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Giottos introduces 'YTL' series tripods with space-saving design

By dpreview staff on Jan 18, 2013 at 16:10 GMT

Giottos has announced a range of tripods that use a unique 'Y'-shaped centre column profile to offer a more compact folded package. The 'Silk Road YTL series' replaces the existing MTL range in its entirety, and according to Giottos offers a 30% space saving without any sacifice in stability or weight capacity. The range includes 12 models offering 3- or 4-section legs, conventional 2-way or tilting centre columns, and weight capacities from 5 to 10 kg. They'll be on sale from mid-January, with at prices starting from £100 for aluminium models, or £220 for carbon fibre.

Press release:

Giotto’s launches patented brand new design for its core tripod range

Giottos YTL8213

Just when you think you’ve seen it all in the world of tripods – Giotto’s has launched a brand new range of tripods featuring a totally unique, patented design – enabling a 30% space saving while maintaining full strength, stability and weight capacity.

The NEW Giotto’s Silk Road YTL Series replaces the entire range of Giotto’s MTL tripods and features a new Y-shaped centre column, meaning a super slim 30% space saving when the tripod is packed down.

This uniquely shaped centre column brings a totally new dimension to tripod design – allowing legs to be stowed in a much more compact way, without the ‘bulk’ of tripods using traditional design.

Giotto’s is continually challenging the dimensions of photographic tripods – following on from the huge success of its award winning Vitruvian range – which adopted a space saving inverted design when the tripod is folded down.

The new Silk Road range is named after the historical network of interlinking trade routes covering East, South & Western Asia, parts of North & east Africa and Europe.   New technologies were often traded along this route too – hence the inspiration for the Giotto’s Silk Road series.

The new Y-Tube column allows a 30% space saving vs the MTL range – while maintaining full strength, stability and weight capacity.  The Silk Road Series includes a range of tripods, which support up to 5kg, 8kg and 10kg of camera equipment.

The unique Y-shaped column allows tripod legs to be stowed in a much more compact configuration: 

Within the range there are 12 models with options including a 2 way column and a super versatile 3 way centre column, ideal for very low level shooting.  The 3D column tripods have an included low-angle adaptor.

The range also includes models with 3-section and 4-section tripod legs – for additional height and compact stowage.  The adjustable tripod legs have 3 ‘footprint’ settings – full height, mid height where the legs are slightly wider and an ultra wide setting for low level photography. 

The new range also features graduated leg markings and new, patented Quick Easy Leg (QEL) Lock adjustments for fast, accurate adjustment without taking your eye off the subject.

On the models with 2 way centre column, there’s also a bubble spirit level built in and all models feature a swappable tripod thread – so you can easily change between 3/8” and 1/4” – meaning the Giotto’s Silk Road YTL range is compatible with any Giotto’s head and models from other manufacturers too.

For the ultimate grip in wet or uneven conditions, spiked feet are now available as an optional extra. The range is available in both aluminium and carbon fibre made from the finest quality components.  Carbon fibre models are manufactured from the highest quality 8x multi layer carbon fibre to increase strength and reduce weight.

Key Features:

  • Brand new patented ‘Y-Tube’ centre column – enabling a 30% space saving
  • 12 models including finest quality aluminium and carbon fibre
  • 3 or 4 section tripod legs
  • Brand new Quick Easy Leg Lock (QEL) and graduated leg markings
  • Fully compatible tripod thread – works with any Giotto’s head or other standard thread tripod heads
  • Range of height settings – and optional extras including short centre column and spiked tripod feet

 Guide retail pricing:  from £100 for aluminium models and £220 for carbon fibre models. 

The Giotto’s Silk Road Series will launch at the SWPP Trade Show (11th – 13th January 2013) and ‘first look’ of the entire range will be on show at Focus on Imaging (3rd - 6th March 2013)

Product will be available in store & online from mid-January.

Comments

Total comments: 108
caskauge
By caskauge (Jan 23, 2013)

Are they as poorly made as the others? I've used Manfrotto all my life for a reason, but I was using a friend's Giottos and it was knocked over and the entire head assembly snapped clean off.

0 upvotes
LaFonte
By LaFonte (Jan 22, 2013)

Wow! Something totally worth of press release

1 upvote
Jonathan Ragle
By Jonathan Ragle (Jan 22, 2013)

While I appreciate this innovative approach, in this age of ever-so-slightly too slim weight limits on airline luggage, my first priority isn't how to condense more gear into less space. That said, I often find myself carrying my camera case in one hand and my naked tripod in the other. When closed, those gaps between the tops of the legs and the center column, foam padding sections included, provide the perfect grip and balance for somewhat comfortable treks...whether to Central Park or into Central Asia.

0 upvotes
Sam Carriere
By Sam Carriere (Jan 21, 2013)

A better mousetrap!!!

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Jan 21, 2013)

Giottos: look to UK, not Italy, for current webpage:

NEW*:
http://www.giottos-tripods.co.uk/index.php?page=new

New Silk Road Series - YTL tripods:
http://www.giottos-tripods.co.uk/index.php?page=products&cat=50ec1218ae834

NEW YTL 3D Column Tripods:
http://www.giottos-tripods.co.uk/index.php?page=productpage&cat=50ec1218ae834&product=50ec39504d3d2

YTL 9353
YTL 8353
YTL 8354

YTL 9383
YTL 8383
YTL 8384
_________________________________________________

NEW YTL Vertical Column Tripods:
http://www.giottos-tripods.co.uk/index.php?page=productpage&cat=50ec1218ae834&product=50ec2875c1fbf

YTL 9253
YTL 8253

YTL 9283
YTL 8283

YTL 9213
YTL 8213
_________________________________________________

YTL Model# Key:

9000 Series (Aluminum Material)
8000 Series (Carbon Material)

0300 Series (3D Column TRIPOD)
0200 Series (Vertical Column TRIPOD)

0050 Series (5kg Wt Capacity)
0080 Series (8kg Wt Capacity)
0010 Series (10kg Wt Capacity)

0003 Series (3 Leg Sections)
0004 Series (4 Leg Sections)

1 upvote
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Jan 22, 2013)

OMG... DPReview's switchover to new servers have logged me out... now I'm using my old acct created by my recently deceased (RIP) husband that was meant for me (i'm the resident family photo-nut)... and so all my current emails under our family 'cable tv/internet' acct used for DPR Forums no longer work, and now his name mismatches my profile pic automatically carried over from my 'active' profile that you see above...

I'm only here because my own email [that i still use] still works, but is associated with my original hubby's acct created for me!!!!

AAAAaaaarrrggghhhh... now don't y'all think I'm a man, ok??? lol

sigh... i already sent DPR a 'membership error message'... i hope they can help fix this for me... they rarely reply, so i don't know how this will work out...
:(

sdyue

HELP!!!!

Comment edited 6 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Serge Yavorski
By Serge Yavorski (4 months ago)

lol!

0 upvotes
Gerard Hoffnung
By Gerard Hoffnung (Jan 21, 2013)

I'm a certified old fart and sadly, my hands are not as steady as they once were. I make frequent use of a monopod but sometimes would like to a carry a lightweight compact tripod. My old tripods are nice but cumbersome, so even at the price point, I'll be checking this out when it becomes available in my area.

0 upvotes
AmaturFotografer
By AmaturFotografer (Jan 21, 2013)

Ditto to Giottos.

0 upvotes
AV Janus
By AV Janus (Jan 20, 2013)

Also gotta love this nice press release without any link to Giottos page...

And you just gotta love a product launch that isn't even mentioned on their 95' looking web page...

1 upvote
AV Janus
By AV Janus (Jan 20, 2013)

Price difference between Alu and Carbon units is ridiculous!
I wonder how they came up with that number!?

Carbon stopped being that exclusive and price worthy like 10 years ago...

0 upvotes
ivan1973
By ivan1973 (Jan 21, 2013)

Alu tubes uses simplest form of extrusion process. Carbon tubes need layering and curing.

3 upvotes
Bossons
By Bossons (Jan 20, 2013)

Amazed by how many that find this tweak to a centre column amazing. The best thing you can do with the centre column is to never extend it or remove it entirely. To maximize the stability of your tripod keep the camera as close to the spider as possible.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Jan 21, 2013)

I try to extend my center column minimally as well, ie. use it as little as possible. All the more reason to minimize its size profile through this tweak: it's still there, but takes up a lot less space.

2 upvotes
Bossons
By Bossons (Jan 21, 2013)

"I try to extend my center column minimally as well".

I didn't mean to imply that I use a centre column. I haven't owned a tripod with a centre column in over fourteen years. I shoot with Gitzo 3 and 5 series tripods and RRS and Arca heads. I understand many baulk at the price of Gitzo and RRS, but I make my living from photography and can fully justify the cost.

The point I meant to make was that one should not base a buying decision on such a gimmick.

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jan 21, 2013)

@Bossons - First of all, a center column is no gimmick. Adjusting the height of your camera, even if it's just by an inch, is a heck of a lot easier to do via the center column than it is to do by repositioning the legs. So whether you like it or not, plenty of people do use the center column.

Secondly, given that most people do expect to have a center column on their tripod, it makes sense to use new designs to minimize its size profile while still allowing people to use a center column. You also have to keep in mind that most people aren't shooting with 8x10 field cameras these days. A decent center column can handle today's cameras.

Sure, you can brag all you want about how you are too cool to use a center column, LOL. But for most people, a center column is a useful feature. And using a well-designed center column to raise a camera a couple inches will hardly compromise stability to the overblown degree that you seem to think it will. Let's not blow it out of proportion!

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
electric eel
By electric eel (Jan 22, 2013)

Blossons,
I've heard this repeated many times, and several years ago tested the centre-column-up vs. down. With good technique there was no difference using a 2 series Gitzo with 6 lbs of Contax 645 camera/digital back. The trick is good technique, mirror up when possible (otherwise avoid 1/4 and 1/2 sec shutter speeds), give the tripod 2 seconds to steady after any camera adjustment and use a cable release but with care not to move the camera by pulling it. If a cable release is not available just use self-timer. I redid this test recently with a very anemic tripod and it did fine also but not with 6 lbs. and good technique is more important.

1 upvote
Mathewj23
By Mathewj23 (Jan 22, 2013)

I shoot food for client's menus and brochures and find adjusting the center column the best way to get that perfect angle when shooting food on a table.

1 upvote
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (Jan 22, 2013)

In all tripods, the main thing is lightweight construction and stability in operation. These two things are at the opposite edges of the construction problem, but it can be overcome by a simple addition that I have used for decades.
A piece of triangular net can be hooked at the end of each upper leg extension of any tripod. Make a triangular piece of cloth or a dense net material, and add Velcro fastener to each corner.
When you need the extra stability, just put some weight into the net. It can be a rock, or bottles filled with water, or a plastic bag filled with shingle or earth... whatever is handy.
Throw it out, and your tripod is as light as it was before.
The second solution (that I use now) is a short loop of gurt with a hook. The gurt loops permanently around the central column tube.
When I use the tripod, the hook can be weighted with just about anything, as above. When I'm carrying the tripod, the gurt slides up, and serves to fasten the tripod to the outside of rucksack.

0 upvotes
coffeebugg
By coffeebugg (Jan 20, 2013)

It's amazing and brilliantly simple redesign, it's bordering on stupid. Mind boggling how they only came up with this now. Load and rigidity testing aside, that is.

This is a very welcome development for Travel, Long exposure and time lapse enthusiasts.

4 upvotes
Xellz
By Xellz (Jan 20, 2013)

Wow, took long enough for someone to make this kind of tripod. Though the price is a bit too high.

0 upvotes
Mansour228
By Mansour228 (Jan 19, 2013)

Well

Construction Cranes use similar sections , so no worries about rigidity

I would add a small tube inside the triangle though for extra stiffness

Good Solution Though

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 19, 2013)

Good luck mounting anything heavy on top of that odd-looking profile column, let alone a video head.

0 upvotes
HubertChen
By HubertChen (Jan 20, 2013)

Your comment is a good example of spreading FUD "Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt". What experience or simulation data do you have to back up negative expectation ?

24 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Jan 20, 2013)

No luck needed. Every tripod has a weight rating, have you that data?

4 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jan 20, 2013)

Francis Carver's logic: if it's "odd looking", it must suck. LOL

8 upvotes
John Driggers
By John Driggers (Jan 20, 2013)

I believe the weight rating for the strongest of these is 10 Kilos,5 kilos for the lightest. Sounds more than reasonable for a "TRAVEL TRIPOD." Guess it still wouldn't hold the weight of some commenters egos though.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
13 upvotes
Jim Lewis
By Jim Lewis (Jan 19, 2013)

Great idea. Now we need a quick release mechanism that locks from the side so there's a sufficiently small form factor that it doesn't interfere with movement of articulating live view monitors on mirrorless cameras such as the NEX-7. Or has someone already thought of that, too? If not, patent pending.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
probert500
By probert500 (Jan 22, 2013)

I got a purpose built arca compatible QR plate for my 5n that doesn't interfere - it cost $24.00. Sunway makes nice stuff - check ebay.

Alternately you could pop the rear screen out a bit prior to putting a QR on. Give up that little bit of slimness but use something laying around the studio.

0 upvotes
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (Jan 19, 2013)

So why not use triangular profile for all construction and save maximum space?

3 upvotes
ivan1973
By ivan1973 (Jan 21, 2013)

If you could think of a tighten mechanism when you extend and retract.

0 upvotes
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (Jan 22, 2013)

Of course, it's very easy. Offhand, think of the button/hole(s) mechanism along the lines used to connect the vacuum cleaner tubes... The second system would be based on a flat wedge blocker, at the end of each extension.
One could also imagine a wire lock that clicks into the slots in the rim of the profile. In principle, the best locks would be the flat ones, to keep the profile size to a minimum.
If Gitzo gets interested, they only have to interest me enough to suggest some of the solutions ;)

0 upvotes
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (Jan 22, 2013)

Whoops! That should've read Giottos... ;)

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Rod McD
By Rod McD (Jan 19, 2013)

Yes this new design makes the diameter of a folded tripod smaller, but that's not the real problem. To me, the key aspect of any tripod that manufacturers have to struggle to improve is to keep the rigidity high and the weight low while getting the yoke as high as possible on the legs BEFORE elevating the centre column. I've never heard anyone complain about the diameter of their packed down tripod.

1 upvote
Steve Balcombe
By Steve Balcombe (Jan 19, 2013)

It's relevant for a travel tripod, which will often be packed inside a bag. And it achieves this with no cost to the rigidity - I think it's a great idea.

3 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Jan 20, 2013)

I agree with Steve completely. Any volume saved for backpacking is nice when there is no compromise. Doesn't seem to be any with this design. Good for Giotto's.

C

2 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jan 20, 2013)

Weight, height, rigidity, diameter...these are all things worth addressing in some way or another. Just because it's not of interest to you doesn't mean it's not of interest to someone else.

2 upvotes
John Driggers
By John Driggers (Jan 20, 2013)

Ditto to the three comments above.

0 upvotes
Rod McD
By Rod McD (Jan 20, 2013)

I'm a very keen backpacker and trekker myself - I agree with all of you (Carl, Steve, John and T3). I did acknowledge that it's an improvement, and I never said that it's not interesting, but my point was that storage diameter isn't the key aspect of good tripod design. (There are a huge number of travel tripods 'out there' that pack small but are too low to be versatile, or are dependent upon excessive column extension to get height.) I'd certainly look at these Giottos if I didn't already own several lightweight tripods that suit my needs.

1 upvote
Reg Natarajan
By Reg Natarajan (Jan 19, 2013)

With every camera capable of ISO 12800 these days, tripods are about as useful as slide rules to me. (I'll bet some of the younger people here don't even know what a slide rule is. Trust me, you're not missing anything.)

0 upvotes
michal75
By michal75 (Jan 19, 2013)

Not everybody want/can solve every exposure issue with high ISO. The moment I will need new tripod I will seriously think about this one.

2 upvotes
Rod McD
By Rod McD (Jan 19, 2013)

Sooner or later the light gets low enough...... And let's not pretend that the IQ at ISO 12800 is as good as ISO 100.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
22 upvotes
Dheorl
By Dheorl (Jan 19, 2013)

And for those of us who like the effects of a long exposure? I never go out these days with a camera without at least some sort of tripod and I constantly use it. Also the quality drop between base ISO and 12,800 isn't acceptable to me for general shots. I'll use it when it can't be avoided i.e subject movement, but that's it.

Even if it's just a bit cloudy, a camera locked down on a tripod at min ISO will still give you the best possible quality image. If that doesn't matter to you then yes, a tripod has less use.

12 upvotes
Ansel Spear
By Ansel Spear (Jan 19, 2013)

So you're a bit of a snapshooter, eh?

16 upvotes
grafli
By grafli (Jan 19, 2013)

Night photografie isn't realy possible without a proper tripod.
But if you're just shooting holiday snapshot, and only by day... then you really don't need a tripod...

8 upvotes
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (Jan 19, 2013)

There are too many reasons for tripod use, not all recognized by those new to photography. Consider stacked photos, where exposure can take up to several hours... or wildlife photography, where it is used with remote control....
Eventually, everyone gets in the situation to use some kind of support, be it ballhead & clamp, bean bag, or tripod.
And yes... the slide rules are still in use, along with computers and calculators, just as GPS lives peacefully along the ancient sextant.

2 upvotes
photokandi
By photokandi (Jan 19, 2013)

Oh Dear!

0 upvotes
gabgon
By gabgon (Jan 19, 2013)

I think we all figured out who the young photographer around here is.

5 upvotes
Geckotek
By Geckotek (Jan 19, 2013)

This is how I know the difference between a serious photographer and a guy with a camera.

4 upvotes
skytripper
By skytripper (Jan 19, 2013)

Have you looked with a critical eye at the results you get at iso 12800 with most cameras, even really good ones? That's no solution in low light if you care about image quality—unless you turn your images into uncropped 3x5 prints, in which case iso 12800 may be perfectly adequate.

3 upvotes
michal75
By michal75 (Jan 19, 2013)

@gabon Sad think is that the young "photographer" claims to shoot over 20 years and he still dod not realised tripod can be useful...
http://www.regnatarajan.ca/photography/

2 upvotes
GirinoFumetto
By GirinoFumetto (Jan 20, 2013)

Who needs a tripod and understands enough about photography has no need to know how well it's camera works at 12800 or 25600 ISO.
He needs a tripod and most likely, a well made, space saving tripod!
I need it too rarely to buy and bring one with me.
Nevertheless I know what it is for.
What many people doesn't know is that a well optically stabilized image is allways worse, to some extent, than an image taken with a tripod and IS off. The reason is simple and intuitive: A moving sensor ( or lens) is not the best solution if your camera is steady.

0 upvotes
jibee
By jibee (Jan 19, 2013)

Interesting... This goes to show that there's always something that can be improved or enhanced.

2 upvotes
KAMSA
By KAMSA (Jan 19, 2013)

Nice compact disign, If its offordeble for me in time I wil consider to buy it, but for now, £100 is to expensive for me.

kind reg.

0 upvotes
JJSo
By JJSo (Jan 19, 2013)

never mind

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
xlotus
By xlotus (Jan 19, 2013)

I am a longtime customer of Giottos tripods and ballheads. Both my ballheads however have become damaged even with light use. This is due to design flaw that caused the main and tension knobs to locked up. I would never buy Giottos ballheads again and advise anyone from doing so.

The tripods however are a different story. I still own five Giottos tripods to this day. In the past, I tried to contact Giottos to point out some improvements that they can make with their tripods.

What I hate from them, they never updated their website (www.giottos.com) even though they have come up with new products.
To me, a company that does not keep their website updated and exciting indicates that the company is not doing well.
Indeed they have stiff competition from many newer names whose products copy each other: Benro, Induro, Feisol, Sirui for example. Others use more English sounding names like Redged, Photoclam and many others.

1 upvote
Jettatore
By Jettatore (Jan 19, 2013)

I like the tri-wing shaped center post for space saving, but as both a consumer and a designer, the idea that something like this can be patented is ridiculous.

Also, not necessarily in tri-pods per say, and I don't quite remember where, but I've seen such a space saving implementation somewhere else before...

Very nice...? Yes, definitely, if I find myself in need of a new tri-pod I would highly consider one like this. But the patent bothers me (not that they tried to get a patent, your supposed to do that, even for absurd requests, but if it were to hold up in any court, I'd be bothered). Our broken patent system which does not serve the consumer, is most often too expensive, complicated and out of reach for talented product designers and small firms on a small budget. I'm sure it was a big expense for this company, fortunately for them they could afford the process.

That said, if I want to make something using that shape in a design, they can try to sue me, but it's a joke...

3 upvotes
rondhamalam
By rondhamalam (Jan 19, 2013)

Creative.
Keep thinking

0 upvotes
TLD
By TLD (Jan 19, 2013)

I notice that in the photograph above, the new design does no have leg locks whereas the old design does. The working model will obviously need leg locks, so is this a bit of spin to exaggerate the apparent difference?

2 upvotes
M Lammerse
By M Lammerse (Jan 19, 2013)

good notice

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jan 19, 2013)

I don't think the leg locks will add that much size (if any), considering that the cut-away cross-section includes the thick leg cushion padding that exists at the top of the tripod. At most, the top leg lock would only be a couple millimeters thicker than the leg cushion...if they were thicker at all. Also keep in mind that the leg locks could sit below the center column, depending on the length of the center column and the length of the upper leg piece. So in reality, I think the "apparent difference" isn't exaggerated at all.

4 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jan 19, 2013)

Yeah, you can clearly see from the image of the complete tripod above that the leg locks sit well below the center column, so they don't interact with the center column anyways. And they are no thicker than the rubber padding at the time of the tripod, too. So the "apparent difference " is real, at least when it comes to the overall circumference of the collapsed tripod.

2 upvotes
JJSo
By JJSo (Jan 19, 2013)

@TLD: No. The leg locks are not placed at a height where this shown section is, so without center column there's plenty of space for leg locks.

But if the center column is as long as the first leg, I wonder how the straps of a photobag will deal with the column? Usually I can put two legs and center column into the tripod bag attached to my rucksack or slingshot.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Jan 19, 2013)

Just compared the specs of these new designs:

http://www.giottos-tripods.co.uk/index.php?page=productpage&cat=50ec1218ae834&product=50ec2875c1fbf

to the established Gitzo traveler tripods:

http://www.gitzo.com/photo-tripods-traveler

Don't see any weight advantage.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
facedodge
By facedodge (Jan 18, 2013)

To those worried about reduced stiffness, I can confirm as a structural engineer, that this is less stiff but probably stiff enough..

The determining factor is the "moment of inertia". The formula for a tube is I=1/2M(R1^2+R2^2) (where M is mass and R is radius)

The formula for the Y section is more complex, but as you see in the example above, the larger the radius and mass, the greater the moment of inertia and the stronger your tube is. It appears that about 2/3rds of the section is closer to the center with maybe an average of 1/3 the radius closer. This would mean 1/3 of the section is unchanged. 2/3rds of the section has 33% less moment.

Boiling this down... it's 1/3 +2/3*(1-1/3)=.778

So it's about 77.8% as strong as the tube shape... This of course could easily be corrected by increasing the gauge of the aluminum.

12 upvotes
Funduro
By Funduro (Jan 19, 2013)

Thanks for your scientific input. My amateur assessment would have given the new shape more "strength". That' of course is based on my pure speculation, not scientific. I have a question of aluminum alloys, can a "better" allow create a stronger new shape?

0 upvotes
John Driggers
By John Driggers (Jan 20, 2013)

Umm-science guy, what "kind" of strength? Resistance to compression stiff? Resistance to harmonic vibration stiff? Resistance to twisting stiff? I'm mostly interested in resistance to harmonic vibration stiffness.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Vlad Didenko
By Vlad Didenko (Jan 18, 2013)

Didn't Manfrotto had a triangular-tube center column for exactly same reasons for a while now? I think others had it too. Not clear, why is it patentable aside from a crappy patent office.

3 upvotes
cfh25
By cfh25 (Jan 19, 2013)

If Apple can patent the rectangle why shouldn't Giotto patent this?

4 upvotes
Vlad Didenko
By Vlad Didenko (Jan 20, 2013)

Ditto

0 upvotes
tazmac
By tazmac (Jan 18, 2013)

When I first got my giotto’s ballhead I had to realize these Chineses ain’t joking

0 upvotes
ratune
By ratune (Jan 18, 2013)

Can't say much, looks like a copy cat.
I'm holding here it's little brother a Vanguard VS-72.
Same construction(innovation)

2 upvotes
Marcel Mutter
By Marcel Mutter (Jan 19, 2013)

I don't mind the old design of a tripod because when I put flat in the trunk of my car for transportation I think it will not roll as easy in corners as the YTL design because the legs are more apart.

So advantage becomes a disadvantage when transporting the tripod.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jan 19, 2013)

@ Marcel Mutter - geez, you must corner and brake really hard when you drive.

1 upvote
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Jan 18, 2013)

While this upgrade does make the tripod thinner when collapsed, it would not allow to flip the legs 180 deg. up (around the bullhead) to make the tripod shorter. Because of this feature my Feisol Tournament fits in carry-on luggage.

Also the platform on the top will get smaller (what may or may not be a disadvantage).

0 upvotes
DStudio
By DStudio (Jan 18, 2013)

Do you mean the ball head? Or the mount it attaches to?

You just unscrew the ball head and take it off. And the mount for it adds less than 1" in height, so either way I think it's of little consequence.

1 upvote
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Jan 19, 2013)

'buillhead' must have been between my shoulders when I wrote that comment :) Yes 'ball head' it is.

The ball head is usually screwed quite tightly on the baseplate of the tripod, so re-attaching it is not very convent, but of course can be done. An indeed once the head (the ball one), then of course my argument is not relevant anymore.

0 upvotes
Jeff Greenberg
By Jeff Greenberg (Jan 18, 2013)

Am waiting for gelato Giotto.
Buy it, use it, eat it.

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
rurikw
By rurikw (Jan 18, 2013)

Agree with: Very simple, very elegant, wonder why it wasn't invented 100 yrs ago.

1 upvote
vista77
By vista77 (Jan 18, 2013)

wonder when the wheel will be patented by gittos as The O

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Jan 18, 2013)

Sounds great. But are those leg locks the usual plastic? A lot of the non-Gitzo/RRS tripods have these great, state of the art carbon fibre legs but with protruding plastic clamps. The airlines really like munching on these, although they told me it was the cold temperatures that made the plastic brittle.

0 upvotes
DanlB
By DanlB (Jan 18, 2013)

Great design. Surprised it has not been done before. I wonder how stalble it is?

1 upvote
limlh
By limlh (Jan 18, 2013)

The Beike BK-555 is equally innovative. Its tripod legs have internal locking mechanism, so there are no protruding stumps at the leg joints. When folded, its length including the ballhead is only 13 inches.

4 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Jan 18, 2013)

That looks rather like a copy of the Velbon 'Trunnion shaft' design.

2 upvotes
brumd
By brumd (Jan 18, 2013)

Thanks for this suggestion!
This one looks really interesting. 1.1kg is very acceptable weight and it looks really compact.
The main reason not to carry around my current tripod is its size which makes it difficult to carry combined with a small daypack and camerabag.

0 upvotes
Amnon G
By Amnon G (Jan 28, 2013)

How hard is it to pan with a ball-head? This tripod definitely looks interesting and small enough.

0 upvotes
Amnon G
By Amnon G (Jan 18, 2013)

Why not take that one step further and make the shape of the tripod almost cylindrical when closed? Instead of using circular legs use different shape legs, for example half circles or ovals. I'm sure the strength challenges resulting from that can be compensated by materials and/or strategic shaping of the legs.
With cameras that make very few compromises are getting smaller, this is a worthy cause.
I would also consider improving stability (and compensating for low weight) by making the bottom section fold out at the bottom.
Just like camera shape and functionality started to evolve from the 20th century SLR (mirrorless, non-Bayer pixel arrangements, etc.) so should the tripod evolve, and I think we haven't seen nothing yet. This is a nice small step.

7 upvotes
BaldCol
By BaldCol (Jan 21, 2013)

Can I be first on the waiting list for the 'AmnonG CyllinderPod 1"?

2 upvotes
rfsIII
By rfsIII (Jan 21, 2013)

Bigger fortunes have been made from lesser ideas than this. Ammon G, You need to go into production ASAP.

1 upvote
rockjano
By rockjano (Jan 18, 2013)

Does it really matter that much how thick is your tripod.

Tha weight is a lot more important at this will not make it a lot lighter.

1 upvote
Nigel Wilkins
By Nigel Wilkins (Jan 18, 2013)

Really?!!...stability is the number 1 reason for owning a tripod. It's directly proportional to the cross section of the tubes. Weight is always a secondary consideration, even if like me, weight is important for hiking or convenience.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jan 18, 2013)

I sort of agree. So it folds a little flatter, it's still 2 feet long and weights a few pounds.

Cool idea, but I doubt it's going to cause people to abandon their current tripods.

0 upvotes
tlinn
By tlinn (Jan 19, 2013)

Completely agree. 30% reduction in weight = impressive. 30% reduction in girth = meh.

0 upvotes
brumd
By brumd (Jan 19, 2013)

Speaking as a hiker, both reduction in weight AND girth are relevant. It's almost impossible to attach a "classic" tripod to my pack where I can actually reach for it (without having to take my backpack off all the time). This design makes it lots easier to fit it in a side pocket.
I would definitely welcome a mid-size tripod with minimal weight, girth and length, extendible to at leat 1,20m, and strong enough to hold my OM-D E-M5+lens (<1kg).
So, I definitely welcome this development, even though this is not going to be the one for me.

0 upvotes
BaldCol
By BaldCol (Jan 21, 2013)

It's a neat idea. Nice and comapct. No I would not dump my current tripod to buy this one but when I need a replacement its an extra feature I like.

0 upvotes
Todd Ka
By Todd Ka (Jan 18, 2013)

Cool.

0 upvotes
wowlfie
By wowlfie (Jan 18, 2013)

Amazing it took so long to implement this

5 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jan 18, 2013)

Seems so obvious that I am surprised this is a new idea. I guess a lot of the good ideas are like that.

3 upvotes
huyzer
By huyzer (Jan 18, 2013)

Yes, the simplest ideas are the toughest to come by. Case in point, the crosswalk timer countdown. :)

1 upvote
Robert Gallery
By Robert Gallery (Jan 18, 2013)

Not sure that the change in section of the center column is that good an idea as it will substantially reduce the torsional stiffness.

0 upvotes
Pierre Couture
By Pierre Couture (Jan 18, 2013)

Actually, it might make it more rigid, as Y-shaped beams are very strong, but testing would be required in order to find out.

4 upvotes
Robert Gallery
By Robert Gallery (Jan 18, 2013)

No - you want all the material providing the stiffness as far away from the central axis so that it provides the greatest moment of resistance so a circular tube is the optimum section.

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jan 18, 2013)

I'm going to go out a limb and say the engineers at Giottos took that into consideration.

2 upvotes
davidgp
By davidgp (Jan 18, 2013)

Looks like an ingenious approach to minimizing tripod size.

Theoretically there is a slight reduction in the stability of the center column due to the change in cross-section of the center post but I suspect it is a non-issue in real-life situations.

Looks like a winner.

1 upvote
viking79
By viking79 (Jan 18, 2013)

Agreed, I imagine the only reason not to do that is cost (i.e. why someone hasn't done it before). A round tube is cheap. That does look nice and slim.

3 upvotes
Mike921
By Mike921 (Jan 18, 2013)

Wow, 220 quid for CF? Guess I'll keep lugging my old CF rig around then ;)

1 upvote
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jan 18, 2013)

Triopo makes it even cheaper - though not with this clever Y-shaped column.

0 upvotes
Randomenough
By Randomenough (Jan 22, 2013)

My daddy had a tripod from the 1940's or 1950's that had a Y-shaped center column. It was not hollow though, so I guess that is why this Giottos idea is "innovative". I remember marveling at the brilliance of it for economy of space. Why do some ideas fade away, only to be re-invented decades later? I guess we just have to wait for their patents to expire.

1 upvote
Total comments: 108