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Michael Wolf offers a new perspective on Hong Kong's high-rises

By dpreview staff on Aug 26, 2013 at 06:03 GMT

At first glance, Michael Wolf's photos look like they could be a tapestry, or perhaps abstract art. Look closer and you'll see that they're actually cleverly composed photos of Hong Kong's ubiquitous high-rises. Wolf would head to one of the many hills in the city - or sometimes just go upstairs in an adjacent building - and set up his camera. The results are spectacular, with colorful mosaics of concrete and glass.

Wolf initially compiled the photos for his Architecture of Density project, which is now in book form. In an interview with Wired, Wolf explains 'at some point I just took a photograph and I folded away the sky and the horizon until I just had the pure architecture. By removing the context, viewers have no idea how big these building[s] actually are.'

A colorful Hong Kong high-rise, complete with laundry and much-needed air conditioning.
Photo credit: Michael Wolf

The photos also illustrate everyday life in a Hong Kong high-rise, according to Wolf. Look closely and you'll see laundry hanging from windows hundreds of feet above the ground.

Below are a few of our favorite images from Michael Wolf. For the full interview and even more photos, hit the source link below. 

Photo credit: Michael Wolf
Photo credit: Michael Wolf
Photo credit: Michael Wolf
Source: Wired

Comments

Total comments: 105
Five Piece
By Five Piece (8 months ago)

Wow. Love these photos. To me they tell a story, of the lives of the thousands and millions living so densely together. This makes me wonder how should we shape the future of urban design as the world becomes ever more citified. Thanks, Mr. Wolf for sharing your experience with us.

0 upvotes
MarcMedios
By MarcMedios (8 months ago)

I don't know... they are not that original at all. I think all of us at some point of another have toyed with the visual repetition of high rises. I was seriously underwhelmed.

1 upvote
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

Many have been critical of the criticism myself and others had leveled against these pictures. To put what I am saying into perspective I want to make the point of repeatability. Lets take Ansel Adams' Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico and any one of the 4 images used in this article here on DPR. Now, who can name a professional photographer in the world today, using any kind of equipment, new or old, who could effectively reproduce Ansel's classic image, of course as the scene looks today. Anyone? Ansel himself could only capture a single negative of it, so any takers? Consider that the exact date, time and place from where this classic picture was taken is know. Now lets look at the 4 Wolf pictures. Given the exact time, date and location from where they were taken, is there a top flight professional commercial photographer in the world today who could NOT recreate these 4 pictures, as these scenes looks today?

0 upvotes
nikonuser72
By nikonuser72 (8 months ago)

You simply fail to get the point. Mr Wolf's photographs stand out because these are byproducts of his personal quest. Given the exact time, date and location of the photographs, both you and i will be able to recreate these photos but those will lack the personal quest of Mr. Wolf and hence will not be art.

1 upvote
Dazzer8888
By Dazzer8888 (8 months ago)

indeed he fails to get the point.......mr Wolf thought of it and did it. It's ludicrous to say after the fact "i could have done that if i'd thought of it, if i'd made the effort to actually go there and do it". I also think these picture exhibit a high level of skill and it ain't as easy as people think it is to make them...........JMHO of course.

0 upvotes
nikonuser72
By nikonuser72 (8 months ago)

Yeah...i agree.

0 upvotes
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

Mr Wolf was not the originator of this idea. Photographing the flat side of a building for the sake of showing off its repeating patterns has been done many times before, especially in Hong Hong if we can believe the eye witness accounts of some of the posters on this thread. So what this is then is Mr Wolf's take of a common idea, commonly done in Hong Kong. Its worth noting that the idea in the first place is to make a photograph of someone else's creation; that of the architect. In a way, this idea is akin to photographing an area of a painting and then claiming the results as your own unique 'vision'. Of course there are unique and creative ways of photographing architecture, but this is the least challenging and lowest form of conceptualization, if it can indeed even be called that.

1 upvote
nikonuser72
By nikonuser72 (8 months ago)

Will you please go to his website and see all of the photographs of the series. These photographs makes me face a question - What's our future? What will be the world for our children and grandchildren?
Some of the photographs scare me ( not of course those posted here).
I have seen many hundreds of photographs of highrises and city skylines, none have evoked this reaction in me ( and i believe many others). Those photographs just give the feeling of viewing post cards.
THESE ARE NOT POSTCARDS.

1 upvote
Dazzer8888
By Dazzer8888 (8 months ago)

I'm curious about the technique used to make these pictures.

Some of them seem so flat it makes me wonder if they were taken from multiple vantage points and later stitched together. Like all parts of the shot have the same perspective, with no lens distortion. I've been thining about trying something like this but can find nothing on the interwebs about it.

If this is how it's done, i like the unreal effect it creates.

I guess the other possibility is that the shots are taken from very far away with a zoom lens, and only the centre of the image is cropped and used.

Anyone?

0 upvotes
Philip Goh
By Philip Goh (8 months ago)

What you're looking for is a tilt-shift lens. They're not only used for producing "minature" effects ;)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilt%E2%80%93shift_photography

0 upvotes
Clueless Wanderer
By Clueless Wanderer (8 months ago)

Just a long lens in the building opposite. Perspective distortion (if any) fixed in Photoshop.

0 upvotes
Clueless Wanderer
By Clueless Wanderer (8 months ago)

IMO I don't think a tilt and shift would have a long enough focal range..

0 upvotes
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

The easiest approach would be to get up high along side the building, (midway up would be ideal) set the camera up parallel to the building and level to the ground. Its the same camera technique one would use for copy work of paintings etc.

0 upvotes
Clueless Wanderer
By Clueless Wanderer (8 months ago)

HA,HA,HA.... I have just finished editing similar images from our Hong kong trip for my website and my girlfriend commented that they look naf and know one would be interested in them :-) I stood my ground on this one and it looks like I may have been right :-D

2 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (8 months ago)

How similar? Please show some. If they are as good as the ones above, you are skilled IMHO.

1 upvote
Clueless Wanderer
By Clueless Wanderer (8 months ago)

I said similar but not Identical. I do have that same building that is number 3, but taken from the ground and perspective corrected in PS. I shot from viewpoints in the hills with a 300mm with 1.4xtc on a full frame camera. If I would have thought to actually go inside the opposite building I could have had larger files, rather than the corrected crops I have ;-/. Oh well maybe next time. Regarding seeing the pic's, My website should be up and running in two weeks, I will post a link then..

0 upvotes
budi0251
By budi0251 (8 months ago)

instead of arts, what comes to mind would be a very uncomfortable hamster cage or an overcrowded chicken coop.

Anyway, the photos really convey the story :)

1 upvote
Mike Sandman
By Mike Sandman (8 months ago)

Quintessential Hong Kong.

1 upvote
b craw
By b craw (8 months ago)

Absentaneous, you make a good comparison of Wolf to Gursky. And an excellent observation of the further lineage back to Bernd and Hilla Becher; they are the real originators of concepts so important to latter visual motifs used by Gursky and others, often using spacial subversions, often using flattening and patterning, to remove the specific identity of subject. Of course, this is only one body of experimental method employed by many Postmodern-leaning photographers in rethinking landscape, etc. So, within this context, Wolf's approach does seem a little late to the party, and lacking in the conceptual relavence of some of the others. It is more of a form of stylistic mannerism. But, I do find many of his images interesting, visually - if I am to see them primarily focused upon transfiguring space into pattern.

As an aside, I suggest DPR feature at least some artists whose work is specific to the potentials of digital imaging - methods which really can't be in film. One example is the work of Jason Salavon and his composite of visual images. Here is a link to his compositing of all the Playboy Bunnies by decade.

http://www.salavon.com/work/EveryPlayboyCenterfoldDecades/grid/11/

2 upvotes
joe6pack
By joe6pack (8 months ago)

Got to read the original article about the trouble he went through to take the photo:

"Fortunately, Hong Kong is a hilly place, so it’s easy for Wolf to walk up an incline to get parallel to the middle of a building. Occasionally, he’ll climb up on rooftops, parking garages or even schools. “Sometimes I’ll go into the building opposite,” he says. “I’ll try to find someone who will let me into his apartment so I can photograph out of the window.”

1 upvote
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (8 months ago)

He could use a quadrocopter with a small high quality camera.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (8 months ago)

Number 1 is very nice and so is also number 4, IMHO. No 2 and 3 I can live without.

Lots of people here are very fast to call photos cr@p. I think they shall reconsider, and at least agree on that they think it is cr@p. Its not the same thing as saying it is cr@p.

0 upvotes
madeinlisboa
By madeinlisboa (8 months ago)

At least (unlike photoshop lovers) he tried to get his photos straight from the camera. I bet most here would shoot from ground and perspective correct them later.

1 upvote
acidic
By acidic (8 months ago)

#3 is perspective corrected (either that or he shot really wide and cropped the bottom). He shot from a level equal to that near the bottom of the photo.

0 upvotes
Clueless Wanderer
By Clueless Wanderer (8 months ago)

Madeinlisboa. If your anti photoshop im afraid your going to go the way of the dinosaur. Photoshop is just one of many tools to make you vision a reality. ..Just the same as the camera is.
Its not about how you slaughter the animal but how good the meat tastes :-)

0 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (8 months ago)

These do look like Popular Photography covers from long ago but so what....

If you are a photography expert or "pro" (and who isn't) living here would be fabulous. Totally serious. Just think how quickly you could test a lens for barrel and pincushion distortion and soft corners.

0 upvotes
inframan
By inframan (8 months ago)

DPR used to draw people who were into the craft of photography. Now, based on comments like the majority posted here, all that seems to count is to be able to take a picture of something, regardless of context or composition.
These images are outstanding, but wasted on this site.

5 upvotes
Jan Grijs
By Jan Grijs (8 months ago)

Not wasted, I hope. I like to believe that the “silent majority” of visitors of this site appreciate pictures like these very much. At least I do!

5 upvotes
Nguyen Anh
By Nguyen Anh (8 months ago)

I like them too, and wish that dpreview continues in the same direction.

2 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (8 months ago)

Sure they're great, just don't agree with the headline.

0 upvotes
EvokeEmotion
By EvokeEmotion (8 months ago)

Where have I seen something like this before?

http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/8898702377/photos/1899842/img_8653-2

0 upvotes
inframan
By inframan (8 months ago)

Sorry. Not even close.

6 upvotes
EvokeEmotion
By EvokeEmotion (8 months ago)

Look who's talking.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (8 months ago)

I repeat what inframan said. Its not even close. Look at it again, you might see it also.

3 upvotes
audijam
By audijam (8 months ago)

this is NEW to him.....so be nice

1 upvote
Hugo808
By Hugo808 (8 months ago)

I hope the lift doesn't break down in these places!

It's like that sci-fi novel where the whole earth is divided between farmland and living space and the buildings just get bigger and bigger. An inevitable future...

0 upvotes
Seagull TLR
By Seagull TLR (8 months ago)

Never mind the elevator breaks down. In a high-rise, worry about the fire first.

0 upvotes
edm78
By edm78 (8 months ago)

Damn, a lot of haters on this site. LOL. It reminds me of all the wannabe film makers who criticize films but who have never filmed a homemade birthday party.

Comment edited 27 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

I suspect that the commenters here have take a picture or two and a lot are not fools at all. To criticize is not to hate. What the criticism is here is that these pictures are predominately technical and have very little artistic merit. They require al the skill of photographing a brick wall or a test target in a lab. The lighting is stable and flat, the subject is not moving and the work is entirely repeatable. As avotius says in the comment below, Hong Kong is full of pictures just like these. Yes people like them. No they are not new or special or difficult to do. The truth is cats are more challenging to shoot than these images. Cat anyone?

1 upvote
avotius
By avotius (8 months ago)

Sorry but this is nothing new. Go to Hong Kong and look in the art galleries and they are full of pictures like this.

3 upvotes
Polariser
By Polariser (8 months ago)

This doesn't do it for me I'm afraid. I live in HK and.there are far more interesting buildings than these.

4 upvotes
sdribetahi
By sdribetahi (8 months ago)

I don't think the goal is to find the most interesting hi-rise in HK and take it's photo. You can get that in a postcard shop.

4 upvotes
Seagull TLR
By Seagull TLR (8 months ago)

@Polariser Do you mean IFC, aka the d*g? ;-)

0 upvotes
arndsan
By arndsan (8 months ago)

yes - we can buy such facade pattern on pillows and bed sheds at GOD in Hong Kong.
love his 100X100 set !

0 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (8 months ago)

Skyscraper Cities Ranking List :
http://tudl0867.home.xs4all.nl/skylines.html

Buildings over 90m tall :
Hong Kong 3,124
New York City 897

1 upvote
Rod McD
By Rod McD (8 months ago)

Human filing cabinets. Not a leaf to be seen. Sad that it's probably the future in many places.

1 upvote
shigzeo ?
By shigzeo ? (8 months ago)

Even fewer leaves in Tokyo. Asia really isn't happy with its nature. Where there is nature, put a fence around it and make people pay to enter. That, or advertise the hell out of it so that a nice nature hike trail entertains as many people as a small city.

I'm sick of living here for the reason that people and walls and concrete are really all that exists. Yes, there are aberrations: Hokkaido, Northern China, etc., and so on, but overall, Asia is simply nasty... unless you just love millions upon millions upon millions of people, and noise and cars and pollution and the dominance of human over its environment.

I live in Tokyo, a city with more population (in its metro area) than Canada, than Sweden, Finland, Norway, and Denmark put together. Japan has a high enough population that if its density was spread across Canada, Canada would tip the scales at over 4 billion people.

2 upvotes
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (8 months ago)

Life is as how you see it. There are plenty of green spaces in Tokyo, and Hong Kong for that matter.

You get a little wider on these and you would be able to a lot more than just buidlings...

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
PicPocket
By PicPocket (8 months ago)

You probably have never been to Hong Kong. More than 70% of the land is preserved country parks which are open to public (popular for hiking). I am an expat living in Hong Kong and I am quite impressed with how the locals have preserved the limited resourced that have (mainly land and reservoirs)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservation_in_Hong_Kong

4 upvotes
shigzeo ?
By shigzeo ? (8 months ago)

Yes, Hong Kong is far better at preserving their space than is Tokyo. Seen from above, Hong Kong is city with some green and then green around it. Seen from above, Tokyo is all grey with a few fingers of green.

It is awful. Of course, it is a matter of perspective. I came from Canada, a country that still keeps vast tracts of almost untouched land even in the middle of its cities, and before that came from Sweden where tall buildings and urban sprawl are frowned upon.

But when I travelled to Hong Kong, I was very impressed. It is far too crowded where there are people but at least those people take care to keep nature in the city.

0 upvotes
Peter Kwok
By Peter Kwok (8 months ago)

I would rather have tightly packed, efficient living space so as to leave more empty lands as wilderness, than boring suburban sprawl where everyone has to have a front lawn, a back yard, a 3-car garage, and a 3-car driveway.
Given the same number of people and same area of land, what would you do with your land?

0 upvotes
Mario G
By Mario G (8 months ago)

You don't really know Hong Kong - from the windows of many of those high-rise buildings you can actually see plenty of green space and mountains with relatively few constructions around, like these:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jetow/6190738281/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tiascapes/5116491792/

And even when you are right in the centre, the wilderness is always less than half an hour away - that's way better than most of the cities in the world.

0 upvotes
photogeek
By photogeek (8 months ago)

Nice use of Adobe Lightroom "Upright" feature. :-)

0 upvotes
shigzeo ?
By shigzeo ? (8 months ago)

How ridiculously tough this crowd of enthusiasts, gear heads, and a few professionals is toward real, payable photographers.

16 upvotes
sdribetahi
By sdribetahi (8 months ago)

This place is like senior housing when the soup guy runs late.

14 upvotes
rrccad
By rrccad (8 months ago)

omg sdribetahi .. that's gold !

3 upvotes
photoramone
By photoramone (8 months ago)

Honey-combed litters..

1 upvote
Paul Storm
By Paul Storm (8 months ago)

it's interesting how everyone is focussed on the technical or uniqueness of the photos. i think as a series they are quite powerful. for me this makes me think how we are dealing with overpopulation and as a bigger picture suggests the relationship and implications of the volumes of people inhabiting this planet.

11 upvotes
Artistico
By Artistico (8 months ago)

Nice photos in their genre, I suppose, but "new perspective"? Hardly an original concept. The originality in this - and many other works of both photographic and other kinds of art - is more a question of marketing than artistry.

The finest art, arguably, is of course to make people notice your photography and think it is original and interesting, regardless of whether that is true or not or whether it has any technical or artistic merit. Some artists master this and can make big money from stuff that other artists would bin in a heartbeat. A recent record selling price photo of the Rhein comes to mind.

At least this is more interesting than that.

0 upvotes
alatchin
By alatchin (8 months ago)

Not everything has to be an original concept. As out time changes, applying concepts of old to the current today can be just as interesting, as in 50 years we may look back and make comparisons.

0 upvotes
Artistico
By Artistico (8 months ago)

Well, Alatchin, I don't think concepts have to be original. In fact, when someone desperately tries to be original rather than doing what they like, that can show and often be worse. But the heading did say "new perspective" implying some sort of originality, and hence my comment.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (8 months ago)

I think "new perspective" refers to new perspective to the usual one you see - in photos or when looking at it in real life.

1 upvote
Model Mike
By Model Mike (8 months ago)

I've nothing against artists who are able to market their art. It's another skill. Better to have the two skills rather than have one and moan sour grapes. Or none at all.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

This kind of work is not new and even when it was it was technical and not creative. Its neither clever nor insightful nor interesting. Its stupidly simple to do if you have the right equipment and know how to set it up, focus and expose. In brief, this kind of work is what students get asked to do as a training exercise when learning how to operate technical cameras. Its high time praise for obvious and easy ended. Next we will have a series of images taken of the empty blue sky being heralded as 'revolutionary' and 'breakthrough'.

1 upvote
Nigel Wilkins
By Nigel Wilkins (8 months ago)

"Its stupidly simple to do if you have the right equipment and know how to set it up, focus and expose"

erm, can't you say that about all photography?

8 upvotes
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

Nigle: No, only with static subjects with flat lighting and no compositional challenge at all except to have the camera straight and level. No moment to capture, no action or timing, no dramatic light or point of interest. Just a flat wall and hours and hours to align the camera in parallel to it.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
sadwitch
By sadwitch (8 months ago)

Photography happens in the mind and eye first. Equipment and setup are just functions that follow.

5 upvotes
tabloid
By tabloid (8 months ago)

I agree 100% there.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (8 months ago)

Peter - please tell me how you align the camera.

0 upvotes
Model Mike
By Model Mike (8 months ago)

Yawn

0 upvotes
nikonuser72
By nikonuser72 (8 months ago)

Your comment proves this kind of a sight does not invoke any reaction in you....while for the photographer and many of us, it does. That makes the photographer and us 'human', and you a robo.
Be happy with your tricks and techniques.

0 upvotes
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

Ronald Karlsson: Certainly. You need a tripod, preferably one without a center column. If you are not using a camera with a movable front an back such as a 4x5, you could use a leveling base, like the Manfrotto 338 QTVR Leveling Base. The use of a spirit level will have your camera vertical and parallel in minuets. If however you are using a technical camera like a 4x5, you can do without the leveling base and simply straighten the from and back of the camera to be level and parallel with each other and the building/wall in front of you. On a technical camera with a grid viewing screen you can check visually if the lines are all straight and make the necessary adjustments to get them straight if the don't appear to be so. If you have neither a leveling base nor a technical camera or even a tripod, then you can simply take the best picture you can aligning the lines with your eye and then straighten it using software in post processing. Its not no skill to do this, but it is elementary.

0 upvotes
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

nikonuser72: Soap operas evoke much emotion in manny, but fine works of cinema they are not. My point about these pictures is that they are entirely technical exercises and not art. Reading the comments posted here from those that live in Hong Kong it is also clear that wolf saw such pictures everywhere in Hong Kong and without being able to think of something creative he copied the millions of pictures the locals had already taken. If you are moved by these pictures as art how does that make me a 'robo'? Who does move me? Try Michael Kenna for one.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
nikonuser72
By nikonuser72 (8 months ago)

Peterfree: I have used the word reaction, not emotion. I think there's some difference.
I'd be happy to see photographs of this standard from locals, unfortunately i don't find any on the net.Please provide some examples.
Seen Michael Kenna's photographs. Perfect examples of soap opera. I now understand why Michael Wolf is not your cup of tea.

0 upvotes
Clueless Wanderer
By Clueless Wanderer (8 months ago)

Peterfree: As i mentioned I have similar pictures. I didn't see any local images for sale (not saying they are not any, just I didn't see them).
Knowing we were going up high that day (as a tourist) I chose to take my 300mm and 1.4 teleconverter with me. I saw the buildings, saw 'Repeating pattern's' And fired away.. So Im saying you can't assume that mr woolf was 'inspired' by gift shop images.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

nikonuser72: So photographing a flat wall is 'fine art' but Michael Kenna's work is 'a soap opera'?

What words could possibly be said in reply to this....

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
nikonuser72
By nikonuser72 (8 months ago)

Peterfree: Nothing could be said.....those are works of craft, no art in them.

0 upvotes
peterstuckings
By peterstuckings (8 months ago)

Hey DPreview, this guy's HK pictures have been shown here before. Not new or news!
Whereas I tried to bring some newsworthy content to your attention but no reply. Did I not offer enough of an incentive or something?
Read about Michael Freeman's comments on the state of the digital photo business here: http://peterstuckings.tumblr.com/post/54383845665/michael-freeman-on-the-business-of-photography

3 upvotes
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

Thanks for the link, interesting article.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (8 months ago)

old news... was going through the photography websites a few month ago.

3 upvotes
BeReal
By BeReal (8 months ago)

Here is my humble opinion. Is a great set of photographs, However with all my respects to Mr. Wolf who I know personally and I have/had attend his exhibitions in Shanghai,and I do buy his books, I don't believe this is unique or a different way to appreciate architecture or tell a history about the urban life in crowd cities and of course not original that all. Many photographers we live in Asia and visit several places several times during the years and we all have set of pictures like this. Perhaps the difference is that his team of marketing and/or the gallery/PR that represent him is fast enough to promote his work. Go into stock photography sites and you will have plenty of the same work with the same look, feel and sometimes perhaps more interesting. However, good for him and good luck in future his exhibition.

0 upvotes
mckracken88
By mckracken88 (8 months ago)

makes me glad i live next to trees and grass.

i could never live in a city. these pictures are just sad.

6 upvotes
deleted-13120401
By deleted-13120401 (8 months ago)

Nobody chooses to live in a tiny box in a concrete jungle for their whole life purely for aesthetic reasons. Cities are economic necessities for most.

11 upvotes
barry reid
By barry reid (8 months ago)

This is a great series, not just in it's own right but also in context of his wider body of work around urbanisation. It's also well worth looking at his "Tokyo Compression" series.

4 upvotes
Kodachrome200
By Kodachrome200 (8 months ago)

for once dpr posts something and kinda like the approach. like to see these in ultra high res so you could look closely at them

1 upvote
Johannes Zander
By Johannes Zander (8 months ago)

Better idea than shooting brick walls for lens testing.

2 upvotes
Stealthy Ninja
By Stealthy Ninja (8 months ago)

I live in Hong Kong and honestly these pictures (though very nice) aren't too special. Most people could go out and take these photos pretty easily if they lived here. In fact on his page number 8 looks very similar to a place nearby where I live.

They look pretty nice though, don't get me wrong.

7 upvotes
day2012
By day2012 (8 months ago)

It's a pretty special project in my opinion. Of course lots of people could have taken the photos, but nobody else thought that it might be interesting to take a whole series and create a project out of them.

10 upvotes
Stealthy Ninja
By Stealthy Ninja (8 months ago)

Then again you don't live in Hong Kong.

2 upvotes
Raist3d
By Raist3d (8 months ago)

I don't think it changes what he said. How come this wasn't done before if it's that trivial?

1 upvote
Sordid
By Sordid (8 months ago)

I doubt it wasn't done before.
Maybe it wasn't covered by media before?

3 upvotes
gustabod
By gustabod (8 months ago)

agree, there's a restaurant in Ocean terminal which has a couple of similar ones as wall decoration. Inspired me to go out and do the same last time I visited there...had a hell of a time correcting the lens distortion!

1 upvote
Stealthy Ninja
By Stealthy Ninja (8 months ago)

I think I've been to the same restaurant gutabod. There's a large print that's very similar to these.

0 upvotes
peterstuckings
By peterstuckings (8 months ago)

Of course it was done before!!! As Stealthy Ninja says, you don't live in HK. If you did, you'd see this kind of thing on the social media pages of every photographer friend! It's just the DPreview favour certain people, and who knows for what reasons. Since I've tried to bring photography topics to their attention, and never had a reply from them, and yet this guy's HK work has been featured here more than once, perhaps someone gets paid. Just sayin...

2 upvotes
dash2k8
By dash2k8 (8 months ago)

Very good stuff!

0 upvotes
absentaneous
By absentaneous (8 months ago)

he's obviously a fan of andreas gursky.

4 upvotes
Paul_B Midlands UK
By Paul_B Midlands UK (8 months ago)

Obviously!

0 upvotes
Mikhail Tal
By Mikhail Tal (8 months ago)

You mean the scam artist who sells amateur snapshots for millions of dollars?

4 upvotes
barry reid
By barry reid (8 months ago)

Tell you what mikhail tal, go make prints a couple of metres across that are viewable with detail from half a metre away then tell me how 'amateurish' the process is.

5 upvotes
peterstuckings
By peterstuckings (8 months ago)

Ha, Barry. Good argument. You're right to an extent. With a decent pro DSLR today, and some stitching software, it ain't that hard. Certainly not multi-million-dollar hard! ;-)

1 upvote
absentaneous
By absentaneous (8 months ago)

@Mikhail Tal,

not everything one can't value or understand is scam. the greatness of gursky is not just in what he does, but the influence he had on the whole art photography movement. even if he was also pretty much influenced by Bernd and Hilla Becher who were even his photography teachers at the university.

2 upvotes
PeterFree
By PeterFree (8 months ago)

barry reid: On the contrary, making an image for large print is ridiculously easy once you have the right equipment and know how to use it. These picture prove that Wolf is capable of using his equipment, now he needs to go out and make some interesting images with it. These exposures are not.

0 upvotes
stephenpatterson
By stephenpatterson (8 months ago)

I have seen this done by many others, but Edward Burtynsky's photography of China and other urban/industrial landscapes immediately comes to mind. www.edwardburtynsky.com
Enjoy.

2 upvotes
Model Mike
By Model Mike (8 months ago)

:-) Not a bad role model.

0 upvotes
Kei Ma
By Kei Ma (8 months ago)

This book is not new. I remember seeing this book a few years ago.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 105