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Best Camera of 2012: And the Winner is...

By dpreview staff on Jan 1, 2013 at 01:10 GMT

Just before Christmas we invited you, our readers to tell us what you thought was the best camera of 2012. This year was one of the busiest that any of us can remember, and saw serious new products from all the major manufacturers. This was the year of the groundbreaking 36MP Nikon D800, the incredibly ambitious Olympus OM-D as well as an all-new system cameras from Fujifilm, with the innovative X-Pro 1 and X-E1. Sony had an amazingly busy year as well, bringing us the great value SLT A-57 and the feature-packed SLT-A99, along with a host of NEX upgrades. Canon wasn't idle either, and consolidated its enthusiast-oriented DSLRs with the long-awaited EOS 5D Mark III and, at the end of the year, the EOS 6D. Meanwhile, Pentax revamped its popular K-5 with the new K-5 II and K-5 IIs and introduced its first large-sensor mirrorless interchangeable lens camera, the K-01 which was... interesting.

Our shortlist didn't contain the K-01, but we've gone over the figures, made a list and counted it twice, read most of the comments (and thanks to the majority of you who kept them constructive) and now we're ready to give you the results! So without further ado, with almost 15,000 votes and almost 1500 comments, here are the top three cameras of 2012, as voted by you, dpreview readers. 

In third place... Canon EOS 5D Mark III 

Canon's EOS 5D and 5D Mark II were hugely successful cameras, making the 5D Mark III one of the most anticipated new releases of the year. The 5D Mark III has a 22MP full frame sensor in a body that's based on the EOS 7D design, and with a 61-point AF system borrowed from the flagship EOS-1D X. Compared to its predecessor the Mark III is essentially a completely new model, with every major system upgraded and updated. 

When we reviewed the 5D Mark III back in March we praised its excellent Raw image quality, reliable metering and fluid ergonomics. Thanks to its greatly improved AF system and a few well thought-out tweaks to the rest of the feature set the 5D Mark III is in many ways the camera we wanted the 5D Mark II to be, and it was easily one of the top cameras of 2012. 

In second place... Nikon D800 / D800E

Purely from the point of view of specification, Nikon's D800 and its sister model the D800E drew a lot of attention in 2012. Successor to the venerable D700, the D800 tripled that camera's pixel count and included several features borrowed from the professional D4, at around half the price. The D800E variant offers improved resolution for $300 more, thanks to an innovative sensor design that has the effects of its anti-aliasing filter cancelled out. Both cameras offer a very compelling video specification, too. 

We were highly impressed by the D800 and D800E when we tested them in June, both by the performance of their 36MP sensors, and also their handling, which on the whole, improves upon previous models in some meaningful ways. Of all the cameras we tested during 2012 we kept going back to the D800 because of its addictive blend of excellent performance, solid image quality and pleasant ergonomics. This is one camera whose specification is unlikely to look out of date anytime soon. 

And in first place... The Olympus OM-D EM-5

Pipping the Nikon D800/E by one percentage point in the overall count, the Olympus OM-D EM-5 won out in this year's poll by a whisker. Although a very different camera to the D800, the OM-5 EM-5 is a seriously impressive product. With the launch of the E-M5, Olympus harks back to one of its most fondly-remembered camera systems - the Olympus OM range of 35mm SLRs. Initially the E-M5 looked like it might simply be an upgraded E-P3 with a built-in viewfinder, but in use it proved much more than that - probably the most competent enthusiast mirrorless camera so far.

When we reviewed the OM-D in April we commented on its excellent image quality which at that point set a benchmark for Micro Four Thirds cameras. As we'd expect from Olympus it's also an incredible customizable camera, and with the huge range of compatible Micro Four Thirds lenses available it's also one of the most versatile. About the only thing the OM-D can't do well is continuous autofocus, but if you can live with this limitation, it stands as one of the best cameras currently on the market, and a worthy winner of our poll.


Thanks so much for voting, for reading, and for commenting.

Barnaby Britton - reviews editor. 

Comments

Total comments: 1412
12345
zos xavius
By zos xavius (Jan 4, 2013)

Wow. I need to quit reading the comments here. Its painfully obvious so few of you have anything intelligent to add to the conversation. So have fun endlessly bickering over which camera is better. How about being thankful that different companies are all trying different things right now and that we now have more choices as consumers than we ever did before? Maybe the OM-D is not the camera for you. Great! Don't buy one! Is it that hard? What a frothing pissy waste of time and energy 90% of you are. I would have voted on the k-01....or even the Q. Just for being different. Then there's the k-30. What a deal that camera is. Wake me up when canikon does something different from changing the number in the specs next to MP. (ok trolling here, but seriously, where's the innovation from those two?) Well its been fun. I'm sure I'll be back sometime later. Barnaby and co: You guys do alright. Don't listen to all the hate. You should do a Q10 review too! Its fairly innovative.

15 upvotes
zos xavius
By zos xavius (Jan 4, 2013)

and yeah the om-d belongs firmly where it is. its the first micro 4/3 camera to really close the gap between aps-c and 4/3. Its rightly a little over a half stop difference anyways. Is that a huge difference? no. Its a much bigger leap to FF for from either format. For a street shooter, there isn't much better than the OM-D for stealth. A leica maybe. The fuji just doesn't cut it yet. One day maybe, but the OM-D will focus faster and more reliably and that's what you want. The extra DOF actually helps too. Zone focusing would be pretty easy. Set to f4 and your good for a huge range. For every negative, there is a positive. M4/3 offers a lot and still has decent image quality. An OM-D is better than a d90 for instance. Don't believe me? Measurebate yourself. Note: I do not own an om-d, but it is a very, very intriguing and beautiful camera. The D800 is a disruptive camera for sure, but only for a tiny market. Interesting times we live in. great to see all these new ideas in cameras.

13 upvotes
english_Wolf
By english_Wolf (Jan 4, 2013)

My vote is for the 800e.

Just found the money to purchase it within a month... What held me back was the lack of user feedback, the novelty and the missing $$$ to get the FX lenses.

What convinced me was it was narrowly beat by a Hasselblad (spelling) but had better results in the blacks...

Bummer about my DX lenses that I will be selling with my 300... Then again, I do not believe I will return to the DX format.

2 upvotes
Canadian Eagle
By Canadian Eagle (Jan 3, 2013)

Eight months with the OM-D and I still revel in the ease of use, the terrific 5-way stabilization – and the great low-light rendition. Eleven days of shooting all over Cuba gave me, and the OM-D, a workout. It's not a big luggable beast –- not that size really matters – only to sore shoulders. It was just fun to shoot with such a sturdy, but light weight machine. The viewfinder is so very sharp. I've even put some old half-frame Pen-F lenses on it and used it in aperture mode. God, I hope this doesn't sound like a commercial. It's not. It IS a fan letter to the folks at Olympus who have put together a GEM of a camera! Bravo for a deserving win!!!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/89996031@N04/8179999315/in/photostream/

13 upvotes
lpv
By lpv (Jan 3, 2013)

yup.. love the details in the upper part of the image
http://www.flickr.com/photos/89996031@N04/8179994177/in/photostream

what's happen to the sun?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/89996031@N04/8179996303/in/photostream

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
lpv
By lpv (Jan 3, 2013)

@canadian eagle - you could get same or better results with canon 350d, nikon d40 or so for a fraction of price and not that much more weigth.

0 upvotes
Martin.au
By Martin.au (Jan 4, 2013)

Errr, you need something more like a D7000 to better the OMD in image quality. As for your claim of "not that much more weight".

Well, I think CE took lenses to cover from 12-300 so we'll use DX lenses to cover that range from 16-400 with a Nikon D7000.

OMD+12-50+Pana 100-300 = 1.13kg
D7000, 16-85 and Sigma 120-400 = 2.76kg
(both have a gap in the focal length between long and short lenses. If you want you can come up with your own lens combo to fill the gap)

Not so cheap or lightweight anymore is it?

6 upvotes
keeponkeepingon
By keeponkeepingon (Jan 4, 2013)

Real world samples look about the same as the 350D.

Also throw a TC on a 200 lens and you can get the entire package with the 350D down to about the same weight or at least within a pound. The $1000 you save on the body can go a long way towards getting the lens.

If you have to have D7000 IQ get the K-01 (same sensor) for $300.

Refs:
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/digital_rebel_xt-review/nightshot-tele-800.jpg

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/olympus/omd_em5-assets/nightshot800.jpg

2 upvotes
Martin.au
By Martin.au (Jan 4, 2013)

Have you actually had a look at those two images you just posted? There is a pretty obvious quality difference.

TCs eat light. Are you still comparing like with like? I doubt it.

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Just Posted
By Just Posted (Jan 4, 2013)

Whats so great about 5-axis IS? I mean it might keep the camera still but it won't stop the object you are shooting from moving will it?

For other camera systems that use 3-axis IBIS or OIS are the pictures that bad or different? how many stops faster is 5 axis compared to 3?
Some of us have had to learn to shoot with out IS at all but I am glad for it, but I just dont see 5 axis as something to be all excited about, dont see it in the pictures even though I am sure it is there. Help me out

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Jan 4, 2013)

I have a feeling the 5-Axis IBIS may make a more noticeable differnce for video work.

0 upvotes
Fiatopichan
By Fiatopichan (Jan 4, 2013)

The 5-Axis IBIS is quite good on both video and still shooting, as you can see in my video test here, http://vimeo.com/41085256.

I've used Canon lens with IS (my friend's camera). I find the canon and E-M5 IS are both good on still shooting but E-M5 is much better on video shooting.

On dynamic range, I quite believe that it has one of the widest dynamic range for crop-sensor camera.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/49149456@N03/7214642566/in/photostream/

1 upvote
DigitalVista
By DigitalVista (Jan 4, 2013)

I wonder if that can keep up with the proffesional grade Optical Steady Shot of the NEX SEL18-200 lens that came over directly from the professional grade VG line of video cameras, certanly makes a difference compared to the other IS lens that the NEX can use, including the ones from Sigma and the like.

0 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Jan 4, 2013)

LPV Is full of SH** The 650D is delivering WORSE image quality than the OM-D And I have OWNED the 350D SO I know how much BS LPV is. HE is a kid that knows NOTHING about photography

0 upvotes
Martin.au
By Martin.au (Jan 3, 2013)

Lol. Bye bye Player2.

Not surprised the OM-D won. It's a nice combination of image quality, size, weight and features. Being the biggest, baddest camera on the block (D800), doesn't always mean that's the most versatile camera.

Disclaimer: I own an OM-D. :D

4 upvotes
illy
By illy (Jan 3, 2013)

does the winner get a trophy to put in a cabinet, because if not this whole poll and winning thing is a mockery of a sham......

0 upvotes
lpv
By lpv (Jan 3, 2013)

nope. it's to increase clicks on this web site.

0 upvotes
texinwien
By texinwien (Jan 3, 2013)

Huh. Yet another camera-reviewer names the E-M5 "camera of the year." Quick, someone explain to him the error of his ways!

TOP (The Online Photographer) Camera of the Year 2012
http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2013/01/top-camera-of-the-year-2012.html

10 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jan 3, 2013)

Yeah, what does he know...?
(For those too stupid to live, this is a sarcasm.)

1 upvote
mytake
By mytake (Jan 4, 2013)

@texinwien

Thanks for the heads-up.

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Jan 4, 2013)

That's the great thing about the internet: anybody can have a blog and all of the sudden they are experts. I know Mike, he's a very nice guy, but only a fanboy (or someone who has a problem carrying a 1000g DSLR) would claim the EM5 is better camera than the D800 or 5D3. You will not find a single professional photographer who would choose an EM-5 over a D800/D800E. That means more any the opinion of a random blogger.

2 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jan 4, 2013)

Of course, Marike6. You are much more qualified to make a judgement on a camera than Mike Johnston. The difference between you and him is that he's entirely devoid of prejudice and bigotry. (The fact that he also keeps a very popular and entertaining blog doesn't matter because you say so.)
Also, if the result of thispoll is so meanigless to you, why do you keep commenting at the rate you do?

6 upvotes
Everdog
By Everdog (Jan 3, 2013)

For those who have not caught on, there are a bunch of Sony and Nikon fans creating new IDs solely to post in this one comment section and bash the winner. lpv and player2 are the latest.

For Bob, you could only vote once....except for lpv and player2, they can vote with their multiple IDs. :)

2 upvotes
lpv
By lpv (Jan 3, 2013)

well.. film user here:) not nikon fan, nikon user.. and for me this company haven't done anything of a use since fm3a and coolscan's.
choosen fm3a for 1/250 flash sync; not interested in new nikon glass, can't mount G lenses on fm.. I was really looking forward when they announced 24, 35, 84 f1.4 lenses.. was thinking to switch to F100, but sadly build quality of these lenses is behind AiS so nothing interesting from Nikon for a decade :)

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Husaberg Grok
By Husaberg Grok (Jan 3, 2013)

@lpv ... I agree there is some great old Nikon (and Canon FD) glass out there.

I've been really enjoying them on my OM-D. The great OIS system really helps me get great hand-held results.

It's like re-connecting with an old friend!

3 upvotes
Bob Yanal
By Bob Yanal (Jan 3, 2013)

Bias in sampling is always an issue. Did Olympus owners (or fans) vote more than others? However, the larger the sample, the less bias. 15,000 votes is a pretty big sample.

1 upvote
Mike_PEAT
By Mike_PEAT (Jan 3, 2013)

There's always a chance that someone created multiples ids to vote more than once, but one vote here or there wouldn't change much. At least it's not like years ago where whether you voted or not was tracked by a cookie which could be deleted; in that poll two people voted more than 20 times each.

Some sites block certain features until a user has a certain number of posts, but then again some people may put up a bunch of "I agree" posts to increase their post count.

0 upvotes
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (Jan 4, 2013)

(removed)

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
designprof
By designprof (Jan 3, 2013)

I am not surprised that this camera won.
It just is a great camera.
Its size and portability.
The image quality and low light sensitivity is superb but not spectacular.
The fact the camera and its kit lens is weather proof!
The image stabilization is amazing.
The kit lens 12-50mm zoom has a motorized zoom feature (hello!)
The great lenses that are available for the camera are numerous.
The accessories are also great.
I was an Olympus OM-1 user since the mid '70 through to 2000.
I am biased.
I took the camera on a week's vacation to Spain along with a Sony compact.
It wasn't the camera that took great photos. Its the photographer.
I strongly believe you can take good photos with a pin hole camera if one had too.
We should not place too much weight on this nomination but I still think
the winning camera is worthy of its distinction as a great camera.

11 upvotes
lpv
By lpv (Jan 3, 2013)

Honestly, I don't know how you can compare this digital Olympus to OM film based models...
You've probably been never interested in large aperture primes or you like equivalents vs real thing.
so the largest aperture equivalent lens available is 2.8?
and the kit lens equiv f8 - f11?
just another quirky novelty camera.

1 upvote
Everdog
By Everdog (Jan 3, 2013)

lpv needs to take a beginner's photography class.
Aperture/exposure are the same on any camera from P&S on up.
If you need F/1.4 ISO800 and 1/60 on an LX7, you need the exact same on an M43 camera and the exact same on a FF camera.
Give it a try and learn. :)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
lpv
By lpv (Jan 3, 2013)

well, was hoping you get that on the fly, I meant
equiv. aperture (depth-of-field) :)

0 upvotes
Husaberg Grok
By Husaberg Grok (Jan 3, 2013)

lpv...another signed-up today guy........sigh*

Too bad there can't be a rational discussiion on the shifting photography market.
Because that is the TRUE story behind the poll results.

2 upvotes
Everdog
By Everdog (Jan 3, 2013)

DoF is really determined by distance as much as anything else. This is why you can get a shallow DoF with a P&S.
Anyway glad you figured out where F-stop matters (really T-stop) the most...exposure. In low light that 5-axis IBIS and an F/.95 lens are unbeatable.

1 upvote
lpv
By lpv (Jan 3, 2013)

I believe such a discussion is possible.. for me some of the products are simply not there yet - not to be consider as a tool for anything.

0 upvotes
Husaberg Grok
By Husaberg Grok (Jan 3, 2013)

I agree that we aren't there yet, but manufacturers are making some good progress and enthusiasts are enjoying some great products.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
lpv
By lpv (Jan 3, 2013)

I can agree with that :)

0 upvotes
illy
By illy (Jan 3, 2013)

they should of put some of the mobile stuff in, i would of loved to have see how they would of polled vs conventional cameras, that's the biggest shift........lets hope this year they do it.

0 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Jan 4, 2013)

Thank you for being rational is all I am going to say, it is not up to a 5D mark III standards but it wins on engineering and how much punch it packs in such a small package offering an "entry level DSLR" in a tiny package. (aka image quality, noise reduction and focus speed)

0 upvotes
IrishhAndy
By IrishhAndy (Jan 3, 2013)

When it came to a popular vote customers chose convenience and utility over megapixels. I hope the big boys have learned their lesson.

If Nikon had made a 16mpx D400 it would have probably been the best selling DX camera ever and might well have topped this poll. But Nikon know better than their customers who are now flocking to micro four thirds.

One more thing.........

http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2013/01/top-camera-of-the-year-2012.html

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Tape5
By Tape5 (Jan 3, 2013)

'I hope the big boys have learned their lesson.'

Any boy who has learnt any lesson as a result of reading these posts, let me assure you, is not a big boy in photography.

1 upvote
Tape5
By Tape5 (Jan 3, 2013)

Sorry I just realised you are talking about manufacturers.I am not so sure if Nikon and Canon are doing poorly. They are a lot larger and more resourceful to be bothered by this sector.

0 upvotes
IrishhAndy
By IrishhAndy (Jan 3, 2013)

They should be bothered. Restinh on their laurels shall not save them.

3 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Jan 3, 2013)

You've got a point.

If somebody made a $1,000 FF camera, there might be something to discuss here.

It's about perceived value. In today's market, FF cameras don't give you $3,000-$8,000 in value, they just don't. But they are being very expertly marketed as if they still do. The sellers don't want to puncture that illusion.

3 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Jan 3, 2013)

@ bobbarber,

That is a matter of opinion. IMO the D800 at $3000 is a BARGAIN for what it offers, especially in the IQ department. Nikon could have easily asked for $4000 for it and it still would have had a 6 month back order.

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Tape5
By Tape5 (Jan 3, 2013)

A great dress maker doesn't need the best fabrics and designs
A great painter doesn't need the best oil paints
A great sculptor doesn't need the best hard rocks and granite
A great poet doesn't need fancy words and phrases
A great chef doesn't need the best cooking utensils
A great actor doesn't need the biggest part
A great dancer doesn't need the best shoes

Gadget affection has nothing to do with creation or art.
Seriously.

2 upvotes
lpv
By lpv (Jan 3, 2013)

yup. that's why fm3a bought back in 2001 still serving me and there's no need for anything else... lifetime investment..

0 upvotes
Tape5
By Tape5 (Jan 3, 2013)

@lpv

It is always a pleasure to explore the large worlds that surround seemingly small things. I took my father's Lubitel to throw it away for him and I ended up using it for nearly eight years.

0 upvotes
LarryK
By LarryK (Jan 3, 2013)

Yeah, that makes sense. All of your great sculptors spend hundreds of hours working on soapstone because "it doesn't matter", any old rock will do.

And I'm sure you're such a great photographer you used to make you own film emulsions, and now you're cobbling together your own sensors.

1 upvote
Anepo
By Anepo (Jan 4, 2013)

But it can help make the creative process more efficient or "easier" Give chase jarvis the lego camera and he creates art (and he has done that with it already)

0 upvotes
olypan
By olypan (Jan 3, 2013)

It's like the Irish EU referendum. Make them vote again until they give the right answer.

2 upvotes
Tape5
By Tape5 (Jan 3, 2013)

to be sure ...to be sure..

0 upvotes
Edymagno
By Edymagno (Jan 5, 2013)

No wonder Chavez got re-elected... again. The dangers of democracy!

0 upvotes
english_Wolf
By english_Wolf (Jan 3, 2013)

On the topic at hand...

I agree that a popular vote shows anything but the real picture.

How many have the camera they vote for?
How many vote due to a bias toward or against something else?

The true picture is in the number of unit sold, during the same period, meaning when the first camera came out then six months later then a year later. That would give a real picture that could reveal:

1) Brand/model expectation (hype value 1)
2) Popularity over time (increasing/decreasing value 4)
3) Number of cameras sold over a full year (value 5)

Giving a different quotient value to each of the three, starting with #3 and creating an average would give a truer reflection of between what is 'popular' and what is really used.

3 upvotes
Mike_PEAT
By Mike_PEAT (Jan 3, 2013)

Agree it should be called something like most influential or interesting camera, but then again other sites and magazines are also calling the OM-D the best camera of the year...it's not like the DPR poll was disagreeing with everyone else!

0 upvotes
Alejandro del Pielago
By Alejandro del Pielago (Jan 3, 2013)

NEW POLL !!!

How long the Nikki fanboys will cry ???

Options:

a) Two - three months
b) Until they try to take pictures
c) When they realize that it is just a poll
d) Never

11 upvotes
AndyGM
By AndyGM (Jan 3, 2013)

It's not the Nikon and Canon owners causing the aggravation. From what I see, most posters that are supporters of those 2 brands are laughing this result off as irrelevant and a blip, an anomaly. They are generally being good humoured about it.

Strangely, it is Sony and Pentax owners accusing of vote rigging and calling people names.

1 upvote
Josh152
By Josh152 (Jan 4, 2013)

@AndyGM

The difference is the Canon/Nikon shooters are using the current standard for pro/enthusiasts so they don't have the insecure need prove their choice is just as good like the Sony/Pentax/Olympus/mILC shooters do.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
AndyGM
By AndyGM (Jan 4, 2013)

Oh, so the majority of Canon/Nikon users are using D700, D800, 5D MkII or 5D MkIII? Even the majority of Canon/Nikon owners posting into these comments have those cameras? That 650D or D3200 users are "using the current standard for pro/enthusiasts"? Please, lets have a serving of reality to dilute the cognitive bias here. The cash cows of Canon and Nikon are their entry models, which benefit from a "Halo Product" effect generated by their top end models.

What you see as an "insecure need", I see as supporters of disruptive technology who what to depose the incumbents, the hegemony, by showing others there are alternatives. Having a duopoly in this part of the camera market is no good for anyone.

There are plenty of comments from CaNikon SLR users in here, that they barely knew the EM-5 existed and are only looking into it because of this poll. So now they know of an alternative. It might not suit them, but at least THEY KNOW its there.

2 upvotes
Anepo
By Anepo (Jan 4, 2013)

until they get a new reason to fight with the canon kids.

0 upvotes
Prime_Lens
By Prime_Lens (Jan 3, 2013)

I don't get some of the hate comments that I see on this poll.

It is what it is.
A poll by the people just like you, who agreed and/or disagreed.
It just happens to be a poll with a result that conflicts with your interest, but it is still a valid poll and one that decided which cameras are commonly liked.
Respect that or you have no base or ground for your argument either.

5 upvotes
kayone
By kayone (Jan 3, 2013)

I agree with this verdict, my OM-D is the camera I shoot w 90% of the time

3 upvotes
Just Having Fun
By Just Having Fun (Jan 3, 2013)

Agree, "The best camera is the one you have with you".
I can tell you I am 10x more likely to carry a mirrorless camera in my jacket than lug around my new D600. So while the D600 is great, as most EM-5 dual format owners will tell you, most pictures are taken with the smaller/lighter camera.
Now if the poll were for indoors on a tripod, the D800 would win hands down.

9 upvotes
2eyesee
By 2eyesee (Jan 3, 2013)

The same reasoning lead me to ditch my mirroless (m43 & NEX) for an RX100.

You must have big pockets! I wouldn't consider any m43 camera capable of being carried around in a jacket pocket. The most pocketable mirrorless combination would be an NEX with the new 16-50mm.

1 upvote
Just Having Fun
By Just Having Fun (Jan 3, 2013)

The NEX 6 which has the 16-50mm lens option (which is a bad lens) is large compared to the latest PMx models. Plus M43 has more usable pancakes and smaller pocketable lenses like the 45mm F/1.8.
I tried NEX but the lenses were still DSLR size which means you need to carry a bag. With a PM1 last year at Disney I carried 3 lenses and the camera in my cargo shorts pockets easily (including a tele-zoom!) :)

Comment edited 52 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
bagsATX
By bagsATX (Jan 3, 2013)

My XZ-1 fits nicely into a pocket and it goes everywhere with me except dark alleys where the sensor thinks it is always snowing. Same with the OM-D...too noisy.

1 upvote
2eyesee
By 2eyesee (Jan 4, 2013)

@Just Having Fun

The NEX 16-50mm is not a bad lens. It's design has necessitated certain optical compromises but these are corrected in-camera in new NEX bodies like the NEX-6. It may have developed a bad reputation as these corrections are not made on older NEX bodies, but on new bodies it produces perfectly acceptable results. Sony is not unique on taking this approach - my understanding is most Micro 4/3 lenses also employ in-camera correction.

As I said, I would never describe a Micro 4/3 camera as pocketable, but you're not the first person I've seen describe them as such. People have vastly different requirements in a camera - which is why we have so many varieties on the market - so I'm not about to tell you what works for you just because it doesn't work for me :)

0 upvotes
Scales USA
By Scales USA (Jan 3, 2013)

I'm wondering if voters voted on a camera they own, or just on specifications. I've owned two of the three top contenders.

Opinions are fine, but sales would be a indication of people who actually vote by plunking down their hard earned dollars.

3 upvotes
pdelux
By pdelux (Jan 3, 2013)

In that case... the lower end models would win BEST, and you would not need a poll at all, just look at sales figures.

2 upvotes
quailoaksphoto
By quailoaksphoto (Jan 3, 2013)

New Poll:

If you were to receive one of these camera's free including choice of lens, which camera would you want and which lens?

Olympus did a splendid job targeting a very popular market, at a good price point for performance, that appeals to a broad market of photographic enthusiast, not just professionals. Somehow I don't think this poll was as much about a camera with it's limitations, as it was about the strengths it has for it's intended application.

4 upvotes
Just Having Fun
By Just Having Fun (Jan 3, 2013)

Yeah, the RX100 has a better lens than you can get for NEX and also has IS. That's a no brainer. I ranked the RX100 3rd on my list.

2 upvotes
cameron2
By cameron2 (Jan 3, 2013)

I'd choose the most expensive body/lens combo (e.g. M9+f0.95 lens for around $20k), and sell them on ebay, and then buy the camera I'd actually want to use (with enough cash left over to buy flash cubes, film and processing ;-)

4 upvotes
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (Jan 3, 2013)

While 35mm cine equipment was used for most of Captain America: The First Avenger and Iron Man 2, some action sequences were recorded with EOS 5D Mk II cameras. The less cumbersome equipment is ideal for exciting point-of-view sequences, according to Cinematographer Matthew Libatique of Iron Man 2, who attached four DSLRs to some cars when filming in Monaco. "One of the cameras was mounted in the front of Tony Stark's Grand Prix car as it flies up into the air," he recounts. "It's probably the most impressive shot in that sequence." Superb video quality was equally important, since it allowed the editors to seamlessly integrate HD clips with the film footage. http://www.marketnews.ca/content/index/page?pid=10408

0 upvotes
pdelux
By pdelux (Jan 3, 2013)

LOL what has this got to do with the poll/results?

1 upvote
Peter K Burian
By Peter K Burian (Jan 3, 2013)

Personally, I would call the Nikon D800 number 1 ... the EOS number 2 and the Olympus number 3.

1 upvote
Everdog
By Everdog (Jan 3, 2013)

Player2, come clean. Who are you really?
The names you are calling everyone matches a certain NEX fan.
You could gain credibility here by telling the truth, lose it all by telling a lie.

btw, the IBIS is really revolutionary. It beats the IS others put in a handful of their lenses....and it works with thousands of lenses :) In-lens IS can't detect rotation like the Olympus IBIS.

7 upvotes
ThomasSwitzerland
By ThomasSwitzerland (Jan 3, 2013)

This comment from <player2> is very harsh; although I might emotionally fully agree against those ugly Oly sales pitches and their hair raising FF analogies and (innocence?).

We should avoid noting IP-addresses but coming to a discussion of understanding each other better. Why we came to a decision, and what lessons we learned to make a better decision in the future.

We need a collaborative approach (me included) to promote culture, style and knowledge in the forum.

3 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Jan 3, 2013)

"player2
Joined on Jan 1, 2013"

@ThomasSwitzerland

Are you making some kind of a good cop-bad cop comment to give player2 some credibility?

If we are trying to get rid of recent joiners just to comment on this thread, don't you think we should start with player2?

He's been incendiary in virtually every post, obviously joined dpreview just to troll this thread, and now you want us to take his message as reasonable?

5 upvotes
ThomasSwitzerland
By ThomasSwitzerland (Jan 3, 2013)

We have now more than 1069 messages. Just like a prime time event. It hit something. May be an underdog strike back. Hurt because Olympus was great name, the destiny to have “the” camera.

This forum now became very emotional. This is not bad because it brings movement, may be progress. Let us prevent to describe others as trolls – otherwise we make ourselves to an elite, we are not.

2 upvotes
Jeffa4444
By Jeffa4444 (Jan 3, 2013)

One last point. Any camera is only as good as the lens its better to buy a cheaper camera & better lenses.

2 upvotes
b0k3h
By b0k3h (Jan 3, 2013)

this axiom is more relevant for film than it is for digital, where the sensor, processing, metering, and the rest of the algorithm go into play.

3 upvotes
Anastigmat
By Anastigmat (Jan 4, 2013)

That is not true in the digital age, because the camera is the film. When you buy a camera, you are stuck with the sensor. The smaller the sensor, the more noisy it is going to be, and the more diffraction limited it will be. The 4/3 sensor is handicapped by its small size, and also by diffraction. No matter how good your lens is, the sensor will limit the image quality you will get. In fact, a full frame has the advantage that even a less than spectacular lens will help it outperform a great lens with a bad camera/sensor.

0 upvotes
Jeffa4444
By Jeffa4444 (Jan 3, 2013)

I work for a Motion Picture camera rental company part of the group is Lee Filters who work with professional landscape photographers. These photographers use large format, Canon & Nikon equipment but some also use 4/3rds cameras especially Panasonic & Olympus because of the wide lens range. The Olympus OM-D E-M5 and the Nikon D800 both use Sony designed & manufactured sensors both designed specifically for Olympus & Nikon.
I have personally and we use professionally Canon cameras & lenses, I also own Olympus 4/3rds cameras the two systems I use for different purposes the right tool for the job. The OM-D E-M5 is a very well balanced camera, the image stabilisation is proberly the best system in existance today and the Olympus 4/3rds lenses due to their concentric design & being designed for digital are overall very good for their price.
The Nikon D800 video quality is nothing short of stunning for its price point (better than the Canon 5D MKII) as yet Ive not shot with the 5D MKIII

9 upvotes
Mike_PEAT
By Mike_PEAT (Jan 3, 2013)

Just to add a factoid to this, an Olympus PEN was used to film some of the action scenes in the movie "Secretariat."

2 upvotes
illy
By illy (Jan 3, 2013)

and a Canon filmed a whole episode of House

2 upvotes
Mike_PEAT
By Mike_PEAT (Jan 3, 2013)

"House" was the small screen, not a big screen movie!

Also for House the camera was on a dolly, not attached to a fast moving horse! The benefit of a smaller camera!

1 upvote
illy
By illy (Jan 3, 2013)

ever heard of the film ParaNorman?

2 upvotes
Michael Offe
By Michael Offe (Jan 3, 2013)

Interesting results and actually I am not too surprised about the top three based on what I see in the large camera store I manage.

All the a certainly good cameras. The D800 amazes me most in how the massive jump in resolution hasn't left it with any major image quality/high ISO deficiencies. The 5D MkIII certainly jumped performance up on the MkII (maybe a couple yrs too late to save a lot of people who hopped brands), and the OM-D EM-5 has certainly been a popular camera in the market place and certainly one I wouldn't mind owning myself to fit between my D700/D300 and my pocketable Sony HX5... actually not so far from my old Minolta A2 in feel!

Only disappointment in this announcement was I thought I would read a few of the comments for some interesting feedback... only to realise the topic seems to have brought out the worst in much of posters making me feel like the read was a waste of time... at least the camera's aren't! :-)

8 upvotes
Michael Offe
By Michael Offe (Jan 3, 2013)

P.S. Congratulations to the ever growing team at DPReview as well for the continued hard work and dedication to the industry! I bet none of you really envisaged where DPReview would be today. I remember back to the early days (cir. 2000) when DPReview was just starting to become the larger/more popular of the review sites... it has certainly grown over that time and I can't put in words how invaluable the site (and your hours upon hours of hard work) is to the entire camera and photographic industry. I would hate to count how many times in a week, or a day for that matter our staff would access dpreview for relevant info, specs, battery details, side by side comparisons, etc!

Thankyou. It's also great to hear Jeff and Shawn joining in on the team as well!

Yours sincerely,
Michael Offe,
Camera House, Queensland Australia.

4 upvotes
Andreas Stuebs
By Andreas Stuebs (Jan 3, 2013)

Congratulation Olympus for this success!
I must admit, I did not vote for the OMD. Mainly because when I handled it in the shop I was not happy how it felt in my hand. And also, I do not really like electronic viewfinders preferring a bright optical viewfinder. But even so - it is a well deserved win for a nice camera even if it does not suit me.
The question of the poll is rather silly. As if there can be "the best camera". There are so many different uses that there can be for each use a best camera. A camera,which tries to suit all, risks becoming a jack of all trades and a master of none. Having said that, it is quite impressive for a fairly small camera maker (compared to the BIG TWO and their fanbase) to come top of the poll. A bit like Tottenham coming out on top of the polls in the UK vs. ManU, Arsenal, Liverpool, and Chelsea.

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
8 upvotes
yortuk
By yortuk (Jan 3, 2013)

The use of the word "best" is certainly problematic, though it's actually stated as "best of 2012", which I think can be taken to imply an emphasis on newness and innovation. Maybe "most interesting new camera" would make a better title, but then maybe that's the Lytro.

edit: on second thought, I'm going to go with the Nokia 41 megapixel camera phone.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jan 3, 2013)

Two things:
1. Most E-M5 users never shot with an upper-grade camera (say, full-frame);
2. Most Nikon and Canon DSLR users never shot with a micro 4/3 camera.
Yet all of them are exchanging opinions about products they never laid their hands on.
How pathetic is that?

9 upvotes
Mike_PEAT
By Mike_PEAT (Jan 3, 2013)

For the record, my first camera was a fully manual medium format 6x6. I used a fuly manual 135/35mm film camera for more than 20 years. I've also professionally used a 6ft tall process camera which used 24"x36" (that's 2 feet by 3 feet) max sheet film. Even with all that "upper grade" experience, I've chosen the OM-D.

I have tried high-end Nikon and Canon digitals, but they didn't impress me with my "upper grade" experience. Olympus always has!

And yes, Olympus is a full frame format! So was my medium format, and the process camera I used!

Comment edited 12 minutes after posting
11 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Jan 3, 2013)

Your point is well taken. I do think that many people who grew up with mirrors are unwilling to try mirrorless, and some of the generation that has grown up looking at the back of a camera doesn't see any reason every why anyone would ever need a mirror.

However...

Most people that are in the market for a two-door sedan DON'T HAVE to drive a Hummer to know that it isn't for them. And vice versa.

Also, I'm sure that many of us go for smaller cameras PRECISELY BECAUSE we have used bigger cameras for so long. I have a medium format, large format, and 35mm film (Nikon N90, Minolta X570) cameras here in the room with me as I type. Apart from the inconvenience of using film (I also have a box of 4x5 film, 35mm film, etc. in the room, and still shoot film from time to time), those cameras are just BIG. The novelty of carrying around a big, heavy machine kind of wears off after a decade or two, know what I mean?

9 upvotes
Rockchan
By Rockchan (Jan 3, 2013)

I got a full frame camera for years and actually considering to buy D800. The reason I also got mirrorless camera is because it is too heavy. Full Frame provides me the best IQ but it is never the best camera I want to have (a camera that I cannot bring with me all the time is never the best camera to me).

I always need to go for business trips. This is not possible for me to bring a full frame camera with me.

The IQ of compact cameras like RX100 is too bad for my standard.

Therefore, just take the middle ground. Mirrorless camera provide the best compromise. I can easily put it in my bag and will not feel anything (i.e. the weight), and at the same time it provide much better IQ than camera like RX100.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
LeoSss
By LeoSss (Jan 3, 2013)

Same here.
I've just completed a 35km hike and brought along my OM-D + 3 lenses (7-14, 12-35, 75). The whole package came under 3lbs.

7 upvotes
sgoldswo
By sgoldswo (Jan 3, 2013)

I used to shoot with an A900 and also own a Leica M9. I can tell you now the E-M5 gets a good bit more used than the M9 (even if the GH3 is now getting more use than the E-M5)

0 upvotes
ThomasSwitzerland
By ThomasSwitzerland (Jan 3, 2013)

Is this a true readers‘ poll?

I have used all three cameras on a test drive. The Olympus on 1st place? Some dealers here even don’t carry this camera anymore: poor quality control and many returns. Olympus against the rest? They must be lucky not going bankrupt by wrongdoing and lagging in technology breakthroughs. And against the D800: What a joke, could be from the Marx Brothers.

Retro design does not help when vision disappeared.

0 upvotes
Spunjji
By Spunjji (Jan 3, 2013)

Yes, it is a true reader's poll.

4 upvotes
Mike_PEAT
By Mike_PEAT (Jan 3, 2013)

"DPR user poll".

DC Watch members ALSO picked the OM-D as top camera with the D800e in second place!

7 upvotes
olypan
By olypan (Jan 3, 2013)

Do me a favour. Olympus is the most reliable brand I have ever used. Nikon D800 Has atrocious focussing issues. just like the D7000. D800 is a dinosaur with a heart transplant. OMD is state of the art.

9 upvotes
tramontina
By tramontina (Jan 3, 2013)

I haven't returned mine. Not planning to. Same with many who owns it that I know. Probably your town got a bad batch.

2 upvotes
sgoldswo
By sgoldswo (Jan 3, 2013)

I'm mystified by your comment. Have you heard of 5 angle IBIS?

1 upvote
pdelux
By pdelux (Jan 3, 2013)

Someones had their feelings hurt. These are just blanket accusations of a desperate person.

You may have had credibility if you didnt say "llagging in technology breakthroughs."

Olympus have been one of the most innovative camera makers over the last decade if not longer. They invented live view, dust buster, 5 Axis stabilisation, not even going to mention lens design.

2 upvotes
ThomasSwitzerland
By ThomasSwitzerland (Jan 4, 2013)

IBIS is a relict from the past when ISO was important because of film emulsion limitations. Today, with good technology in sensor, you raise the ISO, not needing IBIS. IBIS is like mounting electronics to an old fashioned car. The future is sensor processing not mechanical balancing. Just known in hi-tech. Takes a while until Oly gets up.

0 upvotes
Maklike Tier
By Maklike Tier (Jan 3, 2013)

Look I'm just getting back into photography so take my opinion for what it's worth.

The Canon and Nikon are obvious. Second tier models, with most of the features of the top of the line model for a fraction of the price. Pretty simple simple choices for the peanut gallery.

Now despite what some people think, from an outsiders perspective that OMD is a product that makes photography exciting not only for enthusiasts but also for people just getting into photography or wanting to. The DSLR is bloated and anachronistic, the OMD retro and svelt. It's not intimidating for beginners, yet featured enough for the more seasoned. It's weather sealed. It has a good range of lenses available. The only part where it falls down over an equivalent DSLR at the same price is higher ISO shooting.

If you're a pro, nothing short of full frame will suffice, but if you're an enthusiast who loves your gear and more importantly loves taking photos, what's not to like about the OMD?

16 upvotes
texinwien
By texinwien (Jan 3, 2013)

Most DSLRs also beat the OM-D in tracking autofocus capabilities. Otherwise, what you wrote is spot on.

2 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Jan 3, 2013)

@player2

Did you mean continuous AF? Yes, mirrorless cameras have a weak spot there (except for the Nikon V and J series, good job Nikon!); however, CDAF is more accurate than PDAF, period. I can't speak for the D800, etc., but from reading these forums it's obvious that many high-end DSLRs (D7000, Pentax models, etc.) have problems with AF accuracy.

Also, MANUAL focus is much easier and better on mirrorless! There is no contest here. The photos I take of my wife (my favorite model), always have her eye in focus. A-L-W-A-Y-S. That guy lugging around the big DSLR and clicking away at the model may look more professional than me, and his photos may have more dynamic range, but I GUARANTEE that using m43 I can take more photos with accurate critical focus than he can, either using AF or (especially) manual focus.

I hope this helps.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
sandy b
By sandy b (Jan 3, 2013)

So you "Guarantee" you can get more shots in focus with your Oly than a pro shooting a pro DSLR. Right, believability right out the window. Pass the Koolaid.

2 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Jan 3, 2013)

@sandy b

How exactly is your thought process working here? You didn't make a point, just repeated a tired reference to Koolaid.

Do you think that PDAF on DSLRs is more accurate than CDAF on mirrorless cameras? That simply isn't true for static or near static subjects. A pro with a DSLR would do better than mirrorless with surfers, for example, or sports, but not with a model posing.

Do an Internet search on focus problems with D7000, D800, etc. These cameras have serious problems.

Take a 100 shots each with a DSLR and mirrorless camera of a model, and afterwards check critical focus. I think you will find that the DSLR has missed critical focus a lot more than the mirrorless cam, but that results are "good enough" given DOF. That may be the ideal work flow for a pro, especially given DSLRs better abilities at continuous AF, but it does not mean that DSLRs focus more accurately than mirrorless.

I hope this helps.

2 upvotes
LarryK
By LarryK (Jan 3, 2013)

Personally I think the EVF could be a lot better, and all the lenses I really like using on it are Panasonics.

0 upvotes
bobyg
By bobyg (Jan 3, 2013)

How pity that some of the users here cannot accept that Olympus managed to create a truly wonderful camera. However, I enjoy using it ;)

13 upvotes
G L
By G L (Jan 3, 2013)

Its really entertaining.
Some just cannot live with it that their beloved camera did not win.

4 upvotes
Tape5
By Tape5 (Jan 3, 2013)

' creating something truly wonderful'?

This OM-D thing is getting funnier. This is a line from the Space Odyssey or the book of Genesis by any chance?

2 upvotes
olypan
By olypan (Jan 3, 2013)

Denial is strong with this one.

2 upvotes
pdelux
By pdelux (Jan 3, 2013)

with every comment - Tape5 becomes more desperate, and entertaining!

0 upvotes
keeponkeepingon
By keeponkeepingon (Jan 3, 2013)

There's a lot of accusations of ballot stuffing that could be cleared up really easily:

Publish the results deleting the input from accounts created after the poll was announced.

How about it dpreview? What are the results from actual community members versus accounts created for the purpose of the poll?

3 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Jan 3, 2013)

DPR relies on the clicks generated by their users. If people did come from other M.4/3 sites to show support for M.4/3, DPR will be happy that the poll helped to increase membership. New users were not excluded and their vote is a relevant as anyone else's.

A more meaningful test would be a review of the IP addresses used to make the votes and to see if multiple user accounts were created from the same IP address, because that would have been contrary to the stipulation that you can only vote once.

I'm certain some people will have voted more than once, but I don't think it will apply exclusively to the winner, more likely every brand and likely of little material impact on the result.

It would be great to see an infusion of new blood into the M.4/3 because it was recently branded by DPR staff as worse than a playground full of school kids, and many regulars stopped posting there as it was near impossible to talk objectively and discuss flaws without waking the pack-monster.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Jan 3, 2013)

@player2

Well if you are going to post lies, I guess that explains why you created a new account to do.

Here's a Nikon link rallying their vote:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50526145

It was all a bit of fun, get over yourself.

If camera ownership is proving too stressful for you why not simply take up knitting. It will give your fingers something more constructive to do, help you limit the nonsense you are posting here, and at the end of it you could have made yourself a nice comfort blanket.

PS: If you made links on the oly forum during the voting, which account were you using, as your new one was only created after the vote finished.

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
Mike_PEAT
By Mike_PEAT (Jan 3, 2013)

Re:"Here's a Nikon link rallying their vote:"

And yet no one from DPR has contacted me to cease and desist, scolded me, or have banned me. In the picture at the top of the page DPR even joined in the fun by putting the word "vote" on the Olympus sign.

The only people who seem to be upset about it are those who didn't think about it first.

1 upvote
tramontina
By tramontina (Jan 3, 2013)

Some people acted like Nixon suddenly voted as the Pope!

So you don't like the winner. Life goes on.

0 upvotes
Ubilam
By Ubilam (Jan 3, 2013)

The next DPR poll should be about which new camera smells the best, out of the box. Love that new camera smell...

3 upvotes
Husaberg Grok
By Husaberg Grok (Jan 3, 2013)

The m4/3 is full frame. It isn't an adaptation of an old film standard with the sub-group of cropped frame lenses.
I've said it before and I'll say it again....
With the progress we've witnessed over the last 15 years with optical sensors, the next 15 years will be a shocker. Full frame 35mm digital cameras will become the studio-standard, and the enthusiast format for field work may be even smaller than the m4/3 format.
We've also seen a continuing swell of interest in the cellphone camera segment.
Sooner or later we will finally throw off the shackles of film and see super portable photographic systems that exploit the full potential of digital sensors and advanced lense designs. The stuff we are using today will look HUGE!
Who wants to carry a backpack full of gear?
The results of this poll indicate that consumers want a high quality, versatile, COMPACT photo system and that the OM-D E-M5 fills this need for many digital imaging enthusiusts.
There will be more fun to come!

16 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jan 3, 2013)

"Full frame" = anything with a sensor frame measuring 36 x 24mm, because the "frame" that is referenced in the term "full frame" is the 35mm film "frame." It's as simple as that. Just because a sensor and a lens match up by design does NOT mean that it can be called "full frame." If that were true, then the Nikon 1 system, with its tiny 13.2mm x 8.8mm would also be called "full frame." Or the even tinier sensors in cell phone cameras could also be called "full frame" because the sensors are designed to match the size of the cell phone's lens. That's the confusion that is going to happen if you attempt to change a definition just because you feel like it.

Don't be upset that the term "full frame" has a historically significant origin. And don't try the silly and self-defeating argument of "hey, let's ignore history because that's in the past!" Well, duh, of course history is in the past. But plenty of phrases, standards, units of measure, etc. have a historical origin.

5 upvotes
Picturenaut
By Picturenaut (Jan 3, 2013)

Shoot full frame with a really fast lens (e.g. f = 1.2) and you know that FF is a completely different league. Never get that shallow DoF with a 4/3rd if you want this effect for composition.

That said I think the the OMD EM-5 is a really nice camera.

0 upvotes
Husaberg Grok
By Husaberg Grok (Jan 3, 2013)

What do you call the medium format Hasselblad's, Pentax's and Leica's out there? Mega-Super full frames?

It's a format for pete's sake!

I think everyone knows that a crop sensor is one that is smaller than what the lense/body was designed to support. Since 35mm was such a dominant format and "full frame" sensors were initially so expensive to produce, it is only natural that everyone associates "full frame" with the old 36x24 format.

Micro 4/3 is full frame designed for micro 4/3 lenses just as the Nikon 1 system you mentioned. To re-state the obvious, these are different systems or formats.

Wow!

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
7 upvotes
Mike_PEAT
By Mike_PEAT (Jan 3, 2013)

As well "crop factor" is an improper term, as in anything smaller than 135/35mm format has a crop factor. There's only cropping taking place when you are using a lens from a larger format, and that includes using a medium format lens on the misnamed "full frame" (135/35mm) format.

If you are using an APS lens on an APS body, it's full frame as there is NO cropping taking place.

It's unfortunate that terms like "full frame" and "crop factor" have been wrongly adopted by the digital community. Just because people use the terms wrongly, doesn't make them right...like when they said the Earth is flat!

The term that should be used is "multiplication factor" and ONLY IF you are comparing one system with another. When using a medium format camera I don't think what "normal" is on another format, I just pull out my 80mm lens; when in the US I don't think how many km/h 55mph is!

IF all sensors smaller than 135/35mm have a crop factor, does anything larger than have a NEGATIVE CROP FACTOR?

5 upvotes
Olympus Full Frame
By Olympus Full Frame (Jan 3, 2013)

Olympus full frame is best slogan of 2012 ... LMAO

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Jan 3, 2013)

@Husaberg Grok - "What do you call the medium format Hasselblad's, Pentax's and Leica's out there? Mega-Super full frames?"

No, you call them "medium format." It's not that complicated. Go to the Wikipedia page for "Image Sensor Format" and you'll see it's all laid out for you there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image_sensor_format

As you can see, "full frame" only refers to 36x24mm sensors. If you go larger than that, it becomes "medium format." Not "mega-super full frame".

@Husaberg Grok - "It's a format for pete's sake!"

Yes, they are all formats. But they each have their names or agreed-upon ways to refer to them. You can't just call a 4/3 sensor "full frame" just because you feel like it, or because your ego compels you to do so. Likewise, medium format sensor shooters don't call their sensors "full frame" either. Nor do they call them "4/3." These words and names are not all interchangeable just because "it's a format for pete's sake."

1 upvote
illy
By illy (Jan 3, 2013)

even Olympus market their lenses showing the equivalent focal length in 35mm terms, someone should tell them it's a FF system, they obviously are doing it wrong

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Jan 3, 2013)

@ Mike_PEAT - "If you are using an APS lens on an APS body, it's full frame as there is NO cropping taking place."

Boy, you completely missed the boat on this one. The point of the crop factor is to give you a 35mm equivalence. In other words, those crop factors and multipliers allow you to quantify all these smaller formats by how they compare to the reference standard that everyone knows: the 35mm format. So 2.7X ("Nikon CX format"), 2X ("4/3 format"), 1.6X ("Canon APS-C format"), 1.5X ("Nikon DX format") all refer to how these sensors compare to the 35mm format, which has been established as the reference point of 1.0X. So your point about an APS lens on an APS sensor not having crop is neither here nor there because the multiplier/crop factor is a calculation that allows us to reference that particular sensor format size back to the 35mm format as a point of comparison.

1 upvote
Mike_PEAT
By Mike_PEAT (Jan 3, 2013)

My point was "crop factor" should be replaced by "multiplication factor" for converting between different formats. Having photographed for any decades I used the term "multiplication factor" before the term "crop factor" was invented by APS users too lazy to say or write multiplication factor.

As for Olympus putting an equivalency sticker on lenses, it's a marketing thing to educate newbies...that sticker is removed from all my lenses!

The only time I use 135/35mm equivalence is when talking with non-4/3 users. In the 4/3 forums we don't use equivalence.

Like I said about driving in another country...I don't look at te speed limit of 55mph and try to convert to how many km/h that would be...I just push the pedal down until the speedometer says 55mph! Ok, maybe the first time you want to know how fast 55mph is before going there so you know how comfortable yu are driving at that speed, but after that you just think in terms of mph.

I know my fisheye is 7.5mm, not 15mm equivalence.

3 upvotes
gordon1000
By gordon1000 (Jan 3, 2013)

OP and MIKE_PEAT are right according to this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/135_film

The term "full frame" was misused by high-end digital camera manufactures because 135 standard (35mm) was the most popular film size at that time no one referred to it as full frame back in the film days. The marketing teams probably thought it sounded good. Any system with native lenses at their shortest focal length projecting image circle about the size of their sensor is full frame and there is no cropping.

2 upvotes
Husaberg Grok
By Husaberg Grok (Jan 3, 2013)

I will admit I was pedantic and literal in my last comments. I was up past my bedtime!
I've enjoyed photography for over 50 years and seen a lot of terms change and formats come and go. That why I've said that there will be a large shift in format popularity in the next 15 years. Digital photography is changing the format landscape.......again!

Cheers!

0 upvotes
c76
By c76 (Jan 3, 2013)

Just wondering if Olympus come out a full frame interchangeable lenses, MLC, little bigger than OMD EM-5, what will happen?

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
1 upvote
IrishhAndy
By IrishhAndy (Jan 3, 2013)

It would have giant lenses. Totally defeats the purpose.

3 upvotes
IrishhAndy
By IrishhAndy (Jan 3, 2013)

Ah'll mollcate your pickle. Is it a jherkin ?

0 upvotes
G L
By G L (Jan 3, 2013)

What would happen?
Some who prefer a lager sensor will buy it, thats all.

You know larger sensors have advantages and disadvantages as have smaller sensors.

And if they do a larger sensor camera why would they just use the 35mmm film size. No reason for that.
Make it a bit smaller than 35mm. No difference to 35mm but with a mirrorless system you can be significantly smaller.
Or make the sensor even a bit larger and the mirrorless system is still smaller than a DSLR.

Nothing wrong with a different sensor size but for sure nothing wrong with m43.

2 upvotes
Rockchan
By Rockchan (Jan 3, 2013)

It is not possible to be just little bigger than OMD. Even if Olympus can make a small body, the lens will be big. You can look at Sony NEX as example: A thin body with big lenses. It took Sony years to release 16-50mm lens. Even the RX1 only got a prime lens.

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
ManuelVilardeMacedo
By ManuelVilardeMacedo (Jan 3, 2013)

G L, Canon did that with APS-H. It didn't work. They reverted to FF.

0 upvotes
G L
By G L (Jan 3, 2013)

@Manuel
But Canon (and their customers) had lenses for 35mm format available for a long time. So it makes not much sense to have a sensor size which is not much smaller than 35mm. If you are going for a large sensor anyway why not use the full image circle of the available lenses?
But if you start it from scratch, very different story.

@Rockchan
So far I know lenses for mirrorless can be quite a bit smaller than lenses for DSLRs
The RX1 has only a prime but compare that size to a 35mm DSLR with a similar lens! A mirrorless system for the same sensor size would not be that small but quite a bit smaller than a DSLR System.

1 upvote
DonParrot
By DonParrot (Jan 4, 2013)

Well...
To be honest, I don't see Olympus creating a bigger-sensor system - I don't see a market chance and think they would lose more money than they did with FT - but if they did and would opt for a 35mm-size sensor but in a 4:3-format, the lenses still would be significantly smaller than the ones you would need to create the same IQ for a 3:2-format sensor as the latter format means that the pircture circle is significantly bigger.

0 upvotes
Melvin J Bramley
By Melvin J Bramley (Jan 3, 2013)

I purchased a Olympus OMD to replace my Nikon D300 .
As good as the Nikon is It was too much weight & bulk to take to the back woods with.
I am generally happy with the Olympus which for my purposes is a fine piece of equipment.
We can pixel peep & compare specification until the cows come home but if we don't use the equipment then what use is it?
Well done Olympus ; it's nice to see the format grow up.

13 upvotes
luxborealis
By luxborealis (Jan 3, 2013)

Wow - reading through the comments, I am surprised at the vehemence surrounding jpeg vs raw files. It's quite simple: people who take pictures shoot jpegs...people who make photographs shoot raw. There is a world of difference between taking and making.

3 upvotes
TSOriginaux
By TSOriginaux (Jan 3, 2013)

totally agree with you. The problem is the one who post a photo to web want to attract most attention form others. That will makes his evolution from taking to making pictures gradually. How many of us will insist on only taking pics while leave the final photo as it is in the memory card from cameras?

0 upvotes
lpv
By lpv (Jan 3, 2013)

people who take pictures shoot film, people who make photographs shoot film. there's no difference between taking and making:)

0 upvotes
DonParrot
By DonParrot (Jan 4, 2013)

And I always thought it's all about going out there, seeing this special moment or landscape or animal or machine or whatever, adapting your camera and pressing the shutter. I really didn't know that PP has anything to do with taking pictures or making photographs. Thanks for having me enlighted.

But to get serious: no, you're wrong. Anyone with sufficient knowledge of the respective software can execute a good to splendid PP job. Taking/making a good picture, however, is a completely different affair. You need the eye and the feel - and if you haven't got it, you arguably never will succeed. Yes, you can take techcnically perfect pictures and PP them to an even higher level of technical perfection, but there are millions of these pictures out there in the World Wide Web. So no - PP most definitely doesn't represent the difference between taking a picture and making a photograph.

0 upvotes
luxborealis
By luxborealis (Jan 3, 2013)

I must admit to being rather surprised the OM-D EM-5 came out on top. Except for those few of us who prefer detail in our landscapes to go with dynamic range, maybe the pixel war is truly finished. The OM-D EM-5 certainly has the quality both in sensor and optics and 16mp seems to be a sweetspot. However, given that it's 4/3s - that sweetspot is also its greatest limiting factor. Congratulations Olympus - you've hit a home run!

5 upvotes
IrishhAndy
By IrishhAndy (Jan 3, 2013)

Problem with pixels on consumer cams is you start to rely on tripods and good technique. Most people just want a wee cam to take on holiday.

0 upvotes
illy
By illy (Jan 3, 2013)

it needs weatherproofing if you wee on it

0 upvotes
Sergey Kostrov
By Sergey Kostrov (Jan 3, 2013)

I didn't vote for a camera because I really don't know how cameras of different types could be compared? I think it would be better to vote in at least three different polls, like a DSLR-camera Poll, ILC-camera Poll and Compact-camera Poll. Also, this is some information from a PCWorld report on 100 Best Products of 2012:
...
#21 Olympus OM-D E-M5 A quote: '...terrific image quality...'
...
#94 Sony Cybershot DSC RX100 A quote: '...the king of compact cameras...'
...

In the PCWorld report only these two cameras are listed.

2 upvotes
micronean
By micronean (Jan 3, 2013)

It's kind of pathetic to see grown men pouting over their toy that wasn't voted most popular.

I'd hate to see how they were in high school, ugh....

6 upvotes
Husaberg Grok
By Husaberg Grok (Jan 3, 2013)

@ DigitalVista, Just Posted and player2.

Welcome to DPR! It's good to see you are forming relationships, finding new friends and adding to the quality of the website with your thoughtful posts.

15 upvotes
DigitalVista
By DigitalVista (Jan 3, 2013)

@ Husaberg

Yes, thanks, so which one are you? They clown trying to convince anyone who he disagrees with you that they are wrong, or are you the one that encorraged others to make multiple accounts just to falsely inflate the numbers?
Just wondering because you just seem so upset that somone might draw attention to the real facts. Please go ahead and explain your trolling everyone on here....

5 upvotes
Ollie 2
By Ollie 2 (Jan 3, 2013)

...and yet all the whiney agro is coming from non-mft guys.

Hmm....go figure.

6 upvotes
LeoSss
By LeoSss (Jan 3, 2013)

Why are these pots calling kettles black?

0 upvotes
Pat Cullinan Jr
By Pat Cullinan Jr (Jan 3, 2013)

@micronean "I'd hate to see how they were in high school, ugh...."

"WERE" in high school?!

2 upvotes
Just Having Fun
By Just Having Fun (Jan 3, 2013)

It is amazing how many really good photographers are making the switch to the OMD (and GH3 too). It seems every day a couple more show up in the M43 forum and soon after post great pics from their photo shoots.

As people get used to seeing what the sensor sees with an EVF and learn to live with smaller buttons, my bet is we will see more too. It also helps that Panasonic and Olympus (and others) are creating so many high qulaity lenses too.

17 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Jan 3, 2013)

The smaller and slightly fiddly to press buttons are in part due to the weather sealing (and in part the overall compact body with a large screen). It's a compromise I'm very happy to tolerate because previously I had both GH2 and NEX-5N start failing with sticky buttons while shooting in Asia (moisture and dust in equal measure).

The EM-5 has had zero problems in these environments thanks to the sealing. Also, the robust build has helped maintain complete reliability despite the inevitable harsh knocks that happen when you take your camera everywhere.

There were quite a few places I wouldn't take a £3,500 DSLR + Lens, for a number reasons (awkwardness, safety, low profile, etc) but the size, cost and robustness of the EM-5 really makes it a camera I can pick up and take wherever I'm going without a moments hesitation.

9 upvotes
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (Jan 2, 2013)

it's a pity the sony rx1 not be one of the three here. it just pulled the trigger for the race for compact full frame cameras, something long time wondered to when it would be happening. it's like it finally makes the digital age to catch up with the film, since back then full frame compacts were not something out of this world, but the opposite. sony made it with the rx1, and in a very competent way. the olympus om-d can't even come close to it. it's attempt to live up the 'om' status failed for me. if you pay close attention, the film om's are far more beautiful, elegant and well balanced (in terms of design) cameras. the om-d, despite its unquestionable quality, does not deserve the first place.

2 upvotes
Rockchan
By Rockchan (Jan 2, 2013)

It is the best camera for users, not the most innovative camera. If we use your standard, even D800 and 5D Mark III should not get the second and third place.

As a photographer, the best camera is the one that we are willing to buy and use all the time. A camera that MOST PEOPLE WILL NOT BUY will never be the BEST camera. If it doesn't even worth to buy in many people's point of view, how can it be the best?

Did you buy it? If not, it is not the best at your viewpoint too (at least not the best for your money). Whether a camera is the best is determined by our actions (bought one and use it), not based on some BS.

Comment edited 5 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
thewhitehawk
By thewhitehawk (Jan 2, 2013)

I think that the RX-1, despite of it's excellent specifications is a niche product. It's one that only a very slim percentage of users will ever consider purchasing. Since polls are essentially popularity contests, and the RX-1 is a niche product, it's not very surprising to me, that it didn't score so highly as some of the other offerings.

I don't think we should get too philosophical about what cameras ended up in first place but if there is one thing that I would take from this poll is that mirrorless cameras should start getting less skeptical-attention from DSLR users.

2 upvotes
Just Posted
By Just Posted (Jan 2, 2013)

I think the best camera for users is the one that the users seem to be buying and its not any of the olympus brand, except only in Japan.

1 upvote
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (Jan 3, 2013)

the fact i don't own one does not disqualify me for voting. if this were a criteria, poor of many. most users here would be giving opinion about something once every 3-5 years, every decade, and some would never.

if i can vote for many persons i can't follow most of their lives at close, why can't i vote for a camera i don't use? and the first situation is more risky, right? so, yes, i do have authority to vote. i know a lot about photography, am not ignorant, am always willing to learn more, and, most of all, accept another's victory (crying, angry; but do), and i accept the om-d being the winner, ok?

it is worth noting (especially to myself) many of the people who vote in this poll were still not living their biggest moment in photography in the 80's and 90's, maybe some were still a kid, and for this reason, i can understand the factor of not being much into the full frame compacts vibe, but rather a(pff)s and smaller factor com(pff)acts.

compacted substance in hands also matters

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Prime_Lens
By Prime_Lens (Jan 3, 2013)

RX1 is a technical achievement, that's marred by its steep price tag.

At $2800, it is a serious investment that has no expansion potential.
Even if I get one for free from a lottery drawing, I would end up selling it to someone at a discount price, so that I could buy some other camera system that is more affordable and/or more capable to expand.

It will have to be significantly cheaper to really sell well.
Because, while there is no other camera just like it, there are plenty of competitor camera system that can replace it for what it suppose to do.

3 upvotes
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (Jan 3, 2013)

sony, once not considered a genuine camera maker by many, made its way and launched something expected to be done by canon, nikon or pentax. they are right, even though many are not willing to pay, asking for that money!

it is the only one, the well-done one, and by sony. there is an interesting story behind the rx1, something about power, and the price means it. i'm not saying it's not too expensive, but it's a message to consumers who did not believe, and to the rivals.

sony always had the only thing minolta ever lacked, one of the very top image quality. now that minolta soul lives inside sony, it is what you ever desired (or didn't know would desire one day). doesn't have all the systems, too expensive. sony (with minolta accent) surely knows where it is worth entering, what is doing, and how much is asking for.

0 upvotes
Prime_Lens
By Prime_Lens (Jan 3, 2013)

And I agree with you.
It's a state of art by its own right.

There are many categories of best camera.
One from technical stand point, one from craftsmanship, one from tested and proven, and many from personal reasons.

This poll is mostly from that later one, and while it is your right to disagree.. It is still true and valid poll that just happens to be conflicting with your interest.

It is what it is.
These are best cameras by the poll by common people for common and personal reasons.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
illy
By illy (Jan 2, 2013)

I own none of the cameras on the list, this gives me a partiality that the users of aforementioned cameras do not have, therefore my vote is more valid than theirs. Those users shouting the loudest that they own any of the cameras should have had their vote discounted immediately.........especially those who sound like a review or they are trying to sell you the damn thing.
And what this whole poll has shown is, the things you own end up owning you, think on that when you're boring some local when you're out and about, shouting on the merits of 5 axis IBIS or near MF quality, they don't care.

1 upvote
Just Posted
By Just Posted (Jan 2, 2013)

Are you ok?

0 upvotes
illy
By illy (Jan 3, 2013)

it's my new years resolution only to do serious posts on the serious questions of our time........now will it be lemon tea or English breakfast, i suppose i could do a poll and see what everyone thinks

2 upvotes
Just Posted
By Just Posted (Jan 3, 2013)

Thanks for the laugh, I think everyone here could use some of that.

Comment edited 34 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Jolyon Gray
By Jolyon Gray (Jan 2, 2013)

I sold all my Nikon gear, D7000, f2.8 zooms (including the 17-55 Nikon), prime lenses, flashes, etc. It was a risk going for the OM-D but really happy with the choice. Considered getting a FF Nikon but it didn't really make sense to me.

Things the OM-D does better (or equally as well).
-Image stabilisation! Not only good for low light but also for creative low shutter speeds, blurring water, moving people, etc! Transforms manual focus lenses, stabilised when focusing! Brilliant! Handheld video is super smooth, close to steadycam, something I could never get handheld with the Nikon.

-Articulated LCD, great for creative shots.

-Marmite but the EVF - thought I would hate it but...:
--Bright Light - can actually see my photo playback.
--Zooming in on the EVF for manual focus - brilliant
--Highlight and shadow clipping - great for the shooting I do
--Loads of other things, info views, etc.

-Size! Works best with the battery grip, gives you 3 options in one depending on what you fancy that day.

-Lenses. I've got the 12mm, 25mm f0.95 Nokton, 45mm, & 75mm.... and this all fits in a small shoulder bag + filters.

-Competition : Great to have two manufacturers that have compatable products. Panasonic make great pancakes.

-ISO; to my eye as good as the D7000, but I'm not a pixel peeper.

-f0.95 Nokton

-f0.95 Nokton

-f0.95.. Ok you get it.

-Focus. I found my D7000 a bit temperamental, sometimes spot on, sometimes less so, needed loads of AF tweaking, drove me nuts. I don't need C-AF but it seemed good enough shooting my nephew at Christmas. No missed shots.

-Olympus colours.

-No need to clean oil off the sensor from the mirror slapping around.

-Asthetics, not the most important thing but it is a pretty camera :).

Don't mistake this as Nikon bashing - I had Nikons for about 5 years and have some brilliant shots. Maybe I'll get a FF Nikon in the future to take advantage of true focal length, bokeh, etc. For me it was a risky purchase, I sold 4-5k of gear, OM-D and lenses seemed overpriced, but just enjoy photography more with the OM-D. It goes everywhere with me :).

If I could only have one camera & lens it would be the OM-D & 25mm Nokton (might change my mind one the 17mm Nokton is delivered!). Racing car drivers don't drive automatics ;).

12 upvotes
Hugowolf
By Hugowolf (Jan 3, 2013)

Marmite ??????

1 upvote
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Jan 3, 2013)

Marmite. A yeast based spread for putting on bread. It tastes revolting but some people (presumably with defective taste buds) absolutely love it. Famous in the UK for an advertising campaign showing people nearly vomiting when they accidentally taste it, a rather unique way to market your food!

Marmite = You either hate it or you love it.

0 upvotes
Spunjji
By Spunjji (Jan 3, 2013)

"Marmite. A yeast based spread for putting on bread. It tastes delicious but some people (presumably with defective taste buds) absolutely hate it. Famous in the UK for an advertising campaign showing people nearly vomiting when they accidentally taste it, a rather unique way to market your food!

Marmite = You either love it or you hate it."

Just ran some minor corrections there. ;D

0 upvotes
Just Posted
By Just Posted (Jan 2, 2013)

I dont think its such a great camera for the money, but that just me.

Seems funny that so many here have some strange attachment to seeing their hardware achieve some award that has no real merit.

5 upvotes
Rockchan
By Rockchan (Jan 2, 2013)

Just Posted => Joined on 2 Jan 2013.

Seems funny that somebody have some strange attachment to create an account just to complain they feel unhappy that a hardware achieve some award that has no real merit.

4 upvotes
adrianf2
By adrianf2 (Jan 2, 2013)

Seems funny that ' Panasonic make great pancakes.' That's diversification for you I guess.

Seriously good point by illy about the gear owning you though. Are camera 'enthusiasts' worse than other obsessives? Or just more boring?

0 upvotes
adrianf2
By adrianf2 (Jan 2, 2013)

Also JG mentions 'Olympus colours' as being an advantage of the mighty (form over function) OM-D, but what's so special about silver and black?

0 upvotes
adrianf2
By adrianf2 (Jan 3, 2013)

I agree that the OM-D is not such a great camera for the money. Too many flaws, partly caused by its retro design. People are comparing it to DSLRs, but a more valid comparison would be with other mirrorless cameras that have fewer flaws.

Not much of a future for these overweight dinosaurs anyway.

1 upvote
joe Campo d2x
By joe Campo d2x (Jan 2, 2013)

I have all three and agree, the little OLY get the 1st prize for most fun and great lens, the Nikon wins on IQ but loses on Quality Control, The Mk3, is a great all-around camera with few serious problems. I sold my D800 for now, I will re-viisit in the fall. Love the little Oly, I even used it on a couple of table top jobs... I also love the Lens! Love using the old Nikon mf lens on the Oly. as well as, Konica and Leica, what a kick.... Magnification when focusing is a blast. So much fun. Not Happy with Nikon and very surprised they lost control of a product the had the potential to blow away the rest of the group , it still can, maybe all will come together by the end of the year until then my D700 is my favorite Nikon camera. I cant wait for what Oly will come up with next.

13 upvotes
sethmarshall
By sethmarshall (Jan 2, 2013)

There goes DPReview's reputation for understanding what the word"best" means -- or at least it's readers.

1 upvote
Barney Britton
By Barney Britton (Jan 2, 2013)

This is a reader's poll. It's a bit of fun.

27 upvotes
Spunjji
By Spunjji (Jan 3, 2013)

Bawwww.

0 upvotes
AlexCHStudio
By AlexCHStudio (Jan 2, 2013)

LOL
Result is so funny! Excellent joke! I can't stop laughing...

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Piggy the bad
By Piggy the bad (Jan 2, 2013)

o I don't need a full frame after all ?? The next thing is, is this Oly going to produce better results than say an EPL5 or xz1/2 ???

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (Jan 4, 2013)

Well, E-PL5 has the same sensor and processor as E-M5, so in most cases it will produce the same result.
There are some exceptions though.
1) Rain. The only result most cameras (including almost all mirrorless except E-M5 and now GH3, and most DSLRs) will produce is a puff of smoke.
2) Low shutter speeds handheld. E-M5 has significantly better IBIS compared to E-PL5.

0 upvotes
jnk
By jnk (Jan 2, 2013)

Thom Hogan call it on Dec 27, 2012 :

http://www.sansmirror.com/newsviews/sansmirror-serious-camera.html

The results from DPR is dated on 1/1/13 - give the man credit where it's due ...!

6 upvotes
illy
By illy (Jan 2, 2013)

Thom's was for the best mirroless camera, no Dslrs or compacts were in the running i believe

4 upvotes
Mike_PEAT
By Mike_PEAT (Jan 2, 2013)

DC Watch's members ALSO chose the OM-D as best camera of the year...the D800e was also number two there!

2 upvotes
illy
By illy (Jan 2, 2013)

then the EM-5 has polled excellently because it's an excellent product

7 upvotes
Total comments: 1412
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