourite before putting it into a 18K supertelephoto :)

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
10 upvotes
feraudy
By feraudy (Jan 29, 2013)

You mean fluorite, flourite is a brand of flour with which I can make great cakes.
Yes, they probably put the fluorite elements into a special shock-protected casing with a refrigerator ;).

This is a bit speculative:
Special ED glass requires rare-earth elements. Many rare earths are getting very hard to find, because China is hoarding them, so it's back to fluorite.

2 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Jan 29, 2013)

This is quite funny. Nikon’s gone from saying ED glass has all the benefits of fluorite with none of the drawbacks, to saying (in the UK press release for this lens):

“The fluorite elements also deliver superior optical performance, achieving high transmission rates with minimal chromatic aberration and much lower dispersion properties than even super ED glass.”

Amateurish at best.

Another thing: the US press release goes on about “fluorite glass” when they really mean just fluorite. It’s not glass.

3 upvotes
Teila Day
By Teila Day (Jan 29, 2013)

Writers aren't usually scientists, and quite often have no working knowledge about the subject they're writing about. Even today, you'll read and hear the media talk about how many "fighter jets" were deployed to an area, when "jets" don't fight at all. They merely propel an aircraft. They should use the term "fighter aircraft".

Sometimes they do say "jet fighters"... but who in their right mind thinks that a developed nation is deploying manned propeller aircraft to attack ground or air targets on the modern battle field?

"Flourite glass"... it won't be the last time you hear that. ;)

4 upvotes
M DeNero
By M DeNero (Jan 29, 2013)

That's marketing for you! It has long been known that fluorite crystal is superior in these applications to any type of glass, and fluorite's fragility problems were solved many years ago by fine control of the crystal growing process. Nikon tried in vain for years to match Canon's supertele performance. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em! The use of rare earths is a non-issue: the ones used in low-dispersion glass are common and plentiful. I assume the reason Nikon went with fluorite is there is no viable option in designing a lens of this focal length/aperture to modern standards.

Also, it is possible that this is 'fluorite glass". Canon's own Super UD glass is optical glass blended with fluorides. Time will tell if Nikon's remedy is pure fluorite crystal, or something more like Canon's Super UD glass.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Jan 29, 2013)

Teila Day: sure, but this is Nikon. The company should get its act together and find one of the several people on the planet who can both write and understand optics basics. Alternatively, put a writer on a team with an engineer. Together, they’ll put out a decent press release. It’s not hard.

And the current situation is more like Lockheed Martin talking about ‘fighter jets’ than the press doing so. We expect better from Lockheed Martin, if not the press. (And it’s hard to blame the press while press releases look like this!)

M DeNero: if it’s fluoride glass then Nikon should call it that, not fluorite glass. However, it’s not. It’s fluorite, like the Canon lenses. And probably used for the same primary reason: to get the lens weight down.

0 upvotes
jhinkey
By jhinkey (Jan 29, 2013)

Let's hope this new version is way way better than the old version which was not very good. If it is, then the $150 premium over the current will be well worth it.
Though I have the wonderful 17-35/2.8 AFS, rarely do I use it at f/2.8 and I'd love to save some weight if the IQ is very good and the ghosting/flare resistance is good as well.

Hopefully Nikon did a better update with this lens than it did with the 24-85AFS (which was not much of an improvement if any over the previous version).

0 upvotes
Raymond Cho
By Raymond Cho (Jan 29, 2013)

Have Nikon been upping the prices. I got the older one for $350-400US (new). If one looks at the lenses that have been upgraded to AF-S like the 50mm's or the 85mm's it's gone up considerably. My 50mm 1.8 AF-D was under $100 for grey or US version for about $115. At least I am outside the USA and the USD has fallen. Even the pro zooms like the 70-200, before $1600US now almost $2500US. VR1 vs VRII. At least I am just a hobbyist with a bit of sense, getting pretty expensive out there.

1 upvote
chlamchowder
By chlamchowder (Jan 29, 2013)

Cool.
With the 18-35/3.5-4.5 AF-S, though, I'd probably pass and go for the older 18-35, saving about $150 in the process. AF-S focusing and full time manual override isn't so important with wide angle lenses, which I manually focus more often than not.
I'd rather take the aperture ring and get a better live view experience (live aperture changes while in LV mode) on the D600 and anything else that's not a D800 or D3/4.

1 upvote
Total comments: 143